Trek & Cannondale Introduce More Recyclable Bike Packaging on Some Models

Nov 5, 2020
by Ed Spratt  

Trek and Cannondale are investigating options for shipping their bikes in fully recyclable and plastic-free packaging with a goal of eventually ditching plastic bags, PVC and zip ties.

While cycling is seen as a green sport, the industry currently has a large plastic problem and a huge reliance on the material to package bikes, components and clothing. This year, both Trek and Cannondale have begun to explore other options for packaging their bikes. They believe a change would not only help the environment, but can be better for bike shops and customers.

Cannondale's solution to the plastic problem involves using FSC-Certified cardboard with natural, plant-based inks and biodegradable fiber-reinforced paper tape. Cannondale estimate that their old packaging produced around 20 liters of landfill waste as most of the packaging was not recyclable.

bigquotesOur objective was to design a better packaging system. Make it better for the environment, make the packaging protection stronger and significantly reduce assembly time. This is better for the planet, a gift for bike shops, and a win for our customers. Eugene Fierkens, General Manager for Cycling Sports Group Europe

Trek has not quite ditched all their plastics yet, but have plans to go entirely plastic-free eventually. Currently, Trek was able to reduce the number of non-recyclable parts down from 22 to 12 on their Marlin hardtail and for 2021, they hope to get this number down to just 2.

Both Cannondale and Trek are testing out the new packaging on limited models in their range with the aim to expand further in the future.


Trek's Packaging Before and After:

Before:

After:



In addition to updating their packaging, Trek has recently launched a campaign to educate customers and retailers on how they can safely and effectively dispose of the packaging. They believe that education also plays a big role in minimising the environmental impact of packaging.

bigquotesWe set out to reimagine this product, simplify it, and decrease our impact. But packaging is only one step on our broader path. Another big one is education. Kevin Rogers, Trek's packaging development manager

To help with this issue, Trek has released a detailed guide on how to deal with their packaging here and they are set to release a sustainability report later this year.

Just by making the switch to a more sustainable packaging on their Marlin hardtail, Trek will save almost 23,000 kilograms from landfill. This makes you think how much plastic could be saved from landfills if the entire cycling industry introduced more recyclable packaging.


121 Comments

  • 91 9
 The amount of cardboard LBS's recycle/throw away is alot more than people think, nice to see some changes!
  • 84 2
 Cardboard isn't the problem though, cause it's one of the most easily recycled/biodegradable packing materials on the planet. The problem is all the plastic and Styrofoam they use as we have a harder time recycling that.
  • 14 73
flag PinkyScar (Nov 5, 2020 at 16:57) (Below Threshold)
 Greenwashing.
  • 12 5
 'Green sport'...lol
  • 27 1
 You should see the amount of waste in big distribution warehouses for general consumer good industries. When most people thing of waste generation, they think how much trash/recycling their home or small biz generates and not everything up the line for that product to get to them in the first place. It's sad how much we are trashing this planet.
  • 5 0
 The amount of cardboard I reuse from the LBS's recycling is a lot more than people think just to sheet mulch my yard.
  • 15 0
 Wanna see waste? Check out a job site..did custom interior for years and the amount of plastic you have to throw away from painting and doing drywall is disgusting..and since they get “contaminated” you have to throw it away. Glad companies like Trek are trying at least.
  • 3 0
 @chezotron: I'd like to know more about this sheet mulching. Thanks!
  • 6 0
 I appreciate both the effort for something better and the irony of packaging an non-recyclable hunk of carbon landfill filler in the same box.
  • 3 0
 @jrocksdh: I fricking laughed.
  • 2 0
 @DIYsandvich: the amount of plastic I’ve thrown away receiving inventory is insane. One of the worst was always Fabric, which is under the same umbrella as Cannondale. Hopefully this is a change towards reducing that as well. Other notorious offenders are POC and Shimano. Shimano loves sealing all small parts in plastic for some reason....
  • 5 0
 @DIYsandvich: I totally agree with. I work in a bike shop in Geneva and the amount of plastic waste we have is insane. Luckily the Swiss have a bag for everything though so I guess it does eventually get recycled.... At least we in the shop make sure all the waste is in the correct bag for when it gets collected.
  • 2 1
 @thedee38: the number of recycle bins for different materials in public buildings in Taiwan is really good. Now back in the UK and it's shocking how much does not get recycled. Everything just goes in the bin. There are a lot of dog poo bins interestingly. People obviously care more about stepping in doggy poopoos than they do about recycling coke bottles.
  • 4 2
 In the end it doesn't even matter because we will ruin the planet in record time anyway. I mean just look at those morons believing Elon Musk will save the climate by selling millions of electric vehicles.... lol
  • 4 2
 @KalkhoffKiller: It's about everyone doing whatever they can, and not being discouraged by seemingly how small a change we make with out decisions. Riding to the trailhead, not eating meat and dairy, shopping plastic free etc, magnified by millions and eventually billions of people and compound effect isn't insignificant.

Ps. sure, electric cars aren't great in terms of production and at the end of their life cycle, but they still more than make it right during the 10-15 years of usage in between.
  • 6 17
flag jaame (Nov 6, 2020 at 3:11) (Below Threshold)
 I will never stop eating meat. In fact, I always eat double to cancel out the good work vegetarians think they are doing! Ha!
  • 2 0
 @andwrong: My wife did this last fall. Basically you just lay down cardboard over your previous garden, or in our case, lawn that you want to turn into a garden, with some rocks or whatever to hold it down. We actually raked a bunch of leaves over the cardboard to keep it moist and hold it in place as well. The cardboard will kill off any grass or whatever that's growing and keep weeds down in the spring until you are ready to plant while simultaneously introducing organic matter to your soil as it breaks down.
modernfarmer.com/2016/05/sheet-mulching
I never thought to use bike boxes for this though. Sounds like I might have an excuse to stop by the shop soon!
  • 2 0
 @nhlevi: +1 Ride to the trailhead of it’s even remotely possible.
  • 2 0
 I’m a pharmacist- multiple 50 gallon trash cans get filled up with plastic every day at our pharmacy (one of several in a big hospital). That’s not counting the plastic that our chemo drugs are packaged in which has to be disposed of as hazardous. It’s something that’s bother me for a long time and a big area for improvement.
  • 1 0
 I know a lot of people on here work in or own a bike shop, question for you: when you order bikes from a manufacturer do you order several at a time? Does each bike come in it's own box? I mean shipping ~4 bikes in one big box or crate with thin sheets separating them would save a lot of cardboard, tho it'd complicate warehousing and shipping for distributors. And the box would weigh a lot, like 140lbs for 4 35lb bikes. I'd say ship more than 4 but ups weight limit is 150 lbs I believe. Just a thought.
  • 2 0
 @nhlevi: it just doesn't work with the overpopulation trend and capitalist dogma of economical growth. The individual reductions of your co2 footprint get more than equalized through population growth.
  • 1 0
 @KalkhoffKiller: i don't think as many people see him as savior of the earth as you think - rather, we see cars as one area with room for big improvement is all
  • 1 0
 @tabletop84: true, but "how dare you suggest that humans should stop reproducing" ...
  • 1 0
 @gibspaulding: I put mulch on top of mine because we have ChipDrop out here. So it makes some amazing black gold when it's done. Bike boxes are super thick so it really kills what's underneath and doesn't warm it as much as plastic so the ants aren't as apt to build a colony underneath.
  • 42 1
 Im a successful dedicated packaging engineer and would love the opportunity to help manufacturers design better packaging. ASTM D4169 Distribution Cycle 13 is what you want to test to. I have a ton of ideas just not a platform or opportunity to execute. Currently full time packaging engineer for Hologic, Inc. whos manufacturing a substantial amount of the worlds COVID tests. Someone from a manufacturer please contact me and connect me with the right people to make these changes for the industry- for the world Smile
  • 21 1
 Hope you’re on LinkedIn, post there about it - heck share this article and bring something to the table. There are tons of sustainability managers(some locally are hiring but it’s highly competitive despite being a growth market) and logistics folks who would be exposed through that avenue vs. pinkbike(not that we’re not great). Sounds like you’ve got a great event and specific case experience with wildly varying packaging and scaling needs. All due respect, I would never hire someone who said “xyz industry person reach out to me and connect me with the right people to get a job at your company.” Find them, show you’re driven. Make yourself a brand. Good luck.
  • 8 0
 @isaacschmidt: if you think you got something that will serve the industry (and the environment) well, don’t ask them to come to you. Go to them! How should they know what you got to offer? Make a presentation and show it to them. Go to your local bike shop and ask them how they would like to unpack a bike with your idea of shipping material.

When you listen to the bike podcasts and they ask the question how to get a job in the industry, it’s a lot of times the same answer: work at a bike shop and make yourself seen.
Chances are there that a bike brand manager may read your comment. But if you want to Make sure they see you, get in their face- in the best way possible.
Good luck and go after it!
  • 1 0
 @scottyoo5 Packaging engineer here, too. Love this comment; just sent you a message.
  • 28 0
 About damn time. The amount of unrecyclable foam we have to deal with at our shop is disgusting. Now if only they could get rid of the bureaucratic nonsense that requires all bike to be sent with reflectors....
  • 7 7
 3rd world countries would probably welcome your free reflectors.
  • 8 12
flag JustAnotherRiderHere (Nov 5, 2020 at 18:05) (Below Threshold)
 @jrocksdh: the same third world that makes folks in coal powered, environmentally destructive, tax payer funded Teslas and other forms of delusions in a false effort for "green". I am certain China is 99.⁹99999999% of the pollution when talking bikes. Beyond that, we the consumers will pay for this wasted effort.
  • 2 0
 @JustAnotherRiderHere: my point is many could probably actually use them for proper safety since their roads often dangerous. A shop could fill up a box in a month and ship em over.
  • 3 0
 @JustAnotherRiderHere: have you seen the MOUNTAINS of rental bikes wasting away over there?
  • 11 0
 @JustAnotherRiderHere: It doesn't matter if China is the biggest polluter. Most of the products they make are exported to the whole world, so the whole planet is responsible for their pollution, since if they didn't buy China's products, China would stop making them, hence stopping the pollution too.
  • 4 1
 @TheJD: False. See, China will convert a bike factory into a battery factory in a split second. China is very agile in the business world, unlike in the US. China labor does not get to complain about work conditions, Chinese citizens do not get to complain about sludge in their drinking water. To think that an effort in bike wrap will have any net gain (other than net gain in costs from production) is delusional. Until such time (and it will never come) China (or India, most of Africa) even pretends that they are going to 'clean up their act" all of this is nothing more than placing a delusional ideal of morality onto the production of a durable good.

If it makes you feel better, have at it. The reality however simply doe not care about your emotional status. The moral code of Westerners simply is not germane to a conversation about global efforts to reduce pollution.

Hey, seen any images of Prince William Sound lately? Or more so, Hiroshima? Hmmmmmmmm....seems the tree huggers simply are not basing their emotional cries on the realities of this ever changing planet.
  • 1 0
 I agree, it pains me to have to put reflectors on brand new bikes, also can we rid the world of the serving plate sized dork discs while we are at it.
  • 2 0
 @pcassingham: What am I missing? "Dork Disks"? Am I missing an opportunity to make fun of folks?
  • 2 0
 @JustAnotherRiderHere: The plastic disk between the cassette and the spokes that is intended to keep the chain from going into the spokes if your rear mech is not properly adjusted. Not a bad thing to leave on some peoples bikes but for most cyclists they will want to remove it because it is ugly, especially when it gets dirty and it is not really necessary.
  • 2 0
 @pcassingham: But, they look awesome on the side of the trails in the woods. In general, pried off to stop the non-stop rattling on the rear wheel of the novice cyclist.....
  • 2 0
 @JustAnotherRiderHere: You read what you want to read, not what I wrote.
Who will they sell the batteries from the converted factory to, if noone outside China will buy them, dumbass?
No buyers -> no export -> no production -> no pollution.
  • 1 0
 @TheJD: Um nothing you do is going to stop global capitalism. You do what you want, I will keep riding my (made in China) carbon bike with my (made in China XX1 bits) and my (made in China) tires. I type this on my (Made in China) computer talking on my (Made in China router and network hardware). Eventually, I will use a bit of Made in USA gasoline in my (Made in Germany) V8 car and ride on the trails.

I promise however, I will not toss a reflector, a wheel disk thinger or a gel packet onto the underbrush.
  • 2 0
 @JustAnotherRiderHere: That was not the point.
The actual point was that most of the civilization is responsible for China's pollution levels.
  • 2 0
 @TheJD: Not exactly. See, in the US and in many European nations the enviro-nuts have driven business out of their nations due to regulations and costs secondary to regulation....so, China as a good communist country with very well educated leaders and plans simply fill the void. I have been there and seen it first hand.

As pertaining to bikes....simply, in most cases...they do it better. You have to look hard to find an AFFORDABLE comparison to many of the Chinese items (I am including Taiwan as China).

All in all, it is a multifaceted scenario where Unions, EPA, Minimum wages and taxing bodies have driven MFG to China (and other second world nations). Blaming ourselves for their lack of concern on the environment? Um, no, I am good. The entire thought process and judging virtue is WAY old with me. I do not tolerate it from our staff, I do not tolerate is from riding partners and I do not tolerate it (by not shopping at) stores and brands with the same "intolerance" for free will and open markets.
  • 1 0
 @JustAnotherRiderHere: You are taking my words for they aren't. I am not talking politics, economics and various scenarios. I am stating one thing, which is that China's pollution is driven by western civilization's (or substitute what you want here). I am not considering other factors or saying how good or bad it is.
  • 1 0
 @TheJD: but nothing you do or any American does, anyting any person anywhere says is not going to change anything the Chinese do in manufacturing.
  • 1 0
 @JustAnotherRiderHere: Are you american? Guess you didn't vote, right?
  • 1 0
 @TheJD: I voted. Seems now we will "lay off" five FTE's before the New Year and also nix plans for our $5m expansion into a new facility. We will also be cutting most MA staff to part-time as to not have to cover benefits. Already we do not accept Medicaid or public sector plans. Never will.
  • 1 0
 @JustAnotherRiderHere: No idea what you're talking about. Btw why did you vote? Taking into account your previous comment, one would think that your vote "is not going to change anything".
  • 1 0
 @TheJD: Nationally, sure. As for global situations pertaining to the environment - not one iota. In the big scheme of things, humans are nothing more than a pimple on the planet. Plus, it is undeniable that Oil is a natural product and a very valuable natural resource (certainly, as proven, worth going to war for).

No environmentalist can prove any of their theories. Conjecture, sure. Science? Nope. Scientists used to say the Earth was flat and the Sun rotated around our planet....well, until the day they didnt.
  • 23 1
 Now, how about a transparent look at the entire production cycle of a bike, from far-away factory to LBS, if we want to assess how ethical these companies are?

We might wish to believe "every little bit counts", but this is just greenwashing.
  • 4 0
 Many industries would lose lots of sales if they showed the whole process to the end customer. These include oil companies, battery companies, animal agriculture, soda companies, the whole clothing branch, anything that includes cheap asian manufacturing, ... Why would they show more than they have to..
  • 6 0
 Every improvement does count
  • 1 2
 @colincolin: Um.....naaaaaaaa. Just dont go to a hotdog factory and do not eat animals you know by name...
  • 2 0
 @JustAnotherRiderHere: Yeah why not stick your head in the sand.
  • 4 0
 Green Scheme Marketing is the name of the game these days. But no one wants to have that discussion.

Scrub carbon.... no amount of reduction in output or increase in efficiency will un-do the warming trends. It's like draining the ocean with a dixie cup.

Everyone is content "feeling" like they are making a difference, and that should scare us. Feelings can't change data.
  • 2 0
 @jcav5: $ generation scheme more than helping thw environ. I make $ testing sources(turbines/engines/flares/etc)
  • 12 3
 It’s all these little things that starts to make a difference, Thank you to the bike industry, we’ve seen lots of little things here and there this year from lots of brands trying to be more environmentally conscious. It makes me happy Smile
  • 9 0
 On the other hand Yoann, if we all do a little, at best we will achieve a little. I am constantly amazed by the number of people who applaud themselves for an inconsequential environmental or climate action and then go for a solo 30 mile drive in their oversized vehicle to do some mundane thing.
  • 4 0
 @sspiff: Can't only blame the individual though. You basically have no public transport over in NA.
  • 3 0
 @colincolin: That was just one example of many. I agree though, one of capitalism's greatest coups had been to pass the burden of environmental responsibility onto the consumer.
  • 1 0
 @sspiff: we create the market, it's easy to argue that consumers set the rules... we can't just play victim the whole way down, it's our money the "evil capitalists" are after...
  • 2 0
 @jcav5: externalities and unaccounted costs exist down entire supply chains. Pretending that the consumer will (1) be informed on the societal or environmental costs of their decisions and (2) then spend according their concious as opposed to maximizing value is what got us in this mess.
  • 2 0
 @sspiff: I guess if you have the opinion that humans are incapable of learning, understanding, and must be controlled because they must not know any better.... then I'd agree with you. But if you take a quick google search for "sustainable products" you're confronted with the obvious truth that there are folks who put more value in less environmentally impactful products, that cost more than their cheaper counterparts.

My point is that there are folks who want to "feel" like they are making a difference, but they aren't educated enough to understand that the contributions they are proud of are trivial... but if we can educate consumers we could drive real change.

I think we are in more agreement than initially implied.
  • 2 0
 @jcav5: At the same time fools think that a hybrid is going to save humanity...we can pump 350gal of diesel into my boat and set course to crystal waters in the Bahamas....no emission controls to worry about. :-)
  • 7 0
 For someone who has worked as a mechanic, this is big. The amount of packaging that will never reach a customer is absolutely mind-boggling. While things still need to be protected in shipping, stuff like this and companies using recycled packaging or less of it, are a step in the right direction. While individual consumerism habits are good to think about, initiatives like this will create real progress.
  • 7 0
 *Scott Bikes has been doing this for a while, replacing zip ties and rubber bands with twine and using little to no foam on most of their bikes. Haven't gotten one yet that's come damaged because of shipping, so it's definitely achievable.
  • 7 0
 Got my front disk rotor damaged by shipping.

But seriously, how do they plan to recycle carbon frames and components?

And what about ebikes components? Expect some ebikes going to trash because most of the electronics is not open source / repairable.
  • 1 1
 Carbon frames and components are not single use plastics and it isn't expected that you will throw them away as soon as you open the box. These items will last at least as long as plastics in a car and in most cases will probably last longer.
  • 5 0
 Hej! I work in bike distribution and packing. I will not say where work becuase Im checking Pinkbike in my working hours Smile
This is not an easy answer. If you pack as clean as possible the costumer will complain, if you overpack, the costumer will be unhappy.
We try to develop "boxes" that you can transport without damages and storage in an easy way. After the bike is on the spot, the box must be easily folded and able to send to a recycling spot.
I can say that 99% of the people in the industry is trying and ready to make changes, not only small changes, we try to make big changes. We are not old fashion people, we like our planet and we try the best.
Was nice to read all the comments and for sure we will take care of the good ideas.
Have a nice ride this weekend!
  • 5 1
 I think the idea of a standardized, possibly clamshell-style modular shipping box, even for each model year if made of a high strength fiberglass-reinforced plastic with a sort of internal pegboard system to place dowels to hold everything in place, would make a lot of sense for the big manufacturers that regularly sell to shops.

My idea would go like this: The manufacturer sends however many modular boxes they can fit (stack? Interlock like legos?) on a reusable pallet with a deposit cost to the shop on each box -> that gets dropped off at the bike shop -> the bike shop sends back their empty modular boxes and they get their deposit back from the manufacturer.
  • 2 1
 thats going to cost double in shipping than before, though. not to mention the extra travel and time needed by the trucks. i dont think thats worth it at all.
  • 3 0
 @TylerG96: yeah the individual shipping modules will definitely have a higher upfront cost, but if they can break even on materials cost even after only 10 bikes or so shipped in the module, it could work out to be more cost-effective in the long run, especially for bikes that don’t see yearly model changes.

I admittedly don’t know much about bike shipping logistics from manufacturers but from what I understand, each manufacturer has a regional distribution center and I’m going to guess that distribution center is using a dedicated logistics company to ship bikes from the DC to the retailer. The delivery company will be returning to the DC for another pickup after making the rounds, so it would make sense for the retailer to send back their modules when they’re empty. It makes sense in my head, at least, but I’m sure there are all kinds of costs I don’t know about.
  • 3 0
 @sjma: the modular boxes will ultimately need to go back to Asia. You’ll do more environmental damage shipping the boxes back and forth than the original packaging caused.
  • 4 0
 Here's one for you keyboard engineers - rather than pack the bikes - seeing as they are being transported by sea, and water is soft, you could tow them all on a kind of rope behind the boat and drag them through the ocean safely encased in their watery blanket - direct to the end consumer (who will be waiting on the beach)
  • 4 0
 There could be a problem with hubs and pivots seizing up. Unless you ship them via the Bearing Sea.
  • 1 0
 @commental: hot damn that's an underrated comment
  • 2 0
 So good! How is this not closer to the top?
  • 4 1
 This is fake progression for PR. They dont need to test the design, they could just roll it out across the range. My suggestion to Trek and Cannondale? Buy a YT bike and copy the way they do it. They have been doing this across their range for 2 years and you can even buy a cover for using the box as a transit bag.

Its not new and this announcement is just sloppy greenwashing.
  • 6 1
 Awesome. Keep working to make things greener
  • 5 1
 It's cool to see the bigger brands working on reducing their impacts like Bjorn bikes and other small brands.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, Bjorn deserves credit for leading the way, if I'm not mistaken.
  • 1 0
 Stealthy Wink I really like what Bjorn are doing and hopefully they gain traction. Trek did something similar around 10 years ago with the Belleville and Atwood. They considered the whole lifecycle of the bike including it's death. Maybe ahead of their time as I don't think they were very popular due to people wanting cheap and as many features as possible.
  • 2 0
 Im being facisious, this is nice but its a drop in the hat. Brands like Spank and Nicolai and many others have started pushing ALU bikes/parts as the ones to get and duh, with proper marketing it sells.
  • 3 0
 YT was already doing this 2 years ago when I bought my Jeffsy. And the box was so good I used for traveling back and fort to Madeira!
  • 1 0
 ya same, they make it a shipping box for airplanes so I have every bit of mine still. Works amazing!
  • 1 0
 The packaging will also be more "ecological" ... the fact remains that to buy a bike must arrive on the other side of the world with all the impact on the environment that ships, trucks, warehouses have. Without taking into account that industries in Asia are often light years away from European environmental protocols.
  • 5 1
 Thank you Trek and Cannondale!!!
  • 3 1
 man, itd be crazy if they made the bikes out of some wonderous, infinitely recyclable material in a move to curb plastic waste...
  • 2 0
 On the scale of waste generation, bicycle packing is minimal. But it matters, as consumers are more likely to recycle paper and cardboard vs Styrofoam.
  • 2 0
 Very true, the funny thing is EPS is actually quite recyclable. I’m hoping we’ll see more molded paper pulp used in the industry, it recycles well, tears down easily, and provides great product protection (assuming the product isn’t in direct contact with the paper)
  • 4 0
 And the great thing is, where styrofoam beads and bits of plastic will lurk in the environment for ever, if cardboard or paper get out into the street, into the drains or blown into a park, they'll eventually just compost down and turn into microbe, worm or fish food.
  • 1 0
 @ernestozed: Quite right. I think it's a net positive to keep plastic out of the food supply.
  • 3 0
 Just fill the bike boxes full of kushy weed nugs to protect the bike. Problem solved.
  • 2 1
 What if they use a partner like shipbikes or something similar? I'd go with reusable shipping boxes rather than less material.
  • 2 0
 Scott Bikes have been this since the start of this current seasons bikes have rolled out!
  • 3 0
 Carbon bikes in recyclable carton boxes? Cmon who you are kidding?
  • 2 0
 How about ditching dork disk for bonus point? (I know it is mandatory in great USA Frown )
  • 1 0
 A for effort. Now if you could just focus your efforts on trying to invent an e-bike battery thats less of an ecological disaster to produce.
  • 2 0
 I work at a Trek shop and Trek's bikes have been packaged the "new" way for over a year...
  • 1 0
 I would love to buy something that says made from recycled Plastic. Any attempt to reduce the consumption of plastic and paper is an excellent choice . This is good news.
  • 4 1
 love it
  • 2 0
 Well it's a step in the right direction
  • 1 0
 Finally! Good to see. Apparently Revel Bikes uses Evoc bike bags then you ship them back.
  • 2 0
 Why would they protect the tires with plastic cushening?
  • 2 1
 Looks like a progression.
  • 2 0
 About time!
  • 2 0
 Looks like a session.
  • 1 0
 A small but positive step in the right direction
  • 1 1
 "more" recyclable packaging on "some" models.... Trek and Cannondale really spearheading the revolution here
  • 1 0
 let's ignore all the heavy metals in the battery... those don't count
  • 1 0
 woahhhh im sold!!!!
  • 1 0
 Noted. Beer
  • 1 1
 Yep, good effort.
  • 1 1
 Trekendale
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