Trek Remedy 9.9 29 - Review

Mar 8, 2015
by Mike Kazimer  
 
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Trek Remedy Review

For a bike that was introduced less than two years ago, the Remedy 29 has already racked up an impressive race resume, thanks to the performances of Trek Factory racers Tracy Moseley and Justin Leov on the Enduro World Series circuit. The big news for 2015 is the addition of an OCLV carbon framed option, which is claimed to shed over a pound of weight off of the aluminum version. There's also a new rear shock that Trek and Fox developed in conjunction with Penske, along with the introduction of yet another axle standard. We tested the carbon framed, SRAM XX1 and Shimano XTR-equipped 9.9 model, which retails for $8,799.99 USD. There are three other less expensive versions in the line, starting with the base model, aluminum framed Remedy 8 at $3569.99.


Trek Remedy 29 9.9 Details

• Intended use: trail / all-mountain / enduro race
• Wheel size: 29"
• Rear wheel travel: 140mm
• OCLV carbon front triangle and seatstays
• Fork: RockShox Pike RCT3 140mm fork
• Shock: Fox Factory Float DCRV RE:aktiv
• Drivetrain: SRAM XX1
• Brakes: Shimano XTR Trail
• Wheels: SRAM Roam 40 w/ Boost148
• Seatpost: RockShox Reverb
• Weight: 25.8lb(size 19.5" w/o pedals)
• MSRP: $8799.99 USD
www.trekbikes.com, @trek

Frame Design and Construction

Devoid of any sharp angles, but also not overly swoopy, the Remedy's svelte frame profile makes it look fast even when it's standing still, poised and ready to leap from the starting gate at a moment's notice. The front triangle and seat stay are constructed from Trek's OCLV (Optimum Compaction Low Void) carbon fiber, with extra reinforcement and a plastic guard in place on the down tube to help ward off rock strikes. There's a mix of external and internal cable routing - the housing for the stealth Reverb dropper post exits the seat tube to join the rear brake line that runs atop the downtube, while the rear derailleur housing is tucked away inside the frame. The frame layout leaves room for a full sized water bottle inside the front triangle, a bonus for those riders interested in shedding their hydration packs.

As you'd expect, the Remedy has the obligatory tapered head tube, ISCG 05 tabs, a 12x148mm rear thru-axle, and... Wait, what? 12x148 rear spacing? Nope, that's not a typo. Get ready for yet another standard, because by all appearances this one looks like it's here to stay, and the Remedy 29 is the first bike on the market with this new spacing.

Developed with SRAM, the initial goal behind Boost148 was to create a stiffer rear wheel, and widening the bike's rear end by three millimeters on each side turned out to be the best way to achieve
Trek Remedy 9.9 29 review test 2015
bigquotesDevoid of any sharp angles, but also not overly swoopy, the Remedy's svelte frame profile makes it look fast even when it's standing still.
this. That extra space allows for the hub flanges to be moved outwards, in turn creating a better bracing angle (the angle between where the spokes leave the hub and where they enter the rim). According to Trek, Boost148 makes it possible to have the stiffness of a 29” wheel be on par with that of a 27.5” wheel. There's no need for a different bottom bracket shell width with Boost148, but a different crankarm spider is required in order to achieve the correct chainline, due to the fact that the rear cassette will be sitting 3mm further outboard than it would with a 12x142 setup.


Trek Remedy 9.9 29 review test 2015
The Remedy 29's carbon frame gives it a lean and sleek look.
Trek Remedy 9.9 29 review test 2015
There's plenty of room for wide tires, and a guard is in place to protect the seatstay from chain slap.

In addition to the claimed increase in wheel stiffness, the additional room also makes it easier to fit wider tires, and to create chainstays with enough clearance for taller chainrings. Although it was developed for 29ers, with the rumblings about 27.5+ continuing to grow, the new standard could be a hint of things to come from Trek, since it's a way to make bikes compatible with the wide rims and tires that are poised to hit the market in the near future. As far as aftermarket wheel options go, Industry Nine, Hope, and DT Swiss have already announced plans to offer Boost148 compatible hubs, and several other manufacturers will likely be ramping up production over the next few months.


Trek Remedy 9.9 29 review test 2015

Suspension Design

The Remedy uses Trek's Active Braking Pivot (ABP) suspension design, versions of which are used on everything from their Fuel XC race bikes all the way to their downhill race rigs. ABP uses a pivot that rotates around the rear axle, with the intention being to prevent braking forces from affecting the rear shock in any way. The shock itself isn't attached to a fixed point on the frame; instead, it's attached to the chainstay and the upper rocker link, allowing it to 'float' for what Trek says is increased sensitivity.

The rear Fox shock still contains Trek's Dual Rate Control Valve (DRCV) technology, where a secondary air chamber opens up as the shock goes through its travel to increase the amount of available air volume, but Trek has added another feature for 2015. After working closely with the suspension wizards at Penske, a company known for their work in the world of F1 racing, Trek and Fox came up with what they've dubbed RE:aktiv. In simple terms, housed inside the shock is a spring loaded valve that allows for increased low speed compression for pedaling support and on smoother terrain, but when the shock's shaft speed increases, the valve opens up, enabling the shock to quickly and smoothly absorb the impact before the valve closes again.

Compared to a typical CTD shock, the RE:aktiv internals are intended to have a better response to impacts, even when the shock is set in the firmest Climb mode. Climb mode still creates a firm platform for efficient pedaling, but when the shaft moves at the predetermined rate, the shock quickly transitions to a fully open state until things calm down again.


Geometry
Trek Remedy 9.9 29 review test 2015




PB Test trip
Riding the
Remedy 9.9
bigquotesCombine a sub-26 pound weight with the increased rollover capability the bigger wheels provide, add in the traction provided by the rear suspension design, and you've got a recipe for a serious climbing machine.


Setup: Our 19.5” bike came outfitted with a 750mm Bontrager Rhythm Pro carbon handlebar and a 70mm stem, which isn't out of the ordinary since Trek places the Remedy 29 in both their Trail and Enduro categories, but to really unlock the bike's potential on technical terrain swapping to an even wider bar and a shorter stem is highly recommended. Despite all of the trickery that's happening inside the RE:aktiv shock, the set up procedure is the same as with a traditional DCRV shock - inflate it to the recommended air pressure, cycle it at least 50% into its travel in order to fill the secondary air chamber, and then check the air pressure again and adjust as needed to achieve 30% sag. The Remedy's geometry can be adjusted by flipping the chip located at the top of each seatstay, but it remained in the slacker and lower position for the duration of the test, simply because there was never an occasion when it felt like a higher BB or steeper head angle would improve its performance. In the low setting the Remedy has a 67.5° head angle, and a 445mm chainstay length.

Climbing / Handling: Out of all of the bikes we had on hand in Sedona, Arizona, for testing, the Remedy 29 earned a spot with the best of the best when it came to climbing performance. Combine a sub-26 pound weight with the increased rollover capability the bigger wheels provide, add in the traction provided by the rear suspension design, and you've got a recipe for a serious climbing machine. There were sections of trail that I was unable to clean on any other bike except the Remedy, no matter how many times I threw myself at them. Even on tight switchbacks, those tricky uphill turns where 29ers can lose some of their climbing luster, the Remedy was still quite manageable, with a balanced and centered feel that made it easy to weight either the front or rear wheel as needed to maintain traction. The overall fit of the size 19.5 frame was well matched to my 5'11” height, with an upright and comfortable climbing and pedaling position, especially once a shorter stem was installed.

The Remedy is an active climber, and even in Climb mode the rear shock will cycle into the beginning portion of its travel during pedaling, but this movement is unnoticeable unless you're actually looking at the shock. Rather than acting like a lockout and turning the bike into a hardtail, the Climb setting provided support, but the suspension was able to stay planted on the ground, matching the contours of the trail rather than deflecting off of them. Riders who are looking for a shock that feels fully locked out in the firmest setting won't find it here, but I'd argue that on the RE:aktiv shock Climb mode is actually more useful than it typically is, since it's good for more than just smooth fireroads and paved approaches.


PB Test trip
bigquotesThere's a refined sense of brutishness to the Remedy's handling - imagine a boxer reading Shakespeare in the corner of the ring after laying his opponent to waste, or a football player flawlessly performing a complicated ballet routine and you start to get the picture.

Descending: The Remedy's climbing abilities proved it could hold its own in the trail bike category, but it was the downhill portion of its performance was that I was most interested in. A 140mm 29er doesn't immediately seem like the type of bike that would be capable of winning EWS races, especially considering the number of 27.5” wheeled bikes with 160mm or more of travel that are also battling for that spot, so I was curious as to what tricks the Remedy had in store.

Any questions I had had about the Remedy 29's downhill capabilities slipped away the instant gravity took over, replaced by a sense of awe at just how fast this bike truly is. No matter how nasty the trail, whether it was on the chopped up chunky rocks of Sedona or the roots and mud of the Pacific Northwest, nothing seemed to rattle it. There's a refined sense of brutishness to the Remedy's handling - imagine a boxer reading Shakespeare in the corner of the ring after laying his opponent to waste, or a football player flawlessly performing a complicated ballet routine and you start to get the picture. It can be a thug when necessary, plowing straight down the fall line and gobbling up everything its path, with plenty of stability on hand thanks to its longish wheel base, but it will also leap from one side of the trail to the other at a moment's notice, whether it's to get to the sneaky lines that save time in a race, or the little bonus hips and airs that make a trail even more fun. Wheel size rarely crossed my mind during testing – there were absolutely no “if these wheels were smaller I'd be having more fun'' moments. In fact, most of the time I really couldn't imagine having any more fun than I already was.

Suspension Performance: Considering how much technology Trek has managed to pack into the Remedy's rear shock, it's impressive how little thought it requires out on the trail. It simply works, with only the occasional flip of the red CTD required depending on the terrain, and even that motion is optional - there were plenty of rides where I left it in Trail mode for an entire ride. That was my preferred shock setting for the descents as well, since it kept the bike just a tad higher in its travel than Descend mode, while still opening up fully when the going got rough. The RE:aktiv shock has a high level of small bump sensitivity, which allows the rear tire to stay glued to the ground, increasing the amount of traction provided by the big wheels even further. The opening and closing of the regressive valve is seamless, and although I occasionally heard a subtle 'tick tick' noise come from the shock when it was in Trail or Climb mode, the entire stroke was silky smooth, without any odd ramping up or sudden loss of support. Deeper in the travel the shock felt bottomless, making it feel like the Remedy had even more than 140mm of travel on tap. Heavy braking didn't have any negative affects on the suspension performance, and the rear end remained active even during slow speed maneuvers down steep choppy sections of trail. Up front, the RockShox Pike displayed the consistently high level of performance we've come to expect, and felt well matched to the rear shock.


Trek Remedy 9.9 29 review test 2015
Wider bars and a shorter stem would make the Remedy even more race ready, and it'd be nice to have that dropper post lever located on the underside of the bar.
Trek Remedy 9.9 29 review test 2015
Boost148 isn't a proprietary standard, so expect to see various manufacturers offering hubs with the new spacing in the near future.

Component Check

• SRAM XX1 drivetrain: Part of the reason for the 9.9's steep price is the inclusion of a full XX1 drivetrain. The X1 drivetrain that the next model down is equipped with works well, but XX1 works even better. Shifting feels smoother and less 'clunky' than it does with X1, and that sensation lasted throughout the test period despite exposing the bike to a winter's worth of mud and grit.

• Shimano XTR Trail brakes Shimano's XTR brakes continue to impress with their excellent performance and ergonomics – the dimples on the lever blade for extra grip are a nice touch – and the set on the Remedy didn't disappoint. The one change I'd like to see is for them to come equipped with metallic instead of resin pads. On wet days the performance of the resin pads greatly diminishes compared to the metallic version.

• Bontrager XR3 Team tires: Bontrager's XR3 tires were impressive, especially considering how low profile their tread pattern is – they have far more grip than expected, even in wet, slick conditions. Our test bike came with the XR3 in the front and rear, but the actual spec should have included an XR4 , which would have satisfied my request for a slightly meatier tire in the front.

• SRAM Roam 40 wheels: It seems counterintuitive to develop a new hub standard that's claimed to increase wheel stiffness, and then lace it up to rims with an internal width of only 21mm. Bontrager's XR3 and XR4 tires work especially well with wide rims due to their rounder profile – it'd be great to see the Remedy spec'd with wheels that allowed them to perform to their fullest potential. A bearing on the drive side of the rear wheel also developed play and needed to be replaced much sooner than expected. As far as actual wheel stiffness goes, I can't say that I noticed any drastic increase. The bike does track very well in corners, but the rear end didn't feel any stiffer than other 29ers I've spent time on recently.


PB Test trip
The Remedy's performance both climbing and descending makes it one of the best do-it-all bikes currently on the market.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesAt first glance it'd be easy to call the Remedy 'just another big wheeled trail bike,' but that would be like saying the Porsche 918 is 'just a car' - neither sentiment could be further from the truth. The fact that the Remedy 29's climbing performance is almost as outstanding as its downhill prowess is what truly makes it such an incredible bike, and I'm not one to use the word 'incredible' lightly. I'd still like to see wider bars and wider rims, but otherwise there's nothing else to nitpick about the parts spec, which is how it should be considering the price. The 12x148 rear spacing will certainly raise some eyebrows, as any new 'standard' is apt to do, but it does appear to have traction, and a number of other companies are poised to hop on board, which will make it easier to find aftermarket replacement parts if necessary down the road.

This is a bike that truly blurs the line between categories - it climbs as well as any trail bike out there, and its downhill performance places it in the top tier of the all-mountain category. In short, this is one extremely impressive ride, capable of tackling anything that's thrown its way, whether that's a mellow lap on a ribbon of swoopy singletrack, or navigating through the hairiest stages at an Enduro World Series race.
- Mike Kazimer




About the Reviewer
Stats: Age: 32 • Height: 5'11” • Inseam: 33" • Weight: 150lb • Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Twenty years deep into a mountain biking addiction that began as a way to escape the suburban sprawl of Connecticut, Mike Kazimer is most at home way out in the woods, carving his way down steep, technical trails. The decade he spent as a bike mechanic helped create a solid technical background to draw from when reviewing products, and his current location in the Pacific Northwest allows for easy access to the wettest, muddiest conditions imaginable.
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257 Comments

  • + 141
 Phew, glad I had that extra 3mm on each side to stiffen up that back wheel. What's that? No, don't bother adding an extra 1mm to each side to make an even 150mm BECAUSE THAT ALREADY EXISTS Really Mad
  • + 20
 Its a different set up though. This is inbetween 142 and 157, its still got the recessed slots in the dropouts
  • + 34
 150 hubs don't actually widen the flanges though, so in reality, no it doesn't already exist. The offsets to each flange from the hub center still totals exactly the same for both the 135/142 hubs and the 150 hubs, just its split evenly on the 150 hub so the wheel builds symetrically between them with the same spoke tension on each side. On Hope Pro 2 rear hubs for example, its 26.5mm each flange offset on a 150 hub shell and 33mm left flange / 20mm right flange for their 135 hub shell. Boost 148 hubs increase the total distance between the hub flanges by 6mm so this would mean 36mm and 23mm for a Hope Pro 2 boost rear.
  • + 4
 Yes they do, in case you hadn't noticed, hopes have a big bit between the flange and disc tabs. Your argument is true of hopes and that's the reason they did it but most companies are still offset flanges that are wider set than 135
  • + 42
 There's also the fact that 150mm rear spacing also typically requires a 83mm bottom bracket shell, while Boost148 does not.
  • + 14
 So by pushing the chainline 1mm farther outboard, you now will need a BB that's 10mm wider? There's something I'm missing here.
  • + 7
 No. Again, its 157mm it needs comparing to on that front. This is only 3mm wider each side than 142 (135 with extended cups to sit in the slots) but 4.5mm narrower each side than 157mm. Ideally it probably should have a 78mm bb shell but one step at a time eh Wink
  • + 26
 More like one drained bank account at a time.
  • + 8
 F--k it why don't they just make a new 78mm BB standard to go with this hub?
  • + 25
 @maxlombardy - Because then you'd have twice as many things to complain about? Just kidding. But in all seriousness, Trek was able to avoid going to a different BB size by using a different spider that moves the front chainring outboard 3mm more to match up with the cassette. This way the Q factor remains unaffected.
  • + 2
 It's a pointless standard. As said above, a 78mm BB width alone would have made infinitely more sense.
  • + 13
 @Maxlombardy Exactly. I wish they would just sit down, come up with all the ideal standards that work best and start building bikes with them all at once. This incremental change thing is getting old. Bikes are becoming outdated as fast as computers.
  • - 13
flag maxlombardy (Mar 8, 2015 at 18:32) (Below Threshold)
 @mikekazimer not a personal attack on you, no need to belittle me. Thanks for the review though.
  • + 6
 What everyone is trying to ask is "why?"

People want to buy this bike, and a lot of people probably don't want to buy a full bike because of $$ reasons or brand preference. Increasing rear wheel stiffness with a wider dropout/hub makes sense in theory, but why bother if it sets so many people off of it because they can't put the wheels they want on? Especially if it doesn't really do anything, as @mikekazimer pointed out in the review.
  • + 5
 The same increase in wheel stiffness could be achieved with two more spokes or CF rims.
  • + 10
 that would be 4 more spokes.
  • + 20
 It will only be a new standard if you buy one. Spend your money with company's that don't piss you off.
  • + 17
 I am in heavy agreement with @maxlombardy. I find the industries trend of constantly changing specs extremely frustrating. I am all in favor of progress and change, but the pattern of a new standard release every 2 - 3 years speaks more to planned obsolescence than product improvement. Axle standards have been one of the worst offenders, as these changes require you to completely swap out a bike by requiring the rider to upgrade wheels, fork, and frame.

You can't argue that these spec changes have been purely about product progress, some of them have been blatantly about forcing product upgrades. Look at front axles, the 20 mm spec was superior to our current 15 mm specification (considerably stiffer, with a slight weight disadvantage). You can argue that in this case I should simply only support manufacturers that still offer a 20 mm front axle. The problem with that line of argument is that you can barely find anything currently on the market with this standard in non DH platforms (YT deserves a shoutout for their BOS equipped Capras).
  • + 17
 "Trek was able to avoid going to a different BB size by using a different spider that moves the front chainring outboard 3mm more to match up with the cassette"

Great. Another frame from Trek that has a horrible chainline with any other set of cranks that don't have their +3mm spacing addition as an option.
  • + 18
 10/10 will not buy.
  • + 12
 With a 73mm BB, and a different spider, what is about the crankarms touching the rear stays with all that clearance for bigger tires and +-sizes?

Are we going back to super slim gussets in an area, where all the forces come together, e.g. when sprinting out of the saddle on rough ground?
Will we see even more cracked chainstays from Trek??

I have nothing against TREK, and this bike looks great. But 148 ist just stupid!

This 148mm truly is marketing hype to sell 28 hole 29er rims. I sold my ROAM wheels instantly before trying them out, they were soo flimsy - those tiny hubs, thin rims. Why not just put 4 more spokes to the wheels and take a wider and stiffer rim, maybe will weigh 10grams more?
  • + 11
 YT industries NOTON, 73mm bottom bracket with a 150mm rear wheel, in 10 speed, its been out for the last few years, 148 is not needed imo
  • - 1
 @mark3 150mm wheel? That's a really tiny wheel.
  • + 4
 @mark3 Lenz has been making 29ers with 150mm rear hub spacing and normal sized BB's for years too. Mine works just fine with a typical 10 speed system without the need for a different crank offset. I agree- really don't see the need for another new standard.
  • + 2
 "006_007" wrote on "http://forums.mtbr.com/general-discussion/yet-another-new-standard-148mm-rear-thru-axle-942827.html" : "Biggest issue with 150 is strange Q-factors. Plus the 150 hubs typically sat inside the face of the dropouts, not into the slotted alignment areas (which was why most 150 became 157, similar to how 135 became 142)..." ....148mm allows wider hub flanges so it totally makes sense for growing wheel diameters, boys...
  • - 25
flag deeeight Plus (Mar 9, 2015 at 5:14) (Below Threshold)
 All the complaining here won't matter, as the folks who complain AREN'T Trek's target market for the bikes they submit for review anyway... its the market for those of us with the money AND the desire to own these bikes, and are capable of making our own decisions on how to spend that money. I sometimes think Pinkbike should adopt the model some other privately owned web magazine forums are going to and require users who wish to leave comments to pay for that priviledge.
  • + 7
 @deeeight can confirm: I can buy 3 of these bikes a year. I wont. I'll stick to my DH bike a year and keep my old xc bike because of how ridiculous pricing is for "amazing new technology" ie. more better standards. so much nope built into this bike! looks nice tho.
  • + 2
 @cxfahrer if you sold the wheels before trying them, how can you say they were flimsy? I've been on a set for 6 months. They're very sturdy, beautiful hubs, DT internals, good weight, and haven't needed a true the whole time. At least use it before you throw out claims about its performance.
  • + 1
 @maxlombardy: you are right, but I wouldn't have got the money I wanted when used.

Miniature bearings, 24 Spokes for 650b and 21mm rims vs. enduro + my weight 200lbs = that will never work. Maybe with a carbon rim.
Swapped them for Hope and WTB i25 frequency, 150gr more for the set with 32 instead of 24 spokes for each wheel.

24 or 28 spokes make a wheel cheaper in the first place. It is not the weight!
But when it comes to trueing out such a wheel, good luck with 24 spokes. My 28 spoke Sun 29er wheelset is so out of shape and flexy after 2 years of just-riding-along. Maybe SRAM uses wunder materials that last for longer? Or is it just ok to throw them away and buy a new bike (like if it was a 148boost-Trek)?


What I really dont like on this bike, is the chainstay yoke. In my opinion this yoke and the rightside chain stay are a crampy ugly design. Why is it going down so far? Is it because the biggest possible chainring would interfere with the clearance for a 2.5" tyre?
  • + 0
 FFS, it's one hub for one frame from one manufacturer for one wheelsize. They just made it open standard instead of proprietary. If you are not specifically buying a 29" Remedy, 148mm doesn't really apply to you.... I don't understand the uproar.
  • + 7
 If you don't like new standards, don't buy bikes with new standards! There are plenty of great bikes out there that stick with what works, vote with your wallet! Bitching on PB won't get any of the bike co's attention.
  • + 4
 I stopped reading at "boost148" Frown
  • + 4
 Interesting to read all props and cons. I'm grumpy and bold and you can guess I stand out for the regular BB and rear hub spacing. I hate when certain brands trying to re-invent what already works well and works for all / is compatible. Along with Trek we have Giant and their OverDrive 2 1 1/4" steerer tube. What an utter bullsh*t! Enough said...
...back on my singlespeed bike for an hour commute... with annoying 120mm rear hub spacing Wink
  • - 2
 "standards" only become such when other brands adopt them also, until then they're proprietary things unique to one brand. A number of brands have already adopted the Boost hub idea though so its going to be a standard. Someone else in these comments mentioned a fat bike in their argument, and as an owner of one, I'll point out that we've now got 4 new front hub "standards" (135mm rear-disc offset QR, 135mm front-disc offset QR, 135mm front-disc offset thru-axle, 150mm front-disc offset thru-axle), 4 new rear hub "standards" (170mm QR, 177 thru-axle, 190 QR, 197 thru-axle), and one new bottom bracket standard (120mm shell width, adopted by several makers for their larger tire clearance models).
  • + 1
 No, proprietary by definition means ownership, not registering it as a patent or trademark means it's not proprietary, just an as of yet an unused standard.
  • - 1
 Sounds like TREK are trying to reinvent the wheel. Does it mean this new standard will only be needed for 29"?
  • + 2
 @zede where did that review come from? I never saw it!
  • + 1
 all these "standards" drive up the prices of bikes... it's part of the reason why you can get a medium performance car rim for cheaper than a medium perfomance bike rim. hub manufactures need to do limited runs on this kind of crap... stupid.
  • + 0
 Medium performnace car rims are produced in the tens if not hundreds of thousands and require no real labour to produce, they're cast/forged and largely made by machines. A "medium performance" bicycle rim involves a lot more work to produce, in much fewer numbers. If you don't like the prices... try and start your own brand and see what the reality is...
  • + 0
 thanks for agreeing with me. if they actually did standardize, costs could come down.
  • - 1
 I wasn't agreeing with you, and no costs won't come down. The bike industry has been constantly evolving for the past forty years. If you want it to remain stagnant, by all means don't ever buy anything new, but the rest of us haven't a problem with evolving designs and technology.
  • - 1
 appreciate your positivity and thanks for agreeeing! Smile theres a difference between evolving and change for the sake of change. an all mountain bike from 2 years ago can be just as good, if not better than one now. all thats changed is what the hypes about. there was a time when people gave more of a shit about biking than what they were riding. Don't worry about what other people are doing. just ride your bike and if you NEED somthing then get it. if you WANT something for the sake of having it, maybe re-evaluate your life. no one cares about your wheel size outside of biking.
  • - 5
flag deeeight Plus (Mar 9, 2015 at 19:51) (Below Threshold)
 There wa such a time but then the internet came along and trolls like you got a place to spout off like you know more about the bike industry than the people actually IN the bike industry.
  • + 2
 Good god.
  • + 3
 deeeight, I'm all for innovation but you do realise people in the bike industry want your money more than they want to innovate?
  • + 2
 @hamncheez I don't know, I never saw it on the main page.

interesting, my comment has been deleted
  • + 1
 haha .... was that you, yeti? have you been unhappy with the test result? or was it you pinkbike? did you fear, yeti would stop buying ads on pb? questions....
  • + 2
 @zede also interesting is the article no longer exists but the deleted comment was still in your profile page.Brother pinkbike it'shiding many truths I sense.

@markripper and @deeelight both have valid points but I feel reality of new standards is indeed more as Mark puts it. innovation is valid but gains are so tiny. it's life, companies have to do business. come on tho, intentions are not four your benefit don't be deluded.

that aside,seems a great bike. 1st time I find myself kinda wanting 29er. can't justify replacing my outdated stumpy evo 26 tho lol
  • + 2
 With wider hub, comes wider swingarm right? Isn't that an issue for people with large feet ?
shoes rubbing on the carbon swing arm was a problem with Lapierre spicy if a remember well

@bOObdesign I think yeti won't be bothered some much by this article, jared and richie aren't known to be light xc rider and they never broke a frame during a race + graves won EWS last year + SB6c is a really sexy bike
  • + 2
 @zede : true! i dont want do say the yeti is bad in any way but thats certainly not cool. doesnt make me question the bike but the company
  • + 1
 @ninjatarian Just a thought I had. Creating an perfect bike all at once would be great, I'd love that. However, I think it takes too much work for them to design it "all at once". It takes quite a bit of engineering to come up with the "ideal standards". Asking them to do that in a year is similar to asking for a car companies to design an SUV that gets 50 mpg and still has great towing capacity, all while running on solar power. Not to mention most everybody wouldn't buy it unless it cost less than $40,000 msrp. We should all be happy that bikes have been progressing as fast as they have been. Look back at how they were 5-10 years ago.
  • + 38
 Oh boy so basically a perfect riding bike. :/
  • + 36
 Correct.
  • + 5
 It is an awesome machine! If you have an opportunity to try one out, do it! You'll like it.
  • - 38
flag properp (Mar 9, 2015 at 5:05) (Below Threshold)
 Just demoed one at fat tire in Ocala. I must say that Trek was NOT a top ride in my book. All the models tested were on the bottom of my list. Every one I asked about their opinion said the same thing. Trek was one of the worst riding bikes at Fat Tire. Cannondale pulled out ad was a no show. BOO Cannondale. The best riding bikes went to Giant, Liv, Rocky Mountain, and Specialized. I never herd a single person say one positive thing about the Trek's. Well it looks like PB likes them witch makes me question the opinion of PB.
  • + 47
 @properp to be clear, pinkbike is reviewing a bike that is designed to be raced at a professional level on and rough rowdy trails with massive amounts of climbing and descending over technical terrain.

Aaaaand you are commenting based on your experience riding it in Florida. The Flattest place I've been to in my entire life. I think it would be obvious to most people that the Trek Remedy would not be a good bike for Florida...
  • + 20
 How would you be able to test it climbing OR descending in Florida?
  • + 4
 @properp I was also at Santos for the FTF and can say that you and your buddies probably didn't have Trek set sag/pressures before you ran off with the bike. I know because I had to have my buddy go back and have them dial that in. They were basically throwing pedals on and changing seat height and that's it unless you asked them to go over pressures.

@danny @ReformedRoadie I own a 2015 Remedy 9 and it's a brilliant bike for FL for a rider that likes to get rowdy. It's head angle isn't that much slacker over the Fuel and it pedals damn well. Then when you want to take it out jumping or off some drops, no biggie. Sure it's on the upper end of what you need for general riding in FL, but you should travel to Santos and see some of the trails there before judging. I will say that the Slash is completely unwarranted and the Fuel is all that most would need. We might not have the epic climbs or extended bonkers downs but we do have stuff that can scare people from up north. It's just much shorter in duration. A Remedy is also nice to have if you take trips out of state like my crew does quite frequently.
  • + 6
 The Fuel EX head angle is 69.5, the Remedy is 67.5. Two degrees of head angle is a significant difference.
  • + 5
 Sinkholes made of limestone covered in continuously wet leavess to create decent grip. The trails go in and out of them all over the Florida greenway.That and quarries like the Vortex freeride park the largest freeride park in the USA. Unfortunately Razorback is closed but it was an old MX racing quarry that as the name suggests was full of steep ups and downs.
  • + 3
 @rfeagan Going by the 27.5" numbers its 68.0 for the Fuel and 67.5 for the Remedy. So 0.5 is not a very big difference.
  • + 1
 half a degree is bigger than you think. the slash rides drastically different in the high and low positions.
  • + 1
 I have the trek remedy 8, 27.5' and I live in Florida... Most trails here are pretty flat (as expected) I wish I could take it up north to Highland or Coast Gravity Park and really give it a test out on some big terrain. I have to say though, for jumping the remedy 8 with 27.5' wheels is awesome! I'm glad I got it even though I live here because i'll be able to take it other places on trips and it should handle pretty good. It has 140mm front and rear.
  • - 6
flag properp (Mar 12, 2015 at 6:42) (Below Threshold)
 I just dont like the Treks. This is my opinion and you all dont need to make excuses about why. Yes I know how to set up a bike and sag. After wrenching on top level bikes for over 20 years. You all can have them because there lots of other bikes that I think out preform the Trek. To all of you who say FL is flat I say when you run your mouth about something you know nothing about you are a fool! It may be mostly flat, but there are trails that will make the most experienced rider smile and say wow what a ride lets do it again. Also we here in FL ride year around. No part time riders here in FL. We do it year around. When spring comes and you all are coming out of hibernation Fl peeps are showing up to your trail in shape putting it on top of the box.
  • + 28
 People like to diss Trek for lots of different reasons. However, I am now on my second Remedy. My first was a '10 Remedy 8 26" that I thrashed for four years. Loved that bike. Now I am on a '14 Remedy 9 27.5. Again, I am totally blown away by the bike. I used to hate on Trek for no particular reason. Now I shut my mouth 'cuz I know I am riding an amazing machine. This new carbon 29er looks awesome and being so familiar with the design, I'm sure it absolutely rips.
  • + 12
 I was exactly the same, hated them for no reason, bought 2014 Remedy 9 27.5 reluctantly and loved it then changed my views on Trek.... Until the way the way they treated me 9 months after purchase when the frame started flexing around the head tube and the paint started flaking off. Plenty of false accusations from Trek Australia on how I treated my bike and their warranty isn't worth the paper it's written on. Just really reinforced my initial feelings towards Trek. It did ride fantastic initially, but I'd never bu another Trek. Hope your bike stays awesome and Trek Canada is a bit more respectful of their customers than in Australia!
  • + 6
 Yeah man, I have a '14 Remedy 9.7 650B, I like it a lot, probably will never sell it, but I also had an opportunity to try out this exact bike above, the '15 9.9 29er... it was amazing! It maneuvers really well, it's very light and feels unstoppable. Definitely a very capable awesome machine!!! I think the rear shock that Trek has now days on their bikes is hands down the best shock in the industry, you notice that the moment you sit on the bike... it is way better that anything I ever ridden!
  • + 4
 I have a '11 Remedy 9 26" and I really do love that bike. I do quite a bit of technical climbing to the top of the DH runs and then ride the bejeezus out of it on the way back down and wow is it fast. It really can take a thrashing and make trail surprisingly smooth. I do have a couple gripes about it though. One, it didn't come with a chain guide or a clutch derailleur which it desperately needs. Keeping the chain on through a rock garden at high speed is literally impossible even on the day after I bought it. The other thing is the rear DRCV shock. That thing sucks. Yes, it feels like you're floating when pushed hard on normal trail but when charging a rock garden it feels like you're dragging an anchor. I can blow through about 70-80% of the suspension hopping of a curb easily. This is with 30% sag. So this means when I'm out on the trail, I'm bottoming out on every other rock pretty much. Overall though, an awesome bike, and, four years later, I'm still riding it hard grinning ear to ear.
  • + 2
 Yea man, I rode bikes with those first generation DRCV, those do suck, you can't tell if it's open or locked and they do bottom out easy, but try to do an upgrade on your bike and get the newer generation the '14 or '15, The new ones that have the 3 positions open-trail-lock are night and day different from the older ones that only had 2 positions. They work the way you want a shock to work. I think those new ones are the best shocks on the market. Do an upgrade or try a newer bike, you'll notice the difference the moment you sit on the bike.
  • + 1
 CircusMaximus, amen to that. I'm still on my '09 Remedy 9 and the only thing stock left on it is the seat post and rear deraileur, and I keep throwing money its way because it really is worth it. Best riding bike I've ever owned.
  • + 1
 Treks done a lot of good things and some bad things. This Boost 148 is bad. That new ReActiv shock is simply amazing.
  • + 1
 I don't know, honestly the Boost 148 doesn't seem like a problem to me. Anyone buying a $9000 bike is going to have money to throw towards a custom wheelset laced with a new hub if they really want to. By the time I will be able to afford this bike second hand, there will be more options available.
  • + 23
 Could I run boost148 on my dh bike cause its 150 and I will just clamp my axle down really tight. Trek can S my D if I cant do this. DONT TELL ME HOW TO LIVE MY LIFE!
  • + 12
 Huh. I bet this might actually work. Please try it, for science.
  • + 3
 My Norco will run so much stiffer with it
  • + 11
 unless your downhill bike happens to be a 29er, then no.
  • + 8
 why cant I lace up to a 26 rim.
#getonmylevel
  • + 1
 Yeah its like, a 29 specific hub sizeg
  • + 5
 So you are saying there is no way to lace this to a 26 inch rim? like id like to know how a hub can determine the rim size
  • + 4
 Your cassette will sit to far inboard, and your rotor will not be sitting in the same plane as a correctly spaced 150mm hub would be. Sure you might be able to squeeze it into the frame, and MAYBE you could get the shifting to work, but good luck setting up the brake...
  • + 2
 still doesn't mean its 29 pacific
  • + 2
 I didnt say it was 29er specific.. But currently that is where it is giving the most beneficial relative improvement in stiffness.
  • + 19
 Best all around bike I've ever owned, hands down!!

Change the Fox DRCV Reactive to a Rock Shox Debon Air for better balance with the Pike and swap out the 70mm stem for a 50mm or shorter and she really comes alive!!!!!!

As far as stiff wheels, I9 has trail 32 hole boost 148 wheels in production now. I had a pair of I9 Trail 24s on my old Remedy 29 and they were insanely stiff!! They are producing Trail 24s in the near future they told me for the boost 148, can't wait!!!

www.pinkbike.com/photo/11906455
  • + 1
 i'll just speak for everyone:

DAYYYYYYUUUUUUUUUUUM thats a nice trail bike.
  • + 1
 tbh i think drcvs are one of the best feeling air shocks on the market, you just need to add more air that usual and run it at 20% sag and your onto a winner. i have the 2014 remedy 9 27.5 and have done a few upgrades myself (www.pinkbike.com/photo/11910034) and it is truly the best bike I have ever rode. I've done plenty of demos of other bike companies after working in a bike shop such as scott, whyte, cannondale and others, and the remedy trumps the lot
  • + 0
 Nice looking bike mate. How did you fit up the Monarch to the DRV mounts on the linkage? Custom bolt and bushes?
  • + 2
 The Monarch Debon Air is already set up for the Remedy 29ers. Whey you order it, it comes with the upper mounting hardware and the lower mounting hardware stays the same. Super easy set up and super noticeable right off the bat!! The Monarch stays way higher in its travel while peddling than the DRCV did and you don't have to keep changing modes during a ride as well. It peddles insanely well while in OPEN and its crazy plush while descending, its like magic!
  • + 1
 Do you still have your DRCV take off? Willing to sell?
  • + 1
 Sorry brotha, sold it.
  • + 17
 What a beautiful looking machine!
  • + 9
 Agreed. Perfectly proportioned and clean. Such a shame about the BS rear axle width.
  • - 8
flag Petair75 (Mar 8, 2015 at 21:52) (Below Threshold)
 I think haters or people who are jealous just try to pick on something on a perfect machine.... Smile
  • + 0
 Rear axle doesn't grind my gears as much as the PF BB.
  • + 1
 Treks BB92 isn't bad at all compared to a real pressed in BB. Actually BB92 is t pressed in at all.
  • + 12
 That re:activ shock is really understated, I have a remedy29 with a Fox 36 up front and carbon wheels and transforms the bike into something so much more beastly. Truly a very under appreciated, over capable machine.
  • + 9
 I would very much like to hear their reasoning for creating the boost148 rather than using the 150 standard that already exists.
  • + 16
 I read once before their reasoning was this is the maximum they could go without switching to an 83mm bb.
  • + 5
 Because 150 doesn't have slots for the end cups, its actually between 142 and 157mm
  • + 2
 In the same terminology as a 135 hub, it's actually only a 141. so considerably narrower than a 150, if you subtract the endcaps.
  • + 11
 Cue price complaining in 3...2...1....
  • + 40
 UH REGGA FLEBBA BREECKA BRECKA SMULLEN-ELLEN MR. KRABS!! YEGGA HEGGA MERGIN Wallet!!!!! DIMMY MIDDY SPEND! RIVY FLIVY DIVA SHIVA MR. KRABS WALLET!!
  • + 5
 That was the best comment ever
  • + 1
 Gold.
  • + 10
 8799? who buys this stuff?
  • + 33
 People with money. You can't take it with you to the grave, might as well use it while you're alive.
  • + 12
 Might as well earn it before you use it...
  • + 1
 Nah.
  • + 4
 I can't even earn it to take it to the grave
  • + 1
 A lot of people who probably won't use it as intended but have the $$ to throw around?
  • + 3
 mine's on order!
  • + 1
 Bike shop employees. I can't give you specifics, but it's actually somewhat affordable at EP considering the parts.
  • + 3
 a lot of people considering pretty much every size is sold out until june from trek.
  • - 1
 depends on how many have actually been sold
  • + 9
 Most reviews nowadays are like """that truly blurs the line between categories"""".....to describe 130-140mm bikes
  • + 5
 Several bike company's are releasing boost 148 bikes for next year. There are plenty of engineers trying to make riding their bikes better. They don't do this to put money in the companies pocket, they do this to try and achieve the best stiffness to weight ratio.
  • + 9
 Pinkbike Users: Oh don't do it

PB: 29er

Pinkbike Users: Omg
  • + 7
 I wonder what other colours it comes in? cos for 9k i might get two. or is 18 thousand dollars alot of money to spend on 2 bikes?
  • + 4
 Amazing bike. I will personally say I just bought my second Trek bike. This time a full suspension Fuel Ex 9 29er. Trek makes solid bikes from where I am from. I did enjoy the Rocky Mountain bikes they had at the shop but they still could not stand up to the Trek for the models they had. I have not been on this site that long but can see you will never get a consensus on any bike, product or setup on here. lol Everyone has such different opinions. This is good, if too many people have the same opinion we would all be riding the same bikes and complaining more! lol I just find it funny how upset some people get specially when some of clearly never even rode the bike in the topics. Anyways, I love my Trek's and I do see alot of amazing other bikes posted around here. My next bike I may try something new from either Yeti or Specialized. But who know! Its what ever fits my budget and I enjoy riding. Smile
  • + 4
 ok, I have waited long enough to answer this total noob question. But I can't hold it any longer:

How do they make the bikes stand up straight like that for photo shoots??????? I've seen a rod that holds them up by the crank or pedal but so often I don't see a THING!
  • + 11
 @peep6543 - It's magic. Or if you don't believe in magic, an assistant holds the bike, and after the photographer counts down they let go and step backwards out of the picture for the split second it takes to snap the photo. The bike will balance on its own for a bit, and than the helper can catch it before it hits the ground.
  • + 1
 OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!
  • + 1
 Must be the Boost 148, extra width counts...
  • + 5
 Nice bike in my opinion, as it's rather similar to my Stumpy Evo 29, but I still have trouble accepting another axle standard.
  • + 3
 Totally agree. It's like the SJ Evo and that's no bad thing but the pointless rear axle standard would stop me from buying it.
  • + 3
 Ok! How many of you haters out there are planning to buy a new bike this year like the Remedy 29? Thought so. Then there’s really nothing to whine about. Especially when a lot of you are still happy with your 26″ or hate on 29″. Obviously this bike or standard aren’t gonna mean anything for you, yet. And for those two who are planning to buy a new Remedy, congratulations! You get an awesome bike that kicks ass, and you don’t have to worry about compatibility, cuz it’s already there and it just works fine.
  • + 2
 Just bought the Trek Remedy 9.8 2016, loved this bike and I didn't care to much about the boost 148. Just love to ride and love the bike. That was enough for me, just my non tech opinion and my riding opinion. And that's just my opinion..
  • + 2
 great review @mikekazimer However I would urge you to try out and review an On One Codiene 29, everything you've said here matches the feel of it but retailing for £2600 with the ccdb air option it's an incredible beast. Heck I'll lend you mine if you can't get a demo.
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer do note that the geometry of the carbon Remedy 29 has been changed/updated slightly from the aluminum version. The carbon remedy 29 has slightly longer reach/front center. they stretched out the bike a bit more to make it more suitable for shorter stems. I'm 5'11" and have the aluminum bike now in a size 21/XL (i have very long legs/35" inseam), but given the longer reach on the carbon models, I'm ordering a size 19.5 in the carbon version. thanks for the optimistic review!!
  • + 2
 "There were sections of trail that I was unable to clean on any other bike except the (insert bike name here)"

Is it just me, or have I read this line in several of Pinkbike's last few bike reviews?
  • + 3
 I've noticed the same. I think other review sites are latching onto this wording. Serves a dual purpose of subtly enhancing tester cred and differentiating product in a way that doesn't offend potential advertisers.

Now we just need a shootout of all the bikes that were able to clean particular sections of trail to find the one that leaves the trail the most sparkling. Then we can award the 2015 "Dirt Devil" (TM) trophy.
  • + 2
 I remember a couple years ago when Trek was one of the first companies with a 142x12 rear long before the other companies followed suit. There were haters and naysayers then and there still is now.
  • + 1
 I used to work at a bike shop that sold trek bikes. I was spinning wrenches when the first 26" wheeled, 6" travel remedies hit the market.

They were the first bikes to use the tapered steerer tube, and the floating brake makes them ride absolutely amazing in the chunky. Oh and they use a floating shock.

I hate to say this but I am a full on eccentric genius, and like, invented a lot of bike stuff that I have actually seen come into fruition. So without arguement I must say there are only three bike companies I actually respect because of the technology and how well they ride.

Treks entire suspension platform, especially the 7 lb session DH and slash

Canfield brothers jedi

And xpresso Ad hoc.
  • + 0
 Actually it would be hard for Trek to be the first bikes to use tapered steerer tubes since they were invented by Giant Bicycles... along with zero stack/intergrated headset headtubes prior to that, and now more recently the overdrive 2 standard (tapered 1.5 to 1.25). As to the floating shock, they ripped that from Don Richardson's Suzuki MX designs (which he also had to sue Suzuki over for stealing his invention) of the late 70s/early 80s. Trek never really does anything first though they are quicker than most brands at copying something someone else has done already.
  • + 1
 @deeeight,

Don't forget about how Trek stole/ "invented" the ABT right after they cancelled a future partnership with DW.
  • + 1
 That you can "patent" a pivot in a linkage at all is one of the things wrong with the patent industry.
  • + 1
 Or that those 7lb Sessions and Slashes were paper thin and dented when you breathed on them wrong.
  • + 1
 Haha Deeeeight, they were the first asshole bike company to make them happen. Giants suck. They are all made by slave children from the cheapest most questionable source. Giant are pretty much the Walmart of bikes. End of argument. Telling me that the floating shock that was stolen from suziki MX desings is basically you telling me that what you have to say, doesn't matter. And unfortunately for you... it doesn't. So I forgive you, only because you a cyclist. And I love all cyclists. I do agree with you, patents are stupid, and I bet you Dave weagle got super drunk one day, and left a picture of the ABP laying around. And trek being the awesome company it was, went to work right away. And thank goodness they did, because now all there suspension bikes ride like kawasaki ninjas. And to the last guy who commented on me. They are paper thin. Which means you should ride smooth and not just straight line everything without any regrets.
  • + 2
 except a DW-link and ABP are nothing alike...
  • + 1
 Who said they are?
  • + 0
 the guy that thinks they stole the idea from DW.
  • + 0
 ABT is DW's split pivot.
Trek and Dw were in a partnership to develop it together. trek broke off the agreement and then released their "own" ABT.

As for Trek and Giant: Giant makes bontrager wheels in their factory in Taiwan. Furthermore Giant manufactures 60% of all mountain bike frames in the world.
  • + 2
 60% is a bit of a stretch. but one thing giant doesn't do much of is design. sure they are contracted to manufacture lots of peoples bikes, but if you wanna talk about a company who doesn't have an idea of their own.
  • + 2
 haha the giant dealer in my old home town would say the same thing. And I told him, if giant are so awesome... why don't they make awesome bikes?
  • + 2
 Giant makes money on their bikes AND other companies' awesome bikes. For the record, I am not a Giant rider, I just understand that they are powerhouses in the industry. Ibis Rider...
  • + 3
 Buy a Smuggler. Transition is the answer when you have had enough of proprietary parts and just want a bike that is always fun and always works.
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer - thanks for a great review. Curious if you could share a very brief comparison of the Remedy vs. the Yeti SB5C - for a PNW rider who is 60/40. Lots of climbing, and intermediate on the downs?
  • + 4
 @willycpc, that's a really, really tough call - they're both in the upper echelon of bikes that rip. Geometry aside, wheel size is going to play a part in how they feel. The Remedy has a touch more stability at speed than the SB5, but as an intermediate downhiller that may not be as much of a priority. They're also probably the two best best climbing bikes I spent time on last year as well - I'd call them equal in that department. When it comes down to it, since you place priority on the climbs, and may not be reaching the higher speeds where the Remedy really excels, I'd give the nod to the SB5. Of course, demoing both of them is the only way to really decide, but I don't think you'll be disappointed in either one.
  • + 2
 I would like to see a Trek Remedy 9.9 29 vs. Santa Cruz Tallboy LTc shootout with similar specs. Even with a couple year old design, I bet the Tallboy LTc would still hold it's own.
  • + 0
 Right on Dawson. I've been itching to get some time on a TBLT for a while now. Needs an angleset tho.
  • + 3
 Thanks to Trek and Specialized 29er are looking better and better each year. Slacker more aggressive geo makes these bikes way more appealing.
  • + 5
 And now I'm bitter because my regular DRCV sucks.
  • + 1
 Hey man, just to make you feel better I rode two of these 29ers with the new re:aktiv DRCV and honestly I can't tell the difference between this and the one on my '14 Remedy which is the previous regular version. I also rode earlier versions before the '14 and those that only have two modes "open" and "locked"... yeah those suck compare to the '14 and this new '15 version that have 3 modes "open"-"trail"-"lock"
  • + 1
 Get a monarch RT3 for it.
  • + 1
 Sweet, good to hear trek has kept the remedy a solid bike. I still ride my 2010 7, amazing bike, put a 160mm 36 up front and changed the cockpit and it rips!!!! A remedy will, hands down, be my next bike
  • + 2
 How much is just the frame? oh wait i don't really care because my brand new enve's probably wont work at a 12x142, cool ill keep having fun on my aluminum banshee phantom
  • + 1
 When are bike companies going to wake up and stop putting daft 70mm stems and skinny bars on their bikes. 50mm is the annual absolute max these days and bikes like this deserve at least a 780mm bar.
  • + 6
 780mm would be too wide for me
  • + 4
 not sure about "absolute", I switched from 75 to 50mm my All Mountain bike and my skills started to decline, not only on the uphills also on the downhills, the bike felt sketchy and nervous, came back to 75mm, my riding has never been better. It really depends on the person. 780 mm is also too wide for me.
  • + 0
 To be honest that really surprises me. I run a 35mm stem on my bike and it rides awesome!
  • + 4
 @matt76 There is no one best stem size or bar width.

I 'd wager the vast majority of riders and or bikes wouldn't get on with a 35mm stem.
  • + 2
 35 would be too short for me on my old bike
  • - 1
 I disagree. Most riders I know are running at least 50mm or less. Even my 13 year old lad is runnning 50 mm stem down from 70 and a 760mm bar and its transformed his bike. I'm only 5'9" and my 760mm bar seems too slim. Will be upping to a 780mm bar soon.
  • + 0
 Also if they actually came with a 780mm bar as standard you could cut them down to taste. You can't do it the other way so those who wanted a wider bar wild then have to make another purchase
  • + 2
 @Matt76 there are so many variables in riding, what type of ridding this person does, what type of trails is he riding, how's the riders body (long arms, short arms, etc...), even wheel size, so saying 50 mm is the "Absolute" max is not only subjective it is also narrow minded, there's lots of riding styles which these multipurpouse bikes will be facing. So to answer your question, bike companies will never stop putting 70 mm stems since it seems to be the sweet spot between short stems and long stems.
  • + 3
 Depends on what your riding, sometimes a longer stem to help getting weight over your front axle on tech climbs helps.
  • - 1
 @Narro2 70mm is actually considered a long stem nowadays. Some bike companies are now producing longer frames and putting shorter stems on there bikes. Look at Mondraker they go down to a 10 mm stem on their rigs. Renthal, Hope, Kore etc are now making 35/40mm stems because that's where the market is now going. I cannot accept anyone's argument that a short stem ruined the ride of their bike. Every bike tester including the tester of this bike all day that any trail bike needs a short stem. They can't be all wrong.
  • + 2
 Hahaha, stick to your guns then... all I can say here is my experience. 35 and 50 mil worsen my riding...both uphill and downhill.
  • + 2
 @matt76 As you have pointed out Monraker have long toptubes and in that particular case it makes sense, not all bikes do. Why do you think they have done that, why bother with forward geometry when they could have just fitted 10 mm stems to their previous line up?
  • + 4
 Justin leov will be racing the 27.5 version this season.
  • + 2
 Fair enough. I hope he's as quick as he was on the 29".
  • + 4
 ...aaand here come the superbike haters
  • + 9
 scottzg here reporting for duty.
  • + 6
 where is the superbike?
  • + 1
 The real question is if we are getting yet another axle standard will older hubs be able to be converted to this size obviously the flange won't be as wide but would you be able to get axle conversions
  • + 3
 Its unlikely that they will be convertable. 135mm and 142mm are convertable because they use the same shell, and 150mm and 157mm are convertable because they use the same shell. Boost 148 hubs use a new shell, so they will not be convertible.
  • + 2
 While Im sure it's an awesome bike to ride and has all the fancy new bits and bobs, Treks never fail to be uninspiring to look at. Yep. It's a bike. Looks like a bike.
  • + 3
 it should come in Lance yellow
  • + 2
 At those prices, soon we'll need insurance to ride our mountain bikes! Ahhhhh!!!
  • + 1
 New standards can be crappy, just look at PF 30 and BB30, I have 2 bikes running both and they don't last pissing time, what was wrong with a treaded BB?
  • - 1
 I'm not bothered by the price. It's an XTR/XX1 bike. There's a lower spec one that's more reasonably priced. They lost me at the proprietary shock and not offering a frame kit so I can avoid their XC-oriented parts. Too bad. Looks like a killer rig.
  • + 4
 It's not really a proprietary shock - if you wanted you could replace it with a standard shock from any number of other companies.
  • + 1
 Am I the only person who doesn't like fluorescent colour matching? Why can't more bikes have simple, classy colour schemes like they did a few years ago?
  • + 2
 Not the only one.
  • + 4
 My bad identiti124...I didn't mean to neg prop you....just the opposite.... flouro...go away
  • + 2
 just make it black on gloss black stickers as an option at least, dont need it screaming "trek" as if you could't tell what it is, gah why am i even waisting my time on this.
  • + 1
 I like the colors on the Remedy 9 much better...
  • - 1
 Hello mr. Suspension journalist. The intention of ABP and other variants of seatstay mounted brakes with a pivot close to the rear wheel rotational axid is not to hinder braking from affecting the shock, but to affect rear wheel movement, i.e. locking the rear wheel. Braking will exert forces to the shock either way.

Whether or not this is valuable to suspension design or not is a matter of debate as it allows braking "in the wrong places", i.e. down steep chutes, traverses, and other low grip situations. As owner of SP, DW, KS and others will testify it's all about carrying speed through cruxes and braking in the right spots where there is braking grip and locking the wheel does not result in rear wheel washouts.
  • + 4
 Starbucks of bikes
  • - 1
 I WILL NEVER buy any bike that utilizes new infuriating standards that will inevitably limit my choices and cut into my bank account when I need to replace or upgrade parts. Take your proprietary marketing angle, and I think you know where you can stick it......same place as all those old paycheque stubs to Lance Armstrong.
  • + 0
 Suspension that designed to use specific shocks sucks! Rear wheel standard is ok, till thay use normal hubs for the compleate biles, not a shitty

Also you can check moto/ auto eheels standards, more than 4 )
  • + 1
 Has anyone done an on trail comparison between the 29 Remedy and the 27.5 Remedy? How does the 27.5 version ride?
  • + 2
 Would you rip this down a downhill trail with rampy jumps on it?
  • - 2
 Just wondering if my Canyon Spectral 29 is the exact copy of this bike or if this bike is the exact copy of the Canyon Spectral. Ok let's see….my Spectral is fully XT and costs 2500 Euro,therefore this Trek can kiss my butt anyway,who cares about the copy.
  • + 4
 Well your Spectral is alloy. The Spectrals that are carbon and similarly equipped to this Trek are in the 7k euro price range.
  • + 3
 not a 29er.
  • + 1
 Please recommend me the size of this lovely creature. I am 186cm. and long legs, and short torso. Thanks very much.
  • + 1
 Probably the one with a reach of about 665.
  • + 1
 looks like Brandon Semenuks Trek Ticket-S colour way from 2013 redbull joyride.
  • + 2
 $8,800...$8,800...8,800.....bicycle.....
  • + 0
 Is this avaialble? On the UK website it only has a 9.9 27.5 version - no 29er...
  • + 2
 I noticed this too. It seems the 29" might only be available in some territories.
  • + 2
 drool
  • + 0
 I bet someone was offered a sales/marketing job at Trek after this review.. Great read.
  • + 2
 #boycottboost148
  • + 7
 You can build a stiffer wheel in a number of ways, without creating a new axle standard... The least effective is widening the flanges and using the same crappy narrow rim and low spoke count setup. Can't wait for the 120mm front hubs to stiffen the from wheel up!!!
  • - 1
 good point, i was wondering if thats why they went to the 148 as those roam carbons look flimsy for carbon
  • + 0
 Sorry, but full floater? Like this: www.fullfloater.com I don't see a resemblance.
  • + 3
 It refers to the shock mounting method, Don Richardson was the first to mount the shock between linkages in motorcycles so it floated at both ends effectively instead of the normal method of anchoring one end either to the main frame or the swingarm.
  • + 1
 I'd love to see a shootout of this with the Specialized Enduro 29er
  • + 1
 more the public knows about these numbers the better in my opinion
  • - 1
 The carbon frame option has been around for a while now, that's nothing new...maybe they were thinking of the slash?
  • + 3
 No... for the Remedy 29er they only had the aluminum version as of last year and the carbon is new for this year for the 29er. They had it for the 650B last year but not for the 29er. You are correct they didn't have the Slash carbon last year, that is also new in '15.
  • + 1
 ah yes, my mistake. I've been looking at the 2015 for so long I guess I thought it was last years model.
  • + 0
 Looks like a................
  • + 1
 Bike. It just looks like a plain old bike. Bland.
  • + 5
 Until you actually spend some time on the design. I guarantee "bland" won't be a descriptor any longer. Fast, dialled, composed, active under hard braking, efficient. These are the words that pop into my head when riding my Remedy. But, yes, I do agree that they are not the flashiest of bikes. Priorities, I suppose... Smile
  • + 1
 Im sure it is, but I want to be inspired when I see my bike...
  • - 1
 I'm a little confused. On the trek website they claim to have a 142×12 hub. Which is it? 142 or 148?
  • + 3
 Apparently I was hallucinating because now I don't see it.
  • + 1
 Ugly
  • + 1
 nice
  • + 0
 So the new shock doesn't bottom out of two foot drops?
  • - 1
 I demo'ed a Remedy 29er a couple months ago. The Trek rep said it would change my opinion of 29ers. It didn't.
  • + 0
 918 is just a car..
  • + 1
 Or technological showcase.
  • - 1
 What happened to the old Remedy we loved with 160mm of travel?
  • + 11
 it became a slash!
  • - 1
 Are you kidding? Trek just took my 'hate on' to teh next level X3.
  • - 3
 When will a version in 26 "?
  • + 0
 What's 26" ?
  • - 2
 Looks like a trek session Wink
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