Trail Tools: Electric Chainsaw Vs. Electric Sawzall

Nov 23, 2022
by Travis Engel  

Let’s get something out of the way before we even start this. We do not condone unauthorized trimming of vegetation on public trails. The only acceptable way for you to do your part is under the organized direct supervision of a land manager or a group legally authorized by that land manager. Any time any overgrowth or deadfall removal is ever done outside of these specific circumstances, it is flawed, unhelpful, and should be severely punished.

There. I, for one, feel far better. Now that the only people reading this are in the specific situation outlined above, we can get down to business. I’m no hero, but I’ve put in my time behind a gas-powered chainsaw keeping the seasonal surge of southern California chaparral at bay. And it’s magical. The first time you pull the trigger and clear your favorite trail’s worst choke point, you feel like a wizard. And you can buy one for relatively cheap, especially compared to the saws I’m talking about here. You’ll probably spend less on a decent quality gas chainsaw than you would on a lower-powered electric chainsaw once you buy batteries and a charger, which aren't included in the listed prices, and aren't cheap. A single Makita-brand charger and 18V 5.0AH battery come together for $195.

But gas-powered chainsaws are a pain. They’re noisy, smelly and require a level of care and maintenance that we non-motorized enthusiasts just aren’t used to. So, I bought myself a couple electronic-assist trailcutting tools, and I’m here to outline some pros and cons of each.

I opted for Makita because I already had Makita batteries. There are plenty of tool nuts on Youtube comparing various brands’ cutting speed, battery life, longevity and durability. It’s not very interesting, and it’s not what I’m here to do. I’m covering the fundamental differences between two categories; the chainsaw and the reciprocating saw, which I’ll just call a sawzall because I’m not a robot. You can pick whatever brand works for you. I recommend the brand you already have batteries for.

For some context, most of my work is on low-lying overgrowth and small trees, so I opted for relatively compact tools. I want to carry them in and out the same day, but not need a huge trekking pack to do it. And I want to still be able to enjoy the ride. Anyway, on my trails, clearing full-sized fallen trees is relatively uncommon compared to constantly encroaching brush.

Makita 18V LXT Cordless Top Handle 10" Chain Saw: $239.99

Because of my experience with gas chainsaws, the chainsaw is where I started. This 10-inch-bar 18-volt offering from Makita (model number XCU06Z) weighs 6.6 pounds with a 5 amp-hour battery and fits in my 20-liter Camelbak Hawg pack without any disassembly, though I opt to run a 70-percent-full hydration bladder and relocate it from against my back to instead nestle in the void just outboard of the guide bar and above the power head. I could just wear a larger pack, but this configuration keeps things snug and compact. One side of the saw is relatively flat, so the layer of padding built into my pack keeps me from feeling any pressure points, but be ready to get creative to suit your needs.

Chain installation, adjustment and lubrication works just like it would on a gas saw, and battery-operated saws use the same chains as comparably-sized gas saws, so replacements are easy to find. I carry one with just in case, as well as a small bottle of bar oil, but I usually run through this saw’s reservoir in the same time it would take to go through two 5Ah batteries. In most cases, that was a little under three hours of cutting and clearing which, as remote as I’ve been working lately, is pretty much long enough to call it a day.

Using an electric chainsaw, I had to constantly remind myself to take things seriously. It’s probably quieter than my Magic Bullet blender, and there’s no idle noise. No pageantry of priming the carburetor or pulling the starting cord. That also means it is a delight to use. In Makita’s case, the safety switch is depressed the moment you hold the handle, so the power is right at your fingertip. And although there is a stabilizing bar to hold onto, I primarily used the chainsaw one-handed. That was a treat because, often, the base of whatever I’m cutting is buried nearly out of reach in dense overgrowth. Eventually, this little guy became an extension of my body, like Ash in Evil Dead 2.

bigquotesThe first time you pull the trigger and clear your favorite trail’s worst choke point, you feel like a wizard.

Of course, it has its limits. Makita claims this 18-volt saw matches the power of a 22cc gas saw. That’s pretty tiny. Most saws you might use for trail cutting are at least 32cc. Cutting anything beyond 4 inches thick with an electric saw this small is a bit of a chore, and that gets more difficult when it’s dry deadfall. Give it time, and it’ll go through thick, soft green wood relatively smoothly, but not on anything dry or dense.

That nuisance is doubled by Makita’s Star Protection system that shuts the saw off if it senses it is overheating or overdischarging. Apparently, the speed and force it takes to get an electric chainsaw to behave like a gas chainsaw is pretty serious. Powering it with a battery most of us use in a household drill requires some protection. Protection against this $240 saw from cooking one of its $100 batteries or vice versa, and that protection comes in the form of inconveniently timed shutoffs. You can toggle the power button and spam it back to running in five or ten seconds, but the more I did that, the shorter the spurts of running time would get. I eventually got in the habit of carrying a small folding handsaw in my pocket to kill the 60 seconds it usually took to get it back in the mood to run.

The other thing I had to stay aware of was keeping the cutting teeth of the chain away from dirt and rocks. I’m well practiced at all that from my time with a gas saw, but it harshed the buzz (pun intended) of having such a light and easy tool in my hand. And even after I’d cleared a section, there’d often be small stumps left behind. If I had a sharp pick mattock with me, I was then obliged to chop out the pungi sticks that I’d left behind.

Makita 18V LXT Cordless Sub-Compact Reciprocating Saw: $159.99

That’s when I got inspired to try a sawzall. Most of what I need to cut is three inches in diameter or less, and most of it needs to be cut at or sometimes below ground level to keep it from growing back. All of the sensitive moving parts of a sawzall are inside of it, so there’s really no need to baby the blade. Seemed like a no-brainer for my application.

The true apples-to-apples (or at least dollar-for-dollar) comparison to the $200, 18-volt 10-inch Makita chainsaw would be the $200 XRJ05Z 18-volt Brushless Recipro saw. I borrowed one, and spent enough time on it to know it may be a good fit for my trails, but also that it is not the saw I want to spend hours holding in my hand climbing through the bush. It’s 8.2 pounds with a battery, and most of that weight is cantilevered far in front of the grip, making it extremely difficult to use one-handed. In a large pack, it does nestle itself next to a standard 100-ounce hydration bladder quite nicely, and is overall an easier thing to transport, but it is not an easy thing to use.

So, I opted for the $150 sub-compact version, model number XRJ07B. Functionally, the main difference is in the stroke length. That sacrifice varies between brands, but in Makita’s case, the full-sized XRJ05Z has a 1&1/4-inch stroke while the sub-compact gets 13/16-inch. In practice, that translates to it taking approximately 10 percent more time to get through the same branch. How that impacts battery life is far more difficult to quantify, though it’s likely not positive. But it didn’t matter to me. The sub-compact saw is 5.7 pounds with a battery, and that weight is far closer to the handle, making it nearly as easy to use one-handed as the chainsaw is. Also, it packs easier. It fits perfectly in the upper compartment of my 19-liter-capacity Camelbak Mule LR.


It took some adjustment to optimize my use of such a different tool. My goal when clearing brush is to cut as close to the ground as possible, and I eventually learned I could cut below the ground. Once I knew the size and shape of what I was cutting, I’d pretty much jab the blade into the dirt and push it to the left until it was through. Or, until it hits a rock or a second unseen root.

The danger in such indiscriminate slicing is not knowing what you’re up against. Most woodcutting blades are easy to bend, but hard to straighten. Demolition blades are taller and stiffer, and the smaller teeth don’t dull as quickly, but they don’t act as quickly either. I now have a small canvas pouch with several blades. The 6-inch demolition blade’s durability is ideal for sticking in the dirt, 6-inch woodcutting blades for thick branches and small trees, and 9- and 12-inch pruning blades can decapitate large yucca or, with patience, get through nearly any deadfall the blade is long enough to span.

bigquotesI’d pretty much jab the blade into the dirt and push it to the left until it was through.

I really was able to drive the sawzall hard. I truly never had it shut off on me like the chainsaw. Whether going from stump to stump or just driving through something thick and heavy, it stayed on until the job was done. But there is one annoying flaw that often forced me to use the sawall in one specific way. A chainsaw constantly pulls in one direction. Once it hits the base of the blade, it cuts through it. The sawzall, on the other hand, goes back and forth. If whatever you’re cutting is able to move back and forth, you’ll find yourself just shaking a branch.

Even if you think you’re making progress on something, a sprout just behind it may be stopping the blade from progressing. It’s crucial to only cut things that are stiff and stationary. This issue is compounded as the blades get dull which, with how I use this thing, tends to happen quickly. And many of the nice fancy blades are not easy to sharpen, so I find myself buying a couple new blades every three or four outings with the sawzall. Thankfully, the ones I use the most are about $5 each, less if you buy in bulk.

Your results may vary. Pacific Northwest and East Coast riders who deal with huge fallen trees and broken branches are in a whole different world from us desert folk. I’m glad I have my chainsaw for specific strike missions to address specific treefall, but when I set out to give myself and my fellow riders a little extra elbow room, I’m bringing my sawzall.





213 Comments

  • 238 5
 These esaws are taking over. Is it really even sawing?!
  • 111 3
 Imagine a french downhill Worldcup with only electric saws on the crowd... Might be nice actually
  • 13 0
 I have an ego 14” and it’s brilliant. Quiet and easy to use, 3 yrs in and no issues
  • 10 0
 Crosscut saws or bust
  • 6 0
 Also have an Ego 18. Working great for 1yr. Cutting time is more than enough with 2 batteries
  • 8 0
 @AAntoine: Yer an animal going through 2 batteries. One battery and I've gone through a gallon of water and ready to fall over
  • 9 3
 @artistformlyknowasdan: no messing with the gas an oil is the best part
  • 12 0
 I use a husqvarna 36v top handle and it changed my trailbuilding game since you can not run around with a noisy 40cc saw in German forrests! Love the battery one...for firewood I still use a real saw
  • 4 0
 @artistformlyknowasdan: a 14 inch ego is huggeee, definitely above the average size ego...
  • 2 0
 Makita DUC353Z here, some more odd timeouts compared to Husquarna, but solid in overall and toolfree adjustment works quite well. Great to be heard only 50 to 100 m far instead of up to 2 km with a gaspowered chainsaw.
  • 1 0
 @artistformlyknowasdan: what are your run times like, or is it better to ask how many cuts you get. I have been debating getting one for 2 years.
  • 1 0
 @StinkyTO: really depends on the wood . Soft damper wood definitely can get through a lot on one battery. When it’s harder and drier certainly goes through battery faster. Not exactly sure on time/cuts but usually 5 amps will get me a afternoon of work.
For larger jobs I think gas makes more sense, especially since your going through fuel and getting out with lighter pack. For sneaking in and quicker jobs can’t beat electric, but it’ll still all weight the same when you depleted your batteries.
  • 7 1
 @AAntoine, I'm in the same boat. Very happy with the Ego 18. Electric saws + ebikes make trail maintenance so much easier.
  • 1 0
 @calarco68: That's the first step manly part though
  • 2 0
 @artistformlyknowasdan: same, I love it!
  • 3 0
 Oh great. The filters are broke again
  • 2 2
 Don’t care which saw. Just clear the darn trail please thank you.
  • 1 0
 @rbreish: that's what she said
  • 2 0
 @SleepingAwake: 100%. I get people are trying to enjoy themselves but the chainsaw noise is painful
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer: you just gave me an idea, I want an ebike that takes my cordless tool platform's batteries lol
  • 1 0
 @tufty: i mean i love it, but it gets a little out of hand
  • 1 0
 @Thema: I've often thought bosch missed a trick not using (or having the option to use) their power tool batteries in their ebikes. I know makita do an ebike but it's a small wheel commuter type thing they use for zipping around the makita factories (which actually sounds pretty fun).
  • 2 0
 Class 1 eSaws are banned on my trails!
  • 57 1
 Not all unsanctioned trail work or work outside a club is illegal. To clarify BC law, on public land you are allowed:

“Minor, piecemeal, or incidental clearing of brush or downed trees either on or off established trails”. Anyone can.

Just saw you are in Cali, but still...
  • 19 0
 unsanctioned trails are also not "illegal" on crown land.
  • 31 0
 next week....... napalm or agent orange for trail clearance work when 18V literally wont cut it
  • 9 0
 @Compositepro: Has the daisy cutter gone out of style?
  • 4 0
 @vinay: i was saving that for the retro round up
  • 7 0
 @Compositepro: both good bands but it's definitely napalm for me.
  • 1 0
 @watchtower: I see what you did there ;-)
  • 1 0
 @jaydawg69: just the construction of them if it involves dirt work.
  • 1 2
 Couldn’t agree more, the countries with the best trail networks per head of population normally have a can do attitude and a lack of red tape which allows motivated people to build trails. All the riding I’ve done in the US was a bit disappointing and I guess this is part of the reason why
  • 1 0
 @Daaaaaaaaaaaaan: Dan Atherton has entered the chat?
  • 1 0
 @mi-bike: He has an account on Pinkbike, but it isn't this one from New Zealand.
  • 2 0
 @BrianColes: depends who the land manager is but riding unsanctioned trails is not illegal. You can get a fine in Seymour Provincial Park so I guess that could illegal? Same fine as not stopping at a stopping sign. Cost of business.
  • 4 0
 I agree, here in Edmonton, there is a trail less than a hundred feet west of the HIGH LEVEL BRIDGE that runs all the way down to the floor of the river valley. The hillside is covered in Poplars (The worlds tallest weedSmile .
It's not uncommon to have "blowdowns across the trail. And I know that if a person was to call the City and tell them there's a tree that need to be cleared to open up the trail, if they actually ever did get around to it, it would likely be a different calendar year by the time they did. (if I was was a betting man, my $$ would be on them never doing it)
So, on a couple of occasions a few years back, I threw my RIDGID cordless sawzall and all my 2.0 AH batteries in my backpack and drove over there @ 7:00 on a Sunday, walked down the hill and cleared the tree(s). And while I was there, did some scouting, and found some others that were DEAD, and rotten but still standing. I was able to rock them back and forth until they went over, and made sure when they did, it was AWAY from the trail.
So, despite being seen as a criminal in your eyes, if I happen to lay awake tonight, the clearing of this trail will not be the cause....................
  • 1 0
 In general shifting dead material (dropped or still standing) is allowed but not to take it away from the area. Pushing over dead trees isn't bad by itself but you've got to know what you're doing. It can be dangerous after a storm, not just to go in there to ride your bike or work on the trail, but also to go in there to help someone out who got injured. Things can tip over or down well after the storm. So if you go in there to clear a trail and you do get injured, you kind of put those at risk who have to go in there to help you out. That's one of the things I learned early on. You can accept risks for yourself but you may put others at risk too when you're doing so. So yeah, you can clear a trail after a storm but only if you really know what you're doing. Dead or near-fallen trees often support each other so when you push one down, something else can come along.

As for fallen stuff, often the trunk is too big to shift you can just cut out a part so that people can continue to ride on the trail instead of wander and widen the trail. I don't think this practice is prohibited anywhere.

What I do primarily is to just cut branches with thorns when they get too close to the trail causing people to wander and widen the trail. I like my tracks narrow and fun. I just carry a knife for that.
  • 1 0
 @Daaaaaaaaaaaaan: you’ve been riding in the wrong places then!
  • 45 2
 Should have compared them with a silky gomboy, because that's literally all you need for trail clearing/pruning, no need for anything else unless you have land owners permission and then you use a petrol chainsaw because noise isn't an issue and it's likely bigger stuff.
  • 12 0
 Agreed, for most of the 3" (such as scrub oak), the gomboy gets through them in 5 seconds or less. A few hours of that can be a bit of a workout but a .5lb saw is a lot easier to get out there.
  • 20 0
 Agreed. It's amazing what you can get through with a good folding saw, even one that's light enough to carry in your pack on a normal ride.
  • 5 8
 I love watching people with their brand new Gomboy taking away and snapping their blades in pieces.
  • 16 2
 Yeah nah. Once you have used a proper e-chainsaw and not had to pfaff with carrying a can of fuel (and the mess and stink that goes with it) especially if you are riding into a more remote trail (different if you are working out of the back of a vehicle), you will never go back to a gas saw (except for the really big stuff). Also no fuel stink in the vehicle (unless you have a truck with a tray).

The small recip saw will do stuff at ground (and below grade) level that a Silky won't or can't and in 1/3 of the time.

Blades, I find that any construction site will have a host of tradies that have a wide variety of still useful blades that they no longer deem suitable for framing or what ever else they are cutting with them.
A six pack at the end of the day normally secures a supply of recip blades for the duration of that project. Most tradies would rather they went to a good use than into the recycling bin.

My 535 XP drives a 14" bar and with the correct use of cuts and wedges I can clear 18-24" dead fall easily. It is more the physics of safely dealing with spanned trunks and other safety challenges than any 'lack' of cutting power.

In more expert hands these saws can really hold their own. I have two batteries which provides more juice than I need for how long I am happy to saw for (about three hours on green timber).
  • 5 0
 Agreed, my bag usually has a Bigboy, 9” Corona and bypass shears. That handles pretty much anything minus the big stuff (that’s what a 20-28” saw is for).

My riding bags all have a little 7” saw for dealing with quick trail side fixes, takes care of anything under 4” easily.

I’ve been toying with an esaw, I’ve worked next to the 16” Makita and it’s quite impressive but does one really need another saw…
  • 9 0
 A good hand pruning saw will beat a reciprocating saw: youtu.be/lAIXPu-gFNg
  • 8 0
 The Silky Big Boy is insanely good. You can get through a 4" tree in a matter of seconds. I've cleared 16" diameter hardwoods off the trail with one (which did result in some saw induced arm pump). For clearing small trees, the silky is unbeatable. The sawsall is nice for clearing roots and stumps though.
  • 3 1
 @MisterChow: this is the video we wanted.

In short, 4 options were tried on a 4" oak
Gomboy - 18s (I'd assume the big boy would be 12s)
Fiskars - 25s
Reciprocating Saw w Gomboy attached - 57s (struggles to sawdust)
6" electric Milwaukee pruning saw - 6s

Really depends on the job and how much you need to do. Clearly electric uses less energy.
  • 2 0
 Komelon fixed blade > Silky Gomboy, IMO. Owned both, Gomboy may last slightly longer, but twice the price and much more prone to breaking.
  • 1 0
 Also helps that Silky has different blades so you can choose the best one for the type of wood you are cutting.
  • 2 0
 @MisterChow: You know, for hunting. lol

Eye opening video thanks. 13:15 is the comparison.
  • 2 1
 I've been pondering a Silky as a semi EDC at this time of year as there are so many trees down on the local trails at the moment. What's the recommended folding saw to stuff in a camelbak without being too big or heavy?
  • 1 0
 @seb-stott: Absolutely.
  • 3 0
 @mountainsofsussex: silky big boy or gomboy. Big boy is around 14.5" and gomboy 9.5". The big boy fits in my Evoc Stage 18L easily. The gomboy fits in my evoc 3L hip pack easily, but i can strap the big boy on the outside of the hip pack as well.

The big boy is faster, stronger and heavier by about 130g. If you can fit it in your pack I'd recommend that more.
  • 1 0
 ummm not for anything bigger than 6 inches. e saws are pretty quiet.
  • 1 0
 @mountainsofsussex: Personally a 7-9” folding saw is plenty for EDC. Once in a while I’ll toss the BigBoy in after a windstorm but it’s generally oaks around here and that usually calls for a chainsaw.
  • 5 0
 Katana Boy 1000 FTW!!!
  • 2 0
 @mountainsofsussex: The silky Gomboy is the go to smaller saw. If you're going out purposefully to trim and don't mind a bigger pack, the silky big boy is incredible.
  • 2 0
 @scferg: thinking about the size of trees that block the local trails, I figured going the smaller/lighter side would work for me, and would be more likely to sit in the pack, rather than something bigger that stays at home. Bit like a DH full face helmet that doesn't get worn as it's too sweaty... So I've ordered a 170 pocketboy. Hopefully I'll not regret not going larger!
  • 1 0
 @mountainsofsussex: you may end up with both. The gomboy for having in your bag for just incase situations, and a big boy at home that can be taken out of you need the extra length. You won't regret the gomboy, just be prepared to spend some time getting adjusted to a pull saw, unless you've already used one ofc, they feel completely alien at first use but you soon get used to them.
  • 1 0
 @andrewbikeguide: yeah nah. Got a 36v makita and an 18v makita (the small, 5 inch cut model) and a 18v recip saw. I will use them when I don't have to carry them to the trail, I.e. At work, and they're great in a residential setting, two buttons instead of dealing with mixing, fueling, priming, pull starting etc is amazing, but if it's more than a pruning job the petrol one comes straight out, it can go all day with no stalling cutting 3x as fast. I think the 36v one is 'equivalent' (spoiler: it's not, the amazon special 46cc saw I've got for firewood purposes has way more oomph, even with its 40:01 oil mix) to a 40cc engine. For the same cost as enough batteries to last all day I can buy a 90cc stihl or husky.

I will concede the point on the recip for roots, I will take it with me if I've got stumps to remove, I'll generally have half a dozen ready to go and just go for it with a couple of part worn blades. Usually just go round in a cone and the stump pops out.
  • 2 0
 @mountainsofsussex: I carry a Silky Bigboy in my Camelbak.
  • 2 0
 @mountainsofsussex: Silky BigBoy 2000 as an EDC in you pack. Awesome folding saw
  • 1 0
 I like the Gomtaro - still fits in my camelback easily and has a longer blade for the same price.
  • 1 0
 @mountainsofsussex: you're in Sussex mate not Borneo.
EDC ffs. Haha
Think a SAK has your needs covered and legal carry in UK
  • 1 0
 @mountainsofsussex: i carry the silky F180 around with me. Fits in my smallest hip pack, the Dakine hot laps.

It’s super light, folds, and will cut 5-6” branches. The 180 is 180mm long blade. There is a 210 and 240 if you are wanting something slightly longer.
  • 2 0
 @sheepsfootchoilbelly: hence something small for a bit of trail maintenance, rather than needing a machete - loads of small trees and large branches fallen on the trails that are too heavy to lift and to strong to snap. Seems to be a shortage of trail pixies sorting it out for me, so figured I ought to step up and keep the trails running for everyone
  • 1 0
 My two silkys never touch dirt. My reciprocating saw I have no problem cutting in or near the ground. Cutting roots when pulling stumps I'm grabbing my electric saw over my silky sea everytime.
  • 26 0
 Does Travis get paid for this nearly 2 year old Beta article re-publishing on PB? Or does Robin Thurston own it for perpetuity and can put it up on whatever Outside Inc. marquee he wants to whenever he wants to?
  • 7 0
 Most certainly the latter, however assuming that nearly no one saw it on beta at least folks can appreciate his work.
  • 4 1
 I read it and also noted that...hey, I read this same article years ago. Still think it's kind of silly to have a desert guy review saws.
  • 2 0
 The second one.
  • 26 0
 That was a well written and very informative review. Only improvement would be to add a huck to flat .
  • 12 0
 Should mention the cardinal rule: Don't randomly start cutting on another builders trail. Always consult with them first, just because you want a wide freeway doesn't mean everyone else does.
  • 14 0
 Cutting edge technology...
  • 17 6
 Electric? Real riders carry acoustic tools only. Cheater tools are for lazy people.
  • 7 0
 Silkyboy rules
  • 12 1
 Electric chainsaws just don't cut it at the races...
  • 8 1
 Tools exist for a reason - pick the right one for the job, it's not really a "VS" in my mind, a sawzall is a cheap workaround for any trail / tree work and while it can work....its not the right tool for the job...you can use a crescent wrench but a box wrench works better.

Gas saws - clearly better for big stuff, easy to bring extra fuel in remote work locations

Electric saws - great for lots of small limbs where you are making many quick / short cuts reasonably close to the TH or truck

Sawzall - good for cutting stuff around a construction site
  • 5 0
 the 16" and 18" esaws will do 99% of the trail cutting just fine.
  • 2 0
 @jaydawg69: nice and silently too when stealth is a factor. Low chance of sparking too if the fire danger is high. I was a non-believer in e-saws for a long time, but not anymore
  • 2 0
 @luckynugget: Spark danger is the same on an e-saw as a gas one. The sparks come from the chain catching on the bar or tagging rocks.

Only safer thing is no hot exhaust to accidentally leave sitting on some dry grass.
  • 2 2
 @Lylat:

1:Hitting rocks is not an acceptable way to run a chainsaw.

2: Your bar should NOT be sparking if it’s properly lubricated, dressed, and your chain is somewhat sharp and properly tensioned. If your chain is throwing sparks, you are seriously abusing the saw, and the bar/chain are probably both garbage. Electric saws generally don’t hold the same chain speed, making the above even less likely. (Thankfully that’s starting to change.)

3: Gas saws and OPE are legally mandated and sold with spark arresters over the exhaust ports for a reason- Hot exhaust starts fires.

4: Don’t ignore the significant risk of fire due to mishandling gasoline- I had a coworker who burned their brand new saw to a crisp by dribbling gas all over it like an idiot while refuelling. Thankfully it was in the middle of a wet lawn.
  • 2 0
 @jaydawg69: depends on where you are cutting trail, here in the PNW on second / third growth it's ok, any mature timber or old growth stuff it's worth bringing the gas saw IMO. An Esaw than can swing a 18" blade is getting into "just bring a 20"+ gas saw" territory so you can refuel and deal with bigger stuff.

My Stihl Esaw works AWESOME for small blowdown and limbing, but even with (3) batterys, once I start getting into the bigger 20" plus stuff it really limits my ability to get a lot of cuts in.
  • 1 0
 @harrisongregoire: cant help hitting rocks or nails....it happens, no matter what your experience level is, anybody with a lot of experience can tell you that.

Most sparks IME are from dull chains, it happens and don't see why it couldn't happen with an Esaw.

I'd say risk is higher with gas saw due to fuel, but the forest service (at least here in Oregon) doesn't care what kind of powered saw you have during "Saw Bans", no chainsaws period because of fire hazard.
  • 1 0
 @RadBartTaylor: I live in NV and cutting anything over 20" is pretty rare. Mostly the very odd fall down but never would I cut a live tree that big.
  • 1 0
 @jaydawg69: We have lots of big blowdown particularly on trails in old growth areas, I've seen some 5' + stuff, bring out the big boys for that....
  • 6 0
 A lot of debate on the comments is in regards to electric vs non tools. From my experience electric tools are 5x faster in most cases than by hand, but are typically 10x heavier and clunkier to transport. As you get further out on the trails hand tools can be better depending on the amount of work you need to do. Its a case by case basis that I would choose one vs the other. I typically estimate the time it takes me to get out there and how much time it will take for the work I need to do. Whatever I think will get the most done I take.

At the end of the day, I think for most established trails, people carrying loppers and or a silky big boy and spending 30-1hr on a ride clearing trail will be the best in the grand scheme of things. Its cheaper, safer and you can cover more ground.

Here is the comparable hand vs electric in my mind.
Silky Big Boy - 10" Electric Saw
Silky Gomboy - Sawzall (had never thought of this)
Loppers - sawzall
Hedgers - Hedge Trimmer (24") - Telescoping ones are amazing on your back
Nothing beats a gas saw when you need to get the big stuff.
  • 5 0
 Nice! I just went through this conundrum myself a while back too and chose a sawzall instead of a chainsaw. Well, I guess that wasn’t the point of the story; which one to choose, but I figured the sawzall would be more useful overall than a chainsaw might have been. Like for cutting metals or pipes and stuff at home.
Cool article.
  • 3 0
 Sawzall for me too, Great for cutting roots in the dirt, which I have had to do a lot for removing old bushes and small trees in the yard.
  • 1 0
 Been super impressed with my full-size brushless 18V Makita sawzall with 9 & 12" pruning specific blades. Blasts through manzanita, Ceonothus, and up to 20" downed old cedars if I work my way around the trunk
  • 5 0
 All of those recip blades in the pictures are cross cuts, which work fine. But you can get pruning blades for it that go a bit quicker (bigger teeth and less of them). Great for when you're not really worried about making clean cuts.

I still use the chainsaw 99% of the time. But for quick maintenance cutting back bushes and small alder, the recip works pretty well, and it's easier to carry.
  • 1 0
 @toast2266: Yup, I bought a 12" 3 TPI blade to try in a Milwaukee Super Sawzall (corded) that I purchased a few months back. Used it to split a 10" dia x 20" long chunk of Apple wood (seasoned in my garden shed since ~2007) longitudinally. That was a workout!! But I got it done. I don't think any of the higher tooth count blades would have worked for that. The two chunks will eventually be joined, and become a small bench for the front entrance, but the "to do" list is longSmile
  • 5 0
 Not sure it’s wise recommending a top handle saw to amateurs. Much harder to control, particularly one handed as mentioned. They are considered pro-level tools. If you want power go rear handle.
I have 36v Makita, petrol Stihl, Pocket Boy and Big Boy. All have their uses.
  • 2 0
 agreed, top handle is for tiny little trimming at best
  • 5 1
 Your old tools with 18 volt batteries can be upgraded to the far superior 20 volt with an adaptor. If you have a lot of tools already it's a cheap and easy way to upgrade. And never cheap out on blades. Quality blades make all the difference.
  • 7 4
 If you get a high quality gas saw and drain it or use fuel stabilizer when it sits for a while, the maintenance is honestly pretty minor. If someone is buying their first saw, I always recommend gas. Electric saws are nice as a second or third saw but I still don't think they're in a place where they can compete with gas, especially when you look at pricing.
  • 17 0
 For sanctioned trail work, sure, a gas saw is faster and more powerful. But for those of us with less-than-loving landowners, this article is entirely relevant...
  • 3 0
 Not possible everywhere, but I get ethanol free gas and don't have an issue with fuel spoilage.
  • 1 0
 I went the other way when I started out. I got the battery-powered Stihl MSA120 and it was great - light, easy to use, easy to handle and cut pretty well. I was nervous about using a saw and it was so easy to get used to, but I reached the limits of it for cutting firewood and got a bigger petrol saw, and I rarely touch the battery one now. But... I think if you don't live in the backwoods, the little electric one would have been plenty for most people and jobs.
  • 2 0
 My 18" is an 80V electric and there's no way I would trade it for the hell of a two-cycle. I've got a full chisel on that 18" and it always starts because I'm literally just pushing a trigger. I see my neighbor yanking on his gas saw for 20 minutes and giving up.
  • 2 0
 @Yerts: Is that the Kobalt? I got one that was marked down at Lowes and really impressed, probably wouldn't have bought it for full price though.
  • 2 0
 @dirtpedaler: Greenworks Pro 80V 18" Brushless Chainsaw: www.greenworkstools.com/collections/chainsaws/products/pro-80v-cordless-18-inch-chainsaw-2000002

I love mine. It's an absolute beast - you just have to swap out the low profile chain with a full chisel.

Greenworks makes an even burlier commercial version, the 82CS27-4DP 82V 18" 2.7kW Chainsaw.

I'm not going back to gas, but I would not recommend anything under 80V.
  • 5 0
 Another Silky fan here, the BigBoy is a usual daily carry, but also have a PocketBoy 170 and Katanaboy650 in the collection too.
  • 1 0
 Ah I see you have a Silky collection that rivals my own - but to be fair the right tool for the job.

PB130 - almost always carry
PB170 - mandatory carry in spring and autumn
F180 - lives in my guide pack, never leave home without it (or my Felco pruners)
GB300 - post storm carry
  • 5 0
 I’ve got the Ego 56v tools and they’re top notch. I can cut down, delimb, and cut to fire length a 24” plus pine tree on 1 5ah battery. Much preferred over gas
  • 2 0
 Think you just sold me one
  • 7 0
 some of these comments are edgy... most don't reciprocate...
  • 3 0
 Not these little 18v battery things. Electric is all about the battery. You want a proper 56v-60v chainsaw. Ego makes nice ones as do some others. You can ones with a nice brushless motor as well. You'll way more omph if you need it and it'll run for a while.
  • 5 0
 PB Your first paragraph of this article is a joke. A good portion of the trail videos that are viewed on PB are rouge. That you make money from.
  • 3 0
 I use a Husquavarna 455 Rancher and a 372. Take both out, spent about 12 hours this week running them, cut over 1000 trees. Gonna have 3km of 20’ wide swath ready to run an excavator down by next week.

I’ve worn out two chains and two files this week. A gallon of mix and the same amount of bar oil. Always have been curious about electric but if my Alaska sawmill attachment on a 3’ bar won’t fit I probably don’t need it.
  • 2 0
 My friends use the M18 Milwaukee saw with 16” bar. One is a full time trail builder. The only electric saw that guys like and is being used instead of their gas saws.
  • 2 0
 @Jvisscher: The M12 Milwaukee Hatchet limbing saw is also capable beyond its appearance.
  • 2 0
 I have a 455 and use a 362 a bit as well. I also have an 18v milwaukee electric. The electric is awesome for little stuff - is nice to not have to worry about ear pro, and it's surprisingly torquey. That said, for any project where I'm doing a lot of cutting, I don't even think about bringing the electric. It's not even close to matching the performance of a proper gas saw.
  • 1 0
 @toast2266: thanks Toast! Ive been curious. Most of the time I reach for the bigger of my two saws and so an electric wouldn’t cut it for building new trails in thick replanted forests. Maybe for carrying around in the spring to clear windfall on existing trails?
  • 2 0
 @Jvisscher: the thing with the electric is that it's not really any lighter than a gas saw - the batteries are heavy. And the battery doesn't last that long - it's probably equivalent to about half a tank of gas in the 455. If I'm clearing spring blowdown, I still bring the gas saw unless I know ahead of time that there's only a handful of trees to clear.

Personally, I mostly use the electric for projects where (*cough*) discretion is necessary.
  • 1 0
 @Jvisscher: That’s a surprise. Any of the 36v saws from Husky, Stihl, Makita, Ego, etc run circles around the 18v Milwaukee.
  • 5 0
 I know my Makita Sawzall will be able to cut virtually any e-bike I encounter into small, easy to recycle pieces. I recommend carbide tip blades for maximum efficiency.
  • 3 0
 Really?! I mean when you need a chainsaw for trailbuilding, the trail shbe an official one - so you meet bigger tools anyway and are free to use the Saw you like.
For clearing up trails just get a good handsaw. It's light, silent, efficient and it will never leave you with an empty battery (at least the battery is you).
I had a good laugh by reading this though :-)
  • 9 2
 STIHL all the way!
  • 2 0
 high on my list for camping/overlanding
  • 2 0
 Earlier this summer I had to clear a tree that had fallen on a trail. I used a sawzall with a super long blade. Took two trips due to battery crapping out (I even had a larger capacity battery). The tree was about 18" diameter, so wasn't surprised it took so long. A cordless chainsaw would have been preferred and if I did a lot of trail maintenance I would definitely go for that vs a sawzall.
  • 1 0
 My 18V brushless Makita Sawzall with an 12" pruning blade and 4AH battery would easily get that assuming its a softwood tree. I've been using it recently for just that task, doing multiple 10-12" logs and then occasional cut up to 18" with 2 batteries lasting me several trees.
  • 2 0
 The 18V works ok and will get trimming jobs done but you'll never get through a proper hardwood 8" or bigger log/fallen tree. I went from 18V to 40V Ryobi (brushless motor as well) and its significantly more powerful and easily fits in my 22litre POC backpack and sports a 16" bar.
I've cut through many many logs of various sizes which is a problem in Ontario with Emerald Ash borer killing every ash tree.
Most importantly watch some videos on how to keep your blade sharp, it makes a HUGE difference
  • 3 0
 I run over my chain with the round file between each gas up and after each full day with the round file and flat file. Keeps it cutting like butter!
  • 2 0
 I was riding tonight with my old Bahco saw strapped to the top tube with a Back Country Research strap. I've also taken my Dewalt recipro out for some decent sized trees. Couldn't really justify the chainsaw when i bought it.
  • 2 0
 I use a mixture of gas, electric chainsaws and sawsalls here in BC for trail building. I definitely find they all have their place but I must say you are completely accurate in your review and comparisons, especially with the pros and cons of each. I find If the corridor is already cleared and its just cutting back roots, branches and flush cutting the sawsall is incredible, but you definitely are limited with size of cuts and breaking blades. As for the electric chainsaw I've used them mostly for urban projects where sound is an issue and for clearing on rides, especially because you can cut through quite large of logs with them, just using a chunk removal technique, and thats where theyre better than sawsalls. but in the end, I find if i can use a real chainsaw thats what I'll use every time, nothing can compare to the power and efficiency of one
  • 2 0
 I got the Dewalt 20V Brushless Compact because it’s stroke is almost double that of the Dewalt One-Handed sawzall (1.125” vs 0.625”) and from everything I’ve read, the stroke length really affected the cutting speed.
  • 4 0
 Stroke length really does impact the time it takes to get the job done. Lubrication can cut the time down even further in most cases, especially in one-handed applications.
  • 4 0
 @juicebanger: username checks out
  • 1 0
 @DizzyNinja: chubby juice bangin can turn one into a dizzy ninja
  • 4 1
 @ringle79: Yup. Apparently that's why a hand saw is faster than a Sawzall? 13 minute mark youtu.be/lAIXPu-gFNg @Mrchow found this
  • 2 1
 @mobiller: Nothing gets over your head. You're reflexes are too fast and you would catch it.
  • 2 0
 @thustlewhumber: Plus I'm super tall...oh wait I see what you did.

Still, same blade 18 sec by hand with longer stroke vs 57 sec installed in a Sawzall is nuts
  • 2 1
 you can also get a sweet little 4", 6", or 8" hand held electric chainsaw on amazon for under $75 which work great for any small vegetation or small trees around 4"> or less in diameter

www.amazon.com/dp/B0947XLWFW?pd_rd_i=B0947XLWFW&pf_rd_p=b000e0a0-9e93-480f-bf78-a83c8136dfcb&pf_rd_r=5NJ7DK9XV1ZR1GXWYCBQ&pd_rd_wg=LPzCp&pd_rd_w=hdCru&pd_rd_r=e9e05da5-721c-4774-96fc-2902104f53e8
  • 1 0
 A saws all with arbor blades is pretty amazing.

I have a wood/ bone saw that does the trick too. Fold up nicely also.

I’ve never ridden with a power tool in my bag. Clipper, hand saw. Even one of those corded chainsaws does a good job. A boys axe with a hatchet handle is my favorite. I can blast through a lot with it.
  • 1 0
 "batteries and a charger, which aren't included in the listed prices"

Wrong. They're not included only if you intentionally buy a "bare tool", which is a well-known concept in the electric tool world. Doing a "shopping" search for that exact chainsaw, I find both a bare tool and a "starter kit" within the first 4 results.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, and listing rrp for the battery and charger is a bit misleading too. I recently got a brushless combi drill with 2x 5ah batteries and charger for £135 as an introductory offer, which is cheaper than the two batteries separately. Makita (and all other, but especially makita in my experience (in the UK obviously)) are great for package deals and offers where you buy more but get way more.
  • 1 0
 An electric pole saw is generally a better option. Remember riders may be 7+ feet tall while riding and many more while flying. A pole saw takes care of all of that efficiently and quicky. I've had good luck with a cheap ass Ryobi.
  • 2 0
 " If I had a sharp pick mattock with me, I was then obliged to chop out the pungi sticks that I’d left behind."

I think you mean you are obligated to bring something with you to chop out the pungi sticks you left behind.
  • 1 0
 Hedger attachment on my Honda 4stroke trimmer is cheat code for clearing the general path for new trails as well as knocking large amounts of brush back from existing trails. Like others said, can't see how electric could ever replace a gas chainsaw for cleaning downed trees.
  • 2 0
 Hedge trimmer is the way to go for brush. I have an Ego hedge trimmer and a 14' chainsaw. I cleared several acers of heavy brush, which included small trees and black berries with these two tools. If the hedge trimmer could not cut it, I switched to the saw.
  • 2 1
 Echo ms-2511T . Sure, it’s gas but if you run aspen gas and can sharpen a chain it’s essentially maintenance free. Under 6lbs and can cut 20”+ trees with the 12” bar. And 8-10” trees like butter. And your arms will give out before it burns 3/4L of gas. Makes electric saws look like toys. If there isn’t enough to cut for the little echo then a silky will do it.
  • 1 0
 For those who must remain analog. A silky katanaboy will get thru 8” or less in a few minutes and can cut out just about anything with some dedication. Personally I’d prefer a katanaboy over anything but a large chainsaw for a large job as it’s only a couple lbs.
  • 1 0
 I own this reciprocating saw. It is great for plumbing with its short stroke ie cutting copper pipe with metal blade. Look for a Sawzall with a longer stroke legs like the Ryobi or other brand also buy tree pruning blade from scale comes in a 12 inch or 16 inch it’s a tri cut blade and slashes roots and cut through wood faster than any other demo blade and sheds Pulp much easier.
  • 1 0
 I've started leaving my Stihl at home and now I carry a Milwaukee M18 Reciprocating Saw. It's easy to carry a couple of batteries and spare blades and there's no fuel mixing or bar oil to worry about. I'll still carry a saw if I need to clear something big, otherwise it's the Milwaukee.
  • 1 0
 I have the 16" Stihl 220cb battery saw and it's incredible for light bucking, limping etc. I'm curious about the XP line Husqvarna battery saw and the new Stihl coming out as well, I will likely try both just because I love chainsaws.
  • 1 0
 Try using diablo blades in the recip saw. They are so good. I first started using recip saws for trees and brush on bc hydro jobs to get around all the safety forms and fire watch bullshit associated with chainsaws. I was really surprised at how good the recip saw worked!
  • 1 0
 Wrong chainsaw. The Milwaukee small chainsaws have cutting teeth all of the way around. The pictured chainsaw has a traditional chain, not as many cutting teeth. The small Milwaukee hatchet I use regularly to cut thru 12-14” deadfall and others on a regular basis. Can hang off the handlebar as I ride out or pack in a larger mid size hydration pack.
  • 1 0
 I live on a acreage and have cleared land for MotoX use bwith hand tools. A chainsaw is great above ground but it can leave riding surfaces sharp and stumps are a no-no. Once I tried a SawzAll down in the dirt, on roots and leftover small trees I was impressed. Impressed that I found a cutting edge that still worked ! One touch of ground with a chainsaw and it'd "game over man". The SawzAll blade just keeps cutting and cutting (just don't jam the tip too often). You can usually get enough roots cut that you can then pull a stump out.
  • 1 0
 I have a really small 12v draper reciprocating saw and ime on roots and branches it's almost as effective as a bigger saw, it just takes a little longer. But it's tiny by comparison to these larger tools. Brilliant trail tool.
  • 1 0
 Don’t get me wrong, I still loves me a gas saw; I have a couple and there’s no question that they’re the tool for the job when you need to get your lumberjack on! Last year I picked up a Milwaukee 18v saw with a 16” bar and for trail maintenance the ease just can’t be beat! Reasonable light, much more efficient than other non-ice options, and quiet enough to keep the Karens and the Greenies from going ballistic. Definitely makes trail maintenance much more enjoyable
  • 1 0
 Have been using an e sawzall, and chainsaw for years. Just depends on the size of the obstruction. We use the little Milwaukee M12 Fuel chainsaw and it is a worthy tool also. Most happy with my new 8" collapsible spring rake though for the final touches and annoying stick removal.
  • 8 5
 Silky BigBoy and never look back. Would blow either of these out of the water.
  • 5 0
 Silky for the win. I’ve cleared fallen tree trunks as large as 6” diameter using a small silky F180.
  • 4 2
 but you don't want to use a Silky in the dirt... I like loppers but the sawzall would be great for bigger roots.
  • 2 0
 @jaydawg69: I have a pruning blade on a Milwaukee sawzall as well as various wood blades. Unless it's totally dry wood you're cutting, the amount of friction and heat in the blade is incredible - it just chews through batteries.

I mean, there is a time and place for it but then you need a sawzall, chainsaw, hand saw, loppers, etc. ...
  • 2 0
 Exactly. For locations where people will frown at you for trailbuilding a silky saw will work as fast as an electric blue toy.
  • 4 1
 “You can have any tool you want, as long as it’s a Milwaukee” Dominic Torreto
  • 4 0
 Pirate trail builders left the chat at the first paragraph
  • 1 1
 Having cut a lot of brush with both, you're far safer with the reciprocating saw than you are with the chainsaw. Reciprocating tend to have less nose weight, so can be handled with one hand easier and the item you're cutting can be secured with the other hand if need be with less danger. Blades are cheaper and easier to swap.
  • 2 0
 Especially if you are cutting large roots below ground, carbide tipped recip blades are the way to go. For example - diablotools.com/products/DS1203CP
  • 1 0
 Since you front-loaded all that legal-ish crap, you should probably know that "Sawzall" is a Milwaukee trademark. All other brands are "reciprocating saws" or "demolition/demo saws".
  • 3 2
 Check paragraph 4 Wink
  • 2 0
 I rather have the boom stick attachment.

"Alright You Primitive Screw-Heads, You See This? This Is My Boomstick! It's A 12-Gauge Double-Barreled Remington."
  • 1 0
 My crew uses a Milwaukee battery powered saw for small/ single tree jobs. We also cart a farm boss in the truck for larger jobs. They all have their places. I way prefer the electric saw
  • 1 0
 Honestly,if it’s under 4” in diameter than it’s not worth using an electric saw for.

All you need is a big chainsaw and a bush handsaw for lopping trail trees.

The issue is transport to the trail
  • 1 0
 I have the 54v Dewalt chainsaw with the 14" bar. I have cut through fallen trees that are the full width of the bar (and more with 2 cuts). Expensive but you are never left thinking that it isn't up to the job
  • 2 0
 I've been waiting for Ridgid to come out with a chainsaw to mate up to their batteries... Spring 2023 baby!
  • 2 0
 Two tools, each serves its own purpose. Like comparing an All Mountain bike to a DH bike.
  • 4 0
 They're different tools, but more like comparing a Saturn V rocket to a spit ball straw.

Chainsaw will go through an 8" hardwood tree in seconds, a Sawzall never.
  • 1 0
 @ViolaVesperlin: sawzall is for roots
  • 1 0
 I use an 8 inch Ryobi saw here in SoCal without overheating issues, thing is great. I also the Ryobi mini grass sheer/shrubber which compliments the trail work well.
  • 1 0
 2cts, Before starting chopping trees on private properties / forest start cleaning it or cut dangerous part of wood , dead wood but think of what you are doing !!!!
  • 1 0
 A very sharp machete with an 18-20" blade will cut through a 4" diameter branch/tree in one swing. Anything that requires a chainsaw, just use a proper one.
  • 1 0
 Totally depends on what is being cut. The chainsaw works better for bigger branches/lumber and the reciprocating saw works well for smaller branches/lumber.
  • 2 1
 If I ever see one of you toolbags sticking your tiny pansy-ass cordless Sawzall into the twigs on the side of the trail I WILL run you over.
  • 1 0
 Just get a Silky Big Boy and call it a day. Folds up into a pack so you can enjoy a rideAND do some trimming. The cut so well that they may as well have assist.
  • 1 0
 We've been using Makita duc353 for years now, I have to admit I really like that saw! It suitable for 90% of time a chainsaw is needed and battery life (5 and 6Ah) is decent.
  • 2 0
 No thanks. I like my chainsaws to run on 110 Sunoco race fuel mixed with Rock Oil.
  • 1 0
 Nah just use a Silky Gumtree root saw. Way better tool for on the go trail maintenance. They cut extreamly well and you'll save money, pack weight and space aswell
  • 4 1
 No saw no ride
  • 7 9
 LMAO anyone who would prefer a reciprocating saw over any type of chainsaw electric or gas for trail building obviously has never really built trail.

the chainsaw is superior in every way for trailbuiding.

who here has tried to cut down any tree bigger than about 5" in diameter with a sawzall? haha
  • 9 1
 Are you cutting trees down for trail building???
  • 7 0
 I can let a reciprocating saw cut through something in the dirt and not have to sharpen the blade. So yeah, they have their uses.
  • 5 1
 Took the reciprocating saw out a few times to try. Comparing it to a chainsaw is a bit of a joke, they're definitely not in the same category. I just pack larger hand held clippers instead for small stuff now it's faster than reciprocating saw.
  • 3 0
 @Mkrol: Definitely nkty, but some areas have small invasive trees that no land manager will mind being cut. Trees that belong there get routed around always.
  • 4 1
 That's not the point of this article.
  • 2 1
 @Mkrol: Are you not? haha Totally depends on where you live.
  • 1 0
 Mate tried one recently for clearing a large stand of gorse and found it quite effective. He did bend a few blades however... I'm a long-time chainsaw user and probably won't change. I do like the small one-handed chainsaw pruners for small brush work.
  • 1 0
 I got a big fat 36v hitachi sawzall that’ll tear through logs up to about a foot across with a good 3tpi blade fast enough on the quieter slow setting and like the article mentioned you can bring some demlition blades too and saw underground. Not somewhere I’d be poking a chainsaw blade.

I do wonder which is more efficient though?, the chainsaw works in a more mechanically efficient fashion but the sawzall does a thinner cut
  • 1 0
 @Mkrol: yeah in texas we cut down quite a few cedar trees ranging in size. I always avoid cutting oak trees when possible, and when I can just cut off lateral branches rather than the entire tree i'll go that route as well. but cutting trees is often necessary around here. cedar trees have a wide bushy profile
  • 4 2
 Brapppppppppppppppppp! Enough said
  • 5 1
 @ringle79: Then again...hiker Karen/Ken have got law enforcement on speed dial for when they hear that sound.
  • 1 0
 Used to be a Silky fan, they are great, but recently picked up a Komelon flexible blade. Never going back.
  • 1 0
 WHAAAT? Battery power saws? Sheesh, what will they think of next? Battery powered mountain bikes? That would be nuts.
  • 1 1
 The name Sawzall is a trademark of Milwaukee Tool. The proper name is reciprocating saw which refers to all saws of that type regardless of manufacturer.
  • 1 0
 Thank you for your service and undying attention to details that, nobody else cares about
  • 3 4
 Gas Powered FTW.
That Makita chainsaw looks like a cool little ripper though.
Also LOL to that first paragraph. You're whack bud. Big Grin
  • 3 1
 Traded my gas for an electric. Cut great but I was so lazy to carry that heavy saw and gas, now my buddy carries the battery and I carry the saw. Ridiculously light. I've got 3 extra batteries if more people ride up to help too.
  • 2 0
 No Milwaukee, no care
  • 2 0
 As with bikes: N+1
  • 1 0
 Sawzall .... pretty sure it's a rip saw!
  • 1 0
 The Milwaukee M12 hatchet is fantastic for trail clearing.
  • 1 1
 Get a battery powered hedge trimmer... you're welcome.
  • 1 0
 Petrol anything!
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