Trek Slash 9.9 29 RSL - Review

Feb 20, 2017
by Mike Kazimer  




Trek shook up their mountain bike lineup for 2017, and when the dust had settled from those revisions it was the Slash that ended up on top as the most purebred, race-oriented bike of the bunch, designed for the rigors of the Enduro World Series circuit. Built around 29” wheel and with a full carbon frame that Trek claims is as stiff as their Session DH bike, the new Slash has 150mm of rear travel paired with a 160mm fork up front.

There are two complete versions of the Slash, the 9.9 Race Shop Limited reviewed here, which retails for a bank account emptying $8,000 USD, and the 9.8, which comes in at $5,500. There's also a frame-only option for $3,700, a price that includes a Fox Float X2 shock.

Trek Slash 9.9 RSL Details

• Intended use: all-mountain / enduro race
• Rear wheel travel: 150mm
• Wheel size: 29"
• Carbon fiber frame
• BB92 bottom bracket
• Sizes: 15.5, 17.5, 19.5, 21.5
• Weight (size 19.5): 29.75 lb (13.49 kg)
• MSRP: $8,000 USD / $3,700 frame only
www.trekbikes.com / @trek


Trek Slash review
Trek's Knock Block keeps the fork's crown from contacting the frame.
Trek Slash review
There are two geometry settings, but the writing on the frame can be a little confusing - the low position (shown) is with the bolt in the most rearward position.


Frame Details


This is one of the few times where the well-worn phrase, “Looks like a Session,” is acceptable, because yes, the Slash does bear more than a passing resemblance to its downhill-oriented sibling. The frame is constructed from Trek's OCLV carbon fiber, and has an oversized, squared-off downtube, part of Trek's new 'Straight Shot' design, which is also found on the Fuel EX and Remedy models.

The frame's downtube shape means that the fork's crown will hit the frame if it's turned too far, but that's where the Knock Block system comes in. A replaceable stop chip located on the top tube works with a keyed headset top cap in order to limit the fork's turning radius, while a keyed stem and spacers ensure everything remains lined up. Non-Bontrager stems are compatible with the Knock Block system, although you'll need to purchase a special clamping headset spacer in order to run one. There's also a rubber downtube protector for one extra level of frame protection.

It used to be that achieving adequate tire clearance on longer travel 29ers was a tricky proposition, but thanks to the advent of 1x drivetrains and 12x148mm rear spacing that's no longer as much of an issue. On the Slash the amount of clearance is especially generous, with enough room to fit a 29 x 2.6” tire, a width that's still somewhat of a rarity, although I wouldn't be surprised to see some wider rubber hit the market in the near future.


Trek Slash review
Trek Slash review


The Slash uses a BB92 bottom bracket, and while I would have preferred a threaded bottom bracket, out of all the pressfit standards I've had the best luck with BB92. Internal routing is in place for derailleur, brake, and dropper post housing using Trek's Control Freak cable management system, which involves threading a zip tie through a port in the down tube to hold everything in place. It's not as quite as easy of a system to work with compared to frames full length guide tubes molded into them, and a couple of bent spokes and some patience are sometimes necessary to get everything cinched down.

Other details include ISCG 05 tabs for mounting a chain guide, and, thankfully, a spot to mount a full-size water bottle on the top of the downtube.


Trek Slash review


Suspension Design

The Slash uses Trek's Active Braking Pivot (ABP) suspension design, where the rear pivots are positioned around the rear axle, but there's one notable difference compared to the layout found on the Fuel EX, Remedy, and even the Session – the shock is mounted directly to the frame, rather than 'floating' between the chainstays and upper rocker link. According to Trek, this change gave them more room to work with in the lower frame area, and made it possible to fit a longer piggyback shock, in this case a metric Fox Float X2 that measures 230x57.5mm.
Trek Slash review


Geometry

In the low setting the Slash is one of the slackest 29ers currently on the market, with a 65.1-degree head angle. There are slacker big wheelers in existence – the Pole Evolink and Nicolai Geometron come to mind – but not many. For comparison, the Specialized Enduro 29 has a 66-degree head angle, the Evil Wreckoning's is 65.5-degrees, and Nukeproof's Mega 290 sits at 66-degrees.


Trek Slash 2017 geo


Specifications
Specifications
Price $8000
Travel 150mm
Rear Shock Fox Factory Float X2, 2-position damper, 230x57.5mm
Fork Fox Factory 36 Talas, 130/160mm travel
Headset FSA Knock Block IS-2, E2, sealed alloy cartridge
Cassette SRAM XG-1295, 10-50, 12 speed
Crankarms SRAM X01 Eagle, 32T Direct Mount X-Sync
Bottom Bracket PF92
Rear Derailleur SRAM X01 Eagle
Chain SRAM Eagle
Shifter Pods SRAM X01 Eagle, 12 speed
Handlebar Bontrager Line Pro, OCLV Carbon, 35mm, 27.5mm rise, 780mm width
Stem Bontrager Line Pro, Knock Block, 40mm
Grips Bontrager Rhythm, dual lock-on
Brakes SRAM Guide Ultimate
Wheelset Bontrager Line Elite
Tires Bontrager SE4 Team Issue, 29" x 2.4"
Seat Bontrager Evoke 3, titanium rails
Seatpost Bontrager Drop Line 125, 31.6mm

Trek Slash review








Setup

Getting the Fox Float X2 shock set to my liking took more tinkering than I'm used to, and for the first few weeks I played with a number of air pressure, compression, rebound, and volume spacer configurations. The Slash has a progressive suspension curve, but the amount of ramp up at the end of the travel isn't as dramatic as on a bike like the Nukeproof Mega 290, or the YT Jeffsy, which means more aggressive riders may need to add an additional volume band.

I ended up doing just that, installing one more volume band to the X2 in order to add more end stroke ramp up, which brought the total up to five, the maximum allowed given the shock's dimensions. My final settings ended up being 180psi for 17mm of sag, low-speed compression all the way open, 19 clicks out on high-speed compression, 20 clicks out on low-speed rebound, and 7 clicks out on high-speed rebound.


Trek Slash review

Climbing


A good amount of my time aboard the Slash was spent grinding up logging roads in order to access the type of steep, technical terrain this red machine was built for. With the rear shock set fully open there is a fair bit of suspension movement, especially during out-of-the-saddle pedaling, but luckily all it took was a flip of the blue, two-position lever on the Float X2 and I could comfortably spin away as long as necessary to reach the goods.

Along with taking full advantage of the Float's compression lever, I regularly made use of the Eagle 12-speed drivetrain's largest, 50-tooth cog, especially when the ground was soggy and saturated, and forward progress slowed down to a crawl. Where I live, that extra range makes a lot of sense, and makes it easy to conserve energy for the fun parts of a ride.

It was on more technical climbs that the Slash's downhill proclivities begin to show, and while I wouldn't say it ever felt unwieldy, the slack head angle does give it a more subdued demeanor; a little more attention is required to keep the front end on track. Of course, it is possible to drop the Fox 36's travel down to 130mm on the fly, which should theoretically improve the climbing performance, but I simply didn't find that to be the case. My weight balance felt better on the climbs and descents with the fork set to its full 160mm of travel.

There's also the Slash's adjustable geometry to consider. I ended up settling on the low geometry setting, but I'm lucky enough to live in an area that's rife with DH-style trails. The difference between the positions isn't drastic, but it its noticeable - I could certainly see using the high setting in areas with more rolling, less steep terrain in order to speed up the bike's handling.

Compared to its contemporaries, I'd place the Slash's climbing manners somewhere in between the steady-rolling Nukeproof Mega 290 and the livelier Yeti SB5.5. It's not likely that you'll suddenly find yourself smashing hill climb PRs, but considering its intended purpose – crushing the gnarliest tracks on the EWS circuit – it's hard to fault the Slash's uphill performance.



Trek Slash review

Descending

The Slash feels exactly like a race bike should – it's stiff, responsive, and extremely stable. Now, stiffness is one of those traits that can be hard to quantify, especially when there's six inches of suspension between you and the ground, but there's a satisfying precision to the Slash's handling. Feel like taking that cheeky inside line, the one with the nearly ninety-degree exit? Or would you rather go wide, blazing a round, clean arc on the very edge of the trail? In either case, the Slash is an unflinching machine, no matter how hard it's pushed.

The rear suspension doesn't feel quite as plush as the current version of the Specialized Enduro (which makes sense, considering the fact that there's a 15mm travel difference between the two bikes), but after I'd found the sweet spot with the Float X2 I was able to cruise right through chunky sections of trail at full speed without getting hung up or knocked off line. There's plenty of traction on hand, thanks to the combination of the larger wheels and a sensitive shock, which helps keeps the rubber on the ground even in loose or slippery conditions. I did reach the end of the travel a little more often than I would have liked, even with the maximum amount of volume spacers in place. This may have more to do with the X2 shock than the bike's suspension curve, but in any case I wouldn't have minded a little more bottom-out resistance.


Trek Slash review
bigquotesThe Slash feels exactly like a race bike should - it's stiff, responsive, and incredibly stable.


When it comes to bike geometry, how slack is too slack? I don't think we've reached the limit yet, at least when it comes to all-mountain / enduro race bikes, and the Slash helps to illustrate that point. As long as the trail was pointed downhill, the 65-degree head angle didn't feel floppy or sluggish, even at slower speeds. Chainstay length plays a role in this equation as well, and at 434mm the Slash's back end is short enough that cranking it around tight turns didn't pose a problem. That being said, the Slash does reward an aggressive rider, one who isn't afraid to push the front wheel into turns and to really lean into the bike in order to make the most of its angles.
Views: 8,726    Faves: 13    Comments: 2


Compared to the Yeti SB5.5 the Slash feels a little more glued to the ground – it would rather plow than pop over smaller obstacles. Put the lip of a lofty jump in front of it, though, and the it'll soar skyward with ease. I even took it down some proper 'freeride' trails, full of nicely-sculpted jumps that were originally built with smaller-wheeled bikes in mind, and the Slash handled it all. In the air, it feels closer to a DH bike than a trail bike, with a calm stability that makes it easy to get lined up and ready to return to earth.

I usually try to avoid using the phrase 'confidence inspiring' in bike reviews, due to the fact that it's in danger of becoming a tired cliche used to describe everything from helmets to socks, but I'm going to make an exception in this case. Those two words are a fitting description for the Slash's performance in steep, rough terrain, and whether I was riding down loose, rutted chutes that snaked straight down the fall line, or moss-covered slabs of near vertical rock that require accurate braking and full commitment, I was consistently floored by how solid and composed the Slash felt. It's one of those bikes that makes you think, "I've got this," time after time, no matter how treacherous the trail ahead appears.


Trek Slash review
There are a lot of Bontrager-branded components on the Slash 9.9, but the vast majority are well designed and constructed.
Trek Slash review
With a 780mm carbon bar and a 40mm stem, there wasn't any need to make changes to the bike's cockpit.


Component Check

• Bontrager bits: Considering the RSL's price, there sure are a lot of house-brand parts on this bike. Bontrager does make some very nice parts – the carbon bars and SE4 tires are all excellent components - but I could see some riders balking at the lack of flashy bits from companies with more aftermarket cachet.

• Fox TALAS 36: The Fox TALAS 36 remained buttery smooth for the duration of testing, although I would have preferred to see the regular Float version spec'd instead of the Talas. Aside from the fact that I never felt the need to lower the front end for climbing, there's no way to add or subtract volume spacers from the fork to increase or decrease how progressive the fork is. That's something I'd imagine many riders would want to do, especially the racer types that this bike is aimed at.

• Bontrager Drop Line Post: Trek says that the Slash is spec'd with a 125mm dropper in order to allow it to fit a wider range of riders, but I'm not convinced that reasoning is sound. Given the terrain this bike is designed for, it only makes sense that most riders would want their seat as far out of the way as possible; at the very least the 19.5 and 21.5 frames should have 150mm posts. At 5'11” I was able to swap out the Drop Line for a 150mm Fox Transfer post with plenty of room to spare on the size large.

• Bontrager Line Elite Wheels: The Line Elites held up well, and they're still true even after a few months of being banged against roots and rocks. Setting tires up tubeless was a breeze, and the 28mm internal width plays with wider tires, making it possible to run lower pressures without needing to worry about the tire peeling off in the middle of a hard turn.



Slash 29 Review


Pinkbike's Take:

bigquotesIt's easy to get sucked in by the Slash's good looks and DH-inspired geometry, but don't forget to be realistic about the terrain you regularly frequent. This is a bike with a healthy need for speed, one that thrives when the going gets steep and rough. If you have the terrain and the confidence to fully take advantage of the Slash's potential, it's a potent weapon out on the trail, and one of the best descending longer travel 29ers currently on the market. - Mike Kazimer




Visit the high-res gallery for more images from this review




About the Reviewer
Stats: Age: 34 • Height: 5'11” • Inseam: 33" • Weight: 160lb • Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Twenty-two years deep into a mountain biking addiction that began as a way to escape the suburban sprawl of Connecticut, Mike Kazimer is most at home deep the woods, carving his way down steep, technical trails. The decade he spent as a bike mechanic helped create a solid technical background to draw from when reviewing products, and his current location in the Pacific Northwest allows for easy access to the wettest, muddiest conditions imaginable.


Must Read This Week

366 Comments

  • + 167
 Even though I know I will never do an x-up or tail whip there is something about knock block that makes me think "engineering short cut" instead of "feature"
  • + 28
 My dad's 1982 Kawasaki dirt bike has the same type of head set limiter.
  • + 15
 Knock Block aside. It seems like it would make minced meat out of the climbs and descents that im used to seeing on the east coast. Seems like a pretty dialed frame.
  • + 28
 Having ridden a new remedy on a demo I really like it, on the trail you don't notice the limiting in your turning radius, Yet you do notice it if you have to bail off your bike in a crash when your bars don't go spinning around messing up your cables.
  • - 7
flag Kona311 (Feb 20, 2017 at 11:46) (Below Threshold)
 Knock block is there because of the straight downtube from the headset. If it wasn't needed to keep the fork crown off the frame, it wouldn't be there.
  • - 8
flag gumbytex (Feb 20, 2017 at 12:26) (Below Threshold)
 I have a friend who, on a recent mountain bike trip on a demo'd Remedy, hit the knock block's limit twice on techy switchbacks in two days' worth of riding. No thank you. Wouldn't be surprised if this let them cut manufacturing costs and they decided to call it a "feature".
  • + 14
 @Lkeenan22: that and stops your leavers from catching on your frame when you crash so you don't end up with a nice scratch on your new 8k bike
  • - 14
flag CaptainSnappy (Feb 20, 2017 at 12:57) (Below Threshold)
 @gumbytex:

"The frame's downtube shape means that the fork's crown will hit the frame if it's turned too far, but that's where the Knock Block system comes in."

So they take it out, you buy the bike, crash it and then notice that the top of the fork stanchion has bashed a hole into the bottom of the down tube of your $8000 bike. Doesn't Trek know we want poorly thought out designs and easily damaged frames?

/s
  • + 27
 Not only is the price crazy, but they blew it with the sizing. The 17.5 has the geo of a small and the 19.5 is like an XL. I did a demo on it on Seymour. The bike rides really nice. I liked it better than my Wreckoning in most situations, but there is no medium or large here. It's really strange. There should've made a 18.5...or made the 17.5 way longer. The stopper didn't bother me like I thought it might. My other complaint is the interrupted seat tube. I couldn't get the seatpost into the frame to my liking. Maybe the problem again was that I was spending time on the 19.5 because the 17.5 is made for midgets. Anyhow , the bike itself rides really nice, but I ended up selling the Wreckoning and going with a Santa Cruz Hightower and running a 160mm fox 36 upfront. Extremely capable bike
  • + 5
 @CaptainSnappy: no, I just mean, the design definitely has problems. There are times on a trail when a rider will want to turn the front wheel farther than this bike's design allows.
  • + 5
 @gumbytex: you just learn to rear wheel steer.
  • + 27
 First Brexit, then Donald Trump and now the Knock Block? I can't take it anymore!!
  • + 4
 @coregrind: rear wheel steer while going up a techy uphill switchback? I guess. I'd still rather not hit my steering limits in tight terrain, or while doing track-stand-ish tight turns.
  • + 1
 100% AGREE @robwhynot
  • - 1
 You don't HAVE to run the Knock block, and the frame is protector where the fork would hit the down-tube anyways.
  • + 6
 I could see it making sense on a dh bike...
  • + 16
 @srjacobs: Your dads '82 Kawi also has dual crown forks..
  • + 13
 You lost me at BB92.
  • + 2
 My son's Giant Pre push bike has a knock block and he gets on fine with it. Just sometimes when he crashes it smashes the key past the knock block.
  • + 9
 I have a 2017 Remedy and I'm not big on the knock block but it is what it is. I honestly only notice it when I'm pushing it around the shop and want to turn around haha I haven't noticed it when riding.
  • + 1
 I always thought one of the benefits of carbon was you could shape things more easily without losing strength, so that's not true, still strength benefits with a straight carbon tube?
  • + 0
 There are bigger things than a knock block to be worried about -- it's a compromise to enable geo / strength / big wheels. Want a knock block, or greater stress in a critical area? Or more weight? Or an insane reach?

And the knock block also doubles as an upper downtube protector for those hang-the-fork-over a chairlift, gondola, or truck tailgate situations.
  • + 1
 I can't help but feel that Trek could've just not had a frame design that put parts of the frame in the way of the forks turning radius. I mean every other company on earth can do it, and I know they talk about stiffness issues and all that jazz but how long has it been since anyone really complained about frame stiffness on a beefy enduro bike anyway.
  • + 1
 @ryanandrewrogers:

Personally I like the idea, but I think it could be a extra feature, rather than you have to have it to avoid shafting your frame.

I mean, get the tube out of the way of the crown, and then fit a knock block if you want
  • + 3
 @gumbytex: How???? I have a remedy and that's never happened.
  • + 3
 Seriously who is gonna tail whip that bike? 2 brake lines, shifting cable and dropper cable...
Now I didn't read any issue with it from Mike Kazimer (or I missed it?) so I will assume there were none.
  • + 3
 @EnduroManiac: I've been on my 17 Fuel EX for about 6 months now. Ive never run into the limits other than crashing once(the knock block survived) and pushing the bike around the garage. The turning radius at the limit is such that its hard to anticipate ever reaching under any normal riding condition.
  • + 2
 @gumbytex: I have great doubt of what you just said, the knock block allows enough movement so that you can practically turn on the spot, so it seems that your friend reached the knock block limiter because his handling is wack
  • + 2
 @ryanandrewrogers: pros dude
Pros complain

And reviewers who review bikes and write reviews about bikes as if their are pro racers writing for other pro racers.

The vast majority of people here will never reach the full potential of this bike

P.s casing a jump and breaking your bike doesn't count as "reach the bikes limit"
  • + 2
 @ShailyCR: Exactly! If you hit the limiter, you're either riding like shit or you're about to crash.
  • + 0
 @theedon:you better demo it. I am 185 tall and xl is just fine. I am ex dh racer.
  • + 2
 @theedon: I felt the same way about the 17.5 remedy, superrrrr short
  • + 112
 For how much money this bike costs you think it would come with something better than an in house brand seatpost. Considering that this bike is $11000 CAD it is grossly under specd
  • + 27
 Got to agree. Trek rims aren't bad at all but for that price would I love to see something like ENVE, etc.. Still look like a amazing bike if you can afford it.
  • + 25
 At $11k CAD I expect some flash. More or less perfection.
  • + 79
 So much Bontrager on this bike, that price tag is a joke.
  • - 34
flag Trekslash360 (Feb 20, 2017 at 8:45) (Below Threshold)
 its 7200 usd??? ask you local dealer
  • + 29
 @Trekslash360: That's still a ridiculous price for something that has all bontrager equipment on it.
  • + 20
 @Trouterspace: Whats wrong with Bontranger parts, Trek are big enough to develop pretty nice own-brand componentry.
  • + 8
 One thing it can't handle is my bank balance! Stupid money for stupid people.
  • + 19
 Bontragers new dropper performs really well. Maybe you'd prefer they put a race face post on it? Lol
  • - 4
flag SpinningAddiction (Feb 20, 2017 at 9:43) (Below Threshold)
 Trek takes to much pride in their name and technology.
  • + 63
 @Racer951: Nothing wrong with Bontrager parts... but they're charging ENVE prices for in-house parts. I would expect the house-brand to come at a lower price tag.. sorta like how it works at any consumer goods retailer around the planet.

They're saving a ton of money speccing their own parts, and not passing that savings onto the consumer.
  • + 12
 I think it is mostly Trek putting a lot of work into Bontrager lately and wanting to show off their progress by spec'n it on this bike.
  • + 34
 @Trouterspace: since when is $8000 with xo1 eagle and full fox factory suspension and guide ultimate brakes enve pricing? That kit with enve wheels from most companies woul be knocking on the door at almost 10 grand
  • + 10
 @Trouterspace: True. It's also a psuedo direct sales company charging retail prices.
  • + 14
 @allenfstar: Santa Cruz, a "boutique" brand, is selling the Hightower with Eagle XX1, I9 hubs/RaceFace Hoops, Rockshox Suspension/Seatpost (with more than 125m travel), Ultimate brakes, Maxxis tires, and only Santa Cruz branded stuff is handlebar and grips. For the same price..

The Trek is a terrible deal.
  • + 28
 @Trouterspace:

You just said Trek is asking Enve prices, but then you come with an example of a Santa Cruz also without any Enve parts... Besides that, there is nothing 'boutique' about Santa Cruz either. They're owned by some giant Dutch investment company.
  • + 12
 Oh my god I lost my cash! Against all odds I bought a Slash!!
  • + 14
 Yeah but did you see the invisible kickstand in the snow shot? No of you didnt, it's invisible! Money well spent
  • + 7
 @cvoc: OK you got me, but I still listed a bike with better parts spec from a smaller brand for the same price. The Trek is overpriced.
  • + 9
 Cash me ouside how bow Trek?

The Bonti post worked fine on the Slash i demo'ed at Crankworx. The bar and stem were a non-issue as well. I may have a preference for Renthal bars and TLD grips though. The tires were good. Rear hub appeared to be a rebranded DT240, like almost every company does.

The frame only pricing is rediculous. I'd have no issue building up an 11spd XT/XTR/Saint version if I could stomach the initial hit.

This bike is a machine and would likely replace my V10C and 26" 6" AM bike. Likely my 29er hardtail as well.
  • + 16
 Has anyone ridden the new Bontrager post? I have a new remedy 9.8 and you can keep all other posts. Except maybe a KS lev. Bontrager post has the same internals as a fox and crankbrother post. I think it's smoother than any Reverb I've owned and did I mention YOU can service it? It has a replaceable cartridge that is literally 5 bolts and 20mins of your time. Why would they spec more expensive parts that they cannot provide customer service for when Trek is known for being the best in that arena? Not to mention the bikes look better than some mix match of after market boutique parts bike. Even Santacruz is puttion their own parts on their 11k bikes now.
  • + 1
 On some of Trek's other models, like the Fuel EX 9.7 ($3899USD), you can get a lower-end (but still carbon) model for significantly cheaper, and upgrade the components as necessary. Slash 9.9 - $8kUSD - Slash 9.8 $5.5kUSD. Seems like Trek needs Slash 9.7 as well.
  • + 2
 @strikeeagle17: frameset custom build and select what you consider is best?
  • - 1
 @Tr011: you are just worth my time! thats 8500 thats 500 over msrp and there isn't one product that actually charges msrp.
  • + 7
 @Trouterspace: its a mistake to believe that SC are still a boutique brand... even with the inverted commas. Wink

This is expensive, but is comparative to others (Yeti, Spec, SC etc)) except those of the direct sale nature
  • - 18
flag thenotoriousmic (Feb 20, 2017 at 12:55) (Below Threshold)
 Anyone who spends this amount of money on a bike regardless of the components is a moron and is doing mountain bikers a massive disservice. We need to come together and let the mountain bike industry know that they can't rip us off anymore. Buying this shit will only encourage them.
  • + 3
 @thenotoriousmic: what price should top tier models from the major brands be sold for?
  • - 1
 @strikeeagle17: i have the bike myself and found this "in house" to be better and a lot smoother then mainstream components.... don't doubt it till you try it
  • + 1
 Does the mentioned stiffness add that much weight? My Enduro 29 Comp weights 14,5kg in M and has no carbon parts.
6€/saved gram
  • + 5
 @Trouterspace: What if the Bontrager parts perform as well or better as everything you just listed? Can't blame a company for wanting to not be viewed as in house product. I've been hearing that Bontrager is pushing hard to not be seen that way. In the road scene Bontrager Wheels are at the top of the line. The MTB scene is just lagging.

Maybe you should try something different and get off the hipster cool aid.
  • + 5
 Considering the fact that the line is one of the best droppers on the market at the moment.... don't knock it before you try it because it beats the hell out of having no dropper while rockshox try's to figure out why your reverb won't drop....
  • + 1
 I am not sure why you think "house brand" parts aren't on par with not "house brand" parts. Furthermore why should a brand put other manufacturers parts on their bikes when most people just change those parts (handle bars etc.) to their personal preference anyways?
  • + 3
 @Trouterspace: Watch that company start to go downhill and over the bars with their buy-out. The Remedy rides way better than a Santa Cruz Bronson. Trust me I've put both against each other.... Yeah you can name all the non-house brand stuff on the Santa Cruz but realistically it doesn't make it any better, you just live in Walnut Creek, not Waterloo Wisconsin... Same reason why people out here think Specialized is the bomb. I've had four Santa Cruz bikes starting with one of the first Tallboy LTc's to ship upon release. DONALD TRUMP TRUST ME, Trek rides better in every-way if you use your pro-pedal switch appropriately. Also you don't have to keep screwing around and replacing pivot bearings like you will on your Santa Cruz if you buy a Trek.
  • - 4
flag thenotoriousmic (Feb 20, 2017 at 15:33) (Below Threshold)
 @enduroFactory: the fact that a top tier (if you can call it that in this case) has more than doubled in price in recent years shows how much they should be sold for.
  • + 1
 @thenotoriousmic: what do you think top tier from the big brands should cost in your eyes?
  • + 1
 @Trouterspace: Made in Taiwan vs Made in USA?
  • + 6
 @Nathan6209: still though, @Trouterspace is correct. Even if everything is just as good as Enve, or Thomson or I9 or whatever else, Trek is saving money by using their own in house parts. It would be nice to see that savings passed onto the consumer - I'd happily rock top tier Bontrager - instead of that massive price tag.
  • + 2
 @PHeller: or wait until next year at this time when they sell the 9.8 for $3499.
  • + 1
 @delicar: I was going to say that. Santa Cruz is made in China, where wages are lower than in Taiwan.

I know the Session is made in America. Is this Slash made in America?
  • + 3
 @jaame:

No its made in Taiwan.
  • + 4
 I feel like Trek vastly behind on competitive pricing in the all mountain/enduro market especially when considering offerings from Commencal, Canyon, YT and other such direct sales companies. I don't understand why they charge so much for parts that they themselves make as opposed to, for example, Commencal's "Ride Alpha" parts that help make Commencals some of the most affordable, quality bikes on the market.
  • + 1
 @PHeller: I'm hoping Trek offers an AL model next year...preferably with a threaded bb.
  • + 1
 @jaame: Generally speaking though...money spent on a TREK is going back into higher paying local jobs, even if the Slash itself isn't done in the USA. Sure, the locals are doing layups on the ultra premium models, but how many guys are doing anything other than assembling at Santa Cruz? A Nomad frame is quite north of $4K CAD here...

I don't own a trek BTW, just some rhetorical speakWink
  • - 2
 @ukr77: not at all, I fully agree with you.

I wasn't sure if the slash was US made. Now while I don't believe US made is superior to Taiwanese made, it certainly is more expensive... which would help to explain the price tag even with a crate load of house brand parts
  • + 1
 This is why direct to consumer brands are blowing up
  • + 2
 @jaame: pricing inline with similar bikes apart from direct sales. Let's not forget the new intense is pushing £10k with enve & XX1
  • + 3
 @thenotoriousmic: I agree, pricing is absolutely mental now but do you not think this could be because top tier has moved onto a different level in terms of performance and cost of production?

This is most apparent in the 160mm bike bracket, bikes that weigh less than 30lb, pedal up hills, can handle full DH course style descents and if you want to still go on a 4hr ride. I

Pricing has grown to a level that the highest end products are now completely out of reach of the average rider but the average rider doesnt need the highest spec product anyway.

Be smart, you dont have to buy a $10,000 bike, purchase one for less than half of the money and still get 95% of the performance and fun (In some cases get a better deal) BUT if you do want to own the 'Ferrari' of bikes they are there for you, if nobody bought them they wouldnt make them.
  • + 0
 @Racer951: this is exactly true you can get a bike with 95% of the performance for less than half the price that's why you'd be mental to spend this kind of money for your using it for anything other than serious competition.

I don't think it's really got much to do with bikes becoming more advanced more the average mountain biker has changed and they can get away with charging more money now also the the bike companies have way more of a monopoly now.
  • + 2
 @ryanandrewrogers:
Probably because that's part of their pricing strategy. They apparently don't want to be the cheapest in the market. And it is a reality that a lot of people make the mistake to think that because something is expensive it must be good. Trek (and many other bike brands) just take advantage of that. It kind of shows that they are part of the 'elite' brands. I would also buy the Commencal instead though...
  • + 1
 @PHeller: Rumors are there's one coming
  • + 0
 @thenotoriousmic: I agree with that, unless you are wealthy and have the spare money that is, after all there would be no supercars if we followed this idea through.

Hmmm, are you sure bikes are no more advanced / don't cost more to build, carbon frames and parts are much more labour intensive than aluminium and required tighter QC and better design, most components on high end builds are highly optimised for weight and strength, suspension systems are better developed so more time and money spent testing and optimising.

Just take for example modern SRAM cassettes at £300, they are that price because they are made in ridiculous way machining from solid, you can get a £45 shimano XT model but its pressed steel, they both do the job but one allows for lower weight and a larger tooth count.

As long as they keep producing affordable (relatively anyway!) bikes I will be happy - Nobody is forcing anyone to buy these bikes. I will keep buying 'Nissan GTR' type bikes, as fast as a £250k supercar but less than 1/3rd of the cost.
  • - 5
flag gavlaa (Feb 21, 2017 at 4:40) (Below Threshold)
 When my current bike breaks I will no longer be a mountain biker. The cost is ridiculous and to be honest I was in it for fun and these bikes just aren't my idea of fun. I want a bike I can afford to break so I can use it properly. Treating a bike like a Ming vase because you can't afford to replace it means you'll be riding it like my gran. Fuck that.
  • + 2
 @gavlaa: So your going to stop doing something you find fun because brands sell expensive bikes?

You can get a brand new hardtail for £1000 that you can ride the crap out of without fear of it breaking and it will use cheap to replace drivetrain etc. Getting something cheaper isn't an issue either, just expect it to be heavier and maybe not perform as well but you will still be able to use it 'properly'.

I really don't get this chain of thought - So what if there are £10k bikes? The cheaper ones are better than ever.
  • - 1
 @Racer951: I'd highly recommend doing this. I got a hardtail for riding through the winter and I haven't even touched any of my other bikes since.
  • + 2
 @Racer951: I'm talking DH bikes. If I want to go on a DH trip this year my only option is to rent a bike. My problem is caused as much by the economy in the UK as it is the MTB industry. I earn less money now than I did 10 years ago and bikes are triple the price. Even direct sale bikes are now out of my price range. I also think that hearing I may lose the sh*t job I have within the next 6 months has made me somewhat negative today!
  • + 1
 @gavlaa: I think its more your personal position that is giving you that outlook - DH bikes have never been cheaper man, the second hand market is full of £1000 bikes that are in good condition with geometry and kit that is so far ahead of bikes from 10 years ago.

You can get a Tues for £1999.99, to compare I bought an Orange 222 around 15 years ago and it was over £2000 - The Tues would run rings around it.
  • - 1
 Slash 9.9 $11,000 CDN. SC V10C 13,495 CDN

One can be pedalled up to the trailhead. The other is moto minus the engine.
  • + 3
 Everyone saying "I'll just buy a Commecal or YT" realizes the Slash is now a 29er, right?
  • + 1
 @gonecoastal: why the comparison between the v10 and the slash?
  • + 1
 @trialsracer: Trek charges the market price for a high end bike. People are buying them, why would they sell them for anything less?
  • - 3
 @mountain-life: because it's a massive rip off and they should be ashamed of themselves?
  • + 0
 @allenfstar: it was on my mind at the time.

Plus I own an older model V10C. And it shows how excessive the bike market is getting when a V10CC is similar price as a KTM moto
  • + 2
 @gonecoastal: there's a little more going on in the suspension and frame material on an off the shelf mtb than most off the shelf motos
  • + 1
 @allenfstar: yeah almost every company is trying to skirt around another companies suspension patent.

Gearbox everything and fancy rear suspension acronyms will fade away within a product cycle.
  • + 4
 @thenotoriousmic: Its at the point when you think a business supplying a non essential luxury should be ashamed if they are maximising profits that you are starting to lose the plot.
  • + 1
 @gonecoastal: that's doubtful, while gearboxes would certainly help with a lot of issues, the engineers will forever be trying to find better pedaling, braking, small bump sensitivity and big hit progression.
  • + 0
 @Racer951: they can sell them for as much as they want nobodys forcing anyone to buy it. I'm just not surprised that I'm not seeing any out on the trails.
  • + 1
 @allenfstar: engineers would be able to optimize suspension based around a few chainring and cog sizes rather than the current 9-50 cogset and 20-something to 38t chainrings people run on standard drivetrain bikes.
  • + 2
 @thenotoriousmic: hate to tell you but my local shop has sold 3 already, they will probably be so popular they will sell out.
  • + 6
 @mountain-life: makes me laugh how people think that companies like Trek should be selling their top of the range bikes for a 'reasonable price'. These 9.9's are the BEST product that Trek can produce, handbuilt, tried and tested, excellent bikes. Yes, they're expensive, but they're quality. If you can't afford one... boo hoo, buy a cheaper bike.
  • + 2
 @Justmatthew: harsh but welcome to reality people
  • - 2
 @Justmatthew: they're not really though are they? A shit tone of house products and some mass produced Chinese carbon at a vastly inflated price. They're taking the piss mate. Like I said I'm not surprised yt are absolutely cleaning up right now.
  • + 1
 @Racer951: I also know for a fact, they are sold out across Europe..
  • + 1
 @thenotoriousmic: It's not Chinese, it's Taiwanese, and it would be top of my list of I was buying a bike this year and I had 8 grand.

Even for normal people, if you've got a £300,000 mortgage, throwing another eight grand on top isn't going to make a lot of difference.

You could get an R6, but a lot of people want to live more than three more years.
  • + 1
 @thenotoriousmic: A matter of opinion, I guess.. As said before, if you don't like them or can't afford one, buy something else.
  • - 2
 @jaame: it's not a product that's going to last though to even warrant that kind of money. That won't last a year around here. Total rip off.
  • + 1
 @thenotoriousmic: Wouldn't last a year? what are you talking about?
  • + 2
 @thenotoriousmic: Just leave it here and stop telling the world and private companies how to price goods or spend money.

I am not this bikes customer, it is too expensive for me but It doesnt upset me in the way it seems to get you.

I completely agreed with your earlier point but you have gone off into a ramble.
  • - 3
 I'm not rambling. I'm lost for words that people are actually justifying the obscene prices company's are charging for bikes these days. Absolutely deluded. its not like it's an investment a bike your going to get three or four years out off. it's a total rip off and there's no two ways about it.
  • + 2
 While I'd be the first to advocate for avoiding the concentration of wealth, a bicycle, especially one such as the Slash is a luxury item. If you were starving, homeless, or sick and unable to afford those basic necessities, I might agree, but unfortunately not everyone can afford a luxury item, and those who can usually lose substantial amounts of money when they resell them a year later for half of what they purchased them for, and as a used-market buyer, that's a good thing.
  • + 3
 @thenotoriousmic: Why are you lost for words though - Do you not live in the modern world? You can buy a handbag for £100k, a car for over a million, spend several thousand on one night in a hotel, buy shoes for hundreds of pounds. The bike industry is made up of companies that want to increase profits, its not some kind of hippy affair anymore, however much you may want it to be.

You can moan all you like about these also being obscene, which I would 100% agree that they are BUT so long as people purchase them the company will continue to sell them. The difference here is that one bag has almost the same production cost as another, £30 to £3000 while a full carbon top of the line bike takes a huge amount more work to design and produce.

As PHeller says, expensive bikes are a luxury item, something nobody needs to justify the price of - Vote with your wallet, dont like it dont buy it - I can guarrantee there are enough people that will though!
  • - 1
 @Racer951: that handbag was worth every single penny and those shoes made my calfs look amazing. Ya'l bitches be hating.
  • + 1
 If they made an alloy version with this build kit Id definitely buy that
  • + 74
 You can get an Evil Wreckoning with the XO1 Eagle kit (only house brand components are the grips and the seat collar) and a custom Push 11.6 shock for less than the cost of the Slash 29. Plus no pressfit bottom bracket, choice of dropper length, two colors to choose from and you could still throw in a custom E13 chainguide and have money left over.
  • + 13
 Yeah - no brained unless you aren't paying retail.
  • + 3
 I have a Wrecking, but I would love to try this bike. It's probably better build quality and lighter than the Wreckoning, plus I'd imagine it stays more active under braking.
  • + 1
 The 9.8 is actually about inline with the lower build Evil Wreckoning.
  • + 2
 @dthomp325: Trek is not better build quality, nor is it lighter. If you can't do it with the wreckoning, prolly isn't the bike . . .
  • - 2
 @dthomp325: The vast majority of riders I've come across with Wreckers put their weight with pedals in 30-31 lb range. Pretty much the same as the Trek. I cannot really speak on build quality, but there are tons of people that have broken Treks. Yeah, I know lifetime warranty, yada, yada, but I rather be riding than dealing with a RA number. Granted, Evil has had a sordid history, but that seems to have been ironed over the last few years. Now, as for componentry while I am sure the Bontrager stuff is swell (personally, I think the 780 bar the Trek is equipped with is too short and having to change it means getting an all new cockpit due to Trek's proprietary stem/bar knock-block nonsense), I ask you to think about the last time you or anyone you know or read about went out of their way to purchase Bontrager stuff aftermarket over Race Face. Finally, as with any single pivot there will be some influence due to braking. IMHO, with link-driven single-pivots, especially the DELTA it is pretty negligible and a minor trade off.
  • + 0
 Where are you getting these numbers, if it was so easy to do that companies like trek wouldn't be in the game!
  • + 4
 @Trekslash360: What numbers are you talking about? The Wreckoning weights? Look up the tons of comments about the Wreck over on empty beer's Evil forum. My friend's XL weighs 31 lbs, with normal bits and alloy wheels. The bar width is listed above. The cost differences? Check out the build kit offerings on Evil's site. The number of people breaking Treks? I don't have exact count, but having a friend who's shop deals Trek I've heard plenty of warranty issues and many more over the years from numerous riders. None of this is to say that the Trek is better or worse in it's ability, but the Evil seems to delivery a better value on paper. Whatever one anyone likes is fine by me.
  • + 1
 @LuvAZ, @hellybelly: my Large Wreckoning is 7.9 lbs with Monarch Plus. I don't know what the Slash weighs, but it's like a lb heavier than the Yeti 5.5. Build quality of the details are not as nice as the big brands, things like the cable ports being a bit wonky, decals not nder clear coat, sticker instead of a headbadge, etc.

My full build with Reverb (awful btw), Lyrik (great), Stan's Flow, CrankBros Enduro pedals, and XT 1x is in the upper 32lb, almost 33lb range.

The 34.9 seatpost is lame too. Reverb and Lev are the only options right now, and I think the IFP design they both use sucks. Evil says using a shim voids the warranty.

I love my Wreckoning. Geometry and ride are perfect, other than the suspension stiffening up under braking more than other bikes, and it looks badass. I just think the new Slash and Enduro might be even better. It seems like a cheesy gimmick, by the swat compartment on the Specialized is nice.
  • + 35
 I really wish people would go out and try the new Bontrager component lineup. Their new stuff is easily as good as any of the boutique brand components.

I have the privilege of working at a trek dealer and getting some pretty wicked hookups when it comes to bikes and components so it only makes sense for me to ride as much Bontrager stuff as I can. I have been pretty blown away with what Bontrager is offering. The fit, finish and performance has been awesome which I cant say has always been the truth... but man for 2017 they have been killing it. Oh and the new SE4 and SE5 tire, goddam they are fantastic tires.

I think its safe to say that from now and into the future the big names in Mountain biking, Trek, Specialized, Giant... etc are going to produce better and better components every year and until we start seeing side by side comparisons its going to be hard for people to argue who's components are better, aftermarket or in house?

I totally understand people wanting to see maybe a RF bar and stem combo bikes like these... But lets also look at it that if you come in with an issue with your bike, your shop can get problems resolved far quicker being as they only need to contact one company for everything. Since working at the shop I have been pretty impressed by how well Trek and Bontrager takes care of warranty issues and or any other issues our customers have come in with.

I'm not telling anyone that they need to drink all the Kool-aid but maybe if you get a chance at least try a sip.
  • + 5
 It's our own confirmed bias at play. Most of these components are coming out of the same factory.
I still haven't figured out the draw of RF components. Wow the Atlas bar came in a few rises and every año colour under the rainbow. Wow. Such prestige.

Giants line of components and accessories are looking pretty damn failed these days. I have a wheel set on my road bike. DT 240s straight pull hubs with bladed spokes. No reason to "upgrade" my wheelset to after market besides my own ego. And I know I'm not fast enough to run Envés.
  • + 11
 A quote from another poster in this thread:

"They're saving a ton of money speccing their own parts, and not passing that savings onto the consumer."

No, there's probably nothing wrong with their parts. I'm sure they're as good as other brands. The problem is that they're saving by specing their own parts, but the bike ends up at the same price point as other brands that don't. Why doesn't the consumer see any benefit here?

I can buy a Zerode Taniwha with a similar quality part spec for the same price. How the hell is that possible when comparing a tiny hand built brand with a gearbox versus a giant like Trek that should have a massive price advantage given their size? Oh right. They're ripping people off.
  • + 7
 i have said this before and will say it again. i buy components from groups like chromag and deity because they support some awesome riders (especially freeriders who would otherwise not see the same level of support). They also pump out tons of awesome and FREE media for us. This is at least my reasoning over taking nukeproof, funn, etc. Admittedly trek supports way more riders, but where is the flash in the bontrager line haha
  • + 4
 @jayacheess: They (trek) price to the market and will do anything possible to improve margins - why lower pricetag when they sell as a comparable complete build to other manufacturers. Although I do agree bontrager stuff is pretty sick now and is close to comparable to top of the line component manufacturers, they still have laughable things like XXX kovee @ $2200 ENVE prices there). Anyone notice the profitability of these bike manufacturers lately...yeah their margins are huge...bike shops, not so much...why, manufacturers have leverage and can opt to sell direct now. Bottom line is if they continue with incremental change, companies like Zerode, YT, etc will leave them up a creek without a paddle at their price points.
  • + 3
 Ever heard the quote "strong, light, cheap, pick two"? Guess who said that.

Kids these days. Just looking for the what's flashy. Well, that is the exact opposite of what Keith Bontrager is about. Take a look at my profile pic and Keith's garage.
  • - 1
 @adrennan: this really old ad might explain why there's no flash for bontrager parts

"Friends don't let friends ride neon"
peoplesbike.com/pplsen/?p=258
  • + 2
 @nicolai12: you do realize that the xxx kovee and xxx line wheels are hand built from the ground up in the USA right? They are on par with enve therefore have a similar price.
  • + 1
 @jayacheess: it's that same mentality again. Why should Trek pass on their savings..? They're a big business.

Do you see Apple, coca-cola, Volkswagon etc.. passing on their savings to the consumer? NO. They produce their product, name their price and make money.
  • + 1
 @Justmatthew: they only make money if people buy their overpriced product.

I'm not saying Trek MUST bring down their price, but they shouldn't be surprised that brands like YT, Canyon, Cube, etc are cutting in to their market share.
  • + 1
 @jayacheess: Of course, and i'm sure Trek are aware of this competition and it's competition which creates new product, innovation and consumer choice...
  • + 1
 I find the distributors in canada suck and never have anything i want in stock anyways. I always can get bontrager or specialized stuff, and a decent price. Wanted gravel tires for example... no gravelkings, no clement xplors.... guess who had triggers in stock tho! Wanting to get carbon next bars and seatpost on my bike but i fear i wont be able to, nothing wrong with bontrager rxl bars i guess... not as flashy but $50 cheaper.
  • + 38
 All opinions of Trek and the Slash aside...this is a good looking bike.
  • - 10
flag Domtheturtle (Feb 20, 2017 at 11:13) (Below Threshold)
 Looks like a session
  • + 17
 Thanks for the riding video PB. It really reinforced the review. I could tell the bike is a burly machine that prefers to plow through things rather than get popped over. Please keep including riding vids with the reviews. Smile
  • + 15
 I always think that if are prepared to buy a bike over a certain value, you should always go custom and choose all your favourite components and don't compromise! All this home-branded gear is just unacceptable (even though I understand why of course!) for this price!
  • + 6
 So true. I also think people spending that kind of cash don't want people looking at their bike and thinking "oh, another Trek just like everyone else who bought what the first salesman at their local bike shop suggested" and then "and they didn't even bother to upgrade a single stock component...nice" I'm not saying it doesn't ride great, but people will be laughing at you if you tell them what you spent on it...especially when their 3k dollar bike looks all tricked out and has actual personality.
  • + 1
 @Warburrito: couldn't agree more...and that why I always built custom. Always makes me laugh when I get to a trail centre and see several top of the range bikes all the same...usually SC, Yeti, Intense and Orange!
  • + 2
 @gbcarmona: I'm sure that's true. I live in Indiana though and I'm not sure anyone besides me even knows that Intense, Orange, Nukeproof, Banshee, Norco, Divinci, Canyon, Knolly, or NS even exist. I've never seen any one of them here but wish I did. Trek, Specialized, Santa Cruz, Yeti, Cannondale, and Scott dominate the landscape here in our boring xc capital of the Midwest. I long to see different bikes on trails with actual elevation gains and losses. Please dig us an ocean in the middle of our corn fields for surfing and use the dirt to build a large hill for mountain biking! Keep me from dreaming that our landfill will become open to trailbuilders...it makes me feel like a hillbilly.
  • + 1
 @Warburrito: lol...I'm sorry for you mate! Where I live, I'm surrounded by awesome mountains and trails...from XC, to Enduro, all mountain, pump tracks and DH, you have it all within a few miles! I'm addicted to Ti, so I always custom build! Haha
  • + 1
 @gbcarmona: I can see that. That Kingdom Hex you have for sale looks wicked! If the UK ever needs a hookup on corn or soybeans you let me know.
  • + 1
 @Warburrito: it rides as good if not better than it looks!
  • + 15
 Nice touch adding the video, great success!
  • - 4
flag skelldify (Feb 20, 2017 at 10:12) (Below Threshold)
 Meh, first person POV videos are boring and useless.
  • + 2
 agreed, nice looking trails too!
  • + 10
 I may have missed it in the comments and/or article. However, is the frame made in the US? Because at $3700 frame only it DAMN WELL better be made here or a western country. Nothing coming out of Asian sweatshops (not saying they can't make good stuff) should cost more that a decent DH complete bike.
  • + 1
 Made in Taiwan. Trek's marketing focuses on the few frames it makes in the USA, so it is understandable that many consumers are confused.
  • + 2
 @mountain-life: Thanks. I know this is a nice bike, hard to find a 'bad' bike nowadays. However, $3700 for a Taiwan-made frame is f'ing ridiculous. I feel $3k is really pushing it.
  • + 12
 Looks like a... firetruck
  • + 8
 looks baller, but what's that extra $2500 getting you? as you could get 99% of the performance with the 9.8 and still have money left over to get a YT jeffsy or a pretty high end road bike.
  • + 10
 Specialized puts giant holes in their downtubes

Trek "Hold my beer watch this!"
  • + 11
 Slash the price!
  • + 5
 Trek Slash 9.9 is a BEAST of a Bike. I'm fortunate enough to say I work in Trek México since last year, and during the presentation of this model I was left nothing, but impressed. Its capabilities on a trail are enormous and is bike that boost your confidence when the terrain gets rougher.

I know, you would expect to hear this from a Trek's employee, but sincerely I am really happy of what came out of the lab with the Slash. I worked for a Bike magazine here in Mexico City and tested numerous bikes, including Rocky Mountain Instinct 999, or Spesh Enduro 29er. Both are great bikes and I could not say anything wrong about them, but at some point, Trek's Slash is just better, at least for my liking (remember this is just my opinion).

As far as components go... Bontrager, yes, it's an in house brand, but it does not lack quality whatsoever. I prefer 1000 times the Bontrager Drop line seatpost than the **pain in the ass** RS Reverb. Servicing the Bontrager is done in ablink of an eye and performance is nothing but excellent. Rims, I've seen guys with ENVES broken in pieces riding our local trails and haven't seen any of my client's Line Elite wheels with a dent. Hubs are from great quality too, made by DT Swiss so this top of the line are pretty similar to the 240's you guys might be running.

The only thing I'm not gonna argue about is pricing. Everything, for me, in the bike industry is over priced and crazy. Bu well, that might be because most of us are not crazy ass billionaires who can afford buying bikes every year. At least not down here where the conversion rate literally f*cks us in the arse.

Anyway, thats my 2 cents opinion. Slash= amazing bike, Bontrager= great quality products underrated (probably because of their price tag), but give them a shot and you'll be extremely satisfied.
  • + 3
 Bontrager Tires are the best in the industry right now. Sometimes the truth hurts.
  • + 8
 Bontrager tires are so good you swapped em out for maxxis?
  • + 8
 Nope, it was simply a matter of choosing the right tool for the job. The SE4 tires are great all-rounders - they're fast rolling and very predictable, but when conditions got really wet and sloppy it was time to put on tires with more aggressive tread.
  • - 2
 lol

Waiting for the old'n'good "pre production" excuse
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: totally true SE4 very good for the correct conditions, second its mud I've been using conti Baron so far but just started on SE5 to compare.
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer: Damn, you're intense. I rode Maxxis Hookworms for everything for quite a while, and they were noticeably bad, but good for skate parks or street, and very smooth. I never thought to change them out car racing style, maybe out of laziness, maybe out of riding a variety of surfaces all the time. It takes dedication to change your tires to suit the terrain.
  • + 3
 Hope somebody scrolls down to read an appreciate this comment!

First of all... When it comes to buying a rad all mountain / enduro bike these days, most bikes are amazing.

Remember only a decade ago or so this type of bike never existed? It was the free ride bike... with double crown 32 mm sanctions, 68 Degree head angle, high BB and all kinds of awkward not very helpful parts.

I feel as if Mountain bikes have been going through puberty and we are witnessing the days where the bikes of this age have matured into incredibly amazing machines.

Yes Trek have some baggage. All the bike brands do to some degree. Sure I love Santa Cruz, Evil, and YT bikes. But guess what, the local shop that took me in as a grommet, that I worked at... and am now a family member for sells trek. And because of this I a always rooting for the big T.

I just wanted to say before every spreads a ton of hate on them and their choice of house brand parts, and very expensive price tags I must say a few things in their defense not out of bias, but because the company is actually trying to do all it can to make the mountain bike experience better. Allow me to explain.
  • + 6
 These pictures do not do the bike justice!!! picked mine up a few weeks back and can't stop looking at the damn thing
  • + 2
 Dude same. I got mine 2 days ago and cant even stand the littlest amount of dirt to be on it. But I would agree that it is much much better looking in person than in the photos
  • + 6
 distracts you from looking at your bank acct!
  • + 1
 loving the simplicity in the linkage and the general silhouette of the frame. the less complicated you can make something, the better it looks
  • + 3
 I agree with some of the other posters. It sounds like the shock tune is wrong, if you put in maximum spacers and still blow through travel too much. The video shows an awesome trail I would like to ride some time, but it tells me absolutely nothing about the bike. Maybe if you did a side-by-side comparison with a different bike and highlight where you take a different line choice or something.
  • + 1
 If he's got the pressure up and maximum spacers installed, it makes it sound the volume of the shock isn't getting low enough when the suspension is compressed. I already said this but received a down vote for it. The world is a mysterious place.
  • + 3
 I will change my religion; I will convert to hinduism: That gives me a hope that in next life I will be testing great bikes on the great trails and I will ride them so hard....
  • + 3
 With the tweaking of the shock placement being fixed to the frame now as opposed to a floating shock, how is this not the exact same as the Split Pivot system from Devinci Bikes?
  • + 2
 That can't be serious...

8000$ bike.
Reviewer says Bontrager bits are spot on. Then swap the post and rides maxxis tyres...
Reviewer talk about pedal bob. Sets LSC wide open...
5 tokens on rear shock. Bottom out issues...
Front wheel lift up on climbs.
Not as plush as other bikes.
It's a f*ckng 8k $ bike.

Still one of the best long travel bikes for pinkbike.

Congrats to pinkbike. Best mtb advertising web.
  • + 3
 It's aTrek what do you expect. A bike that they will make thousands and thousands of for the masses. Nothing like dumping that kind of money on a bike and showing up at the trail seeing somebody else riding the exact same bike.
  • + 2
 @properp: exactly. The best part it's when a guy with a Jeffsy or a Meta appears and can't stop laughing
  • - 6
flag thenotoriousmic (Feb 20, 2017 at 13:00) (Below Threshold)
 I have so little respect for a pinkbike review that I haven't even bothered to read it but I'm guessing it's a trek commercial disguised as a review.
  • + 23
 @thenotoriousmic: thanks for the vote of confidence, but I can assure you that that's not the case. And @rcksurfer, you'll notice that I called it "one of the best descending longer travel 29ers currently on the market... Descending is the key word there. As for the tire switch and the dropper switch - when we review bikes we have them for months, not just a few rides - there's nothing wrong with swapping components to see how the bike performs in different configurations.

Is it 100% perfect? No, and that's the point of a review - to point out the strengths and weaknesses of a bike or component. Is it an absolute monster on the descents? Most definitely, and it's right up there with the best of the best as far as downhill capabilities go.
  • + 3
 @mikekazimer: just need a Specz 29er review now!
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer: Can you clarify the lack of bottom out resistance...was it a major issue and it seems odd that LSC was open? Given that will control your small bump sensitivity and big hit resistance. Would love to hear something...do you think they spec'd the X2 with incorrect tune?
  • + 1
 @properp: Like Yeti SB6's? Everywhere. Kinda took the mystique out of the brand. That's what happens when you can buy them at Walmart markdown prices. Still wouldn't want to deal with Yeti over Trek in any warranty situation.
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer: talking about how the bikes feels you must be right, but don't forget the price. 8000$ for this bike it's a bad deal. The bike might be the best performing on the market but, that prize, for that components, make it drop out of a hypothetical top 5. That was the point of my comment. No problem with 10k$ bike reviews, but forget the price vs performance thing.

About swap components. Well, I see your point and I would do the same probably. But, if you ride the bike with both tyres, you can tell us if stock tyres worth it or not. If you don't write that in the review and then we spotted a maxxis logo on a pic, we may think that the reviewer don't tell the truth.
  • + 1
 *but *don't* forget the price vs.....
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer: so this website isn't making money from selling ad space? There's an obvious conflict of interest here isn't there?
  • + 1
 @ericwroth: my worst warranty nightmares are dealing with Fox suspension company. It has been so bad I even refuse to buy their products anymore.
  • + 2
 @properp: That sounds about right. Nothing but instant service when dealing with Trek and SRAM in my experience for warranties. I haven't been a fox fan since their 2012-2014 meltdown and I certainly don't have time to wait for a 6 week repair.
  • + 1
 @ericwroth: FUX SUX
  • + 0
 @properp: really, let me know when you go to a mountain with more then 2 people riding this bike???
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: Can you elaborate on the bottom out issues? That seems to be a significant issue...
  • + 2
 Ha! Love mine, started with a black 9.8, cracked frame day one now got a red 9.9 replacement frame. Didn't like the fox rear, went back to the Rockshox rear, much better. Still love it but the paint is chipping every ride and 2cm chip in top tube from resting against corner of garage and can put a knife under paint and lift more off. LBS put hand over his face when he saw big chip.
Looks like another warranty claim, when will it end. Did I mention I love the bike?
  • + 6
 Review summary: 'This bike is.., man it's just straight badass.'
  • + 2
 The bike looks awesome in every way. The "Stop" is not an issue. When riding, one rarely if ever needs to turn that sharp. I'm sure Trek thought of that before they spent hundreds of thousands of dollars making this bike. If it was an issue it would have been changed. I'm definitely looking into getting one of these. Sweet bike.
  • + 2
 There is something going on with the pricing of this bike. In Australia the same bike is A$8,999 which is roughly US$7,000. I bought one and got a good discount which made it A$7,300 or US$5,600 which makes it more reasonable.

For comparison my first preference was a Hightower CC but at A$11,199 for the cheapest build or A$5099 for the frame and no discount offered by my local shop it was a no brainer for me.
  • + 5
 No mention made of the Slash's slack(ish) seat tube angle and the effect on climbing?
  • + 3
 I didn't have any issues with the seat angle, but at 5'11" I'm also not the tallest rider that would be riding a size large. Taller riders may find themselves further over the rear wheel.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: So you're 5'1", but you're listing your inseam measurement at 33". I'm 6'1", but have shorter legs (32" inseam) combined with symian long torso and arms. So you'd think in comparison, I would generally have less of a need for a steep seat tube, and be just fine putting lots of weight into the front wheel while climbing. You, in contrast, probably are pretty far over the rear wheel already. So maybe there's a technique thing there, where you've just gotten really good at scooting forward and hanging on the front edge of the saddle?

What surprised me is that you talked about maxing out the volume spacers on the shock - at only 160# of body weight. Does that mean someone my weight (230#) should just stear clear of this thing altogether?
  • + 1
 @g-42, you're probably on the upper limit for the Float X2, especially if you ride hard. I ended up running 20psi above body weight, and if you did the same that would be close to the max air pressure recommended for that shock. I'd recommend talking to Trek to see what they suggest.
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer: are you saying the X2 tune and HSC/LSC don't work for you?
I'm base 76kg running 195psi sag 20mm, don't add up what I read in the setup as I've find Trek and fox setup guides not far out only tyres change my psi.
  • + 1
 @enduroFactory: I will second this question: seems like if there's still bottom out after all that volume reduction it would be natural to look to the compression, which is easily adjustable on X2.
  • + 1
 @bvwilliams: I'll third this...it sounds like he wasn't able to get the small bump sensitivity and progressive big hits feeling right so he opened the LSC and blew through the later half of the stroke...or his HSC was too open and pushed though to the LSC on big hits and wasn't supported....I really hope the compression ratio is good for heavier riders!?!?! Geez @enduroFactory
  • + 3
 STA of 73 degrees (effective) is simply too slack for (longer) steep ascends. Furthermore the real STA is even extremely more slacker. Which means that for a tall rider effective STA number is even lesser than the officially claimed one of 73-74 degrees for every mm above the stack height. I believe that Trek is well aware of this issue.

Hence TALAS. TALAS remedies this problem to a degree, literally, but, unlike Canyon's Shapeshifter, it also lowers the bottom bracket, decreasing ground clearance and increasing a chance of pedal strikes, especially in rough terrain, which usually naturally comes in combination with steeps.

This all is something that, as a 1.92m tall owner of a 2011 Remedy 8 (also OEM specced with a TALAS), I know quite well. Furthermore my bike has a straight seating tube (actual and effective STA being practically the same). When the trail becomes really steep I end up behind the rear axle and the front end pops up. Pure physics. Finding balance is not easy at this point and positioning myself on the seat's nose is just a pure torture. Interrupted blood flow and numbness in the crotch area is an issue as it is even without this "prostate massage".

All in all, from my experience, I do not believe this bike is such a great climber. At least not for those on the upper portion of a height scale. A 1.80m tall rider might not be experiencing climbing problems. I do believe that this bike is a great descender though. It is a shame that it probably just doesn't work well as an all-arounder for taller riders in more demanding climbing terrain. Generally, bike industry just does not cater to taller people.
  • + 2
 "It used to be that achieving adequate tire clearance on longer travel 29ers was a tricky proposition, but thanks to the advent of 1x drivetrains and 12x148mm rear spacing that's no longer as much of an issue."

I am not sure I agree with this. I have a Specialized Enduro from last year, which is 12x142 (so it's an outdated paperweight, of course) that has loads of room for bigger tires. In fact, I plan to get some 2.6s for that bike because other people have done it and it works. Does Boost actually do anything where the tires clear the frame? I don't think so? It's just a matter of sculpting in some extra clearance into the carbon rear triangle. Tossing the front derailleur is the secret sauce.
  • + 1
 This is kind of like the whole clutch derailleur + narrow wide thing. I have a feeling the clutch is really the responsible part...y.
  • + 6
 Yes, plus our 'dated' enduro 29ers can still run a front derailleur, and it has some of the shortest chainstays in the business!
  • + 4
 So it kinda blows at climbing, wheelies up hills -in a bad way- has to many mediocre factory bits and is grossly overpriced? I think I'll stick to my Patrol thanks...
  • + 2
 Yep, ditto (had an Aluminum Patrol and loved it)
  • + 1
 I have one and its truly amazing. Have not hit the knock block once. The bike is more playful than other 29ers with similar travel. They hooked me for life on the geometry and big hoops. Never thought I'd say that. The review is spot on, thanks Pinkbike, well done.
  • + 1
 Had a brief fiddle with one of these the other day. Local bike shop owner/coach has one. It was a medium and impressively light with his build. Knock block feels weird - I'd be worried about how it could damage the frame if the bars really got spun with massive force. He loves it - reckons it pedals better than his 2016 Remedy 29er. The price of the frame here in SA is R62 000.00 or nearly $4800. Its bad enough at $3700 or R48k but a premium of $1000 over the US price is just profiteering methinks. Keep it, Trek.
  • + 1
 So when I first got my 1st generation Enduro 29er, I went over the bars more in a month than the rest of my riding career. After it won 'bike of the year', I was very disappointed. It only felt fast on slower, tight tracks. It was a nervous wreck on the faster, steeper stuff that I normally love. After getting the 650b shock yoke on it (that slackens it out a degree and drops the BB an inch), the performance dramatically increased. After lots of reading and testing, I think that the lower BB make it so much better, not necessarily the slacker HTA. It was 350mm, and after the yoke switch it was closer to 325mm. I now am obsessed with knuckle-draggingly low BB heights. I don't know what the obsession with high BBs are, but I ruled out the Slash because of how high it is.

I'm also maybe ruling out the new Enduro 29er since it is just as high- in the press release they mentioned that they couldn't make it lower because they had to keep it 650b+ compatible. Compromise ruined the bike. Maybe I'll get an Evil instead.
  • + 0
 Check the link Curtis is running...
  • + 4
 Offset bushings my friend
  • + 1
 @j-t-g: The 650b link does the same thing!
  • + 2
 @j-t-g: Sorry, you meant offset bushings for this trek, I think. The issue there (that someone else commented about on this review) is that the seattube is already pretty slack, and offset bushings would slacken it even more. I also don't know if the HTA would get too slack if it passed 65 degrees.
  • + 2
 @hamncheez: Actually, I did mean for the new enduro, as you can't use the 650b link in this case.

Personally, if I were to use offset bushings on this thing it would be a single one placed in the opposite setting, to steepen head angle and raise BB, then I'd run the fork at 150 to further steepen HA and bring the BB back down.

Basically, I'd turn it in to a fun all round trail bike... I have no need for a pure enduro weapon..
  • + 1
 @j-t-g: I see what you mean. The problem with the Specialized bikes is that since they use that shock yoke you can only offset one side. I wonder if you can do the 650b trick with the new bike, using the new 650b shock yoke.

What you say about the Slash also makes sense; I imagine that would keep the BB about the same height and just steepen things up, but at that point maybe an SB 5.5c or Canfield Riot would be a better option.
  • + 1
 I bet they come out with a 29" specific link.
  • + 2
 @hamncheez: Offsetting one side might be enough, as that's all mino link is approximately equivalent to on the Trek. Of course, I don't know your needs or riding style (but you should get an Evil based on looks alone).

And yeah, it's absurd to say "get an Enduro weapon for 10 grand and then do your best to make it a trail bike" when there are a ton of better trail 29er options out there. I was just talking about my personal geometry preferences (and I guess hinting at the fact that I am sad the Remedy 29er is gone.... I'd love a Slash style bike with more moderate geometry.. Or the exact new remedy with 29er wheels).
  • + 1
 @j-t-g: Ya, I've been looking at the Evil. I'll probably end up with the specialized enduro though since i can get it through my shop, and I don't know if Evil does industry discounts
  • + 1
 @hamncheez: There's a couple companies that'll always do a staff deal for shop employees... I don't know if there's any Banshees or Knolly's that you want..
  • + 2
 Have a 2017 E29 and just ordered a single offset bushing, so should get BB down to around 345mm, HTA to 65.5. Wish that BB was sitting another 10mm lower, but without going to a bike yoke that changes geo, or the ability to add a 2nd offset bushing it is what it is. I've done comparisons to the Evil Wreckoning, that BB height puts the E29 at the same BB height as the Evil in their Low mode, but won't match their XLow setting. HTA ends up being the same though. Same HTA, BB is 7mm higher I think with the E29 and single offset bushing.

Yeah, I wish they had designed geo as 29 only, then people could throw 27.5+ in there if they wanted because the clearance existed, but not as a design limitation.
  • + 1
 @Nizhoni: Do you know if the new 2017 Enduro 650b link could be put on the 29, and would it have the same effect?
  • + 1
 @hamncheez: I don't. I see bike yoke has links out for both models of the 2017, but going to wait for someone to experiment with that. I don't need or even necessarily want it slacker, 65.5 is pretty good for me. Lower BB would be nice, but think it would just further slacken it out.
  • + 1
 Go 650+ on the bike. For 95% of people it'll be faster.
  • + 1
 @jclnv: The trails I ride are steep and fast. Its not about grip for me, and from what I've ridden of 650+ it would squirm in the corners and and grip less on the high speed straights. Plus I would tear or pinch a sidewall every 3rd ride
  • + 1
 @hamncheez: have you ridden the Minion DHF 2.8" or Grid Butchers?
  • + 1
 @jclnv: No, I've only demoed a few plus tires. However, I want a bike thats fast rolling. If I was learning towards a plus bike, I would probably look at the 650b enduro since it comes spec'ed with those lightweight 2.6" tires, or I would check if a Transition Patrol can fit 2.6" tires.

Have you ridden those tires? Could you give a review VS a traditional sized 29?
  • + 1
 @hamncheez: Well if you want lightweight for climbing you won't want those tires. They're all about grip and riding pinned. DH they're on another planet to 29x2.5". I guess if you're over 170lb or so then the lighter weight 2.8/3.0" would be a little squirmy but if you under that you just have to get the pressures bang on. For most people they're faster IMO.

This gets top 50 in EWS - m.youtube.com/watch?v=w6TMA2vI8bA
  • + 1
 Stopped reading when I got to the price. So I didn't get very far.

Public service announcement: Everyone stop buying hyper inflated things on finance that goes for phones, TV's laptops, cars, and now bikes as soon as people realise a lot of modern products are just a carrot to get you hooked on their financial barb the better products we'll get at realistic prices.
  • + 4
 beautiful bike, but why tested with maxxis tires??! i thought the bontrager ones are " excellent components" Wink
  • + 3
 I have put about 300 miles on my Slash 9.9 I can't say enough good about this bike. It's my first 29er and I am pleasantly surprised with the wheels size.
  • + 1
 I m in love with mine, it's just an animal!!!
  • + 1
 I love my 2014 Trek Slash 9 27.5 aluminum. I got it last year for a great price and don't regreat the US $2600 I paid for it brand new. I would love to try the new Slash someday. It looks super clean. But I honestly think that for a long-travel all-mountain or enduro rig, the 27.5 is way better wheel size. Just saying...
  • + 1
 Pretty sad the level Trek had to go to in order to try and stand out. When I read about flexy frames it's the rear, not the front. It's like Specialized with the special yoke being a little stiffer. Justifying dumb crap with a stiffness gain that can only be measured in a lab.
  • + 1
 The reviews of this bike are everywhere, problem is availability. I went to my bike shop (connected to Trek Central base) 0 model available in the whole country... It's becoming harder and harder to buy a bike in a bike shop. Every time I decide myself, the availability is a few months long if you're lucky.

Same problem for the Specialized Enduro 6 fattie already sold out.

No wonder that Canyon and YT are getting a lot of attention...
  • + 1
 Absolutely stunning bike and, I'm sure, a blast to ride. Cost 20% MORE than my brand-new, best-in-class dirt bike (Beta Xtrainer 300). The MTB industry has to get real, but if people are willing to pay.......
  • + 2
 What's the deal pink Bike? I posted yesterday how I love this bike but had issues with the paint and now the post has disappeared.
  • + 2
 Seems like a pretty rad bike. However I would still go for a used 2015 or 2016 Remedy 29er and upgrade the fork to 160mm to have a bike similar to this yet cost way less.
  • + 1
 I love my 2014 slash 8 i seem to be very comfortable on this bike more so than other bikes i have owned. i wonder if this is truly a better slash or just a total different bike.
  • + 4
 Looks like a.......ssss....slash
  • + 3
 I'd buy one and 'session ' the hell out of every trail I ride! Yeah downvote me suckers!
  • + 1
 One question? Why they do not sell baby blue color? Actually with all girls like Tracy Moseley and Katy I would prefer it to red. Still bought red though and waiting for the bike.
  • + 3
 How can a big company like Trek mess up the writing for geometry positions???
  • + 5
 I don't buy it. I think the writing is correct.
  • + 15
 What a bunch of knock blockers.
  • + 5
 They didn't. If you move the seat stay (were the writing is located) in the direction described, its correct.

Mike's just having a moment.
  • + 3
 @jclnv, I get what you're saying, but don't you think it would be more intuitive to label it the other way, which would correspond to the position of the bolt? Look how it's labeled on the Remedy: www.pinkbike.com/photo/13645335
  • + 5
 @MTBrent: The writing is definitely correct. I own this bike.

The low position definitely drops the bb, slackens the head angle and shortens the reach.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: Those trails sure look fun.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: Fair point. I guess the difference on the slash is that the chip is facing inside and not outside.
  • + 1
 Mine didnt even have the writing on it, so how can I mess it up?
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: The Remedy looks wrong to me! Anyway who cares. Killer bike.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: Is there anything like this for a Slash? Specialized executes their bike design well...love or hate....with this was thought through by Trek
  • + 2
 @jclnv: haha oh, drunk. ****wish this was thought through by Trek.
  • + 3
 has no one seen the wear on the frame from the cable rubbing on it below the rear shock!!
  • + 2
 Got it on mine, happens as the travel is past 50% little annoyed you could say
  • + 4
 @toop182, the cable does rub there, but the black mark you see is a small piece of mastic tape I stuck on to save the paint and the frame.
  • + 14
 @mikekazimer: you sure would think on an $8,000 bike there would not be any cable rub. I may sound like a whiny b**** for saying this but on a high-end bike of this price point everything should be spot on. Including anti cable rub devices.
  • + 5
 @mikekazimer: ah I see, lovely piece of kit none the less. I wish you guys would do a blog on your personal bikes, possibly get a new feature on the site? Would provide us with an insight on what bike the reviewer would buy with they're own hard earned and what upgrades etc you would go with. Keep up the great reviews!
  • + 2
 @enduroFactory: I completely agree with you bro on high-end bikes manufacturers should not be passing on cable rub to any Rider. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out how to route cables so they don't wear into your frame. This issues sure does rub me the wrong way.
  • + 4
 @properp: I agree - I would have liked to see something similar to what Specialized uses: www.pinkbike.com/photo/14423014.
  • + 3
 @mikekazimer: I think you have a great job. I feel really sorry for you having to review these bikes and catching hell from all these pink bikers. As a reader I just thought you would like to know that I am more interested in negative things about a bike. I usually have my mind made up on what I want and it's nice hearing the positives. I know your hands are probably tied but I would love to read one of your reviews that say this bike is absolute garbage do not waste your money. I know this may never be possible.
  • + 2
 @toop182: me too. Always wondered that. Although I think if you can hook test rigs up all year round, you'd not buy a bike, as you'll probably know, they're all good enough these days, let alone the 8k variants!! But yes, I'd be interested to know too...
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: it's funny you say that. The 2017 fuel uses one of these...
  • + 1
 @properp: "to read one of your reviews that say this bike is absolute garbage do not waste your money. I know this may never be possible"

I think it is unrealistic to expect @mikekazimer to speak for every type/level of rider out there. While he may not like a product from company A, realize that for some new rider that same product may fit their budget and entry riding skill level to a T. Besides, to say something from company A is "absolute garbage" is running the risk of libel, unless it literally is "garbage"... and even then, what kind of modern day MTB company is going to risk their reputation on sending @pinkbike a complete POS? Companies know how many how widely read and followed @pinkbike is and sending garbage to be reviewed would be professional suicide.
  • + 1
 @CaptainSnappy: I do agree with you. I would just love for pink bikes to go out on their own free will and find garbage products to warn other Riders about them. Not wait for Big Money companies to handout money 4 a top-notch review. Whether they be eBay or wish deals. Mountain bike related items that you may find online. A FYI two fellow Riders to stay away from kind of article The biggest piece of garbage product I ever used was a item called a crud claw. This was back in the nineties. It was supposed to fit in the rear Cog between the teeth and clear out leaves and debris. I was riding in the fall and there were lots of leaves. I thought this item was a gift from the gods. After warranty in the claw that fit between the gears multiple times I realized it was complete garbage. Cheers and good shredding to you man
  • + 0
 What is with so many brands speccing eagle? Sure, it's got a wide gear range and it looks cool, but an e thirteen race cassette gives a wider gear range with the 9-46, and it is lighter, and costs less. Plus you can pair it with a normal derailleur instead of one of the stupidly long eagle ones. It's cheaper, lighter, and gives a better gear range. Why not use it?
  • + 2
 Thanks for telling us everything we already knew about this bike PB.... Climbs ok, bombs downhill... done.
  • + 2
 Goodness gracious......I hope no one here actually buys a bike based on these comments. What a bunch of crap. Move on.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer The lack of bottom out resistance and need to run full spacers and LSC wide open is odd. Is the X2 tune incorrect....overly compressed?
  • + 2
 I've never been a fan of Trek bikes but this bike is looking pretty deadly!
  • + 1
 They make a nice piece, Trek. I'd f*ck 'er. Gimme a gearbox (w/o a tensioner) & I'll eat her loaf. Heheheheheheheheheh!!!!
  • + 1
 Looking good, but I'm really looking forward to seeing the full review on the new RIP9 RDO. It's gonna give this bike a run for it's money. About $2500 worth...
  • + 3
 8000 USD? Not in this lifetime!
  • + 3
 My socks are confidence inspiring!!
  • + 1
 I wonder if this bike needs a custom tune on its X2. Five volume spacers seem an awful lot for racing home trails (read: not an EWS special stage or UCI DH track).
  • + 3
 Long travel 29'ers are boring. Nothing to see here
  • + 2
 Good review, the video was a nice touch. You can kinda see more what the bike is made of
  • - 1
 They took in Gary fisher who was one of the biggest agents for 29er wheels. They bought his company and were one of the first companies to make 29ers mainstream. Remember Kona and even Specialized held off till the very end before going full 29er on everything.

Trek was the first company to take the freeride 1.5 headtube standard that Manitou basically pioneered and turned it into the tapered steerer which we are all very familiar with.

They collaborated with Dave Weagle and came up with the active braking pivot, which is really an amazing feat of engineering because believe it or not hydraulic disc brakes effect suspension when applied in almost every design sand this one where they remain a completely isolated force. Don't believe me? Next time you sit on a non AVP or Split Pivot bike, hold the rear brake and squish the suspension... Tell me if you can notice the difference?

Now fast forward to 2017. They have some of the raddest riders on earth on their team at some point. We wont say all their names but... the best part is almost every rider that we all know who rides or have ridden for them started on their team in grassroots. They somehow find top talent and then help them become ambassadors for the sport.

Sure they came up with boost that now every company uses. But guess what... boost was a great idea. We were basing our hubs and wheels on 90's technology....

When 27.5 came out and I took one for a ride I was instantly converted. I am sorry 26er guys but they are just not as fun to ride on serious mountain bike trails.
  • + 3
 They collaborated with Dave Weagle if you consider being sued by DW for patent infringement to be "collaboration". I dont care about either DW or Trek but alternative facts and all that....
  • + 0
 How come there is no comparison to the Santa Cruz Hightower....wouldn't take be a logical comparison as well as evil...both bikes that have earned high marks in the aggressive long legged 29r class
  • + 3
 Hightower 135mm and 67 deg head angle, quite a bit less aggressive than the slash.
  • + 1
 @mikeep: until you long shock it and mount a 160 fork. It's a hack and I would never expect to see it tested by PB, but it does exist and works really well.
  • + 2
 The Slash has a DH feel, other long travel 29r 140+ have a trail bike feel.
  • + 1
 @mikeep: ha, who says you can't learn something on Pinkbike ..for some reason I was under the impression it was a 5" front and rear design with a 66 degree head angle...indeed the 67 def less aggro....
  • + 2
 Has a bottle cage. Totally worth $8k.
  • + 1
 only 8k? too cheap for us .... i dont want to pay for your Cocaine ....i know you are snuffing !
  • + 1
 I got one month ago:-) but I went for the 9.8. After few customs the bike is brilliant!!!!!!!
  • + 1
 Welcome to the jungle We take it day by day If you want it you're gonna bleed But it's the price you pay....
  • + 1
 Buyers would be really happy if this bike comes with the Revolution Suspension Grips.
  • + 2
 Any plans on an alloy version for the grassroots?
  • + 2
 Thanks Trek for pushing the sport to the next level!
  • + 1
 I demoed both remedy and slash equipped with rs shock, the remedy's full floater for me is still the best linkage
  • + 1
 Its a little too much bike for me, but maybe I'll move to a place I can fully take advantage of that monster.
  • + 1
 If this is Trek's "enduro" bike, why do some many of the pro racers ride Remedies?
  • + 2
 I'd still have sex with that bike!!
  • + 1
 Whenever I read, "knock block" I think, "why?". No other complaints, looks really good.
  • + 1
 Do people know Trek isn't the only company asking more then 7k for a bike with similar or worse spec on it??????????
  • + 2
 Someone tell Niner that 29'ers are making one hell of a comeback.
  • + 1
 Not for me, for that price I'd like a better me that climbs like a trail bike but descends like a dh bike
  • + 1
 Mike, what camera and mounts are you using to film that vid? It's pretty smooth even though I'm sure the trail is knarly!
  • + 3
 It was just a GoPro Session with the standard chest mount - nothing too fancy.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: What trail is that? Been searching comments but yet to find. Could you give us trail name and location perhaps?
  • + 2
 This thing is DA Shit! Looks superb!
  • + 2
 I'd like to see Strava segment times comparing this and a Farley EX
  • + 0
 Knock block sort of reminds me of tugboat technology. Or like that dcrvrvdc shock, that only suckers rode lol.
  • + 1
 Drool. Wish there was an in-between spec though.
  • + 1
 Diagram of Knock Block:
www.pinkbike.com/photo/13534593
  • + 1
 The only bike that I do not mind the high price tag. What a bike!
  • + 1
 26" would it make it comp(l)ete !
  • + 1
 Really nice looking bike.
  • + 0
 It kinda sounds like they put a shock on there with too much volume. Maybe they went too far trying to get a linear feel.
  • + 1
 What happened to the Penske Racing integration we heard about last year?
  • + 2
 $8000 not worth it.
  • + 0
 Metric shock: 230x57.5?
Like 9"x 2.25" wouldn't have accomplished the same damn thing?
  • + 0
 Yeah whats wrong with just saying 9 7/128" x 2 67/256".
  • - 3
 Metric shock sizing is the death blow to aftermarket shock sales.
  • + 2
 @gonecoastal: there are fewer sizes in metric. It will be easier for aftermarket in the long run.
  • + 1
 @Axxe: how do you figure?

With standard length shocks, most bikes came fitted with a shock in a handful of sizes. Trek and Specialized were the two that come to mind who decided on weird shock sizing. (DRCV and old Enduro)
  • + 3
 @gonecoastal: there are more "standard" sizes than metric sizes. Nine vs six.
  • + 1
 @Axxe: I'm sure that'll change once more frame companies switch to metric.
Unsure what the big issue was in running an 8.5x2.5 or 7.787x2.25 shock on a 150-165mm bike was.
Trunnion mounts will add additional shock sizing.
  • + 1
 @gonecoastal: There is no reason for that to change. Metric range now has 3 e2e lengths (vs 7), with two stroke each, 5mm apart. That is enough for all travels. It has improved mount clearance and better mounts. No more different eyelets nonsense.
It really is an improvement in the long run, and better for aftermarket.
  • + 2
 The metric size is supposed to be 230x60 or 230x65 but Trek uses 230x57.5 so you need a specific shock, ridiculous...
  • + 1
 @Sylvain-F: metric supports 2.5mm adjustments.
  • + 1
 For this price do yourselves a favor and just go buy a new RM Slayer!!!
  • + 1
 looking like a session is kinda old, this 29 is boring. nice grips tho
  • + 1
 Is that a Bigfoot on 1:00!??
  • + 1
 Oh and I have the 9.8 and love it so I guess I might be biased Razz
  • + 1
 Just out of curiosity, how much psi did you have in your tyres?
  • + 1
 I'm buying it just for the knock block feature!
  • + 1
 I'll probably buy this bike. Looks great!
  • + 2
 bike is hot bro
  • + 1
 Looks like a...
  • + 0
 $8k without ability to do x-up or barspin, otherwise nice looking bike
  • + 1
 So many comments
  • + 1
 So clean!
  • + 1
 Need to demo it.
  • + 1
 Real bike porn
  • - 1
 In before all the 29er enduro bike hate and the "they should've made it in 27.5" comments...

I'd love to try out one!
  • + 0
 Very cheap
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