TranzX Dropper Seatpost - Review

Oct 17, 2017
by Richard Cunningham  
TranzX dropper seatpost



TranzX is a house brand for JD Component Company, who have factories in Taiwan and China that produce a modest range of dropper seatposts. The TranzX model YSP12 reviewed here (which can also be found under the "BrandX" name at Chain Reaction Cycles), came into my hands while testing a series of affordable trail bikes this fall. The bike I was reviewing wasn't equipped with a dropper, so off to my local bike shop I went, where I discovered that I could purchase a 125-millimeter-stroke, internally-routed TranzX post for less than $150.

The TranzX dropper appears to be well made, with a highly-polished, hard-anodized black finish and a RockShox Reverb inspired saddle clamp. Side play was almost nonexistent, and the internals are powered by a replaceable cartridge, which can be pressurized via a Schrader valve hidden beneath the saddle clamp to fine tune its return speed. The TranzX post is machined from 7075 aluminum alloy and weighs 545 grams. Its cable-actuated mechanism is both simple to install and adjust, and two types of remote levers are available: a vertical lever that requires minimal space on the handlebar, and the more conventional paddle lever that you'll see in this review.


TranzX Details:

• Construction: High-strength 7075 aluminum, replaceable cartridge
• Cable-actuated with internal routing
• Stroke: 125 (reviewed), 120, 100, 80mm available
• Sizes: 30.9 and 31.6mm
• Air-adjustable return stroke
• No-set-back, 2-bolt saddle clamp
• Weight: 545 grams
• MSRP: $150 USD
TranzX dropper seatpost


TranzX dropper seatpost
The two-bolt clamp head is similar in function and design to the RockShox Reverb, which is a good thing.


Riding the TranzX Dropper

Before you can ride your new dropper, you'll have to install it. Fortunately, this is an easy proposition. Cable-actuation means that you can either work the cable or the housing through the inside of the frame, which ever is easier. The fixed end of the cable slides into the remote paddle, while the free end is fixed to the post's actuation mechanism by a set-screw-barrel. Set the barrel so there is no free play in the post's actuator lever, tighten the set screw, clip the excess cable, and the hard part is over. I discovered that the TranzX paddle remote lever was a better fit inboard of the brake lever perch and that's where I left it.

On trail, the TranzX post operates smoothly, with a slightly damped return and a similar feel when compressing it to the retracted position. That slow retraction took some getting used to. The Fox Transfer post I had been using previously snapped to its fully bottomed position so easily that the small amount of resistance the TranzX gave me seemed excessive for a couple of rides. Originally, I was going to add some air pressure to the return spring to speed up the post, but that would have increased the retraction effort as well, so I found a pressure that felt balanced in both directions and called it good. Now that I'm used to the sensation, however, I rarely give it a thought.

TranzX dropper seatpost
The TranzX remote paddle tucks inboard of the brake lever.
TranzX dropper seatpost
Tiny threads of the adjustment barrel seem vulnerable in a crash.


As mentioned, there was almost no side-play in the post when I installed it, and that's how it remains after giving it a good thrashing. I am impressed so far, and if the TranzX can survive through the winter season, I'll call it a win. Less impressive, however, is the remote lever. which feels cheaply made, both in its tactile feel and in the way it flexes during operation - but in its defense, it has been functionally reliable and has not required any adjustment or attention since initial setup.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesI am happy to report that the TranzX model YSP12 has not given me any trouble, and that alone elevates it to above-average status. I have no clue whether or not a replacement cartridge could be found if a customer needed one, but considering the post's 150-dollar asking price and quality construction, I'd say the TranzX is a low-risk purchase for a cash-strapped rider who needs a good dropper.RC



122 Comments

  • + 188
 10/10 for finding a decent bargain product!
  • + 96
 This is what pink bike needs more of. The best of the bargain deals. 99.9% of your viewing audience are not world-class Riders. With a world-class budget. We just think we are.
  • + 35
 these guys don’t pay the bills (no ads), so I’d expect these types of reviews to be few and far between. I’m still waiting for a LB carbon rim review. (And I’m half expecting this comment to be deleted)
  • + 14
 @powderturns: theres 100s of rider reviews of lb rims, just because it isnt on a homepage doesnt make it invalid
  • - 63
flag NYShred (Oct 17, 2017 at 15:23) (Below Threshold)
 Extends post for climb - doesn't sit down. Drops post for decent - doesn't sit down. I really cant think of a more useless product, regardless of price.
  • + 30
 @NYShred: Yeah..... Nobody likes droppers due to how 'useless' they have turned out to be.
  • + 6
 This post came stock on my Heller fatbike and has preformed great, even in the -20F Montana winters. The lever isn't the most elegant or precise as far as droppers go, but once engaged the post moves predictably. I'd buy this again if I needed a bargain dropper for a bike.
  • + 1
 @powderturns: the light bike rims are super solid. i have a some laced up on my bronson currently. No issues whatsoever and the shop that laced them up said their customer service is great. They have only seen one broken rim in the hundreds they sold and lb sent out a replacement no questions asked.
  • + 1
 @powderturns: light bicycle runs ads on pink bike.
  • + 5
 Just a note for anyone thinking on going for this dropper. I'm using it in CRC's BrandX guise, and it's by far the best dropper I've used, before you ever consider price. Lasted 8 trouble free months, without a single piece of maintenance. My old reverb was 1 of the few which was trouble free in 18 months of ownership and I'd still put this well ahead.
  • + 18
 I have this thing on my plus hardtail and the better YSP07 on my enduro rig. The dropper ran all through last winter without fault and I have no complaints about the longer 150mm one on my big bike. One good habit is to always clean out the seal head and grease it every once in a while or after a wash. Also the Wolftooth lever is a must buy upgrade for any cable dropper.
  • + 2
 Just curious, what is so much better about the Wolftooth lever versus the one that comes with this post? Or did you mean for other posts?
  • + 5
 @mdg3d: I have a wolftooth attached to a fox and its just way smoother. way easier to use, and just feels amazing. well worth the 60 bucks.
  • + 4
 Dont know about the Wolftooth but I got a Dropt lever from Cane Creek and its sweet. Machined alloy and tough as nails. Plus its super adjustable... Id recommend that to anyone looking for an aftermarket lever..

www.canecreek.com/products/suspension/accessories/dropt
  • + 4
 @mdg3d: It's got a bearing in it so the movement is fluid and effortless. The barrel adjuster is also your standard find-in-any-respectable-bike-shop part if you somehow manage to kill it. It also comes in I-Spec and MatchMaker flavours so your bar won't look like you're improvising.

The stock lever while nice isn't so friendly. The shape of the paddle means you will probably place it so it doesn't rub on your brakes which in turn means it wont be where you really want it.
  • + 0
 @Pisgah85: damn, that thing is sexy!
  • + 3
 @therealtylerdurden: Yeah its a sick little lever with alot of adjustment. I like that its full alloy. Only the barrel adjuster is plastic. I cant stand janky looking plastic stuff. Plus it uses a sealed bearing... Cane Creek didnt f*** around haha.
  • + 0
 I the 150mm one. Been fine. Its 660g on my scales though! The lever is not massivly compatable with shimano clamps but its not a huge issue. As RC says, feels slow coming back but im adding more pressure to mine. 300psi should do it
  • + 0
 @Pisgah85: f*ck yeah!
  • + 1
 @Pisgah85: yeah, the cane Creek one is really well designed. I was surprised by the number of adjustments available
  • + 2
 I just use my old front derailleur shifter with the guts ripped out as mylever.
  • + 3
 Yeah, I've just bought a bike with this post and I use an XTR front shifter that I've removed the one lever from. Looks cool, and more ergonomic than my old Reverb that's on my other bike. No idea why people would spend 500 odd bucks on a dropper post.
  • + 2
 @m47h13u: Good to know, thanks.
  • + 18
 Why do we call it a seat post, but the seat we call a saddle. Makes no sense. Let's ditch the word saddle and call them seats. What are we riding, horses?
  • - 1
 oh.... and yes to a 100mm drop post! I don't like having my seat slammed all the way down.
  • + 9
 I could never go for calling them seats, that would just feel wrong. Saddle posts, that's what I'm thinking.
  • + 1
 I’m down.
  • + 6
 wait a minnie, just let me clip out of my clipless peddles to sit down and read that.....
  • + 16
 I snagged a 120mm Brand X for $130 delivered to US from CRC. Popularity must be rising because CRC has increased price to about $150 before any $10 coupons. Compared to my Fox Transfer with WolfTooth remote the Brand X isn't quite up to par, and the slightly slower return is noticeable, but only after riding the Fox. But my Fox didn't come with a remote and was at least double the price. I don't find the Brand X remote chintzy enough to slap a WolfTooth on. My Brand X weighed a few grams less than the Fox Factory.
  • + 2
 I agree man. I bought that same mother f'er from CRC and it's been awesome!! By far the best price on a reliable dropper. I ride nearly every damn day and constantly use dropper throughout the ride. It is still solid
  • + 12
 Nice. Dropper post pricing was getting silly. Cable actuated makes so much sense. Id love to see external routing for easy setup and maintenance but thats just me.
  • + 2
 internal isnt very hard as long as it is cable. maybe takes an extra 5 minutes of setup?
  • + 5
 @adrennan: if your frame has a port for internal routing that is
  • + 3
 @chize: i feel like that went without saying... and most frames have an internal port nwadays
  • - 9
flag Milko3D (Oct 17, 2017 at 11:39) (Below Threshold)
 I'd take hydraulic any day!

Had to sort the one that comes with the cheaper Jeffsy for a friend, cable actuated, so finicky! (can't remember the brand).

The tension of the cable was a pain to get right and the length was a pain to adjust. Not to mention that the action isn't as smooth and the feel of the lever pulling the cable is well cheap...since it's half plastic.
  • + 12
 I'd give it two thumbs up just for the fact that you have to say "Trans Sex" when your buddy asks you what brand your new dropper is.
  • + 2
 If they make an Ultralight (UL) version................well its fair to say you won't drop that name too often.
  • + 10
 @RichardCunningham The two bolt clamp was not exactly invented by Rockshox, you of all people would remember that Thomson were running this (and had patents on the spherical bolt heads that made it possible to do without creaking or snapping bolts) 20+ years ago Smile
  • + 7
 Socket: True. My reference is to the overall design of the clamp-head: lower half offset back to support the higher-stressed part of the saddle rails, and the general look of it, being a near copy of the Reverb. There are many two-bolt heads to cite in history, but the Reverb's design is iconic in the arena of dropper posts.
  • + 2
 LOL... if you're going to lecture RC about seat post history (to be fair, he was a BIKE designer... the cunningham component designer was someone else) at least get it right first.

Modern 2-bolt zero offset seatposts were invented almost simultaneously in Canada and the USA. Interloc Racing Design stateside and Syncros in Canada. IRD filed for and were granted an essentially worthless US patent for them (worthless because it was pointed out in a magazine at the time that these were just re-invented and there were 2 bolt seatposts of this type a century ago). Syncros was smart enough not to waste filing for a patent for an existing invention, they improved on the design anyway.

THEY were also the ones who first started using a brass socket washer for the bolts, to eliminate creaking... NOT Thomson. Thomson posts copied every feature from the Syncros posts except the hole in the bottom to pass a lock thru, and the usage of a head pressed and bonded into the post shaft (Thomson went with a 1-piece machined head and shaft design). I have actually broken the head of a syncros post free and snapped the top of the shaft in the process.
  • + 2
 @deeeight: I actually never mentioned anything about Thomson inventing the two bolt seat clamp (because I wasn't sure who did), just citing them as the oldest example I could think of - and RC has been involved in bikes for 20+ years longer than me. I thought they had a patent on the spherical bolt heads, but I remembered incorrectly (from an article in AMB from about 2003) - the spherical bolts weren't what was patented, it was actually the oval ID and highly predictable failure strengths that they patented. Thanks for the history lesson though, did you formerly work for Syncros or something? Pretty obscure thing to know!
  • + 3
 @Socket: They patented the oval ID? that's weird because my Ritchey post circa 1991 had that too! US patenting seems like a total farce.
  • + 2
 @wallheater:

Years ago, I knew a guy who, as an exercise in proving how screwed up the patent office was, by creative wording, and filing the applications with all the FEES paid up front, was granted valid US patents for essentially what were "the wheel" and "fire". That's ultimately as far as the USPTO vets an application anymore and as far as they have for 20 years. Are the fees paid in full ? If the answer is yes, then grant the application even if its for a pre-existing invention they could have proven already existed JUST by searching their own database of existing patents.

That's how Specialized for example, got patents on inertia valve shocks, which they didn't actually invent the idea of, and by not disclosing their KNOWING there was prior patented art in existence. They KNEW the shock technology already existed, because they had licensed it, from its actual inventor, a fellow named Don Richardson. who unfortunately didn't specifically mention bicycles on his own patent application, among the other vehicles he did mention it being applicable towards. Perhaps other old people will remember that name, especially any in the motorcycle world.

Why ? Well this little japanese company tried stealing a previous invention from him... and he took that company to court and WON. The company ? Suzuki.

law.justia.com/cases/federal/appellate-courts/F2/868/1226/17438
  • + 1
 @wallheater: yeah, but not just being oval for the sake of oval, it was claimed in the patent as part of their light weight and the controlled "mechanical fuse" whereby the post would bend before the clamp failed. There were mentions of the spherical bolt heads in there as I originally said, but unlike my original statement, the spherical bolt head concept wasn't the main thrust of the patent. Patent link here goo.gl/354GSp
  • + 3
 Fascinating and compelling commentary on seatpost bolt history, but hard to take seriously you've failed to mention the bolt material, grade, thread diameter, finish etc.
@deeeight @Socket
  • + 10
 Hopefully in the next few years $150-200 droppers will be the norm for high quality. Honestly, It is either up or down....I don't need luxury features.
  • + 6
 I've bee loking into the budget 150mm droppers, I would say the CRC BrandX Ascend XL (150) was my favorite, till now, but CRC never responded to my inquiry on where to get and how much would a replacement cartridge cost, they back it up with a 2yr warranty thought. Didn't know Brand-X and TranzX were the same, so it seems a replacement cartridge in around 66€+shipping. www.ridewill.it/p/en/tranzx-421759022-spare-inner-cartridge-for-dropper-seatpost-150mm-travel/178823
If X-Fusion doesnt release the 150 Manic (and back the promise of a cheap cartridge) will probably pull the trigger on the 150 BrandX/TranzX.
Out of curiosity on bike-discount they have a 170mm in description but not available for selection.
  • + 2
 Sry,couldnt edit: 170mm in their catalogue for 2018: tranzx.com/wp-content/uploads/TranzX2018.pdf
  • + 9
 I might “drop” the cash on one of these
  • + 15
 Please, take a seat.
  • + 8
 I like this post.
  • + 2
 @Bullit-Boy: me too, I just don't want it to let me down gently.
  • + 1
 @Bullit-Boy: But does it have a good rate of return?
  • + 5
 Same as brand X yep
Kona is putting these on their Process SE bikes now.
Same remote as Shimano...may speak to where Shimano has theirs made?
Look closely and you will see many of the same parts used in PNW also, but I believe the newest PNW posts have better internals....or so is my understanding.
  • + 1
 If the newer PNW Cascade is any indication, then they are moving to all coil-spring and hydraulic locking cylinder. Figure that means no air pressure acting on the lockout seals, so it should last longer?
  • + 6
 TranzX, Brand X, Shimano, Cube... I believe there is a cheap supplier of OK droppers.
  • + 3
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: TranzX is the manufacturer, who also makes the command post and several stems and seatposts for specialized.
  • + 5
 They don't last. I've worn through the anodizing on two posts since the start of the year. The lever is prone to breaking/bending.

WRT the PNW post having upgraded internals, how? the internal is one sealed gas strut... I don't think that can be upgraded because it either works or it doesn't. There are different Brand X/TransX/Raceface/PNW posts that are all the same OEM post but use 6061 vs 7075 alloys. The anodizing lasted much longer on the 7075 version but if you look up the reviews from all of these posts it seems most reviews give transX/Bx posts positive feedback but negative for the pnw/raceface posts that use this OEM.
  • + 4
 The Specialized Command post found stock on many of their bikes is actually a re-labeled version of this seatpost. I've got a year on mine on my Fuse Comp 6Fattie. There's a blow-off valve so if you forget to lift your butt or drop it ahead of time, and hit a decent square edge bump with the back tire, the thing "gives" slightly, like a quarter inch travel suspension seatpost.
  • + 0
 Doesn't the command post have little notches in it, in case the hydraulics fail? I always thought that was a cool feature.
  • + 3
 This is literally just a re-branded Brand-X dropper, which is also available in a few other guises, and from what I can tell, is also being installed on several bikes as OEM equipment and branded as such. It's far more prevalent than people think. I have one and so far it's action and quality have been totally reliable and very smooth.
  • + 7
 I am considering TranzX for my Ibis Tranny.
  • + 2
 I've had the Brand X for a couple months now and it's been rock solid. My wife's bike came with a Lev Integra Southpaw and the only meaningful difference I can discern between the two is that the Lev costs $200 more. The lever could be better, but KS's Southpaw lever is no better IMO. Can't really ask for more at this price and with a 2-yr warranty.
  • + 2
 I bought the Brand X post at Chain Reaction for $195CAD and have been using it for the last 8 months in Mt. Fromme, Whistler and Mt. Seymour on dry, wet and muddy conditions. So far, so good as long as you clean it after every ride. My suspect is, the company who makes this dropper might be a 3rd party manufacturer, who make parts for big brand companies like RaceFace.
  • + 5
 "The two-bolt clamp head is similar in function and design to the RockShox Reverb, which is a good thing."

Said no one
  • + 4
 I've got one of the brand x droppers and it's been fantastic over the past 6 months. Cheap, functional and so far completely reliable.
  • + 2
 I have two of the BrandX droppers. One on my Following and one on my plus bike. For the price you can’t beat it. It weighs less than the E-ten I had on my previous bike. The E-ten started to fail after about 14 months.
The one thing we all need to be aware of is all dropper posts will eventually fail. So why spend more than necessary. So far this post has been great. Works well and reliable. So why spend $300-400 for a dropper post that will eventually fail? I’ve been on mine for seven months now and it works exactly as did from day one.
  • + 6
 Now... If PB could just review more reasonably priced bikes.
  • + 1
 What a price! And what a pitty it doesn't come with 150mm when other companies are slowly moving towards 200mm. About time probably. Funny that they make a 125mm version and one with 120mm. Ridicolous. Oh, and i like the saddle. Cause it has red rails.
  • + 4
 They do have one that does come with 150mm. I just took a 150mm off my new bike and replaced it with a 120mm as my legs are too short Razz
  • + 2
 so this looks 99% like the race face effect dropper post the leaver looks the same which is actually hysterical that some a*shole said it was fine to use. throw the leaver away it should work alright
  • + 3
 It may also be worth noting the Race Face Affect Post is identical to this post as well! Exact same Lever, and post actuation, only thing different is the actual collar.
  • + 2
 Wanted to get one of the Brand-X CX 105 posts for my handjob because it comes in 27.2 but there isn't a externally routed option.

Got me thinking though, how many frames with 27.2 seat tubes are internally routed.....?
  • + 1
 I bought one of these from CRC about a year ago. It has now developed about 10mm worth of side-play. I stripped it down to check it out. It has 3 or 4 brass keys that are probably slightly worn. The main plastic sleeve at the top needs replacing also as it has deteriorated and does not allow the post to slide as easily as it should. I asked CRC if they had a service kit for the post. They did not have one available when I inquired about 3 months ago. The post is now nearly unusable. If a service kit, which I assume would be pretty cheap, was available for these it would be a very simple job to replace the worn parts and the post would be up and running again.
  • + 4
 Forget the service kit, CRC should be replacing your post under warranty. If mine develops any issues whatsoever inside 2 years I'll be going straight to a warranty claim.
  • + 4
 tipically spare parts subject to wear (like in this case) are not under warranty
  • + 2
 I've had the 120mm drop Brand-X version since new year & it's been faultless on 50+ rides so far... Much prefer it to my previous Reverb & Command Post, both of which failed in less time!
  • + 1
 My bike came with this post, I have used the giant dropper that was clapped out and the fox dropper. I found that this post would bind and not go down if you unevenly weighted the saddle. You really have to be producing sufficient weight in the exact direction it compresses in, if your weight is already forward on the saddle it won't go down easily. Needless to say I had some unexpected binding on technical climbs and my taint was sore for a few days as a result.
  • + 4
 No complaints about my Brand X dropper. If this is anything like it, it's a steal.
  • + 1
 Already got one of these on my fully. Albeit a brandx job. I'm after an adapter for the lever to mount on an I spec brake lever. Seen one on the shimano version but can't find one to buy anywhere. Any help would be appreciated!
  • + 1
 A transx dropper came stock on my Cannondale Habit and it has performed flawlessly for the past year and a half. It's not as nice as a Fox Transfer but for the money you really can't beat it.
  • + 0
 A TranzX post came stock on my 2018 Kona Big Honzo DL. I've got about 5 rides on it.

It feels stout, has a nice clamp, and works well (so far). However, two complaints:

Lever action - mine is different than pictured, and it takes a real shove. I'll look into something better (gutted SRAM front derailleur shifter, or Wolftooth)

Zero-offset - at least mine is. It also has a really long clamp, so I found it hard to jam the seat all the way back. I went to a different seat with a long front rail, which helped. But it's weird, most mountain bikes / bikers used 20-25mm offset seatposts.

I'd like to see a long-term review to see how it holds out?
  • + 3
 The cartridge is replaceable, but can you get them and other parts. Can it be done at home?
  • + 2
 I would like to find a dropper post that doesn't have constant issues. Been running the Lev-integra and this will be my 3rd sagging problem in 18 months.
  • + 2
 Can't be worse than my Specialized command post. Those things absolutely suck.
  • + 2
 Reminds me of the Pro Koryak, especially that lever... but in more sizes and with an air adjustment
  • + 2
 I own this dropper with 150mm stroke..air cartridge. It works very well! paid less than 160euros
  • + 2
 Replacement parts and cartridges can be obtained through an OEM distributor.
  • + 2
 Decent price! I'm considering a Brand-X for my ladies trail bike. Can't beat a bargain and a good review
  • + 2
 Could we have a picture of the valve to adjust air pressure. Not sure my Brand X has one.
  • + 2
 I just installed a Brand X 120mm dropper onto my 2018 Norco Torrent HT 1 which came with a 150mm Trans-X post (exact same one as reviewed here) as when the bottom half of the post was fully inserted in the seat tube the saddle was 15mm too high. Now with the 120mm dropper I have 10mm of the bottom half above the post clamp.

However, the Brand-X DOES NOT have a Schrader valve under the seat clamp. Just an M8 nyloc nut. I would assume that the internals are therefore equivalent to the under-praised Giant Contact post i.e. just a gas cartridge similar to what is in your average office chair.

The Trans-X had an air valve on it (I had to up the pressure to make the post return as out of the box it was something like 110psi in it). If you have a Schrader valve it is under the saddle clamp so you need to take off the parts. The cap is a rubber grommet which you can pry out with your fingernails or the hook end of a small allen key. If you take off the saddle clamp and all you see is a nut, then you have the same as me on my Brand-X post.

Funny thing was, even the instruction pamphlet said that the post would need pumping up to circa 220psi.
  • + 2
 I have this post on my new Norco torrent not as smooth as my KS but it's nice.
  • + 2
 Aside from the logo, it looks identical to the RaceFace Aeffect Dropper...
  • + 2
 Iooks almost identical to the raceface aeffect dropper post too.
  • + 4
 That's because it is the Raceface Aeffect.
  • + 0
 @m47h13u: I do believe it is a BrandX.
  • + 1
 Been using a DNM dropper from Amazon going on 3 years. Pretty good post for $120 and I works with my budget.
  • + 1
 Whats the slammed height - seat rails to bottom of nut?
  • + 1
 Wondering the same thing. Can't find dimensions online.
  • + 1
 Trans x has always made garbage haha
  • + 1
 alright, but are there any opinions on these droppers after winter 2017?
  • + 1
 Great cheap option to upgrade an old bike but I need external routing.
  • + 2
 The Brand-X version at Chain Reaction is available in an external version.
  • + 2
 it is possible to do your own stealth installation. Chain reaction sell a plastic dolackey to make it all look good.
  • - 1
 this dropper is a POS! It has been coming on bikes that we sell for just over a year now and they completely unreliable and finicky and crazy hard to warranty.
  • + 1
 What crap bike companies are you working with that don't stock replacement units? Hell all the ones I saw that had the last inch stick were replaced without question and the owner got to keep the "defective" one as well.
  • + 2
 We have had more Fox transfer posts and Fancy ass KS seatposts come back than the trans-X, and the one trans-X that came back was replaced in less than a week
  • + 2
 @m47h13u: not sure how it works for you in Canada but here when a part needs to be warrantied we warranty it though the part company, I.e. trans-x, fox, rock shox, etc.
  • + 1
 @deadhorse13: Well depending on the company, but most of the time I deal with the distributor for warranties so I'm not having to email folk in Taiwan or China. The big distributor I deal with has a lot of inventory for warranty so lead time is never more than a week.
  • + 1
 that's just a rebranded brand x dropper. Funny!
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