Review: Trek's All-New 2020 Fuel EX Trail Bike

Aug 15, 2019
by Mike Levy  



Remember when trail bikes were really nothing more than cross-country rigs with a bit more travel but not much more ability? That sure feels like a long time ago now, with modern geometry and improved suspension making the latest examples incredibly capable and versatile machines. Some have even evolved to the point where many riders seem to be questioning the need for more travel, including those who frequent serious terrain.

Trek's Fuel EX platform has progressed through the years, too, and the latest version is said to be ''more capable,'' while still being ''efficient for all-day excursions.'' For 2020, it sports the same 130mm of rear-wheel travel, but it's controlled via a revised suspension layout and paired with a 140mm fork. There's the obligatory slacker and longer geometry, of course, and Trek even specs the 9.9 and 9.8 models with Fox's stout 36.

Fuel EX Details

• Intended use: Trail
• Wheel size: 29"
• Rear wheel travel: 130mm
• Fork travel: 140mm
• New carbon frame
• Storage in downtube
• ISCG 05 tabs
• Tire clearance: 2.6"
• Sizes: XS - XXL (lrg tested)
• Weight: 28.6lb (as pictured)
• MSRP: $7,499.99 USD
• More info: www.trekbikes.com
Given all that, I've been riding the $7,499.99 USD 9.9 X01 model for the last few months in order to find out where the fresh Fuel sits in the grand scheme of modern trail bikes.








The Details

Trek chose to ditch the hump that the previous Fuel EX had just behind its headtube, a move that makes this bike a hell of a lot better looking than its predecessor, at least in my eyes. That might be the first thing you notice, but there's plenty of other stuff to look at, including a hatch on the downtube. Under the bottle cage. That opens when you pull a latch. So you can put your ride-donuts inside the downtube. You can put other stuff in there, I guess, and it even comes with a tool roll to keep everything separate and quiet.

Yes, Trek is well aware that their pals at Specialized had holes in downtubes a few years ago, but they also know that they can put holes in their downtubes, too.


Trek Fuel EX 9.8 GX Photo by Dane Perras
Trek Fuel EX 9.8 GX Photo by Dane Perras
Trek's latch is a bit easier to use with gloved hands than Specialized's, but the idea is the same.


It's low hanging fruit, sure, but we had to come up with a bunch of amusing S.W.A.T-like acronyms for Trek's hole, as any normal person would. Post your own in the comment section, of course, but I'd also argue that they deserve some kudos in Wisconsin for this one; it wasn't their idea, and I'm guessing that it might have been a tough pill to swallow, but it makes too much sense to not use.

Another detail, albeit a less obvious one, is the cable routing that exits behind the seat tube before immediately going into the chainstays, kinda like the new Stumpjumper. It makes for an exceptionally clean looking bike, even if external routing is always easier to deal with.


Trek Fuel EX 9.8 GX Photo by Dane Perras
Knock Block is essentially a headset with built-in steering stops that prevents the fork crown from smashing into the bike's large diameter downtube.


Going back to the front, Trek is persisting with their Knock Block headset for the foreseeable future, so I might as well stop moaning about it as it's not going away anytime soon. It's popular in Europe, I was told, and it does have the important job of keeping your fork crown from smashing into the bike's large diameter downtube that's aimed at the bottom bracket in a straight line.

That's said to make for a stiffer, and therefore more precise, front-end, and Trek says that it's light to boot. It also means there are special headset components that act as steering stops to keep the fork from hitting the downtube.


Trek Fuel EX 9.8 GX Photo by Dane Perras
Trek Fuel EX 9.8 GX Photo by Dane Perras
The Mino Link hardware (left) at the rocker arm and seatstay pivots can be rotated to tweak the geometry a bit. Brake and shift lines pass from the front triangle right into the chainstays (right).


Other bullet points include very adaptable cable routing that'll work with all the usual components and a few less common ones, a set of ISCG 05 tabs around the bottom bracket, and the same geometry-adjusting Mino Link flip-chips at the chainstay and rocker arm pivots. If you like the big meat, you'll like that Trek made sure there was enough room for 2.6'' wide tires, and I also hope you like Bontrager's 2.6'' XR4 Team Issue rubber as that's what comes on the bike.


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New Geometry

Trek added the compulsory longer and slacker sprinkles before putting the new Fuel EX into the oven, and it's come out the other side designed for low-offset forks and sporting a 66.5-degree headtube angle and 470mm reach for my large-sized test bike. If you like to tinker, flipping the Mink Link hardware drops half a degree from that and a few millimeters of bottom bracket height. The Fuel's seat angle is 75.5-degrees in the steeper of the two settings, and the chainstays are 435mm across the board. There are shorter seat tubes as well, allowing for longer travel party posts for all sizes.

Trek Fuel EX

Overall, Trek hasn't done anything too wild with the numbers, but the new geometry was pretty much required to keep the Fuel platform toe-to-toe with everyone else's recently re-designed trail bikes.


Trek Fuel EX 9.8 GX Photo by Dane Perras
The new Fuel EX still has 130mm of travel, but Trek has ditched the Full Floater lower shock mount for more tire clearance and less weight.

Updated Suspension

The new Fuel EX and the one the came before it (but not the one that came before that one) both get 130mm of travel from very similar four-bar designs, and you'll find the same Active Braking Pivot (ABP) at the rear axle that's been a staple since it was introduced on the first Remedy back in 2008.

What you won't find, however, is the floating lower shock mount that was also around since 2008; Trek's ditched that in favor of a more traditional fixed mount that's said to be lighter and stiffer while offering more tire clearance with - you know it - ''No loss in suspension performance.''


Trek ThruShaft review
Trek Fuel EX 9.8 GX Photo by Dane Perras
Full Floater (left) saw the bottom shock mount on an extension of the chainstays. The new Fuel EX uses a fixed mount (right).


It doesn't really matter where the bottom of the shock is a bolted to as long as the bike's suspension does its job, and in the case of a bike like the Fuel EX, that job comes with a long laundry list of must-dos. It better pedal well, of course, but it also better be supple off the top and better offer a lot of support, and you know it better ramp-up for those times when you're pretending it's an enduro bike. Trek's full-suspension rigs are proven performers by this point, but they're also on the active, linear end of the spectrum, and the newest Fuel doesn't stray from that.

One thing that's important to keep in mind is that Trek designed the suspension with the pedal-assist lever in mind, and that means that you'll likely be reaching for it often to get the most out of the bike. More on that later on, though.

The shock is still a RE:aktiv Thru Shaft unit from Fox, but it's seen some updates as well, with a tiny piggyback-ish growth appearing at the top. If it looks familiar, it's because you've seen the same thing on the Remedy and Slash's shocks - it's a thermal compensator that Trek says was on the previous version, only it was tucked inside the shock body.

By moving the compensator outside, it could do its job better and Fox and Trek could put more oil inside; Trek says this makes for a ''more responsive shock.'' More oil volume should mean cooler temps and more consistency, and at this rate, we'll soon have shocks with so much oil in them that they'll need piggybacks.
Trek Fuel EX 9.8 GX Photo by Dane Perras
See that funny looking bump next to the rebound dial? That's a thermal compensator, and moving it to the outside lets Fox put more oil inside.

The shock's shaft size has been reduced, going from 12mm to 9mm. ''That allowed for reduced stick-slip and the increased oil volume, which means increased flow rate. That led to more valve sensitivity, which is a more responsive shock,'' Trek's Travis Ott explained. The rebound dial is numbered now as well, which is a small detail that makes sense.



Specifications

Specifications
Release Date 2020
Price $7499.99
Travel 130
Rear Shock Fox Factory Float EVOL, RE:aktiv with Thru Shaft
Fork Fox Factory 36, Float EVOL air spring, GRIP2 damper
Headset Knock Block Integrated
Cassette SRAM XG-1275 Eagle, 10-50, 12 Spd
Crankarms SRAM X01 Eagle Carbon, DUB, 32T alloy ring, Boost
Bottom Bracket SRAM DUB, 92mm, PressFit
Rear Derailleur SRAM X01 Eagle, 12 speed
Chain SRAM X01 Eagle, 12 speed
Shifter Pods SRAM X01 Eagle, 12 speed
Handlebar Bontrager Line Pro, OCLV Carbon, 35mm, 27.5mm rise
Stem Bontrager Line Pro, 35mm, Knock Block, 0 degree
Grips Bontrager XR Trail Elite
Brakes Shimano XT M8120 4-piston
Wheelset Bontrager Line Carbon 30
Tires Bontrager XR4 Team Issue 2.6"
Seat Bontrager Arvada Pro, carbon rails
Seatpost Bontrager Line Elite Dropper


Trek Fuel EX 9.8 GX Photo by Dane Perras


Trek Fuel EX 9.8 GX Photo by Dane Perras








Test Bike Setup

My Fuel EX stayed mostly stock during my time on it, including the Bontrager cockpit, dropper post, and ridiculously comfortable Arvada seat that I might have to take off before I ship the bike back. The Line Pro 30 TLR carbon wheels stayed on the bike, too, but I did try two different sets of tires: a DHF/DHR combo from Maxxis as control tires, and e*thirteen's new TRS and LG1 fast-rolling party combo. I'm generally not a big fan of high-volume rubber like the 2.6" Bontrager tires that come stock on the bike, so I wanted to give the Fuel a go with something a bit smaller and more traditional.

I was all over the board with the new Fuel's rear-suspension during the set-up process, going from as little as 20-percent sag to as much as 30-percent, and made full use of the pedal-assist switch as well. The Fox 36 was flawless at the higher end of the recommended pressure scale for my 156 lb summer fighting weight, and nothing out of the ordinary was required on that front.
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Mike Levy
Location: Squamish, BC, Canada
Age: 39
Height: 5'10
Inseam: 33.5"
Weight: 156 lb
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Instagram: @killed_by_death
Climbing

Trek's mid-travel bikes haven't ever been the sportiest feeling out there, but that lack of urgency in the pedaling department has always been offset by gobs of wall-climbing traction. I wouldn't have reached for the previous version of the Fuel EX if I was looking for a part-time cross-country rig, and that same goes for the new version, but no one can blame the bike for their dabs on the way up.


Mike Levy Trek Fuel EX 9.9 X01 Photo by Dane Perras
Doubting whether you'll make it up that sketchy climb? Leave the shock open for maximum traction. Need to pound out a fire road to the top of the mountain? Firm the shock up to make the most of your effort.


A zippy trail bike can make you feel like a rockstar on a lot of climbs, but the price to pay is more feedback, more attention required, and probably more fatigue over the long haul because of it. Conversely, the Fuel is happy for you to stay seated while spinning straight up, over, and through all sorts of rocky, rooty steps and chunder, and especially when the suspension is left wide open. Picture the nastiest technical climb in your 'hood and now picture yourself owning both an Ibis Ripley and this new Fuel EX. Not a terrible life, right? On the Ripley, your best approach is to lock onto whatever the so-called ''right line'' is and dance your way up with perfect form before taking a sip of the watermelon-infused soda water in your Polar bottle. Mmmm, delicious and rewarding, even though you're schvitzing a tiny bit.

The Fuel is more lenient when it comes to silly stuff like choosing a good line, which is to say that you might do just fine going straight up that pitch in the same way that you'll probably be fine drinking from that slow-moving creek at the top because you didn't bring any water. It's a more relaxed, forgiving approach, but just as rewarding and delicious.


Trek Fuel EX 9.8 X01 Photo by Dane Perras
The active suspension smooths out rough climbs as if the bike had more travel than it actually does.


Let's get into the meat of this compliment sandwich, with the Fuel EX's baloney being its aforementioned pedaling manners. Leave the Fox shock's blue lever flipped to the open mode and it seems to gobble up a bit too much of its stroke when some weight shifts are required to get up or around something, even with a low amount sag. That said, I suspect that the steeper seat angle (that could be steeper still) has helped the Fuel feel a touch more efficient, but most riders will still resort to adding some hot sauce to this sandwich via the blue pedal-assist switch when faced with any sort of smooth climb.

That's exactly what Trek intended, of course, so while I might not agree with the approach, I can't argue that it isn't effective.

That also means that I probably shouldn't use this as another opportunity to go on and on about how a bike like the Fuel EX, a 130mm-travel trail bike, shouldn't need to be helped out by turning its suspension off... But that's also exactly what I'm going to do. When I'm riding a trail bike, I want to be able to just get on it and climb all the things before I turn around and go down all the things, and I want to do all of those things without feeling like I need to firm up my suspension to get the best performance out of the bike. Of course, 'need' is a subjective term, and many or most might disagree with me, but that's my take on it.
Trek Fuel EX 9.8 GX Photo by Dane Perras
Depending on the trail, the Fuel EX might not be a set-and-forget kind of bike. The pedal-assist lever lets you choose how the suspension performs, and it's worth using.

Back to the bread. The upside of that active suspension and said blue lever is that you can decide if you want the bike to be firm or forgiving. There's a massive difference in the feel of each setting, but both are still usable.

Long, boring fire road climb forcing you to think about all the wrong decisions that you've made in your life? I feel you on that one, but you can pour on the hot sauce, AKA the blue lever, and get the ascent behind with some dignity. Steep and/or technical climb that requires all of your attention and skill? Leave the suspension open and let the 130mm of squish do the chewing for you.


Mike Levy Trek Fuel EX 9.9 X01 Photo by Dane Perras
The great thing about modern trail bikes isn't only how capable they are, but also how much fun they can be on tame terrain. The Fuel EX is no different.


Descending

The traits that largely define how the Fuel EX climbs - active, forgiving suspension - play an even more important role in the bike's personality when the hard part is behind you and it's time for dessert. The same could be said of the previous version, too, but we're asking a hell of a lot more of our trail bikes on the downhills these days than we were just a few short years ago.

One thing that you won't ever have to ask the Fuel twice for is traction and compliance. Fox and Trek have put together what feels like a stiction-free suspension system, which is obviously not possible, but the back of the bike could trick you into believing exactly that. The high-volume, mid-weight Bontrager rubber has to be a factor in that, so I installed a set of Maxxis tires on both the Trek and another soon-to-be-released trail bike with the same intentions and similar travel. The result? The Fuel EX was still magnitudes more forgiving, despite having the same tires at the same pressure and the sag being within a few millimeters of each other.


Mike Levy Trek Fuel EX 9.9 X01 Photo by Dane Perras
Mike Levy Trek Fuel EX 9.9 X01 Photo by Dane Perras
The active suspension does well to smooth out edges and chatter that would upset a lot of other trail bikes.


Sure, one big hit could ruin your day, but it's really the thousands and thousands of smaller, chattery impacts that erode your body and abilities over hours and hours of riding. On the Trek, it feels like there might only be a few hundred of those during a ride, and that's the kind of thing that makes a massive difference over a long day, or even just a long, tiring downhill. The bike is magic at muting that sort of stuff, and as you'd expect, it's not as likely to deflect off of such things than a less forgiving machine, which makes a lot of those "Ohhhh shit'' moments disappear.

I sort of want to describe descending the on Fuel EX as being a relatively calm experience given how it eats that small to mid-sized chatter that usually upsets bikes in this category, but that's only half the story.

Here's the other half. When things ramp up, be it your speed or the trail's intensity, that forgiving suspension starts to feel a little bit too forgiving when the shock is left in the open mode. It's almost as if you've eaten a few too many servings of dessert and gained a pound or ten. It'll take the edge away from roots and rocks, sure, but it can also make it harder to understand what's happening under you if that makes any sense. Let me put it this way: When I'm on a short-ish travel bike like the Fuel, I expect to have to think about what's under my tires and what I'm pointing at - that's part of the fun. But when I'm pushing hard with the suspension left open, it often comes across like it's trying to be a 150mm bike, only not in the way I'd like it to.


Mike Levy Trek Fuel EX 9.9 X01 Photo by Dane Perras
The Fuel EX is most at home covering ground and focusing on fun. You can get loose on it, too, but that's not its MO.


With the Fox shock in the open mode and the O-ring saying just under 25-percent sag, dynamic moves that require a lot of body English and commitment weren't as comfortable as I would have hoped. The 130mm of squish felt much deeper than that at those moments, and the result is a vague, imprecise ride when you're at your personal ten-tenths.

Let me beat some of you to the comment section: ''Levy, you idiot, just run less sag or, you know, firm the shock up with that blue lever like Trek intended.'' Yes, the bike was much more to my liking at those ten-tenths efforts when it was in the middle setting, but there are plenty of other short-travel bikes that work well all the time without needing a different suspension mode.

I did firm it up anyway, though, for science, and I tried a few different kinds of smaller-volume rubber as well. Those changes lit a fire under the Fuel's ass, and I was much more comfortable on it when things got hairy (for a trail bike). For riders who seek out the hairy, I suspect that the Fox shock's blue lever will offer more of a wet and/or cruisy mode (open) and a dry, go-fast mode (firm), which isn't a terrible way to look at it at all. Trek's best-of-both-worlds approach to the Fuel's suspension is effective, that's for sure, but I'd like to see it offer more support and ramp-up so the bike could spend most or even all of its time in the open mode.


Mike Levy Trek Fuel EX 9.9 X01 Photo by Dane Perras
Plenty of traction and revised geometry make the new Fuel EX much more capable than the previous version.


On the handling front, this is easily the most capable Fuel EX that Trek has ever created. No surprises there given the geometry changes, and it allows the 130mm bike to comfortably roll into chutes that I'm not sure I would have been so flippant about if I was aboard on the previous version. We all know how this goes; it's less pointy, less nervous, more composed, and therefore more confidence-inspiring. There, review done! Not really, though, as I have to say that while Trek could have easily added much more length than they did and also have gone a bit slacker, not doing so keeps the new Fuel from losing that nimbleness that some other bikes are happily trading away to go pretend enduro-ing.

The Fuel EX is still a trail bike through and through, and while it might love the steep and gnarly a whole lot more than the previous version did, it's still a hoot to ride on rolling, flowy descents. Of course, you'll likely want the suspension to be firm-ish to get the most out of said rolling descent, so don't hesitate to reach for the shock's go-switch.

The revised geometry has opened up more terrain to the Fuel, which is exactly what should be happening with the all these new trail bikes, but it's also easy to ride. It doesn't ask you to take a different approach to an ultra-tight corner or awkward section of trail, and it's still relatively stable when the corner is ultra-fast or there's no berm to save your ass.
Mike Levy Trek Fuel EX 9.9 X01 Photo by Dane Perras
The Fuel loves a bit of jank, but who doesn't?

Is the Fuel EX one of the most capable trail bikes out there? Nope, as its forgiving suspension and middle of the road geometry keep it from getting that nod, but it is the kind of bike that's going to be at home in a wide variety of terrain, some pretty damn steep and scary lines included.






Technical Report

XT Four-Piston Brakes: My 9.9 X01 test bike is spec'd with Shimano's new four-piston XT brakes that offer plenty of power, but the bite point moved around too much for me to ever feel all that comfortable with them. If you want to know more, here's a full-length review from back in July.

That Hole: Trek's downtube holds stuff just as well as Specialized's downtube, but for what it's worth, the former's latch is a bit easier to open and close with gloved hands. If I'm honest, I've never put much in the hole beyond a light jacket, a samosa or three, some delicious dates, a folding dog bowl, a knife, an energy drink, some candy, a slingshot, a small paperback novel, my headphones, and bag of chorizo sausage, but it seemed to work fine anyway.


Trek Fuel EX 9.8 GX Photo by Dane Perras
Trek Fuel EX 9.8 GX Photo by Dane Perras
Wide Bontrager carbon rims and a 140mm-travel Fox 36 with a Grip2 damper, both of which were flawless.


Carbon Fiber Wheels: Bontrager's Line Pro 30 TLR (BLP30TLR for short?) carbon wheels cost $1,300 USD if you wanted to buy them on their own, a relative steal compared to most other non-alloy wheelsets out there, and they didn't have a single hiccup during my time on them. The 29mm inner width is ideal for the bike's intended use, and while I tend to cringe at straight-pull spokes, I never needed to true them, making the spokes a moot point. The BLP30TLRs weigh around 1,700-grams, too, so they're relatively light.


Trek Fuel EX 9.8 GX Photo by Dane Perras
The chain (which was the correct length) rattled on the chainstay too much, even when it was up in one of the larger cogs. It's easily fixable, but I would have liked to see a quieter solution come stock on the bike.


Other Mentionables: Have I ever told you that Fox's Grip2 damper is impressive? Only a few hundred times, I bet. Having it inside the bike's 140mm-travel 36 makes for a stiff, high-performance package that's hard to beat if you're not counting grams. I'm still deciding how I feel about the 2.6" wide XR4 Team Issue tires (sometimes they're awesome but not all the times) but I rode the bike with a set of Maxxis DHF/DHR EXO+ tires installed, as well as e*thirteen's new and very impressive rubber, and prefer the less muted feel of lower volume tires. And Knock Block... I won't moan too much, but I wouldn't be doing my job if I didn't tell you that I bumped up against the steering-stopper while trying to get up technical climbs during roughly half of my rides. Granted, they're probably not the kind of climbs that most riders have to face too often, but it's a factor for me so it might be for you, too.



Ibis Ripley Photo by Dane Perras
The SB130 (left) has 130mm of travel, while the Ripley (right) has 120mm of travel. Both are intended for the same kind of riding as the new Fuel EX.

How does it compare?

Two bikes come to mind when I'm on the Fuel EX, and they're at opposite ends of the trail bike spectrum. Yeti's SB130 is the obvious cage match contender, and while both would make a rig from only a few years ago look antiquated, the SB130 seems to pedal with more urgency and its suspension is more supportive. The other option is Ibis' new Ripley that has a bit less travel but is designed to do the same type of riding. The Ripley feels more efficient, no surprise there, but it's also much less forgiving than the Fuel.

If I thought I might do the odd cross-country race, or would choose sportiness over forgiveness, the Ripley would be the bike. That said, the Fuel gives you room for error that the scalpel-like Ripley doesn't.



Pros

+ Forgiving, deep feeling suspension
+ It's a wizard on technical climbs
+ New geometry increases capabilities

Cons

- It might be too forgiving for some riders
- You'll be using the pedal assist lever often
- Trek could have gone further with the geometry



Is this the bike for you?

Sometimes it's difficult to boil down who best suits a bike, especially as they seem to get more and more capable each year, but it's an easy one with the Fuel EX. If you put comfort and compliance at the top of your priority list, love long days on the bike, or especially if just want a capable mountain bike to, you know, ride trails without needing to pretend you're the star of a some two-minute-long 'shredit' for the internet, I suspect that the Fuel EX could be just the ticket.

Those people who like to take chances on their short-travel bike, know that forgiving doesn't always mean fast, and look for the lines less ridden probably won't fall in love with the new Fuel EX. Yes, of course you can set the bike up to your liking and do whatever the hell you want on it, but that doesn't mean that you're getting the best out of it.



Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesTrek walked a bit of a line with their new Fuel EX in that it's not the most capable trail bike you could be on, but it's also a lot more capable than its predecessor. Look elsewhere if you like to get a bit saucy on your trail bike, but the Fuel is a good example of an all-around machine that is going to be an ideal for the majority of riders who simply want a capable, forgiving rig. Mike Levy








330 Comments

  • 438 6
 So Specialized has the S.W.A.T box.
Does that mean Trek has the T.W.A.T box?
  • 25 9
 comment of the year
  • 9 1
 Well....there it is....
  • 12 0
 Kind of redundant.
  • 13 42
flag endurocat (Aug 15, 2019 at 8:51) (Below Threshold)
 Mike, we all know that you don't like Shimano brakes. We also know about those special perks you get from Sram.
  • 22 3
 What about H.O.T. box — Hidden On Trek? More marketable.
  • 20 2
 I think it should be named after the Putting In Something Sometimes flap, or P.I.S.S flap for short
  • 112 10
 Someone at Specialized started his laptop, opened Pinkbike, this page, read the TWAT comment, closed the laptop, made a coffee, added sugar, took a spoon, started slowly slowly stirring it as he went outside. The wind was blowing a bit, some truck drove by, he looked into the distance. Camera steps back moves away, suddenly we hear silent, low pitch giggling... the end
  • 8 0
 @WAKIdesigns: perhaps Spec will make a video for us to show us that sequence.
  • 16 0
 It wasn’t long ago that Trek posted a video defending knock block while subsequently criticizing “other brands’” downtube storage for compromising their stiffness. Classic bike marketing.
  • 21 2
 Trek calls it B.I.T.S. Its obviously Best Idea Taken from Specialized
  • 8 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I love this but I have to point out that a low pitch giggle is in fact a chuckle...
  • 2 3
 Only $7500 and has a SWAT box for my weed stocks!
  • 1 2
 Every down tube should have a port hole.
  • 1 0
 I wonder if I can put my Dremel to good use and make one on my Slash 9.9?
  • 122 2
 New rule: If you have a bike with a build spec designated as "X01" and costs more than $5 grand, you aren't allowed to put a a damn GX Cassette on it. Christ!
  • 1 0
 Preach!
  • 55 5
 TWAT.
  • 17 1
 Trek Wide Access Trunk?
  • 2 0
 Or.... Trek Wide Access Trunk... Bung Anything Down Gap Easilly Retrieve.
  • 70 4
 ALL I WANT TO KNOW IS DOES THIS BIKE COME WITH THE CHORIZO SAUSAGE ALREADY INSTALLED IN THE DOWNTUBE? I DEMAND ANSWERS.
  • 45 0
 @IamTheDogEzra: No, you'll have to insert your own sausage.
  • 54 0
 @IamTheDogEzra: We'd have to make you order that one in Project One Ultimate
  • 10 0
 @trek: Coming from Wisconsin, I would expect a brat in the compartment to be an option..
  • 4 0
 Trek marketing sneakin in here being all funny.
  • 17 2
 T.W.A.T. - Trek Weed Access Tube
  • 11 1
 @lumpy873: The brat is preferred
  • 6 0
 @ninjatarian: so you have to insert your own sausage into the T.W.A.T Box
  • 1 0
 @trek: even more important is what you drink with the brat...
  • 2 0
 @lumpy873:

Or at least a tasty block of cheddar.
  • 10 3
 @trek: THE ONLY QUESTION I HAVE TO KNOW IS WHERE WOULD YOU PROCURE THESE WURST? MEASURE YOUR RESPONSE CAREFULLY. I KNOW DOGS IN YOUR REGION WITH DISCERNING TASTE.
  • 2 0
 @trek: beer recovery access tube?
  • 1 0
 @IamTheDogEzra: I hope they source those locally... Outsourcing in that department would be an unforgivable offense...
  • 53 5
 Sounds like you had a hard time saying it’s a good bike
  • 6 0
 sounds like 80% of the complains he has originate with that proprietary rear shock. I wish we could get more analysis on how different that rear shock is, from traditional fox floats to other brands. Thats the main differentiating part of the bike, after all.

I wonder how much better this would perform with a Can Creek IL, for instance. Give Levy that support he needs without locking it out.
  • 22 7
 Ya, this whole review reads "it sucks" without saying "it sucks"
  • 20 6
 @tgent: That's not what I read at all. What I got out of the article is that it's a good trail bike and exceptional climber but he doesn't care for switches and it isn't one of the new breed of 130's that think they're mini-enduros.

I've seen Mike Levy saying something sucks, and this isn't it.
  • 12 7
 @ICKYBOD: It's not a good trail bike, it's a good "mellow, forgiving bike" that gets easily overwhelmed when hitting any real terrain. It also isn't an exceptional climber, it's very inefficient climbing because of the overly active suspension and the only time it is good is when it's super technical and you want a lot of traction.

This is about as close to saying it sucks as I've seen a Levy review, but I also think he does a great job explaining why he doesn't like it and giving it points for what it does do well.
  • 12 3
 @tgent: naw, look at the xt brake review if you want to see a more clear recent example.

But he didn't say what you said he said.

"It's not a good trail bike, it's a good "mellow, forgiving bike" that gets easily overwhelmed when hitting any real terrain ***until I put on different smaller tires that lit a fire under the bikes ass***. It also isn't an exceptional climber, it's very inefficient climbing because of the overly active suspension ***unless you hit the blue switch, which as he hates as a reviewer, but he acknowledged it was effective*** and the only time it is good is when it's super technical and you want a lot of traction ***where it is a wizard***

So what I got out of it is: Trek made some design decisions to make it plush including 2.6 tires and a soft shock mode that is maybe a little to soft and forgiving. Mike doesn't like levers but the lever did make a difference and so did switching to tires that are more Mikes speed. I also read:

"The revised geometry has opened up more terrain to the Fuel, which is exactly what should be happening with the all these new trail bikes, but it's also easy to ride. It doesn't ask you to take a different approach to an ultra-tight corner or awkward section of trail, and it's still relatively stable when the corner is ultra-fast or there's no berm to save your ass. "

"Is the Fuel EX one of the most capable trail bikes out there? Nope, as its forgiving suspension and middle of the road geometry keep it from getting that nod, but it is the kind of bike that's going to be at home in a wide variety of terrain, some pretty damn steep and scary lines included."

"On the handling front, this is easily the most capable Fuel EX that Trek has ever created. No surprises there given the geometry changes, and it allows the 130mm bike to comfortably roll into chutes that I'm not sure I would have been so flippant about if I was aboard on the previous version." (side note- Pinkbike has said positive things about the old FEX).

Sounds like a decent trailbike.
  • 5 1
 @hamncheez: I'll contribute to the other 20%. WHAT THE F%CK IS WITH THE BIKE BRANDS AND THOSE UNREAL SEAT ANGLES???

75° my *ss.
  • 3 0
 @hamncheez: i have the 2017 fuel ex and i had hte same issues. granted i'm about 215 kitted. read quite a bit into other's issues on mtbr. had to run more sag and volume token to get it to feel adequate. that reactiv is great as a general trail tune but as soon as you get aggressive it starts to choke. i noticed mine had what felt like a bump in the suspension curve, like it gives, ramps, then lets go on square or repeat hits. i put a dpx2 on mine and it changed the game. so much better in every way in every switch position.
  • 3 0
 I kept waiting for Levy to refer readers seeking more capability to the Remedy....
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: FWIW I remain steadfast (and apparently in the minority) that shock switches are geometry-preservers. Firm up for climbs and keep that seat angle. Flip to party mode for the shenanigans.
  • 1 0
 That's exactly what I felt too. He was really harsh, especially when the bottom line is that it's a great bike. Not often you see that kind of rant. I understand what he says and can absolutely see the problem. But it's like he holds a grudge of some sort...
  • 2 0
 This is the kind of bike I ride. I put out plenty of power so some inefficient suspension is ok. Why I won't buy it is because it will never be at a price I'm willing to pay.
  • 2 0
 @sngltrkmnd: I don't mind switches either, but they should be on the handlebar....heehee
  • 2 0
 @southoftheborder: This... The new yetis got it right in the seat angle department.
  • 2 0
 @bohns1: Yup, or Guerrilla Gravity, or Nicolai... Not many manufacturers out there escaping the "knee" seat tube trap and listing BS as the ST angle.
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: Hbar switches sure are convenient but not a feature that I seek. Where I live we have sustained 20-30 minute climbs (or longer) followed by big descents. I seldom flip my lever more than twice a ride so the hbar access isn’t necessary for me.
  • 1 0
 @sngltrkmnd: Not much geometry adjustment is happening when you only have 130mm of travel....
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: At first blush, maybe not. But w proper sag on a 130mm travel bike, a steep enough climb may mean 1-2-3’ slacker SA, right? Anyhow, I also like to tune out the bob w compression adjust when on a non-REAKTIV bike.
  • 2 0
 @demoflight: I just don't get it. Look at any forum and you'll see loads of riders swapping out the DPX2 on 17-19' Fuel Ex's...nearly all saying it absolutely transformed the bike. The SB130 has it with rave reviews...I don't get why Trek wouldn't have put the DPX2 on this bike?
  • 45 10
 Too forgiving? when is that ever a con? that's like saying the downside of eating pasta is too satisfying.
  • 16 1
 When it's unsupportive.
  • 13 1
 If you blow through your travel too quickly, esp. on a shorter travel bike....
  • 9 0
 Mmm, I love pasta.
  • 11 0
 I think that’s a nice way of saying it’s too soft and not progressive enough. Meaning that if you are riding enduroey/ bike park trails you need either less sag or a bunch of volume spacers to avoid a bunch of bottom outs
  • 11 1
 Except when that pasta makes you fat. Too forgiving = bottoming out
  • 8 4
 Wollowy and slow, like my old Trek was.
  • 5 1
 Why not toss in a volume reducer to the shock to get it a bit more progressive if that's what you want?
  • 4 0
 @vanillarice19: because volume spacers tend to not add much midstroke support.
  • 5 0
 @Monsterman156: Did you try moving your legs faster?
  • 2 0
 @jeremy3220: Mmm, I love midstroke support.
  • 12 1
 The whole point of selling your Enduro bike and buying a Down Country bike is to brag to your friends who kept their Enduro bikes, how not overbiked you finally are, how effective with much feedback your rear end is. Big Grin
  • 40 0
 My asian parents are pretty unforgiving and don't provide much support. I wish I could put tokens in them to make them more progressive.
  • 4 1
 @Ron-C: gold!
  • 1 0
 @Ron-C: These white people have no idea!! Top comment
  • 1 1
 @hamncheez: says the white mormon from provo
  • 1 0
 @Ron-C: I'm working with some Asian students right now as I read your comment. I'm trying hard not to laugh out loud and distract them from their work. Thx!
  • 1 0
 @RentalBike: Not white not from Provo

But I am from Hawaii and I am Asian
  • 32 1
 Best sentence of the review. "If I'm honest, I've never put much in the hole beyond a light jacket, a samosa or three, some delicious dates, a folding dog bowl, a knife, an energy drink, some candy, a slingshot, a small paperback novel, my headphones, and bag of chorizo sausage, but it seemed to work fine anyway."

Maybe the best sentence of any review and it sarcastically sheds light on all the crap we need to ride. In frame bike storage sounds like the best thing ever. Thank you Specialized, and how Trek. Catch up, industry.
  • 3 1
 It sounds more impressive if it was all in there at the same time.
  • 4 0
 Yes! The whole review was bloody terrific, but this part made me chuckle.
  • 52 21
 Cool bike, but why would you buy this when you can buy the Specialized stumpjumper? Threaded bb and none of that reaktiv crap
  • 61 1
 Is this where the world has come to? Specialized being recommended when it comes to proprietary stuff.
  • 16 40
flag TylerG96 (Aug 15, 2019 at 8:12) (Below Threshold)
 because the fuel rides so much better than a stumpy, specialized makes crap bikes
  • 18 5
 My partner is looking for a good starter bike, looking around the $3000CAD mark. This new Fuel EX 5 is $2800 and has good suspension, shimano drivetrain, dropper post, great tubeless tires, and really solid geo. The cheapest stumpjumper in the range is $4000, a totally different price bracket.
  • 3 1
 @maximell: Now you should be looking at last years models, they should be getting nice little discounts. Maybe enough to get the next model or two better!
  • 1 0
 @bobthestapler: True! Hadn't considered that. I liked the last generation bike as well.
  • 5 16
flag freeridejerk888 (Aug 15, 2019 at 9:57) (Below Threshold)
 No trek makes crap bikes @TylerG96:
  • 5 0
 That's a pretty simplistic take. There is more to a bike than it's bb standard and shock. Not even sure what you think is wrong with Re:activ.
  • 7 5
 Why would you buy a Specialized Stumpjumper when you could buy an even more awesome bike from other companies who aren't corporate bullies and who don't just pour cash into advertising
  • 1 5
flag WAKIdesigns (Aug 15, 2019 at 15:15) (Below Threshold)
 @mkul7r4: you mean like YT?
  • 1 0
 @rowanlewis: i worte this further up but: i have the 2017 fuel ex and i had hte same issues. granted i'm about 215 kitted. read quite a bit into other's issues on mtbr. had to run more sag and volume token to get it to feel adequate. that reactiv is great as a general trail tune but as soon as you get aggressive it starts to choke. i noticed mine had what felt like a bump in the suspension curve, like it gives, ramps, then lets go on square or repeat hits. i put a dpx2 on mine and it changed the game. so much better in every way in every switch position.
  • 1 0
 I like the reactive, Mike is right. sometimes I need the blue switch but its usually only when I'm getting tired on a steep climb near the end of a ride. its way smoother than any Santa Cruz vpp thats for sure. My 2018 fuel ex handles some big stuff but of course falls apart on tech at DH speed. Great all-round bike for recreational riders doing the occasional xc or enduro race.
  • 3 1
 This is funny, because the Re:Aktiv shock with thru shaft on the Slash is AMAZING!!!! It allows the bike to be a very efficient pedaler but still take big hits and chatter like they're nothing. I also never felt the need to touch the blue lever when climbing some steep, big stuff here in Colorado. It climbs almost as good as my Spot Rollik, which is known as a very efficient climber. The Slash uses a Rockshox shock though...
  • 3 4
 @BaeckerX1: you haven’t ridden an amazing shock then my friend. Reaktivs are decent but they are not outstanding like X2, CCDBair or coil shocks like DHX2, EXT, TTX, CCDBcoil
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: oh really? I've ridden more shocks than you know, including DVO and PUSH. This one does great on this bike. Thanks for telling me what I've ridden though...
  • 2 0
 @BaeckerX1: then we have to agree to disagree. If I bought a Slash and I actually considered doing it lately, the shock would be on the way out directly with wheels and Sram drivetrain. And I rode every single shock I mentioned, I also rode Slash 9.8 for a whole day no longer than 2 months ago
  • 2 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Well then it's nice that we have choices and you can ride whatever you like. For me it worked awesome, and I stand by that statement.
  • 1 1
 @BaeckerX1: i did call it decent. I just wouldn’t write home about it.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: depends on what you prefer. I prefer racier, firm suspension, and not plush and plow, so maybe it's just a feel thing. I find it to be very efficient when pedaling, and opens up nicely for all the big hits and bumps. The regressive damping is really nice in my opinion. It makes a big difference for our massive climbs out here. It's not just me either.

www.bikemag.com/gear/reaktiv-detailed-look-treks-f1-inspired-shock
www.bikemag.com/gear-features/bike-shop/bike-shop-trek-thru-shaft-revolution-evolution-or-neither
  • 2 1
 @BaeckerX1: I don’t like plush. But with CC/TTX/EXT/DHX2 you get both plush and stability. At least as long as you can set it up right. Reaktivs compression may indeed be better than standard float or monarch but rebound is just as average. It still, just like every single air shock, blows through travel at lower shaft speeds. You’ll not bottom it off a 6ft huck to flat but then it will fold in half in berms or on smooth landings
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: ride smoother. I've never had that problem. Ha. Air shocks are naturally progressive and with a progressive linkage as well, you shouldn't ever see that.
  • 2 0
 @WAKIdesigns: " I don’t like plush. But with CC/TTX/EXT/DHX2 you get both plush and stability. At least as long as you can set it up right. Reaktivs compression may indeed be better than standard float or monarch but rebound is just as average. It still, just like every single air shock, blows through travel at lower shaft speeds. You’ll not bottom it off a 6ft huck to flat but then it will fold in half in berms or on smooth landings"

That just ain't true. Maybe you rode an old one or something and they fixed it since. Just not my experience at all on my 19 remedy.
  • 3 2
 @BaeckerX1: Reactive is trash. Why does everyone swap them out then? I haven’t seen a single reactive shock stay on a slash
  • 1 0
 @freeridejerk888: Plenty of bike reviewers disagree with you. And how many Slashes do you see anyway? Do you even own the bike? This is a trash comment. Mine will stay on it. There's 1. Start counting pal.
  • 1 0
 @ICKYBOD: Yep, my 2020 Slash rides awesome. Maybe the demo shock had issues on the one Waki rode (if he even rode it at all) since he doesn't own the bike, like most armchair Pinkbike commenters here. I have the bike, but it's my first Trek I've ever owned. I also own a Spot Rollik, and a Transition Smuggler. I've owned lots of bikes from many different companies. I'm far from a fanboy. If it didn't handle as well as it did, I wouldn't have bought it. You can ride the Slash down a flight of concrete stairs without even feeling it, then turn around and pedal up those stairs no issues. I know, because I did it on my first demo ride. It's been 'slashing' trails ever since. Smile
  • 1 2
 @rowanlewis: it constantly leaks fluid, for one
  • 2 0
 @freeridejerk888: mine has stayed on and worked flawlessly since last october, reaktiv shocks are awesome. my slash feels bottomless and i can climb as good as any lower travel trail bike
  • 1 0
 @pedalingbobby: you know that was a run of bad shocks from either Rockshox or Fox (not even Trek's fault) and Trek took care of it for free under warranty to all affected owners? There's a service bulletin for it, and it doesn't affect the new shocks.
  • 2 0
 @pedalingbobby: it was Rockshox.

My name is Dave and I did the thru-shaft project on the rock shox side of things.

..........

Finally the leaking issue- some shocks (too many) had the lower shaft seal rolled or cut on the assembly line during the initial production run- this issue has been solved. The good news is that if you got a bad one- it leaked immediately on the first ride. If the seal is good- the shocks are pretty bombproof.
  • 1 0
 Funny you should say this. I am on vacation right now and rented an XL SJ and have to say I am blown away. It rides way better than my new Trek and that really pisses me off especially since it's a lot less expensive. It's a lot of bike for the dollar and yes, a threaded BB.

Being tall I never get to test ride a bike since shops seldom stock XLs let alone XXLs. So I bought the 2020 Fuel EX 8 sight unseen and....it's just OK so far. Not really impressed with it's climbing or descending ability but to be fair, it's early and I need to sort the bugs out. But so far I would have to give it a big Meh.

Wished I would have seen this review first. It seems like a lot of glowing Fuel owner reviews always start out with "this is my first full suspension mountain bike".....
  • 1 0
 It’s because treks are just “ok”. That’s it. Nothing special maple just happen to be a lot less ok then others. Really shoulda look at Santa Cruz intense yeti ect for an amazing bike at very similar prices @BCRoider:
  • 1 0
 @BCRoider: my trek gave me all that i asked for. i'm not saying that the others wouldnt and i dont think i'd be staying on trek for my next bike. that said, i think there's a lot to be said about the shock tune. i had to do a bit of fiddling with mine to make it somewhat work for me and then i put on a dpx2 and it changed it.
  • 1 0
 @freeridejerk888: I am 6'05" which pretty much narrows it down to Trek, Santa Cruz or Rocky (only the Element) since they are the only manufacturers I am aware of that carry XXLs. OK I think YT does as well. I found a shop I really like and decided to patronize them and they carry Trek. But now I see a SC in the horizon especially after attending a demo day here in Phoenix.

And I also made the mistake of looking at the components you get per dollar. The Fuel EX 8 comes with GX and a similar price SC NX. Word of advice to anyone out there, don't focus on components unless everything else is equal. Fit and how it rides are all that matters.
  • 1 0
 @BCRoider: You don't need an XXL. You just need a proper XL Big Grin

Take a look at the new Norco Sight, it might just fit the bill in XL. It might be a smidge short, but overall it doesn't look bad.
  • 25 1
 Good thorough review.

This is going to make an incredible trail bike for most riders that don't have the ability to consistently push a trail bike to it's limits, aka 90% of riders. Arguably Trek nailed it for it's intended audience. The problem comes when people read reviews and overestimate their abilities and terrain.

And the TWAT thing is just awesome, must have on my next bike I must say. The bike is a good value as well.
  • 1 0
 You’re right. Levy didn’t like the latest stump jumper for some of the same reasons as this trek, “too forgiving”, or “active” rear end. But a lot of people love it. I’m not interested in this bike, as I have my trail category covered, but I will say this bike looks great cosmetically.
  • 21 0
 Trek’s Treasure Trunk looks sweet.
  • 34 5
 Now you can Stache your Fuel
  • 5 1
 @WAKIdesigns: What would it be if there was a stash in your Stache? Hmmm
  • 3 0
 @trek: flavor savor
  • 2 0
 @trek: what about Stache Ex? Is she coming too?
  • 1 0
 @trek: Stashception
  • 21 0
 I wonder if I can stuff a hot dog in the Bontrager Booty Hole?
  • 4 0
 How about just, the Bont Hole?
  • 2 0
 I think Booty Hole is genius!!
  • 2 0
 @h-beck83: How about Donut Hole?
  • 21 3
 One big complaint on the 9.8 Model. They spec a carbon wheelset, but then just average suspension. TREK, keep your carbon wheels and give me some good suspension instead damn it!! I don't give a shit about carbon wheels!
  • 4 0
 I told my Trek rep the same thing... That should at least have an Elite level fork from Fox... But, with the couple thousand you save on the 9.8, you can buy the nicer cartridge, drop it in, and still have money in your pocket... I did that on my Slash 8...
  • 7 0
 @lumpy873: "Couple thousand I save"? Dude, $5500 is getting to the top of my budget as it is! Ultimately that's why I wish they would ditch the carbon wheels and give me some good suspension... I don't want to spend any more than $5400-5800 on a bike.

+1 on the Elite level for sure.
  • 4 4
 Or you can just buy a consumer direct full carbon bike with good suspension and good components for 2/3 the price
  • 1 0
 @mybaben: compared to the 9.9... But, I feel you on the budget restraints... That's why I went with the alloy Slash...
  • 12 0
 Wasn't planning to get excited, geo confirmed my initial thoughts..........But seeing Trek put a hatch in the down tube is pretty neat. I assumed Specialized had that on lock down, but looks like Trek has figured out a way. Which means the door may be open for other manufacturers also. Having a Stumpy Evo with a SWAT box has been a game changer, absolutely love the storage. One day I would like the option of down tube storage across several brands. Perhaps in 5 years the down tube storage will be as common as a "does it fit a water bottle". (Not going to even try an acronym for the Trek box, will leave that door open for others.)
  • 2 0
 I always had a thought about a cavity similar to a swat but it houses a proprietary bottle for the frame. This would open up suspension designs and still fit a water bottle.
  • 3 1
 How is it a game changer- frame bag does the same thing.
  • 3 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: you ever stuff a maple bar in a frame bag?
  • 1 1
 @Tmackstab: exactly. just make a bottle or rather a canister in a shape that perfectly fits in the frame. Then add a hose coming out right behind the head tube. Canister could easily store a liter of water, check out how massive the downtube on Slash is.
  • 2 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: Frame bag does not do the same thing, because you need the frame bag, which takes additional space. With the SWAT, it's just the bike, and if you wanted more storage, you could still buy the darn frame bag.

In my SWAT box: Tube, pump, toolbag, big ass burrito, and still space. This bike has enabled me to do unsupported 60+ mile races without any pack or frame bag, which gets in the way when you have to carry the bike across creeks, over logs, etc. Liberating to never ride with a pack and always be prepared.
  • 4 0
 @Lokirides: and sometimes a light rain jacket, water filter, space blanket and condoms (Whistler area).
  • 1 0
 @JDFF: Must be nice to ride in a magical land where you need condoms inside your bike. (I prefer to think of idyllic landscapes with random maidens and really hope you're not just riding around picking up slags in the village on your bike). Ha.
  • 2 1
 @Lokirides: Well some of us have more than one bike. So when I switch bikes- grab the bag and move to the other bike.
  • 15 2
 A.S.S. Hole Accessible Storage Space
  • 12 1
 The (S)tuff (H)idden (I)n (T)ubes Box.
  • 1 0
 The Fantastic And Rad Tool Box aka FARTBox
  • 10 3
 Looks like it's the same recipe as it was 6 years ago.

I had the 2013 Fuel EX. Top handling capabilities but I had same comment: " When things ramp up, be it your speed or the trail's intensity, that forgiving suspension starts to feel a little bit too forgiving when the shock is left in the open mode."

Had to run less sag and tweak the shocks to avoid repeated bottomings. That lead to less small bump compliance. Uncomfortable.

It took 2 cracked chainstays before I gave up on this bike. Pretty slow learner I am...
  • 2 1
 This is so true, and the main reason I got rid of my Trek too. I never broke a chain stay but I always felt like the rear was blowing through it's travel way too fast and squatting to much. At the time there was a cottage industry to re-tune rear shocks to take care of these issues.
  • 1 1
 Same. My 2010 made travel disappear. I was able to get the best setup with a Vorsprung corset and high sag, but it never felt right.
  • 10 0
 Where are the rate and AS graphs? Let’s see if it backs up your criticism.
  • 7 0
 You folks say it’s a four bar system, which is technically true, but it’s important to recognize that the wheel actually rotates about a single pivot, while the four bar system simply drives the shock and holds the brake.
  • 2 0
 Agreed, it's linkage driven single pivot.
  • 11 0
 As a non-racing dad-bodied weekend warrior, I approve this bicycle.
  • 6 0
 "Hmm, these two bikes are pretty comparable, but that pass thru shock really attracted me to the Trek" said no one ever.

How much R&D, marketing, tooling, and royalties did Trek pay for this stupid thing? I doubt its helped them sell a single additional bike, and their enduro riders don't even use it.
  • 9 0
 swat is that hole in the downtube doing there?
  • 8 0
 It is a very specific cutout, specialized in holding patent legislation docs.
  • 8 1
 So it’s still a wallowing mess of a pedal striker with a proprietary shock? A friend has the previous 9.8 and it is useless if you can’t time your pedals just right.
  • 3 1
 I had a friend who sold a Stumpy for the same reason ????‍♂️
  • 5 0
 My first real FS bike was a 17' trek fuel ex. Aside from the wonky geo (longer reach but slack STA and short stays, also I should've got a size larger) I got along with that bike so well. It never left Reaktiv mode. If I had to I'd probably be pretty happy with this new 2020. I've moved onto a longer travel (140/150) modern geo bike and I find myself overbiked and bored on tamer terrain (lets face it this could be up to 90% of a ride).

The shorter travel, but modernized geo, bike will be the new hotness over the next couple of years. And most of us would be much happier on one.
  • 1 0
 Just so you know, re:aktiv works across all the shock modes.
  • 1 0
 Sure @SimonVelo, technically yes it does but it’s most apparent or beneficial in the pedal/middle setting. In open I guess it is there but it sure feels open (like the review states).
  • 1 0
 @SimonVelo: It really doesn't do squat (SWAT?!) in open mode.
  • 10 2
 MOAN hole.....Marujuana and Other Necessities.
  • 5 0
 Is that price a typo? $5500 with Fox Factory suspension, nearly full SRAM X01, Line 30 carbon wheels, and xt 4 pistons? Sounds like a heck of a deal to me.
  • 4 0
 Must be. Top of the article states $7500, then says $5500 later

Edit: 9.8 is $5500, 9.9 (tested) is $7500
  • 2 0
 Beginning of article says he is reviewing the 9.9, which comes with X01. Trek has GX at the $5400 price point, so I’m assuming it’s a typo.
  • 2 0
 Yes, that's a typo. The 9.8, next one down is $5500.
  • 1 0
 I see $7500
  • 1 0
 Trek? Heck of a deal? Definitely incorrect.
  • 5 2
 This being pinkbike comments, shouldn't someone say something about Specialized suing everyone who copies them?

Guess their lawyers are getting lazy. While we're on the subject, here's an idea: Why not cover over the headtube area of the front triangle with carbon fiber and put the SWAT hole up there where you can reach it from the bars. Sorta like what triathletes do: www.dcrainmaker.com/images/2011/10/the-slow-march-towards-more-functional-triathlon-specific-bikes-7.jpg
  • 2 0
 On a MTB, that's a high stress area, especially during a fork bottom out. Either you'd be weakening the frame, or adding so much material that the added weight wouldn't be worth the benefit. It looks like this hideyhole wouldn't be hard to reach from the bars anyway.
  • 13 1
 Because on a mtn bike, I'm not taking my hands off long enough to open the box, pull out the burrito, eat said burrito, remove joint, smoke said joint, and close the box all while riding. Also I can fit a bigger burrito and joint in the the down tube rather than the top tube.
  • 9 3
 Once again a bike that suffers from Fox's miserable Float EVOL. This shock needs to die already.
  • 5 0
 What's wrong with the evol air sleeve?
  • 8 0
 @clink83: unargued inarguable opinion no. 28,990,000
  • 8 1
 "It's popular in Europe"

Lies.
  • 4 0
 Haha. In Europe it's probably "Its popular in California".

Honestly never been an issue for me on either of the Slashes I've owned or Fuels I've demo'd.

I honestly can't imagine how much stiffness theyd lose/how much weight they'd gain by putting a curve in the DT.
  • 4 1
 The knock block is a solution to a problem trek created themselves. I've never heard anymore saying the old kinked DT was too flexy. Knock block and reactiv shock are the two things that prevented me from buying the new Remedy a couple of months ago.
  • 1 0
 @nouseforaname: I’m on my 3rd Fuel. The “straight shot” downtube and the new 29mm inner diameter wheels completely altered the stiffness for the better. It’s a big difference, but the rims and 2.4 tires arrived at the same time, so I’m not sure what gets more credit.
  • 3 0
 Looking at the pros/cons, whats the problem with using the pedal assist lever on the shock? I haven't ridden a frame with the platform designed in to the suspension but it does seem that a lot of the newer suspension designs have this built in.
  • 10 1
 The pedal assist lever is great for those who want to limit the amount of bob you get from the shock when pedaling. Not everyone wants Bob, even though he's a nice guy...
  • 2 0
 @trek: thank you Smile just wondering why it's listed as a con in the review. Does the reviewer care to comment? Smile
  • 2 7
flag CircusMaximus (Aug 15, 2019 at 10:30) (Below Threshold)
 @trek: or you could design a better platform!
  • 3 1
 @CircusMaximus: welp, I'm currently on a Knolly without pedaling platform designed in (yes I flip that switch) and its a pretty f*cking fantastic ride. I can still ride without the switch on but its only worth it when I'm on a really lumpy tech climb. Otherwise I have the switch engaged. I don't see it as a problem when I get to the top to pause and flip the switch. Are we in an era where we don't have time for that switch or is a designed in platform just a natural technology progression? Also, I'm wondering if the designed in platform has a negative impact when the trail goes down?
  • 3 0
 I used the switch on my Slash on every extended climb. It preserves the seat angle so I’m better centered over the cranks regardless of the terrain. I’ll never understand the outrage. Oh well.
  • 4 1
 "I won't moan too much, but I wouldn't be doing my job if I didn't tell you that I bumped up against the steering-stopper while trying to get up technical climbs during roughly half of my rides. Granted, they're probably not the kind of climbs that most riders have to face too often, but it's a factor for me so it might be for you, too."

This quote speaks volumes
  • 7 0
 Trek Integrated Tool Storage.
  • 4 0
 I'd store my tool in the TITS
  • 10 4
 Clearly
Useful
Nduro
Toolbox

@trek you can have that for free xx
  • 6 0
 Solid review levy. I enjoyed this one
  • 2 0
 Definitely a good looking bike, but I find Trek's to be a bit boring... BUT it is a tried and true design. I am digging the compartment in the downtube. I know Specialized implemented it and I hope other company's catch on as well.
  • 4 1
 Porsche hasn't really changed the look of the cars..... They just keep getting faster.. boring isn't always bad haha
  • 4 0
 "...so I installed a set of Maxxis tires on both the Trek and another soon-to-be-released trail bike with the same intentions and similar travel." Does it rhyme with All-Roy?
  • 1 0
 I'd put my money on that. Hopefully the new TB4 keeps the TB3 efficiency
  • 2 0
 i used to ride a 2013 fuel ex9, i made it 65 degree head angle with a pike 160mm and offset bushings, it was a perfect climber, and could ride like a furious goat in the descents, if it is better now, i know what kind of monster it is :o
  • 2 0
 So basically rides like my old ‘14 Remedy. Had to use the magic lever at all times. It was vague, wallowy and energy draining to ride that bike. And yes, I set the suspension properly but could never shake the attributes of the design. No more trek for me.
  • 3 0
 Finally the new Treks are launching. Wonder when we will get the official news of the 2020 Trek Rail ebike though rideemtb.com/2019/08/08/2020-trek-rail-ebikes-appear-on-dealer-websites-ahead-of-launch
  • 2 0
 The whole thing with the shock feels to forgiving once it drops further into its travel, sounds like the typical past the reactiv platform theirs no mid stroke support at all, i ride a 2017 remedy with re-activ and its magic at the top of the stroke where re-activ is for pedaling but as soon as you break through the re-activ platform no ones home and straight to the bottom out we go....love what there trying to do but come on we are still having the same problems ? i wont buy another trek without factoring in a piggyback shock replacement unfortunately.
  • 2 0
 i like bikes and have spent thousands on a bike....now i spend around 3k on my bikes cos it's enough....more expensive bikes will not make me a better rider! so i buy my 3k bike and get some decent coaching.....if you have the money the fill your boots. I just think some bikes are mega money....rant over....thanks
  • 2 0
 I don’t understand levy’s reviews...I have a 2018 model and had some of the same sqaubbles when I started to ride the bike more towards the enduro end of things. So I did this, a Fox 36 set to 160 on front w grip2: next CCDB coil on the rear w remote, and a custom wheelset. Now this raised its potential to the point where I’m completely happy with its performance (even in enduro territory) but the main things I was wishing to see on the new models was the solid shock mount(they did), more reach(kinda did) slacker(nope) ands steeper STA(they should have done a degree or two more).. so for the most part, it’s a capable package..so unless you’re spending 10G’s on a yet, I’m left wondering what is more capable/enduroish???
  • 5 0
 How does it compare to the stumpjumper?
  • 2 0
 For as much shit as Trek likes to throw at specialized, it probably rides kind of similar to the ST stump jumper. If anything the SJ might be just a lick more progressive, maybe a little more fun to jump. I think this bike wins the “looks” department though.
  • 6 2
 we could make the shock mount taller or lets do a proprietary shock everyone loves those!
  • 2 3
 Exactly the reason I won't buy a Trek. I am not going to deal with only being able to use ONE shock. Thumbs down.
  • 8 0
 Well. It actually works out better now. The new metric size is 210x55 which actually opens up way more aftermarket options. You can even now run a coil Super Deluxe If you wanted. Personally, due to getting special pricing on Treks I'd go for a fuel and immediately swap a DPX2 on there and call it a day. At the end of the day Trek needs to fuck off with these shocks.... But atleast noe the shock sizing makes replacement easier.
  • 3 3
 @TheBearDen: i understand metric shocks and the benefit of them and such but look at the lower eyelet. its 1" long.
  • 3 1
 Learned my lesson on a Stumpjumper, never again buying a bike with proprietary anything.
  • 1 0
 @TheBearDen: I'd love to run a coil but I don't think a coil will clear the seattube...
  • 1 0
 @malerba423: according to someone at Trek (will remain anonymous) a coil will fit as an X2 was fitted to one of these and it's air can is about the same diameter as the coil shocks.

If I end up with one of these bikes I may just grab a coil off another bike and just run a test fit to see what it has for clearance.

It looks like it will be tight when bike is not in its sag but clearance will grow a but as shock is compressed and the top of shock pivots forward.

Give it some time to be out in the world and I'm sure someone else will test this out too haha.
  • 2 0
 @TheBearDen: You may be able to fit a coil, but why in the world would you? The bike is obviously way too linear for a coil and probably not aggressive enough.
  • 1 0
 @tgent: same reason people run could on bikes now that should be running them.... It's the cool thing to do!

I was more just making example. That it can be done. I never said it's a wise decision.

Bikes that can run a host of different suspension models and types is not a bad thing.
  • 1 0
 @TheBearDen: That makes sense, but I'm more concerned about that huge, weird mounting adapter at the end of the shock! I assume one would need to try and install that onto any new shock...
  • 1 0
 @mybaben: your not gonna be able to just install it on another shock. the shock will have to be made with it hence the proprietary mounting
  • 1 0
 @ktm87: Ugh, that's what I was afraid of! Sorry Trek, no purchase until you guys knock that shit off! No soup for you!!
  • 1 0
 @TheBearDen: would it be a nontrunnion 210x55 DPX2? Stock shock is confusing--trunnion with extender.
  • 3 0
 @malerba423: why coil this bike though? You take a bike with a super linear leverage curve and make it more linear? The negatives about riding this bike are that it’s too planted, has no bottom out resistance, and bobs during climbing. A coil shock would increase the negatives with no positive gains.
  • 1 0
 @mybaben: no. That's there to give space for the thru-shaft.
  • 3 0
 @ceecee: standard 210x55 is the same as trunnion 210x55

The numbers represent eye to eye length and stroke. But one mounts in the side of the shock and one through a standard eyelet with bushing.

The trunnion will have more seal overlaps and bushing overlaps blah blah. But just because the bike came with a trunnion doesn't mean it has to run one.
  • 2 0
 @ktm87: no it won't. The mount at the bottom is there to allow space for the thru-shaft. You don't need any dancing mounting hardware other than the standard stuff that comes with shocks.
  • 6 0
 The Trek Glory Hole
  • 5 0
 F.S.R. "Fancy Storage Room"

But TWAT was really good also!
  • 4 0
 I loved the previous Fuel... This looks like a nice upgrade... Mike, maybe a volume reducer in the shock might help?
  • 10 9
 Screw knock block. It prevents any sort of sharp turning. While that's fine for most riding, there's always that bit of riding that you can no longer do because your bike is holding you back. Your bike holding you back is the worst.
  • 7 0
 This happen often for you while you rode your trek?
  • 8 2
 Not really. If you're turning the bars that sharply you're doing something wrong.
  • 5 0
 @TheBearDen: Never in the two years I had one. Managed to clean the tightest corners around which most people walk. I did however find it was just another item to go wrong, constantly needed up-keep and cleaning to prevent it from clicking and creaking.
  • 5 5
 @TheBearDen: I test-rode a Trek...and that was enough for me. I like riding a bike. I like riding so much that I ride even when I don't have time to go and hit a trail. I think it's fun to make tight turns at low speeds...and I hit the block just test riding the bike, so I knew it wasn't for me.
  • 3 3
 @gnarnaimo: I call bullshite. I rode one on a Full Stache and I routinely hit the knockblock on tight hairpins, but then the stuff I ride is pretty technical, at times I'm doing a creeping track stand to clear a corner, but it happened and it sucked.

Maybe we all need to nose wheely around tight corners, that's he answer, yup.
  • 6 0
 And you can't load your bike in a small car's trunk since you can't fully turn the bars.
  • 1 0
 @nurseben: Maybe it's a difference in riding style, but the tightest of hairpin corners that most can't clean I was able to make with knock block on my 2018 remedy. Never had an issue with knock block operation aside from trying to fit it into a float plane to fly to the Chilcotins.
  • 1 0
 I sense some hard BSing on that Seat Tube Angle - just reporting a number that's popular right now. Take a look at those ETT and reach numbers compared to most any 'modern' bike - you can't get there without an STA that's a lot slacker than what they're claiming.
  • 3 0
 Specialized should screenshot Trek's old marketing page where they slammed the swat box and post it up on Twitter and say look at ya now.
  • 1 0
 If the Re:Aktiv rear shock works as well on this bike as it did on my 2016 Fuel Ex then you can ride it in full lock out all summer long and the bike rides like a dream. I only kept the bike for one year so I can’t speak to the serious longevity of doing it that way but the bike pedaled very well and the damper still opened up fine for the descents.
  • 1 0
 On the 2020, I like the higher BB, hate the low stack in XL (long legs), but stepping back I have to chuckle a bit about the Trek marketing machine. No more the famous G2 geometry that was sold as the golden solution to improving 29er steering. Gone the glorious "full floater" suspension hiding that decades old single pivot design. So they still retain Dave Weagle's split pivot design (ABB) and that propriety Penske shock, but even with all that - guess what ?! - you get classic D-link rear suspension squat going up. I have a single pivot 29er from 2007 (Turner) and - guess what - I get squat going up too. Move that ancient Rp23 shock to platform or set less sag on my bike and the squat is significantly reduced. I give kudos to Trek for making the base Alum models affordable all, but I can't see experienced riders choosing this over other choices available at the high price range tested.
  • 1 0
 This is a quiver bike, for long pedally rides. It needs to be complimented by an enduro bike like the Slash if you live in the mountains. It’s for that kind of ride that is like 30 miles-plus and involves huge climbs, maybe some dirt road, and flowy descending. It shouldn’t be reviewed with an enduro mindset.
  • 2 0
 It wasn't reviewed with an "enduro mindset" Wink It was reviewed in comparison to the latest trail bikes.
  • 1 0
 It was reviewed with a Downcountry mindset, which is appropriate.
  • 1 0
 @thesharkman: in the picture he doesn’t have water on the bike or his back and he is out of the saddle while climbing an easy section, you can’t even start thinking about this bikes performance until the thirty or thirty fifth mile and you need water for that, also his main complaint is that it is too forgiving while descending, but this is exactly what you want when you are tired deep into a long ride. You shouldn’t even be getting on this bike unless you are going for a very long pedally ride. His critique is very enduro centric. It’s like generally liking a sprinter van except gosh it doesn’t race sports cars well.
  • 1 0
 I can't believe I just spent 40mins reading the comments,

I have a 2019 9.9 frame and it kicks ass, the new frame is a lot more solid looking, ( there is one in the lbs) and I cannot wait to get one.

I don't see why 5” travel is classed as small these days. I kick ass on mine at 48 years old
  • 1 0
 I'm sure I glad I read this. The Fuel's at the local shop with those 2.6's sure look like 53X and do a great job of getting me inner juices flowing...

...BUT...

..." but it can also make it harder to understand what's happening under you" say's it all!

This was the precise issue with my Canfield ('15) Balance. The Cane Creek DB had bugger all for mid-stroke support and the frame itself didn't help one bit.

When things are this soft, it puts you out of touch with what the tires are doing and even worse, make's it difficult at times to gauge attitude.

Still a rockin' looking rig!
  • 2 0
 This review had so many compliments, and the summary felt like the opposite. Like when your girlfriend says a bunch of nice things before she dumps you.
  • 3 0
 Wondering if you could comment on how this rides compared to the Trek Remedy. Tks
  • 3 1
 Nothing like getting that non-upgradeable boat anchor NX Eagle drivetrain and Fox Rhythm on a $5,000(CDN) carbon framed bike.

Shut up and take my money! Ugh.
  • 2 0
 @toooldtodieyoung: No sir, those TRS cassettes use the XD driver. NX Eagle uses the old Shimano style driver. Frown
  • 1 0
 @SectionThirtyOne: huh, right you are! I was fooled by this passage, but reading it again now, I guess it doesn't say it replaced an NX cassette: “I tested the TRS+ cassette using a lower level SRAM NX Eagle derailleur so if there were any compatibility issues, they would have been exaggerated by the reduced precision of NX mechanism.“
  • 1 0
 @mitcht: By the tone of the review he may have felt a little hot boxed by this bike (pun stinks I know) ... And the words he failed to use to describe this bike ~ "tepid, yet sassy" came to mind.
  • 1 0
 So are the Bontrager Line Carbon 30s the exact same as the Line Pro 30s? Wasn't sure if this may have been an updated product with slightly different nomenclature. Excited to see the new paint schemes in person though!
  • 3 0
 the chain looks like it is actually running on the chainstay
  • 1 0
 Any traditional chainstay design will be close to the chain if it's wrapped around a tiny 9 tooth cog.
  • 5 1
 Tools N Treats...T.N.T.
  • 9 1
 We like this one - it's dynamite
  • 7 1
 @trek: it's yours for the low low price of a new Fuel EX ;-)
  • 2 0
 A storage box in the downtube?? What's next, a toolkit for the steer tube??
  • 2 2
 A pump in your butthole Beer
  • 1 0
 Give it about a week and a half
  • 1 2
 Knock Block is a non-starter for me. I had the previous model and it's something that got in the way on almost every ride. It's fine if you can arc your turns smoothly, even tight ones, but the second you need to pause or stall and change your line to a tighter one mid-turn you can't. It was also annoying when walking the bike through tight spaces where you need to turn your bars 90deg to avoid hitting your nice car or garage door. I was interested in the new Top Fuel for XC, but now that they've added the feature that no one ever asked for I'm out.
  • 2 0
 When do you turn handlebars like that on the trail?? Try leaning the bike...
  • 1 0
 @thesharkman: I know right? The Knock Block is a non-issue. These kind of stories are ridiculous and I even sometime suspect its competitors trolling. Its not even possible to hit the stops riding unless you're trying to barspin. Midturn it'd be so much angle you'd dig the front wheel and either taco it or endo.
  • 2 0
 Trek Fuel G.A.S. Can Generous Accessory Storage
  • 1 1
 PEG hole....Pot, Equipment and Gear....

use in a sentence "Now that Skylar has a Trek he never forgets to Peg before his ride with Janice".
  • 2 0
 Not sure how I feel about that sandwich analogy...
  • 2 1
 Ohhh, a ML size for us 5'10" tweeners! With bang on wheelbase and reach numbers. Nice!!!
  • 5 7
 What the article doesn't mention. No mircospline driver on bontrager wheels- you are stuck with the sram. Knock block is lame. Seat post insertion is minimal which means 125mm of dropper is what you get, and never feels like the seat is down far enough when in the dropped position. Want to run a coil shock? Good luck with that. Mino Link is pretty much pointless.
  • 4 0
 Except you get 150mm dropper on a M and M/L; anything more you get 170.

Size: XS , S
Bontrager Line Elite Dropper, 100mm travel, internal routing, 31.6mm, 340mm length
Size: M , ML
Bontrager Line Elite Dropper, 150mm travel, internal routing, 31.6mm, 440mm length
Size: L , XL
Bontrager Line Elite Dropper, 170mm travel, internal routing, 31.6mm, 480mm length
  • 3 0
 Bontrager definitely does have Microspline drivers.
  • 8 0
 @FisherFreerider: *ding ding* we do have Microspline drivers for our Bontrager Rapid Drive hubs
  • 2 2
 100mm dropper on XS and S frames is a fail
  • 1 0
 @bronco5: yet it's probably the first thing swapped out to 100mm on those size bikes currently.
  • 1 0
 @waxman: Not sure I understand your comment. You mean that people with 125-150mm droppers on small bikes swap them to 100mm? Or that people buying this bike will immediately swap them over to something bigger?

I'm 5'3" on a small Mojo HD4 with a 150mm Fox Transfer. I will not buy another bike that won't fit at least a 150mm dropper. If these new Fuels can fit a 150mm on a small frame at my height... great, but I shouldn't have to buy a second post. And if there's not room for a 150mm post then the Fuel is off my list.
  • 2 0
 knock blocks are fun guards
  • 1 0
 Looking forward to the 2021 Slash with a 44mm offset fork, improved cable routing, and the TWAT box.
  • 1 0
 Like my 18' Fuel EX, I bet dumping the Re:Aktiv shock for a DPX2 would solve most, if not all the rear end issues.
  • 1 0
 @MikeLevy "Mino Link flip-chips at the chainstay and rocker arm pivots." I think you meant seatstay and rocker arm pivots?
  • 1 0
 As it is a Fuel EX, could it be F.L.A.P (Fuel luggage accessory portal)?

So many new bikes these last few weeks.
  • 2 0
 Knock Block an essential for people who can't stop turning.
  • 1 0
 I really wish they would ditch that stupid ass press-fit BB like EVERYONE ELSE that pretty much produces the same frame.
  • 1 0
 @pinkbike
Given its a trek it is only appropriately called the Stache Cache.
  • 1 0
 wow, right now Spesh and Trek rules with swat box; would consider next bike with SWAT only since this is genius!
  • 1 0
 Add to the list the Druid, which has a “reverse” SWAT box. Fully functional.
  • 1 0
 Not the bike for me. But I'm happy other companies are finally putting storage in the frames.
  • 2 0
 "It's popular in Europe"
Nope.
  • 1 0
 One question about frame-integrated storage compartment - wasn't it under some Spesh licensing?
  • 1 0
 im building a 2019 fuel ex with a dhx2 coil and shimano xtr 9100.... wonder what will ride better???
  • 1 0
 Levy did reactiv wrong. Manbun over on the other website rode it like a normal humanoid, and got a different impression.
  • 1 0
 How would you guys compare the trek to the new Santa Cruz Tallboy 2020? Which one climbs better?
  • 3 2
 i love switching the shock lever for climbing.
  • 7 9
 according to the website, the carbon frame is a pound heavier than the previous version... Bike companies need to stop listening to 250lb out of shape people who ride 3 times a month who complain about stiffness.
  • 1 1
 this twig can't bunny hop
  • 3 2
 But but but WAIT! I need to know... is it downcountry?
  • 1 0
 This review got homoerotic really fast.
  • 1 0
 I the Top Fuel is my top pick for a new bike. But this, not so much.
  • 4 3
 Looks like a 2011 Specialized Pitch.
  • 4 0
 Solid bikes those were
  • 1 0
 Looks like the new Cube Stereo.
  • 2 4
 These days I hear a lot if people say "there's no such thing as a bad bike." I disagree. While this isn't a "bad" bike for everyone, my riding terrain and would make this a "bad" choice for me.
  • 2 2
 whats new about it?

my ripmo weighs .6lbs less with the same tires a lyrik fork and a piggy back rear shock...
  • 4 1
 Who cares? you can take a dump and save .6lbs
  • 2 0
 no it doesn't.
  • 1 0
 @ICKYBOD: my ripmo weighs 28 pounds. tell me why it doesn't.
  • 2 0
 @ICKYBOD: actually my wife’s ripmo small weighs 28lbs even. That’s with a 160 36, a dpx2, Maxxis exo plus DhF rear tire, and a 150mm dropper post. My bike weighs 33 lbs and I still smoker her on the climbs....
  • 1 0
 Smoke her...
  • 1 0
 Size large at shop on a park scale with the 7k-ish xo build including the carbon wheel upgrade set up tubeless and one up composite pedals was over 29# factory fresh with no mud to weigh it down. Maybe in a size small with some lightweight bits, but apples to apples I'm not seeing 28 flat. Now I'm sure someone will post a pic with theirs on a scale and prove me wrong /cheers to that person.

Obligatory nothing against ripmos- they're great bikes statement here.
  • 3 2
 Yes Our Unoriginal Repository May Obscure Marijuana
  • 1 0
 Does it have a pedal assist switch?
  • 1 0
 Levy clearly hates switches and running less sag.
  • 1 0
 Gotta say, I had high expectations for this bike and I’m disappointed.
  • 2 1
 Does the stash box compromise the straight shot cock block stiffness?
  • 2 1
 man trek is l8 to the game on the swat stuff.
  • 1 0
 All the new treks look the same. Change my mind
  • 1 0
 T.W.A.T.S. Trek Wisconsin Awesome Tool Storage.
  • 1 0
 At ~5’9” I’m attempting to shoehorn myself into a L or XL frame?
  • 1 0
 T.W.A.T. Box ^^^^^ Comment of the year lol
  • 1 0
 This bike turns me more on than the new Spesh Enduro. Lovely!
  • 1 0
 it's a SLAP box - Specialized Lawsuit Applied Promptly
  • 1 0
 Cool review! Was hoping they would push through-rod further...
  • 1 0
 How would this compare to a 2016 Remedy 29?
  • 1 1
 Forgot a word, Marijuana and Other Ancillary Necessities...damn it.
  • 2 1
 Hotbox
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Hei Hei...
  • 1 1
 Whew, at least it’s expensive
  • 1 0
 Looks like a session
  • 2 3
 Looks good but to short wheelbase
  • 3 3
 Glory Hole!
  • 11 0
 Giant should put one of thess storage room on their DH bike just so we can have a good laugh!
  • 1 2
 No bar mounted lockout lever?
  • 1 1
 The Bont Hole.
  • 2 3
 Internal brake hose routing? Hard pass. Otherwise looks pretty cool.
  • 1 2
 Looks like a... trek?
  • 1 4
 I'd go for the SB130 all day, cuz its better, and its a Yeti.
  • 1 0
 You don't actually ride much, do you?
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