Welcome To Tire Town - Eurobike 2018

Jul 10, 2018
by Mike Levy  
Eurobike 2018

Kenda Regolith Pro

Eurobike isn't exactly chock full new and unseen products this time around, but that's exactly what Kenda had in their booth with their Regolith Pro. Look elsewhere if you want a terrain or condition-specific tire, with Kenda positioning the Regolith as an all-around option instead. The tire's name kinda sounds like it should belong to some sort of giant beast in an overrated Netflix sci-fi, but Wikipedia says that it's actually referring to ''a layer of loose, heterogeneous superficial deposits covering solid rock. It includes dust, soil, broken rock, and other related materials and is present on Earth, the Moon, Mars, some asteroids, and other terrestrial planets and moons.''

So the name does make sense.

The tire's tread design is pretty straightforward, with alternating tight and widely spaced crown lugs that are both siped and ramped for traction and rolling speed, and every other shoulder lug has a transition lug of its own to help you get your lean on. It's not overly open like a soft condition tire, and it also doesn't have a pronounced crown for a focus on rolling speed, but what it does have is a dual compound rubber; there's a harder section down the middle for speed, and softer rubber on the sides for traction.
Eurobike 2018

You can get the Regolith (I can't stop picturing a towering monster) in 27.5'' x 2.2'' or 2.4'', and the 29'' diameter in 2.2'', 2.4'', and 2.6'' widths. Casing options include a light-ish TR (683-grams for the 29'' x 2.2'' tire), the middle of the trail SCT casing (755-grams for the 29'' x 2.2'' tire), or the e-bike-focused EMC casing that Kenda doesn't supply a weight for... Possibly because it's a porker. All options come with a 120 TPI count, a folding bead, and are tubeless-ready.



Eurobike 2018

Kenda Booster

Next up is the Booster, a tire whose intentions are pretty clear. I mean, look at that thing: Low, closely spaced lugs across the tire's crown, plenty of coverage in the transition zone, and then some slightly more stout looking corning lugs. Kenda says this about the tire: ''Fast or aggressive? Choose the best of both worlds with Kenda's new Booster.''

Hhmm, maybe cross-country aggressive; the Booster looks hella fast, but I wouldn't be putting it on anything other than my cross-country or trailbike rig.

And that makes sense because it comes in a single 29'' x 2.2'' size right now, and with either the lightweight TR casing or the slightly less light SCT casing. That said, Kenda does have plans for 27.5'' x 2.2'', 2.4'', 2.6'' and a massive 2.8'' widths, so what do I know. Big wheelers will be able to also get it in 2.4'', 2.6'', and a 2.8'' size, which sounds like an interesting thing to try.

Kenda didn't provide any weights, but the Booster must be relatively feathery.
Eurobike 2018



Eurobike 2018

Goodyear Newton ST

We've already shown Goodyear's new mountain bike tire range earlier this year, but the Newton ST is worth another look. Its tread pattern is pretty close to the standard Newton, but you'll find a difference in the cornering lugs that have a slightly different shape, as well as across the tire's crown where the rectangular shaped lugs are interspersed with the square lugs. Sizing options include 2.4'' and 2.6'' widths, and you can get it in both 27.5'' and 29'' diameters.



Eurobike 2018

Schwalbe Hans Dampf

Next up we head over to Schwalbe to look at the re-designed Hans Dampf that we've even been seeing pop up on the back of a few World Cup downhill bikes. I was a fan of the original Dampf, although that tire's ability to shed lugs quicker than I shed my chamois post-ride was a huge bummer, especially considering the cost of these things. Schwalbe sorted out the compound issue awhile back, though, and the new version is also much beefier looking, too, with more pronounced shoulder lugs that make its predecessor seem a bit underbuilt.

The casing has a squarer profile, too, especially given how rounded the original Dampf was. Sizes include 29'' x 2.35'' and 2.6'', and 27.5'' x 2.35'', 2.6'', and 2.8'', as well as both a 26'' x 2.35'' and a 24'' x 2.35''. Casing options are Snakeskin, Apex, and the burly Supergravity. Just imagine being the guy who looks after all the SKUs at Schwalbe. Eeeesh.


Schwalbe Racing Ray

At the near opposite end of the spectrum to the Hans Dampf is the new Racing Ray (pictured at right), a cross-country option that you can likely tell is all about speed. It's intended to be used up front only, with the long and alternating center lugs providing a fast-rolling middle portion. There are sipes galore as well, which are basically slits in the lugs that allow them to conform to the ground better, especially when things are wet and slippery.

You'll only be able to get Ray in one compound - Addix Speedgrip - but diameters include 29'', 27.5'', and even 26'', and in either 2.25'' or 2.1'' widths. The other specs include Snakeskin protection, EVO casing, and all are ready to be setup sans tube.
Eurobike 2018



Eurobike 2018

Hutchinson Skeleton

I'll give you one guess as to what Hutchinson's Skeleton is intended to be used for. The tire's low knob height makes it obvious that it's all about cross-country speed and low rolling resistance, and the defined center ridge should help on that front. There are alternating chevron-shaped lugs spread across the tire's crown, too, so while it's clear that braking traction isn't going to match a fully treaded, more aggressive tire, it should still slow down reasonably well when you drop anchor.

That's laid over 120 TPI casing that's 2.1'' wide, and in either 27.5'' or 29'' diameters. Weight starts at a claimed 580-grams, too, which is impressively light,



Eurobike 2018

WTB Judge and Tritec Compound

WTB's has put a ton of effort into re-working their tire range, and that also includes a new triple compound construction they're calling 'Tritec' that you'll find sprinkled through their MTB range, including on the all-new Judge that's pictured above. Tritec consists of a relatively firm base layer for support, and then either a medium or soft compound, depending on the tire's intended use, laid over the top across the crown. Cornering lugs are either soft or extra-soft, again depending on the model. The concept is far from new - put the slower wearing, faster-rolling rubber in the middle, the gooey rubber on the shoulders for extra traction, and the firmest layer under it all for support - but up until now WTB didn't have any triple-compound tires in their catalog.

But back to the Judge, whose DHR-esque appearance makes it clear that it's intended, but not limited to, use on the back of the bike. Extremely pronounced crown lugs look like they'd stop you dead when you get on the binders, but the ramps on the leading edges are a concession towards rolling speed. With such large lugs all around, there's no need for transition knobs, either, just massive cornering lugs made from a soft, slow rebounding rubber.



Eurobike 2018


Just imagine being a tire in the Joe's No Flat's booth... It wouldn't be an easy life.


MENTIONS: @wilderness-trail-bikes @schwalbe


Must Read This Week

61 Comments

  • + 62
 That tire gets nailed and screwed more than the entire PB audience.
  • + 28
 Is that the new Brazzers Signature tyre?
  • + 29
 I don't even know why that's chosen as a way to show off tyre sealant. A screw in a rubber tyre is basically self sealing... Maybe screw a screw in then rip it out and see how that does!
  • + 6
 @wreaman: Thinking the same thing. Pull 4 of those screws out and let's see what happens.
  • + 2
 You should ride in a designated trails. Not at your dad's garage or uncle's factory. Moreover if you dad's garage and uncle's factory has so many nails and screws on the floor, they should sit down and have a moment of silence.
  • + 29
 Nothing new from Michelin? Or are they in a perpetual state of prototyping? Been waiting for five years now to see that new Cam Zink DH tire. Or a 2.5 Rock'R2.
  • + 9
 I think Hill was on those new prototypes, but no sign of them here. But yeah, anytime soon would be nice.
  • + 2
 Just right now riding a set of new Michelin Force AM Competition Line GUM-X3D 27.5x2.35
I wish I didn't see them at online-store..
Just zero at rocks, too slippery at roots,....
(
  • + 6
 Sam hills / adrian dailly are on the Michelin Wild Enduro, they are available now in 27.5 with 29 soon. A mate has a pair and they are fricken stout, largest side knobs I have ever seen! Sooo waiting for the 29s for my rig
  • + 5
 wild enduro series is out and new.. best rubber no one is using
  • + 1
 @aushred: Saw that Wild Enduro. Been waiting on the 29er rubber as well. Have a Wild RockR2 up front right now. Debating those Good Year Newton tyres though.
  • + 2
 @gonecoastal: Am hearing September for the Wild Enduro in 29 to be avail in Euro online stores first
  • + 1
 @aushred: Sweet. Might be placing an order for a Cura4 set and Wild Enduro 29 then.
  • + 15
 30 psi in my Minions, don't care about your opinions.
  • + 3
 You aren't alone
  • - 1
 @redsled137: Go fast so i ride clipped in, can't help it if I always win Smile
  • + 12
 I really wish Schwalbe offered tires for lower end customers. Like the Make it Shift Steve and the Whatever is cheapest Charlie.
  • + 6
 Schwalbe does offer lower end tires, they just may not make it in the PB news articles. Browse their catalog. They also offer their Addix compound for their "Performance" tires which are slightly lower end from their "Evolution" tires. And they also do another step lower if you need that. I've been riding the Schwalbe Space a lot, not sure if these are still available. But these were basically exclusively lower end tires.
  • + 2
 Yes Schwalbe bike park tyres are cheapest
  • + 4
 LOL... i want Schwalbe Cheap Charlie for upfront and Affordable Andy for the back....
  • + 1
 I've been on one of their preformance level tires... It was garbage, I would only recommend it to someone who occasionally rides a slow blue but mostly sticks to greens the 5 times a year they go out... Otherwise your money is better spent elsewhere....
  • + 2
 @rclugnut: That's one way to look at it. I'd say if you want the best performance (for instance for competitive and/or professional reasons) and you're willing to pay for it then of course get the best. But no matter what tire you're using, you're going to find the limits of the grip on offer. And the (fun) challenge is to explore that. See how far you can push it, learn how to regain grip after you've lost it. So even though the best tires may allow you to push harder (or compensate for more rider error) there is always something to gain by simply improving skills. And these skills transfer to whatever tire you're riding.

So I'd say the exact opposite of what you just said. If a rider has a certain amount of money to spend on tires a year. He or she could buy the top product and ride little to not wear it out (because of the limited budget). Or buy more of the cheaper tires and ride the hell out of it. I'd recommend the latter. I guess this goes for nearly every component. If you want to ride much and hard, get the stuff you can afford that you're not too worried about of wearing out or getting damaged.
  • + 1
 @vinay: What gets me, is that soft compound tyres are so much slower if your not fast enough to make them better & they wear out faster, so pointless unless you are fast or think you are?
  • + 8
 All right... how many other nerds knew the meaning of "regolith"? Smile
  • + 5
 Trail builder life
  • + 1
 That's not so nerd, is it?
  • + 1
 yup Smile no towering monster….
  • + 5
 2 geology degrees here.
  • + 4
 yup, as a geologist that tire name makes me happy
  • + 2
 Because it takes large stones to run a Kenda?
  • + 3
 How does Schwalbe get away with not offering a decent gravity dry tire? Magics are an awesome allround tire. And HDs are alright for the backwheel I guess. At least the new ones. But what about a contender to a Minion? Bring it on Schwalbe!
  • + 2
 I think that Schwalbe probably goes on the evidence of who races the magic in the dry and who races the minion in the dry and race results.... Saying that, I dont really get on with the magic in the dry and the muddy was a better intermediate to wet tyre than the magic.
  • + 13
 The Magic Mary does everything, no need for another one.
  • + 0
 "And HDs are alright for the backwheel I guess"
piece of cr*p at front or rear..
  • + 7
 Lots of 26" options!
  • + 2
 Of course. And I doubt the big companies like Schwalbe and Continental are going to stop them anytime soon. I'm running 26" tires from both companies along with Procore in 26" on a 26" specific frame delivered only this spring. Don't let the media fool you!
  • + 3
 In addition to all the older 26ers on the trail, groms still use 26ers.
  • + 6
 If Hellraiser was a tyre.......
  • + 1
 We have such heights to show you...
  • + 3
 Judge is gonna rule at the bikepark!

Objected over bars. You’re send is dismissed.
  • + 1
 It'll pound it's gravel and yell, order in the dirt! Razz
  • + 3
 Nope.....Michelin Wild Enduro's all the way. Fit em….all year round tire.
  • + 1
 Why would the Booster not get on anything other than a XC bike of yours when the Rock Razor is a ridiculously common trail bike rear tyre and the Booster looks to be just as aggressive.
  • + 3
 Shoutout to "Joe's No Flat's" for most uninspired company name of the decade.
  • + 2
 I think Dan's More Air is better.
  • + 1
 What the hell is the point of all the screws in the tyre!! Surely the point is the gunk closes the holes after a puncture so the screws should be removed showing the sealing ability???
  • + 2
 The Regolith looks almost identical to a Maxxis Forekaster...which is a good thing cause that tire rocks!.
  • + 3
 I could have used a tire like that last weekend. Lost the front on said regolith and pitched it in hard. My right side looks like a raspberry farm. Not thrilled with the High Roller's absolute zero feedback prior to loosing traction. I'll be giving this one a go!
  • + 1
 booster (rekon) regolith (forekaster)
  • + 1
 Hutchinson Skeleton - Maxxis Aspen copy
  • + 1
 WTB Judge: basically a Maxxis DHR2 3C Double Down knock off
  • + 1
 I'm really excited to try the judge!!! Well done WTB... well done!
  • + 0
 Kenda Booster = Vittoria Morsa
  • + 0
 Maxxis?
  • + 2
 Something EXO+. Something Silkshield. Something 2.6" I'd imagine.
  • + 3
 @GTscoob: That fits like a 2.3 on the rim not doubt.
  • - 2
 Woh Yeah, Dat Tyre Looks Punk Dude.
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