Top Stories from CyclingTips: Abbey Bike Tools, Car-Free At Eurobike, & One Bike To Rule Them All

Nov 5, 2019
by Sarah Lukas  




What's going on in the curly bar world? CyclingTips Digest showcases articles from our sister site, CyclingTips. In each installment, you might find endurance coverage, power-to-weight ratios, gravel bike tech and, of course, lycra.





Toolbox perfection? A look at Abbey Bike Tools’ new tool kit
By: Dave Rome

When it comes to working on modern bikes, what tools should go in a good cycling tool kit? Abbey Bike Tools’ new kit provides some valuable insight into that very question.

Abbey Bike Tools is commonly regarded as one of the best makers of premium cycling tools, and you’ll be hard-pressed to attend a professional road, ‘cross, or mountain bike race and not find an Abbey tool hidden in the box of each mechanic.

The maker of those green tools is now offering its own pre-made tool kit. However, unlike many cycling tool brands, Abbey doesn’t make, or rebrand, everyday hand tools that are needed for fixing bikes. Instead, the Oregon-based company focusses on making cycling-specific tools and believes the best general-use hand tools come from the companies that specialise in making those tools for use across many major professional service industries.

(Read more.)





This guy is giving away a bike shop
By: Iain Treloar

Ben Thomson is not, in any conventional sense, a normal guy. He operates at a different speed and a different intensity to most other people, with laser focus that shifts from one project to the next. He has fingers in many pies. Many of those pies are hot and messy.

Case in point: in the last month, he has jumped 30 feet across a railroad, continued his planning for a tilt at the world paced bicycle land speed record, and announced that he’s giving away his bike shop for free.

(Read more.)





JRA with the Angry Asian: Weekend reboots, rebooted
By: James Huang

Fruita, Colorado holds a special place for me and my wife. Situated an easy four-hour drive from our home in Boulder, Colorado, it’s a mountain biking mecca with a seemingly endless expanse of high-desert trails, breathtaking views, plentiful camping options, and, yes, even fantastic pizza despite being a small town of just 13,000 residents.

For more than 10 years, it’s been an annual pilgrimage for us to head out there with friends, ride our legs off for hours, then bask by the glow of a warm campfire as we recount our days over hot dinners and cold drinks.

Things have changed a bit since those earlier years.

(Read more.)





How one bike brand is making others look environmentally irresponsible
By: Dave Rome

At this year’s Taipei Cycle Show, I got talking to a product manager who was in the midst of setting up a new bike brand. Normally I’d glaze over upon hearing another such story, but this was different. It was filled with talk about disposable and non-recyclable products, irresponsible packaging, poisonous working conditions, and an over-complication of the bicycle that’s designed to have you buy more, more often.

Enter Bjorn Bikes. A start-up out of Vancouver, Canada that aims to raise awareness about how environmentally hypocritical our pedal-powered scene can be. The brand’s first model, a do-it-all, make-it-what-you-want gravel frameset, is made with up to 60% recycled stainless steel and a fork that’s up to 70% recycled aluminium. The bike is accompanied by a grip made from recycled materials, and there’s a tyre in the works, too.

(Read more.)





Could you live with just one bike for a year?
By: Iain Treloar

For us multi-disciplined cyclists, or even those of us who need different travel mountain bikes for different terrain, which would be your one bike you would always have?

Since March 2019, I’ve been putting an idea to the test – whether it was possible to live with one bike for an entire year. It was, in part, an exercise in minimalism – removing the drawn-out decision between a number of bikes down to a single simple choice. Subtraction, not addition. Removing the ‘what’ to ride; replacing it with just ‘when’.

But it also gave a good opportunity to dig into something that seems to come up all the time in gravel bike reviews and in the comment threads beneath them. And that was this: is there such a thing as a quiver-killer? Can a bike truly straddle both road and gravel, with little compromise in either world?

(Read more.)





Car-free at the world’s biggest bike show
By: James Huang

Many of us are accustomed to the concept of traveling with your bike. The idea is simple, after all: you pack up your bike, fly with it somewhere cool, ride it somewhere new and exciting, and then reverse the process and go home. However, what if the purpose of your trip isn’t to ride your bike, but a bike would still make the most sense just for basic transportation? How much easier would traveling be if you just had a bike with you everywhere you went?

(Read more.)





Giant Contend AR 1 2020 review: Fresh and affordable all-road
By: Dave Rome

If the lines between road and gravel bikes were already blurry, then the way things are trending is likely to confuse you even further. All-road bikes are relatively new and aim to do everything a good endurance-style road bike does, albeit with a pinch of additional versatility. As the name suggests, they’re designed to handle all roads. If you can point the family sedan at it, then an all-road bike can go there too.

(Read more.)






44 Comments

  • 125 3
 "Could you live with just one bike for a year?"

Well that's what I've been doing for the last four years
  • 54 1
 You absolute madlad.
  • 5 1
 Ditto for about 4 years until April when I got my second. Mine was a 29 HT. Sometimes geared, sometimes single speed.
  • 34 0
 Also depends on how much and what type of riding you do. The bike with basket, bags and childseats I use nearly everyday for work, groceries, getting the kids around etc just wouldn't quite work for me on the pumptrack.

The article seemed to be about a single bike for both road and gravel. It is a bit of a joke really. To the untrained eye (or the eye trained on different, more relevant stuff) a road and a gravel bike is pretty much the same thing. "Hey mom, did you see that? That man is riding a gravel bike, on the road! Daredevil..."
  • 5 0
 Me too. I couldn't live with just that gravel bike though - you can't jump that (unless you are Chris Akrigg).
  • 7 1
 @tremeer023: Danny MacAskill, Fabio Wibmer and Chris Akrigg are amazing riders and intentionally push the limits of the bikes they're riding. But the bike Wibmer was riding in "out of mind" didn't quite survive it in a single go (and he typically destroys himself too during filming) and Danny wasn't tricking with a real kid in the trailer.

I just read the article (where it links to) and he did even worse than I thought. He had a spare set of wheels but when he couldn't get his tubeless tires sealed he just grabbed an other bike. And it was too expensive to lock outside the pub. He would have been better off with something from Planet X, if this were a concern. You can get lightweight front- and rear racks and then use easily detachable Ortlieb (or similar) bags for groceries but he didn't even do that. I'll excuse him for not riding the pumptrack or even remotely challenging mtb trails as he didn't seem to be into that anyway.

It doesn't seem like a failed experiment. He just wasn't even trying.
  • 13 0
 It’s pretty obvious you can live with one bike for a year. I bet most people do. I wouldn’t want my one bike to be a gravel bike though.
  • 3 0
 did that from 1995 to 2002.. now.. hm.. maybe my 120mm bike with 2 or 3 wheelsets would do Smile
  • 2 0
 I only had one bike from 93-2010. 26" hardtail for the majority of the time. It was my trail bike, my commuter and my bar hopper.

Now I have five. Only one road bike though, which is also my CX bike and gravel bike and commuter etc. etc.
  • 4 0
 Today's Article is looking more like advertising for gravel bikes.
  • 4 0
 @jaame: Most people live with zero bikes for a big part of their life and the rest with just one bike. Wink
  • 2 0
 How many ones can you have?

youtu.be/JZGc2sIajMM
  • 1 0
 Same here. I have one bike, I ride it everywhere, then I sell it and buy another bike. I keep my bikes for at least 1 year, and sometimes 2. The real question is could I live with just 1 bike for 3 or 4 years... Probably not.
  • 7 0
 The one bike solution has existed for years. The hardtail mountain bike Ianthe most versatile bike out there and has been for long time and will continue to be so
  • 3 0
 Yep. I use my hardtail (only bike) for everything from xc, dirt jumps/pump/bmx track to short course dh and bike park. I have two sets of wheels; one lighter with xc biased rubber and one dh set with cushcore. A good steel ht is very versatile.
  • 6 0
 Björn Bikes remindes me of Sven:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=41qlBDp-9O4

Smile
  • 1 0
 Don’t forget Sven Sven Sven..

youtu.be/rh6-dcpEHas
  • 4 1
 I have one bike and besides , my Alice really wouldnt be impressed should I bring another lady into the garage and alternate between the two....Jip...I love my Alice and she is beaut on the trails and everywhere else in between...
  • 4 0
 Bikes are like different types of shoes; yeah, you can live with just one type, but there's going to be a lot of compromise (unless you're Yoann Barelli)
www.youtube.com/watch?v=JtHsdKmPS3Y
  • 5 0
 MMMM....Abbey gives me morning wood.
  • 11 1
 My boner died when I saw the price.
  • 2 1
 @Allen82: it is a little ridiculous
  • 2 0
 @Allen82: Pretty sure they mostly put it together for marketing. They build maybe 5 kits to sell and probably just break even, but Abbey Bike Tools gets a story in several bike magazines for free. That marketing value is the real benefit. Smart move
  • 2 0
 My bike is made with up to 100% recycled aluminium. The tyres contain up to 100% recycled rubber and the fork oil is up to 100% recyclable.

Beat that Bjorn!
  • 8 0
 So, what you're saying is you bought a used bike? Smile Bikes, cars, clothes...most of my life has been recycled.
  • 3 0
 @JVance: I did yeah!

The joke I was trying to make was that they quoted “up to 70% recycled”, which means something under 70%. It could be 1%, who knows?
  • 2 0
 “Could you live with one bike for a whole year” i only have a patrol and it weighs 37 pounds and i don't seem to have a problem
  • 1 0
 I used a 26" frame with different wheelsets/tires for well over a year during some rough financial times.
Changed the chain 3x/yr to keep all the drivetrains happy. it worked, but...yeah...
  • 2 1
 Those Knipex wire rope cutter are ok, but the Felco C7 is the real deal. You won't find Knipex in a rigging shop, but everyone will have Felcos in their bag.
  • 1 1
 Abbey essentially made a fancy box for tools from other manufacturers. Adding some of their special bike tools to the mix. That sounds like a more accurate description. Looks nice I admit, worth the price? I don't know
  • 3 0
 hell yeah worth the price. Some of the best tools in the game, and similar price to evey other manufacturers portable kits.
  • 2 0
 I've been to their manufacturing facility. They make everything and its all really legit. The price tag isn't for everyone but if you're serious about tools they are worth every penny. They put an insane amount of time and care into producing their product.
  • 2 0
 The Can you live with one bike? article is a great concept. Unfortunately, the author makes no real attempt to do so.
  • 2 1
 All these bike Co talking about environment and being responsible is a load of horse poop! All their scrap materials are hazardous and spew them for ever material they make!
  • 3 0
 Huh? Aluminum is not only incredibly easy to recycle, but makes financial sense to do so, as most companies do, at least in North America.
  • 1 0
 All my bike tools are in an ammo box at the moment. Not the best solution. I need to hit harbor freight and get me a pretty box to put my tools in.
  • 1 0
 need a can you live with one bike for a year for a hardcore hardtail... like the doctahawk... handle dh duties and trail duties.
  • 1 0
 I definitely enjoy passing up some mountain bikers on that all Road Giant on some off-road trails. 700c fast as fast can be.
  • 1 0
 Fruita has 13000 people? more like 1300.
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