Transition Smuggler Carbon - Review

Apr 2, 2018
by Mike Kazimer  
Transition completely re-worked their bike lineup for 2018, plunging right into the deep end of the long and slack geometry movement. The Smuggler is no exception, and the result is a 120mm 29er with numbers closer to what you'd expect to see on a longer travel all-mountain rig.

Those slack and long figures are part of what Transition refer to as Speed Balanced Geometry, which involves creating bikes with longer reach numbers, slacker head angles, and reduced offset forks. They're not the only ones trying out geometry numbers that would have been called 'extreme' a few years ago, but the fact that they completely modified all of their existing bike models shows their commitment to the concept.
Transition Smuggler Carbon X01

Intended use: trail / all-mountain
Travel: 120mm rear / 140mm front
Wheel size: 29"
Frame construction: carbon fiber
Head angle: 66º
Chainstay length: 430mm
Colors: Bone Grey, Gunsmoke Blue
Sizes: S, M, L, XL
Weight: 29.25 lb (13.27 kg) - size large, w/o pedals
Price: $5,999 USD. Frame only: $2,999 USD
More info: transitionbikes.com

It's the recently released carbon Smuggler that's reviewed here, which retails for $5,999 USD. Equipped with Transition's X01 build kit the spec includes, as you'd expect, a SRAM Eagle X01 12-speed drivetrain, Guide RSC brakes, alloy e*thirteen TRS+ wheelset, a Fox Float DPS shock, and a 140mm Float 34 up front. There's also a GX model that retails for $4,999, along with complete aluminum models that start at $2,999.


bigquotesThis isn't your usual short-travel trail bike - the Smuggler's geometry allows it to shine in terrain typically reserved for longer-travel machines. Mike Kazimer





Transition Smuggler review


Construction and Features

The Smuggler's full carbon frame has a low-key look to it – there's no retina-searing paint job, no wild linkage design, just a clean, straightforward aesthetic. It might not be the flashiest bike on the block, but it does check most of the boxes in the must-have features department. There's internal cable routing where it makes sense, a threaded bottom bracket, Boost spacing, and molded downtube and chainstay protection. Thirsty? There's also room to carry a full-size water bottle on the Smuggler inside the front triangle, exactly where it belongs.

The one fly in the ointment is the lack of rear tire clearance – when Transition say that a 2.3” tire is the maximum recommended size they're not kidding. It's the brace between the seatstays that's the culprit here – it sits a little too low for meatier rubber to fit.


Transition Smuggler review
The derailleur and dropper housing are internally routed, while the brake line runs along the exterior of the frame.
Transition Smuggler carbon review
The recommended amount of sag is printed on the rocker link to simplify setup. Our test bike had an alloy rocker, but all current production models use a carbon link.


Transition Smuggler carbon review
Where's the clearance, Clarence? There's not much room to spare, even with a 2.3" Minion DHR II.
Transition Smuggler carbon review
A threaded bottom bracket is always a welcome sight. Multiple muddy rides wore the paint off the frame just above the brake line - a bit of mastic tape would be a good idea there.


Geometry & Sizing

Transition 2018


The geometry numbers on the previous Smuggler weren't exactly dated, but Transition wanted to push things even further by applying their Speed Based Geometry (SBG) to this short-travel ripper. That means the reach on a size large has increased from 457mm up to 475mm, the seat tube angle was steepened from 74.9° to 75.8°, and the head angle was slackened to 66°, down from 67.5°. All of those changes add up to create a bike with a wheelbase that's 25mm longer than the prior version.

There's also a reduced offset fork – our review bike was spec'd with a Fox 34 Float with 44mm of offset, compared to the 51mm of offset that, until recently, was the norm for 29ers. That reduced offset increases the bike's trail number, which, in conjunction with the slacker head angle, is meant to increase its stability at speed.


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Suspension Design

The Smuggler's suspension layout is Transition's take on the tried-and-true Horst Link suspension design. Anti-squat numbers hover around 100% at the sag point, and the bike has a slightly progressive suspension curve to help keep it from gobbling up those 120 millimeters of travel too quickly.


Specifications

Specifications
Price $5999
Travel 120mm
Rear Shock Fox DPS Performance Elite
Fork Fox 34 Float Fit 4 Performance Elite 140mm
Cassette SRAM XG 1275 (10-50t)
Crankarms SRAM Descendent Carbon, 170mm
Rear Derailleur SRAM XO1 Eagle
Chain SRAM GX Eagle
Shifter Pods SRAM XO1 Eagle
Handlebar RaceFace Turbine R 35 800mm
Stem RaceFace Turbine R 35 (40mm)
Grips ODI Elite Flow
Brakes SRAM Guide RSC
Wheelset E*Thirteen TRS+
Rim E*Thirteen TRS+ 30mm
Tires Maxxis Minion DHF / DHR II 2.3 EXO 3C
Seat ANVL Forge Stealth Cromo
Seatpost RockShox Reverb Stealth 1x Remote



Transition Smuggler review







Test Bike Setup

It used to be that nearly every bike that came in for review, especially the shorter travel models, had a stem that was too long and bars that were too narrow for my liking. Thankfully, that's no longer the case, and the Smuggler is a prime example. It comes with 800mm wide bars (which I trimmed down to 780mm) and a 40mm stem that remained in place for the duration of the test.

Transition have printed a sag reference guide on the Smuggler's rocker link – a handy feature that makes it easy to quickly get the bike dialed in and ready to roll. Based on those numbers I started out with 16mm of sag, or 32% of the shock's total stroke. After some experimentation, I settled on running 14mm, or 28% sag. That created a slightly firmer ride, but it never felt harsh or jarring, and I didn't bottom out the suspension as much with that air pressure. The Smuggler comes with a red, 0.95" spacer already in place in the shock's air spring in order to provide the most end-stroke ramp up possible - which is a good move, considering the way this bike makes you want to ride.
Mike Kazimer
Mike Kazimer
Location: Bellingham, WA, USA
Age: 35
Height: 5'11"
Inseam: 33"
Weight: 160 lbs
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Instagram: @mikekazimer

My time on the Smuggler corresponded with the wettest (and coldest) part of the winter in Bellingham, Washington, which meant that it was subjected to plenty of rainy rides, with some ice and snow added into the mix.


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Climbing

I was a little concerned that the Smuggler was going to ride like a mini-Sentinel - a short-travel bike with the climbing chops of a downhill sled. Luckily, those fears were unfounded, and it only took one lap on a technical XC loop full of awkward, punchy climbs to realize that the Smuggler was an entirely different beast.

It had a livelier, more energetic nature than I'd expected, which made tricky climbs entertaining skills testers, rather than something to dread. At 5' 11", the size large Smuggler was a perfect fit. I never felt too hunched over while climbing, and I didn't have any trouble shifting my weight where it was needed to maintain traction. Even with that slack head angle and reduced offset, there wasn't any unwanted front end wandering. If anything, there was more stability, which meant that less effort was required to keep the front wheel where I wanted it. Riders coming from more traditional XC bikes will likely notice the slightly subdued handling, but it doesn't take long to get used to, and those who are accustomed to pedaling longer travel all-mountain / enduro bikes around will feel right at home.


Transition Smuggler review


For smoother sections of trail, I typically flipped the Float DPS shock's compression lever into the middle setting for a little more support, and flipped it open for the maximum amount of traction on rougher trails. The Smuggler has a nice and neutral suspension feel when climbing – it's supple enough to track over obstacles and maintain grip without getting hung up or diving too deep into its travel. It's a little less active than a Trek Fuel EX, but it's also not quite as crisp and efficient feeling as what's delivered by the VPP design on a Santa Cruz Tallboy - it falls somewhere in the middle of those two.

At a touch over 29 pounds, the Smuggler isn't wildly obese, but it probably won't fit the bill if you're obsessed with having the lightest bike possible. For me, performance carries more weight than the numbers on the scale, and given the Smuggler's handling on the descents I'm willing to overlook a little extra heft.


Transition Smuggler review


Descending

Back in 2013, it was Kona's Process 111 that really opened my eyes to the fact that a bike's geometry can be more important than the amount of rear travel. Unfortunately, that bike is nowhere to be found in Kona's lineup, but the good news is that Transition have taken that ball and run with it – the Smuggler fits perfectly into the slot vacated by the 111.

The Smuggler is all about fun, first and foremost. It's a bike that encourages its rider to goof off, whether that's by seeing how many mid-trail manuals you can pull, or trying to find out just how hard you can smash into a bermed corner. Sure, you can't go rocketing full blast into a minefield of rocks and expect to come out the other side as easily as you would on an enduro race machine, but that's not what this bike is all about. Instead, it's about finding the bonus lines, the hidden lips and landings that make a familiar trail even more entertaining.


Transition Smuggler review
The Smuggler felt right at home in the steep stuff.


There's a nice blend of stability and snappiness to the Smuggler's handling – on fast, wide open sections of trail it felt extremely stable, without any speed wobbles or twitchiness. Slow things down a bit and it's still nice and maneuverable – its manners are relaxed but not sluggish, which is handy when you're trying to pick your way through an ice and snow covered jumble of off-camber roots. The chainstay length is relatively short, which makes it easy to get that rear wheel around on tighter turn, and contributes to the bikes' peppy nature. Granted, short chainstays aren't always the answer, and in an ideal world their length would vary by frame size, but in this case, that short back end fits well with the Smuggler's intentions.

Of course, there are still limits to what you can get away with when there's only 120mm of rear travel available. Having that 140mm Fox 34 up front does help take the sting out of the bigger impacts, but only to a certain point. In most instances there was plenty of ramp up in the Fox Float shock to avoid any harsh bottom outs, but every once in a while a muted 'thwang' would make it clear that there weren't any more millimeters of squish left, typically after I went a little farther, or landed a little flatter than I probably should have.





Transition Sentinel Carbon Transition photo
Transition Sentinel
Scott Spark 900
Scott Spark 900

How does it compare?

I've had a few people ask me whether they should get a Smuggler or a Sentinel, so we'll start there. There's only 20mm of rear travel difference between the two models, but they have extremely different personalities out on the trail. With its 64-degree head angle, the Sentinel has geometry that's not far off from a DH bike and at slower speeds, particularly when climbing, it can feel a bit cumbersome. That geometry makes sense when you're flying down an extra-gnarly trail, or doing laps in the bike park, but for general all-round riding, I'd steer towards the Smuggler.

The Scott Spark 900 and Transition Smuggler X01 sit in the same price bracket, and are both designed to be competent all-round trail bikes with 120mm of rear travel, but they tackle the same goal from different angles. Think of it this way - if they were both invited to a party, the Spark would show up at precisely the right time with a carefully selected platter of cheese and the correct wine to go with it, while the Smuggler would kick the door down an hour late with a half rack of Icehouse under each arm.

The Spark comes with a 70mm stem, narrow(ish) bars, and has a handlebar mounted lockout lever that controls the 120mm fork and shock and stem at the same time, while the Smuggler has a wide bar, short stem, and a 140mm fork up front. The Spark has the edge on the Smuggler when it comes to weight, but the Smuggler's steeper seat angle makes those long climbs more comfortable, extra heft be damned.

On the descents, the difference isn't quite as dramatic, although the Smuggler does encourage a rowdier riding style than the Spark. The Spark is a trail bike, with a capital T, and the Smuggler is an all-mountain machine that's been squeezed into a shorter-travel package. They both have an admirable amount of stability when you take into consideration the amount of available travel, but the Smuggler's longer wheelbase and slacker head angle make it easier to drop into steep sections without a second thought.


Transition Smuggler carbon review
Everbody's different, but the ANVL saddle worked well for me.
Transition Smuggler review
SRAM's Guide RSC brakes were trouble free for the duration of testing.


Technical Report

SRAM Guide RSC brakes: It's always nice to see the RSC version of SRAM's Guide brakes versus the R models – I'm picky about where my brake levers sit and how they feel, and that pad contact point adjust allowed me to get the levers set just the way I wanted. I did find myself wondering how the Smuggler would feel with a set of Code brakes instead. That might seem like overkill, but I've been spending time on bikes with Codes lately, and I've come to prefer the extra power and firmer lever feel versus the Guide brakes. If anything, that's a testament to the type of trails the Smuggler encourages you to ride.

Maxxis 2.3” DHF / DHR II: It's tough to go wrong with the classic DHF / DHR II combo, but I do wish the Smuggler had room for a wider rear tire. Wider tires provide a little extra cushion, cushioning that can be a big help on a shorter travel rig – I bet this thing would be a riot with a set of 2.6” tires front and rear, but unfortunately, that's simply not possible.

ANVL Saddle: Seats are about as personal of a preference as it gets, but I'm a fan of the ANVL saddle. It's not overly bulky, there aren't any unnecessarily pointy edges, and more than anything, it's super comfortable.


Transition Smuggler review


Pros

+ Extremely fun, energetic ride
+ Well thought-out geometry
+ Threaded BB, room for a water bottle
Cons

- Not the lightest option in this category
- Limited rear tire clearance
- Aggressive riders may need to run less sag to avoid bottoming out

Is this the bike for you?

The Smuggler is a trail bike for riders looking for something a little different, and are up for the challenge of navigating tricky trails with a little less travel. If fun is high on your list of must-have ride characteristics, the Smuggler delivers. Full-on XC racers and anyone training for the next Red Bull Rampage should probably turn their gaze elsewhere, but for everyone else, the Smuggler is worth a look.



Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesTransition's Smuggler isn't easily categorized, and that's part of what makes it so appealing. Shorter travel 29ers have progressed rapidly over the last few years, and this bike is a prime example of what's possible with good geometry numbers and a refined suspension design. The limited rear tire clearance is a bit of a bummer, but that detail aside, the Smuggler is one entertaining ride. Mike Kazimer








Homepage thumbnail image: Skye Schillhammer


207 Comments

  • 133 9
 Seriously only just clears a 2.3 Maxxis? That's ridiculous.
  • 41 11
 So dumb...ESPECIALLY since the dang thing was designed here in the PNW!!!?? What the heck...who wants a 2.3 tire on a wet, rooty spring day like today?
  • 19 82
flag PHeller (Apr 2, 2018 at 9:11) (Below Threshold)
 Manufacturers are still limiting tire clearance as a way of preventing misuse. Equipped with 2.5 tires you may be inclined to get TOO rowdy and break the frame.
  • 26 1
 @PHeller: is that true, or just conspiracy theory?
  • 18 1
 I run 2.3s on my XC bike LOL.
  • 6 1
 For summer onlyFrown
  • 9 0
 Looks like a 2.35 Hans Dampf will not fit... that’s a shame
  • 26 0
 So, it won't climb like a goat? I just won't buy it!
  • 7 3
 Yep. 2.6" Maxxis tire on my 275 trailbike were a game changer. Wouldn't get a trail bike that couldn't take bigger rubber.
  • 3 0
 @PHeller: If that’s the case then they should have limited the weight, too.
  • 20 4
 I stopped reading after the 2.3" Maxxis tire clearance was noted in the review. WTF???
  • 4 0
 I had one of the early Commencal Meta 29er’s and it would hardly clear a 2.2. Had to run xc tires, was super annoying. The wheels had to be running dead true as well.
  • 150 6
 Being of Asian descent, I don't have a need for bigger rubber.
  • 1 7
flag tomatokamryd (Apr 2, 2018 at 11:23) (Below Threshold)
 ..
  • 5 1
 @hamncheez: yeah same here, I'm more of a Pivot Mach 4 kind of guy.
  • 6 0
 while i totally agree, i'm 99% sure you could fit a 2.4 DHR back there. i can on my OG Smuggler from 2015 no problem and it's a bit tighter than this. if occasional rubbing or rocks in treads wearing paint bugs you, maybe not. it doesn't bother me. 2.4 with huck norris and i get a fairly cushioned ride and great traction.
  • 15 2
 @jamesbrant: things must be pretty tight if you can only fit 2.4 inches 'back there'
  • 39 4
 A few years ago I found nobody wanted anything wider than 2.3 due to the slow rolling and super heavy rubber. I can't imagine spinning a 2.6 on climbs all day. I think the 2.3 out back is ideal for what I ride, so not a deal breaker for me.
  • 2 1
 @jamesbrant: you shouldn't even have to deal with that headache tho if you're purchasingthis thing new!
  • 7 2
 @gbeaks33: Same here. Shooting running 2.35 DHR II’s on my Scout and have never found myself wanting anything bigger.
  • 3 2
 Switch it over to 27.5+ and I bet you can fit 2.8's in there.
  • 10 5
 @gbeaks33: Exactly..... So many people complaining that actually would be better riders if they weren't on gigantic tires all the time.
  • 2 0
 @mindmap3: but would that 2.35 fit? I guess maxxis always runs narrower than advertised. Possibly the only time that would be considered a good tilting.
  • 1 0
 Edit. *a good thing.
  • 8 4
 Do you really ride 2.5" on a short travel 29er?
  • 4 1
 @High-Life: I do on the front tire on my Jeffsy but def not in the back.
  • 15 0
 @High-Life: Sure do. Have a DHF 2.5 on the front and a Aggressor 2.5 on the rear, cuz I like to party.
  • 11 8
 @gbeaks33: My Patrol came stock with 2.3 front and rear. Originally I was planning on putting on wider tires but the performance from the DHF and DHR combined with the super supple suspension meant that I don't really need the extra girth. I now feel that a bike shouldn't need large tires to compensate for poor suspension performance!
  • 5 17
flag ilovedust (Apr 2, 2018 at 15:20) (Below Threshold)
 I stopped reading when i saw that it had no tyre clearance.
Whats the point in that? Road bike with suspension
  • 2 0
 @High-Life: WT tires on my 120mm bike
  • 8 0
 @MrFogg: I'm using the same rationalization for my Process 111. The chainstay bridge on that is awfully tight, and my 2.3 DHR sure seems to have rubbed the pain right off it (big rider, so I'm guessing there's a bit of wheel flex happening on occasion). But hey, I didn't really want to dabble in wider tires anyway. Plus if you just use a beefier tire up front so your front wheel doesn't wash out, then a bit of oversteer makes for good roosting, right?
  • 9 0
 Running 2.4WT DHR2 on 30mm internal width rims on my 2018 Alloy Smuggler. No problems with that set up over the past 6 weeks.
  • 3 2
 @OperateEng: “If fun is high on your priority list” or “riders looking for a fun bike” is the new “climbs like a goat and descends like a dh bike”. Who, exactly, looks for something that is not fun when they’re buying a bike?
  • 5 2
 @SlodownU: Racers who are looking for a 'fast' bike not a 'fun' bike?
  • 3 0
 @High-Life: it's for mud clearance as well.
  • 4 0
 I fucking love Icehouse. I'm buying this bike.
  • 5 2
 @kingtut87: Oh give me a break, I can’t believe you all buy this horse shit. And which 160mm bike is “not fun”? Just stop.
  • 3 0
 @SlodownU: If they're "not fun" you're doing it wrong and you should take all your lycra out of the closet and go back to the road.
  • 7 0
 I have the 2018 smuggler alloy version with a Maxxis Aggressor 2.5 WT mounted to E-Thirteen 31mm internal rims on the rear and clearance is just fine. Now its the alloy version and maybe on a prime muddy day it may get a bit clogged but all others its just fine.
  • 2 0
 @Urbanriding: Cheers for that. I would get the metal version if I were buying so its good to hear it has a bit more clearance.
  • 1 2
 @SlodownU: Ever ridden the 2016 Marin Attack Trail? The most uninspiring bike I've ridden. Not a particularly bad bike, not a great bike, but very dull.

Never mind the fact the 'fun' is subjective most of the time. Compare a Norco Aurum against a Scott Gambler. One is more 'fun' that the other. Or at least I found them that way.
  • 1 0
 @vunugu: same bike, no problem here with 2.4 Ardent rear, Rekon 2.6 front, Flow S1 wheelset!
  • 56 8
 Transition must abandon the LRTCS system. But I hop they keep AHAFMP**

*Limited Rear Tire Clearance System system.
** Attempted Humorus Acronym For Marketing Purposes
  • 12 0
 Who can forget the Cock and Balls technology?
  • 11 1
 @Boardlife69: and T.I.T.S.
  • 39 1
 I have a 2018 alloy Smugler that I built frame up with all the overkill parts one could desire - including a coil in the back, 145mm lyrik, Hope v4 brakes, and 2.5/2.4WT minions (alloy has clearance for a 2.4). It weighs a hell of a lot (over 34lbs), but I've never enjoyed riding a bike as much as this one. You won't be setting any PRs on the climbs, but I find myself riding noticeably faster than my previous enduro machine (2017 Slash), while having much more fun ...Transition, I couldn't agree more, this bike parties!
  • 3 0
 Most times less is more
  • 1 0
 hey i'm considering going for a carbon smuggler over my trek slash 2017, any pros/cons? I am an aggressive rider, but I dont seem to bottom out the lyrik on my slash.
  • 2 0
 @yahav91: I'm also a pretty agressive rider too, and I love it. I am a strong believer in less is more. I'd rather have a capable shorter travel bike than an enduro monster 99% of the time. I feel more confident riding this bike than I ever did on my slash, everywhere. I think the coil shock plays a part in this, because it tracks the ground unbelievably well. I went from an XL slash to an L Smuggler and the sizing is perfect now, and the bike feels more playful (I'm usually right in between). Other pros, this bike is more fun when the ground levels out a bit. Steeper HT angle wanders a fair bit less on the climbs, but leaves nothing to be desired going downhill. Main Con: This thing is heavy, I do notice the weight over my slash - but the carbon frame would help a lot. Overall, I am very happy that I made the switch. Hope that helps!
  • 3 0
 How'd you get a 145mm lyrik air spring?
  • 1 0
 @j-t-g: Extend the thread then cut the shaft down.
  • 1 0
 @j-t-g: A little custom machining by Fluid Function in Squamish.
  • 1 0
 @i-ride-on-dirt:
Couldn't agree more.
I went from a Prime to a Carbine 29c and back to a Prime.
With a CCILCoil its all I could really need.
  • 25 2
 It is great to see this geo trickling down to shorter travel rigs. This bike looks like it would be a riot to ride in most situations/locations.
  • 12 24
flag jclnv (Apr 2, 2018 at 9:27) (Below Threshold)
 Shame is isn't a couple pounds lighter. Transitions are boat anchors.
  • 4 1
 @jclnv:

Agree that the alu models are boat anchors.

But 29# and change for an aggressive trail bike made for jumping and taking a beating?

Sounds good to me. I've never had an aggro trail bike that was under 30 lbs. This ain't no Tallboy or sb4.5.

Throw your carbon wheelset on it and shred, bro.
  • 10 9
 @jclnv: I remember the good old days around 2008-2010 when you whined about the weight of the bike and most people told you to eat less crap, exercise and take a sht before the ride. I got laughed at for saying I want air sprung fork to cut the weight. But today brother buys carbon frame and you just don't want to hurt his feelings when he asks you which carbon bar to buy... he spent so much money on it, you just don't want to cross his heart. Like a child who's dog's been splashed by a car and but he doesn't know it yet, you just tell him it's lost and will surely be back next week...
  • 1 1
 @WasatchEnduro: I guess weight isn't everything, though my wife's small carbon Spicy weighs slightly less than this, and my medium 2015 enduro expert weighs 1/2 a pound less. Both 160/165mm travel and cost around the same. Maybe a 120mm bike doesn't need to be quite so burly, or maybe I'll end up snapping my rig, not sure where the sweet spot is.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: yes ,good old days , but not quite as good as these days
  • 2 1
 @WasatchEnduro: I bet you a Scott Genius, for example, is stiffer than this bike, has 150mm travel and it's 1.5lbs lighter (frame and all hardware).
  • 11 4
 @jclnv: if you have issues with stiffness of any +2kg carbon frame, you have to read "The Princess and the pea". Or lose 50-80lbs. This isn't 2004 Bullit with Dorado.
  • 7 0
 @jclnv: you probably are just weak bro. My tranny rips. No carbon in sight.
  • 15 0
 @jclnv: scotts are for dorks
  • 1 1
 @jclnv:

true that jc and i like the new Genius.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: lol perfect
  • 1 0
 @catweasel:

That's a nice weight on the enduro, weaslycat.

That is a size smaller than this tho, and if you're rocking smaller wheels then you've got a weight savings in the wheels and tires too. For me if I'm under 30 on an aggro 120 up to a 160 bike I'd be very happy. Either way it would be setup with properly strong wheels and tires at the expense of weight.

Curious about your enduro setup.
  • 2 0
 @WasatchEnduro: 15 Carbon Expert stock no pedals in the shop weighed 28.5lbs, it's probably a little heavier now with a 2.5 minnion/aggressor. My buddy had a 15 S-Works with an ohlins coil in the store at the same time which weighed a little over 29lbs with pedals, and another friend who has a 16 S-Works with carbon wheels and that weighs 27lbs stock. All these are mediums. The 2017-18 are heavier, I guess they beefed them up a little, but I'm 140lbs so not too worried.
  • 4 0
 @catweasel: ahhhh now i get. When you weigh 140 pounds you actually weigh your bike cause when it weighs a 1/4 what you do, its relevant Smile
  • 4 0
 @pargolf8: more weight = new trend. Tired of dishing out warranties to make the lightest bike. Wait for it 321 now
  • 2 0
 @pargolf8: You are probably right there, makes more difference to us flyweights. Mainly like having a slightly lighter bike so it doesn't suck balls if I just want to do some mileage, though 30lbs is fine really. We have an LBS owner who loves weighing stuff, has a spring balance in the middle of the shop floor and will throw anything in the shop up there if you ask.
@Soilsledding: Agreed, probably no bad thing, nobody wants a broken bike, though as I said before where is the sweet spot?
  • 21 2
 "Think of it this way - if they were both invited to a party, the Spark would show up at precisely the right time with a carefully selected platter of cheese and the correct wine to go with it, while the Smuggler would kick the door down an hour late with a half rack of Icehouse under each arm."

Top shelf comparo, @mikekazimer.
  • 7 1
 Then an Unno Dash would be showing up an hour and a half late with four growlers of local double IPA, a bottle of fine whiskey and some local artisanal pickles and grassfed beef dry sausage - but only if your party is really dope.
  • 4 0
 Don't know about that - Transition has their own namesake Party in the Woods IPA on tap at Kulshan. Icehouse and its ilk just don't seem to really go with that theme.
  • 7 0
 Which bike turns up and fixes my door?
  • 16 0
 Seems this bikes matches up with Guerrilla Gravity’s trail pistol. Would love to see a comparison of those though. Another heavy hitting mid travel 29ers with similar amounts of travel. Seems that a lot of people forget about that as a comparable. And a Smash vs Sentinel would be good as well.
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer What are your thoughts?
  • 14 0
 @rbbrandon23, that Smash is definitely on our list of bikes to check out - stay tuned.
  • 4 2
 @mikekazimer: Would Knollys first go at a 29r “The Fugitive” which looks on paper to match up very closely geometry wise to the Smuggler also be on your review list soon? Would be very interested in how it stacks up.
  • 7 2
 @Prh, yes, those are scheduled to become available a little later this year, and I'm planning on spending some time on one as soon as I can.
  • 7 4
 Actually the best comparison would have been the Following MB.
  • 4 1
 I think later in the year a short travel, fun 29er shootout is in order
  • 2 0
 @tim-from-pa: this would be relevant to my interests.

I was up in the air between a GG trail pistol and the sbg smuggler. I ended up going with the smuggler just because I was able to ride one and loved it. Would be awesome to see how it compares to the trial pistol and other 120ish mm 29ers.
  • 22 10
 I love the Bone look here...geez, one of the best looking bikes I've ever seen. I'd have called it the "Bone Tomahawk" for sure (awesome Horror movie). Not sure the Spark is the best comparison, but regardless it'd be nice to see how it does against bikes the masses care about and know about like the Following, Hightower, etc.

That being said, why would I buy this over a Rocky Mountain Instinct?? The RM will pedal about the same (transition is known for poor pedaling), have more rear travel (140mm), shorter wheelbase, longer top tube, Ride9 Adjustable Geo/Fit/Progression, fits 2.6 tires, can run 650b plus setup, can run as BC 155m/160mm bike!, isn't sluggish, has same nice STA, is about a 1lb lighter, etc etc.

I also think they should point out the weak X01 spec in that is has a GX cassette with the pins in it and NOT X01 cranks (descendants aren't all that great and are heavy)...only the heaviest and most expensive parts lol.

Beautiful bike tho, I just think other companies have made this same bike but even better.
  • 10 1
 Great point on the cassette. Everyone cuts corners with spec. the GX cassette is really annoying - do they think I'm that dumb that I won't notice or care when I'm dropping six grand?

Transition is no better or no worse than anyone else when it comes to screwing you on the factory build.
  • 13 1
 Not sure why you think you can say other bike companies have made the same bike but only better when you haven't even ridden the bike. You can look at geo numbers all you want but until you've tried them on the trail and seen how the numbers actually interact with each other and how the suspension feels you'll never know.

As far as the instinct goes it's a matter of personal preference. Sure the Rocky has a longer top tube but transition has a much longer reach and much steeper seat tube angle which will give it a much different feel.

I'd say it's not about being better bikes out there but because there are so many good bikes out there now it's about choosing the best bike for how you ride. Are you more into doing long rides and sticking to mellow trails? Are you more about getting to the top as fast as possible so you can shred down? Do you love to do everything and want a bike that can still shred as hard as possible and get rowdy when you want yet be an efficient peddler and keep up on the mellow trails? It's a wonderful thing now you can pick a bike for your personal needs. Transition typically makes bikes for people that like to get rowdy, this still fits the mold.
  • 8 4
 @ihatetomatoes: BS...Instinct has ride9 adjustments that change the HTA, STA, Shock Progression and Reach in abouut 5 minutes. So the Instinct can be setup with an even steeper STA than the Smuggler and with only 4mm less reach.

Regardless I wasn't talking about the Geo as they are similar (I think Rocky copied much of the Smuggler just like Ibis did with the Ripmo). I was talking about the suspension (I've been on a smuggler), the lack of geo adjustment, and the freaking dumb*** tire clearance for a PNW bike....all in a heavier package with less travel and no plus bike support (let alone options to BC a bike). I mean some of that is pretty significant dude.
  • 19 0
 @Svinyard: I'll give you the tire clearance but no option to "BC" a bike. That's just silly Rocky stuff. The smuggler is already "BC'd" you don't need to buy an $8000 bike like Rocky to get the "BC" edition.

As far as Geo....You off. In the slack Rocky setting with a 66deg head angle you're getting a 74.5deg STA and a 455mm reach. That's way off the Smugglers 75.8deg STA and 475mm reach on a large.

You could put the Rocky in Steep and get an STA of 75.5deg and a reach of 465mm, which is 10mm off Transitions reach but now you have a 67deg head angle and more importantly you're bottom bracket drop is only 23mm now vs the Smugglers 35mm drop. That BBD is going to have a big effect on how the big rides. You're not going to be able to set up the Rocky have the same feel as the Smuggler.

I'm not trying to shit on the Rocky, I know lots of guys that ride them but the Smuggler is a different bike and to say it's not good because it doesn't have geo adjustment (don't need it when the geo is right, every Rocky Rider I know just puts it in slack and leaves it), has less travel and can't "BC" it is just silly. Those who buy it are getting it because it has less travel and want that feel. Want a 140mm bike? Go ahead but it won't have the same feel. Even suggesting that the bike isn't as good because you can get a bike with more travel is just such a silly statement.
  • 3 5
 @ihatetomatoes: I'm not versed enough to dive into the Geo stuff but definitely find value in the Ride9. Its basically like a custom fitment to get your legs properly over the pedals for different body types and also adjustments to the shock progression are cool. Especially if you are really light or heavy...or ride real hard or not. You can't in all honesty saw that one geo is right for everyone...come on dude.

That being said, I'd recommend the new Instinct (or others) over this (assuming you can live without 120mm of travel) because its cheaper, lighter, more versatile and for goodness sake's doesn't have some stupid 2.3 (tight) tire limitations. The tire flaw is enough to make this a hard pass.
  • 9 0
 @Svinyard: No not every geometry is right for everyone but that doesn't mean the Rocky Geometry is right for everyone either, even with the ride 9. If you live where the trails are rowdy or steep then you're going to just put it in the slack mode anyway like every Rocky rider I know so the ride 9 isn't really useful anyway. That doesn't mean the geometry in slack is worse or better than a bike like the Smuggler it's just different and a person can decide whether they like it or not. You like it but that doesn't mean it's right for everyone else.

And the Rocky isn't cheaper. For a Carbon Instinct with Guide R's and a GX drivetrain you're paying $6700. For a Carbon Smuggler with Guide R's and GX drive train you're paying $6450 so the Smuggler is actually cheaper.

You recommend the Rocky because you like it, but everything else you've mentioned is just false, yes the tire clearance is a little goofy but 2.3 tires is probably the most common sized tire that people up here in the PNW ride anyway. It may be a deal breaker for some but lots of people are fine with it.

The Smuggler is going to be an amazing bike for those who want a short travel bike that rips right off the rack with no messing about. The Rocky is an amazing bike for those who want a bit more travel and want some versatility. One isn't better than the other, it's just personal preference.
  • 1 0
 @Svinyard: Maybe it's home field advantage, but there are a lot of happy users of these things here in Bellingham, and we do have our share of mud and greasy roots.
  • 15 1
 The most similar bike to the Smuggler today is the Evil's The Following MB. I'd love to hear how those two stack up comparatively.
  • 2 0
 I'd love to be able to ride these bikes back to back. Same goal in mind of having an efficient trail bike that can still shred on the downs. Transition with the extra long reach SBG tech vs Evil with the more standard long reach but DELTA linkage.
  • 32 1
 it seems like theres some unofficial policy at pinkbike against reviewing Evil bikes
  • 4 0
 @hamncheez: They reviewed the insurgent a few years ago but that's about it. Does seem odd how they have reviewed almost every Transition bike but don't review many Evil's and don't offer up comparisons to Transition when the 2 companies have such similar bike and bike styles. Both from the PNW and make bikes that can get rowdy.
  • 5 1
 A Devinci Django with an angleset would be in the same league as a Smuggler or a Following
  • 7 3
 @hamncheez: The policy is 'pay to play', unofficially of course. Why, PB is a unbiased entity that survives on only providing positive reviews.
  • 2 0
 What about the Ibis Ripley LS?
  • 3 0
 @Happymtbfr: have one, love it. 2017 alloy GX.
  • 13 2
 The Scott Spark is a heavier duty XC bike, comparable to a Ripley IMO, and is not a good comparison for the usual Transition buyer. The new Kona Satori and Evil Following MB would be good counterpoints. The new Smuggler’s limited tire clearance is pretty much unforgivable these days. Maxxis 2.4s will be really tight there, too tight for mud.
  • 9 0
 I have been riding for a really long time and I have had a lot of different bikes. Right now I have an aluminum Sentinel and Smuggler. I ride my Smuggler 95% of the time. I can hesitantly say this is my favorite bike I have ever ridden.
  • 3 0
 I think that short travel aggressive geometry 29ers are indeed the sweet spot for a lot of riders. Rode mine on a pretty beginner-level XC trail this weekend as I was out with my wife for her first trail ride after a broken collar bone. Just enough slope not to have to pedal a whole lot, nothing technical. And found myself enjoying the hell out of it, because the bike was fun to lean into turns and playful enough to mess around with tiny features. A longer travel bike would have been a chore. Slack enough front end and a beefy fork means it's ready to party, but not too much wallowing in its rear travel keeps it fun and playful when not going mach chicken down the gnar. For a one bike quiver, that's a really hard combo to beat.
  • 10 0
 I have the aluminum version. Tire clearance isn't an issue. Must be the weight weenies carbon version. Save a grand and get aluminum.
  • 11 0
 Take notes Kona, bring back the 111
  • 8 0
 Any comparison notes with the original PacNW 120mm trail bike- the Evil Following?
  • 6 4
 kind of laughable that there is no comparison?? Man, I'm newer to the industry and have to say, its shocking how much it seems like every product reviewer (other than Outdoorgearlabs) is little more than a brand ambassador? Its frustrating for those of us who need to buy a bike but struggle to figure out whats what when every bike seems to climb great and decent great regardless of travel etc.
  • 6 2
 @Svinyard: In 2018, every bike does climb and descend great.
  • 2 1
 @sorryforss: there’s always room for improvement.
  • 3 5
 @sorryforss: Not true. The guy reviewing the article even said the Sentinal climbed like a DH sled. I'd just like to see some comparisons like Outdoorgearlabs does. Its not even close as to how much better those kind of reviews are (and they keep adding to it). Imagine if this was the quality of a PB review? (Alloy version here)

www.outdoorgearlab.com/reviews/biking/trail-mountain-bike/transition-smuggler-gx-2018
  • 3 1
 @Svinyard: Except they don't review the best bike of them all the Evil Following MB!!!
  • 9 4
 Seems like Transition way underestimated the demand for these because the carbon ones are sold out until some TBD date far in the future. But the good news is Ibis ripped off the geometry and you can get a Ripmo that has a few more mm's of travel in the back.

I rode one and fell in love. Fingers are crossed that it comes in before 2019. First 29er I have enjoyed enough to throw down some money on. I find Transition's whole party/beer/bro vibe insufferable. I have also been riding long enough to remember when the Transition Bandit had a 120% failure rate on the chainstays and while they always took care of them, it always seemed to be after three weeks of pestering them and a conversation with someone at Transition HQ where they wasted ten minutes of you time talking about an awesome riding trip they were just on. (cool and all but where are my warranty parts!)

this bike is legit.
  • 1 0
 Exactly. I've been checking for a while and they never seem to have carbon bikes available on their website.
  • 1 0
 Transition had a next day turnaround for me when I pulled a brake tab off my Patrol, so I suspect they've come a ways since they had the Bandit.
  • 5 0
 The Smuggler seems a great bike! Thanks for providing the comparisons to the Sentinel and the Spark. The Smuggler seems to share a lot of the characteristics of my (stolen) Tallboy LTc, and the new Fuel EX 9.8 that I replaced it with (I increased the front fork travel to 140 mm). You mentioned these bikes, too. Perhaps a "shoot out" is in order, the kind they are so fond of in Dirt Bike and Motocross Action. Thanks.
  • 1 0
 Vital just did a killer 29" comparison review
  • 5 0
 This bike has everything i’m Looking for - minus the price.
I feel like a couple years back it wasn’t impossible to find a new alum frame with a proper fork (pike, 34, etc.) for less than 4000 Canadian Pesos. Giant Reign 2 comes to mind, or the old Reign SX.
It’s getting harder and harder not to look strictly at direct to consumer brands, even with that weird mix of guilt and shame I would feel going riding with the local shop owners afterwards.
  • 3 4
 Ya unfortunately you'll never get the most bang for your buck with smaller companies like Transition. If you're on a budget but still want good components you kinda have to stick with the big brands. Trek, Giant, Specialized ect..
  • 3 0
 With an angleset + offset bushings, I've bumped my Phantom to 120mm travel and the HA and WB are very close to the Smuggler. That big, sexy wheelbase can get you into speeds that a short-travel bike was never meant to contend with. Its been an interesting experiment. Awesome on smooth/fast stuff, can get you into a lot of trouble in the chunk. Only so much 120mm can handle. If I had a do over, I'd consider more travel to go along with the uber-slackness.
  • 7 4
 reviews are so vanilla and generic on this site. one of the top three PROs is that it has a threaded BB? really?

CON: "not the lightest option" - what DOES the frame weigh? and/or just say it's heavy.

one day manufacturers will realize that the passive aggressive pressure applied to 'journalists' to leave non-critical product reviews means said outlets lose credibility, so that when you actually DO have a segment-leading product - noone believes it, because everything is so hyped.
  • 3 3
 PB is big enough to not need to pander to MFG. I also lament this.
  • 3 0
 @Svinyard: really? think again..
  • 5 1
 @mm732, I like to think I covered most of the bases in this review, but if you have a specific question about how the bike handles, or a detail that I overlooked, I'm all ears.

This quote from the review goes into the bike's weight a little further: "At a touch over 29 pounds, the Smuggler isn't wildly obese, but it probably won't fit the bill if you're obsessed with having the lightest bike possible. For me, performance carries more weight than the numbers on the scale, and given the Smuggler's handling on the descents I'm willing to overlook a little extra heft."
  • 2 7
flag MX298 (Apr 2, 2018 at 14:31) (Below Threshold)
 @Svinyard: check where the manufacturer and reviewer live. . . . . . . Pandering is putting it lightly!
  • 5 1
 @MX298, have you ridden the new Smuggler? This review would read exactly the same even if Transition were located in Novosibirsk, Siberia.
  • 4 0
 @mikekazimer: So Mike how does it compare to the original Smuggler? Have the geo changes changed the character, increased the capabilities ? I have a 2016 with a 140mm fork and it is a really great bike in a wide range of situations but is the geometry change offer enough reason to change the for me to change my frame and fork package?
  • 2 0
 @NorthernIron: here is the (good) advice transition guys would give you. "You like your 2016 smuggler ? Then keep riding it til it breaks, and only then you buy a new smuggler"
  • 5 1
 I have a 2016 Smuggler and am still blown away on what it can do. I just hope I break it now so I can upgrade to this new carbon frame.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer you mention the Process 111. Any chance you could compare the two a little? I suspect the Smuggler wins with respect to high speed stability on the downs, whereas the process is more maneuverable uphill? Would you consider the Smuggler an upgrade over the old Process? I am currently riding an 2014 XL 111 and could do with just a bit bigger bike (more reach and stack - I'm 6-4) but would like to maintain the general characteristics of my bike but I am unsure if the new Smuggler will make a real difference... thanks!
  • 4 0
 Wow mikes best dressed mountain biker I have ever seen, where's that attire available?
  • 6 0
 @thekaiser, no way - you're not going to catch me in a Walmart. Goodwill is the way to go.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: not gonna lie, i thought this was mike using two accounts to shit on himself... either way, well played.
  • 1 0
 @thekaiser: The shirt is awesome and what a price cant find one in uk
  • 2 2
 OK but who the hell goes for a XC ride on an XC bike in jeans and a flannel?
  • 4 0
 @tcmtnbikr: the smuggler is not an xc bike lol
  • 2 0
 @tcmtnbikr: Folks trying to sell you the XC bike.
  • 3 2
 My 2017 Smuggler is my go to trail bike. It can handle so much more than you would expect. This new model looks better in every way. I am a bit skeptical of the slack head angle but I guess I need to ride it. Going to Peru soon and I am torn between bringing my Smuggler or my soon to be delivered 2018 Capra 29.
  • 4 0
 "If fun is high on your list of must-have ride characteristics...."

If fun is NOT high on your list you're doing it wrong!
  • 4 0
 Nice bike, typical review. $3000 frame...priceless. Come on Commencal, where is your new 29er mid travel already?
  • 3 0
 I'd like to see more than one reviewer giver his/her take on a bike like this. I think Kazimer and Levy should weigh in on each other's reviews
  • 1 0
 So SBG is supposed to improve handling at speed and cornering, but what impact does it have on slow speed riding? Did you notice any downsides to the way it handles on slower technical terrain?

I thought one of the reasons offsets were extended a while ago was because it helped the bike handle better at slower speeds, but the geometry then was considerably shorter/less aggressive, so I'm wondering how slower speed stuff handles with short offsets but long geo.
  • 2 1
 This frame stinks.my mates first ride out and the paint has chipped in half a dozen places just by liitle pieces of gravel being thrown up. The inside of the chainstays has been worn right through on either side because of the lack of tyre clearance. The bike looks tatty already so I dread to think whats its going to look like further down the line. The bike has been returned to the dealer and waiting for Transition to make a call on it. Me personally, I would want my money back. Summary... Terrible paint finish and poorly designed rear triangle.
  • 2 0
 Just FYI for those reading this later in 2018, Transition has widened the rear spacing to allow for a 2.4in tire on their carbon frames. Still can't fit that 2.6, but satisfies most 2.3 to 2.4 wide tire options out there.
  • 6 2
 does it climb like a goat??
  • 4 1
 With that clearance, you can forget selling many in the UK!? That's a really bad idea/design!?
  • 2 0
 "bike has a progressive suspension curve to help keep it from gobbling up those 120 millimeters of travel too quickly"

2.5-2.25 isn't what I would call progressive
  • 4 1
 Going out to buy one now!
  • 1 0
 Sounds like transition hit the mark on the right balance of efficiency and fun for most kinds of riding (if you're into the 29 inch thing).
  • 2 0
 Exactly. I just sold my 1st gen Scout, already missing the bike and its only been a month. It was the perfect 27.5 trail ripper that would keep up decently well with Nomads, Capras and such. I have no doubt the new smuggler fits that bill now, except the 27.5 wheel size...
  • 2 0
 @RideTahoe707: I think that bike (Scout) is definitely gonna be one I regret ever selling. Such a rad little bike.
  • 1 0
 @ThomDawson: I sold my 1st gen aluminum Ccout and I still think about it...Moved on to a Carbon Patrol and a Carbon Troy and it's just not the same. I'm selling them for a Calling to hoping to find that magic the Scout had, if the Calling doesn't do it I'm buying a Scout again for sure.
  • 3 0
 I'm hoping Pivot takes the Mach 429 trail in this direction.
  • 3 4
 Oh man, I think that would be killer. I'd like to see that with 130mm of travel in the rear. Everyone seems to be buying these 120mm bikes and wanting to ride them really hard. Its not wrong but with Pivots DWLink I think they could get the same pedal performance as 120 on a 130mm bike today. I'm guessing they wouldn't be dumb enough to only provide 2.3in tire clearance either.
  • 2 0
 @Svinyard: All their new trail/AM bikes have room for 2.6" tires, so they'd do it proper. I've had a Mach 6 carbon on backorder for almost a month.. I'm wondering if I should just cancel it and see what Pivot releases later this month at Sea Otter.
  • 4 1
 Switchblade?

Got one and used to ride 429 Trail.

It's even better and more versatile. Travel doesn't matter (in the negative way) and bike character can be altered from XCish to DH by changing travel in the front, type of shock (DPS or X2) and having 2 sets of tires or wheelsets.
  • 1 0
 @msusic: the Mach 5.5 and Mach 6 are very close as well. I'm thinking they'll do the same with the 429T to bring it in line with the Swithblade.
  • 3 0
 @Trouterspace & @Svinyard I have the Mach 5.5 (previously Bronson, Patrol and a few others). The Bronson I never really got into. Patrol was an awesome bike, but just too much for going up. I really dig the 5.5. I live in Colorado and ride it just as hard as my 150mm bike but it climbs way better.
  • 2 2
 Reall considering going from a Canfield Riot to this Carbon Smuggler. Even though it’s 20mm less in the rear, it seems like I would be gaining a whole lot more in the geo department. Yes?
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer I think you meant "Smuggler" not "Sentinel" in your last paragraph of the Test Bike Setup section.
  • 4 0
 Oops, I sure did - that's been corrected. So many bikes on the brain.
  • 4 1
 When is PB going to put up high resolution pics?
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer Following MB or Smuggler for the win?
  • 3 0
 I haven't had a chance to ride the Following MB yet, which is why there's not a comparison in this review, but I can say that I really like the steeper seat angle on the Smuggler. The Following's definitely in the same class, but on paper it's not quite as long or slack.
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer: Get on it!

I was waiting on the carbon smuggler to build a new bike. Then the Following came out and I nearly pulled the trigger on one. Then I got an amazing deal and built a Trek Remedy.... but my next bike is either going to be a smuggler or a following. If two bikes need to be compared to each other it's those two.
  • 3 0
 @onemanarmy: Yes. How about a Mike vs. Mike, Smuggler vs. Following, Washington state designed 120mm travel showdown? Donuts/celery can be arranged.
  • 2 0
 Be curious to hear thoughts about riding impressions of the offset specifically, for better or worse.
  • 4 2
 It's a shame to see such a finely engineered piece ruined by a poor attention to rear wheel clearance.
  • 1 0
 Smuggler geometry for comparison with whatever you're riding right now... geometrygeeks.bike/bike/transition-smuggler-2018
  • 2 0
 Why not compare two bikes that actually are intended for the same type of riding.
  • 1 0
 So, Mike, did they actually mail it to you or did you just drive over and pick one up? Great bunch of guys there from my experience visiting last year.
  • 1 0
 I Like that Transition stands for but I won't get one until they do something about the durability of their paint. My 2017 Patrol Carbon chipped just looking at it.
  • 3 0
 And the spark found its way into this review....how?
  • 1 0
 FWIW, a Hans Dampf 2.35 fits quite well on the rear of my 2017 Smuggler. Realize, however, I live in SoCal where mud and rain are nearly non-existent.
  • 3 0
 Jeffsy or Smuggler....?
  • 6 1
 Jeffsy, definitely the Jeffsy. It’s the only one I can afford.
  • 4 9
flag Svinyard (Apr 2, 2018 at 8:45) (Below Threshold)
 Instinct for sure. It'll outperform both. This guy below rides nearly every mid-travel 29er. Over 1500miles on them and reviews a lot of these.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=OK6QMSpHuPs
  • 8 0
 Right?!?!

I like The YT but, I also like what-ever Transition has got going on up there in Bellingham. Something about the fact that its not a E-bike is one of their selling features makes me think these guys know what's up.
  • 4 0
 Jeffsy makes financial sense,new bikes are getting to mental prices,looking at a 650 Jeffsy as my next bike over the new Scout
  • 5 0
 I love my Jeffsy. Never ridden a Smuggler. Price was a major factor for me as well. Same spec for ~60% the price of comparable bikes.
  • 2 1
 I'd go for Jeffry, but I may wait for Knolly Fugitive (but annoying 157 rear hub spacing?!?!).
  • 3 0
 @future-primitive: That's what I ended up doing. Al Jeffsy 650 @32lbs with pedals. And 1/3 the price of the carbon reviewed here. It is a blast to ride here in the PNW. loads of travel, great spec and plenty maneuverable in the tricky stuff. But that bone paint job is freaking beautiful
  • 2 0
 The only I would change is a stiffer wheelset on mine.
  • 2 0
 So what type of contraband could one smuggle with such a bicycle?
  • 2 0
 I wouldn't really consider this a short travel rig.
  • 2 3
 Is the clearance for a 2.3 tire because of limitations imposed by Boost 148? Maybe Knolly and Pivot are onto something with 157, because their 29ers have way more rear tire clearance...
  • 7 0
 No, there are plenty of Boost 29ers out there with clearance for 29 x 2.6" tires - it's a design oversight more than anything.
  • 2 1
 @mikekazimer: sometimes I've wondered if its so they don't have dudes running 2.5s, cushcore, and a 150 pike and snapping frames.
  • 5 0
 You can fit 2.6" tires in a Canfield Riot with 16.3" CS and 142mm hubs. A GG Smash will take 2.6" tires with a Boost hub. You don't need 157 hubs to get modest tire clearance.
  • 1 0
 This is one of the best bikes I've ever ridden. I wish I could have them all, but this thing RIPPSPSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS!!!!!!
  • 1 0
 The e13 wheels are absolute trash though. I roached 2 rims in 2 rides, and built a better wheel. Front was fine.
  • 1 0
 Thanks @mikekazimer I’ve been waiting for this review for a while now. Good one.
  • 1 0
 It's cool to see a review video from recent conditions on a local trail. Ripping! ????????
  • 3 2
 SBG is not as stupid sounding as Giddy up geometry.
  • 1 0
 seems to check all the right boxes
  • 1 0
 Hey @mikekazimer will PB be looking at the new Patrol anytime soon?
  • 1 0
 So when is the new Carbon Patrol coming?
  • 1 0
 Maxxis 2.3 tires are like 2.25 of any other brand!
  • 3 3
 I really had no idea how that suspension worked, glad for that video.
  • 2 1
 Jokes aside. If I was buying a complete this would probably be at the top of my list.
  • 2 3
 Heck, I can't even smuggle my little 2.35" to your mom, she requested the 2.5" width. Giddy Up!
  • 1 0
 Looks awesome Smile
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