Trending: Mountain Bike Tech to Look for in 2019

Nov 15, 2018
by Mike Kazimer  
Spinning Circles Mike Kazimer


2018 is almost over, which means it's the perfect time to take a look into the crystal ball to see what new mountain bike tech is on the way for 2019. Unfortunately, I'm not seeing anything as groundbreaking as a trigger shifter operated gearbox that allows you to shift under load, or a dropper post that lowers the seat without any weight on it, but there are still plenty of interesting trends and gadgets that are worth a mention.


RockShox wireless Reverb dropper post
It looks like an electronic Reverb is on the way...
Fox
Expect to see Fox's Live Valve electronically controlled suspension on certain high-end bikes next year.

More Electronics

Mountain bikers don't seem to be as eager to hop on the electronic shifting bandwagon as our road-biking relatives, but that doesn't mean new products aren't in the works. SRAM appear to be on the cusp of releasing their wireless electronic mountain bike drivetrain to the masses, although there's no exact date as to when that will be. We saw Nino Schurter and Malene Degn putting prototype versions to the test on the World Cup circuit, which typically means that the final version isn't too far off. The first World Cup of the 2019 season takes place on May 18th in Albstadt, Germany – I wouldn't be surprised if an announcement happens around that time.

Of course, Shimano's electronic DI2 drivetrain has been on the market since 2014, but it's not wireless, and the installation process isn't the easiest, especially compared to tried-and-true cable actuated designs. I'm positive they're working hard on the next generation, but the fact that the new XTR isn't readily available yet likely means it's going to be a bit before we see anything.

Where else will we see electronics pop up? How about dropper posts? Magura's Vyron debuted a couple years ago, but it's still a rarity out on the trails, and the first iteration's return speed and remote ergonomics made it hard to recommend over simpler, and less expensive, cable actuated options. (I recently received the newest version that's supposed to address those issues – look for a full review once I get enough hours in on it). However, it looks like RockShox are poised to join in. Going wireless is one way to ditch the Reverb's silly hydraulic remote, but it does mean you'll need to make sure your battery has enough juice in it before heading out the door.

Just think, you could have an e-bike with an electronic drivetrain, an electronic dropper post, and electronically controlled suspension. My brain hurts just imagining trying to keep track of all those chargers.


Forking


Evolving Geometry

How much longer and slacker can bikes really get? That's a good question. Every year seems to bring about a half degree of head angle change, and an additional 10mm of reach. I could be wrong (it won't be the first, or the last time), but I do think that over the next few years we'll start to see things settle down. After all, it is possible to create a bike that's too long and slack, especially if you're not regularly dropping into near-vertical chutes. If you look at the motocross world, head angles tend to be between 62.5 – 64 degrees, which is approximately where I think we'll see DH and enduro bikes settle.

For trail and all-mountain bikes, 64.5-66 degrees will likely be the sweet spot, and then there's the unfortunately named 'downcountry' segment, where head angles will sit in the 65.5-67.5 degree range. Speaking of downcountry, I wouldn't be surprised to see a fresh batch of new contenders emerge next season, short travel (110-120mm) bikes that are built for more than XC racing, with dropper posts and real tires, but that can still hold their own when it's time to put the hammer down.

Steeper seat angles will also become more prevalent, although, once again, you can only go so steep before things get weird. I'd say that number is around the 79-degree mark, and most companies will probably stick to the 76-77 degree realm.

Of course, we can't talk about geometry without talking about fork offset. 51mm used to be the standard amount of fork offset for 29ers, but that's changed over the last year or two, and looking ahead I'd expect most new 29ers to have forks with 44 or 46mm of offset. Does it make a huge difference out on the trail? Honestly, I'd say that there's a little more hype surrounding this topic than there needs to be – the difference in handling isn't drastic, especially with slacker head angles, but companies don't want to look like they're behind the times, so reduced offset will become the new norm.


Forbidden Bike Company
Forbidden Bike's high-pivot design turned heads at Crankworx Whistler - will we see anyone else adopting this design?


More High Pivot Designs

High pivot suspension designs aren't new (Paul Aston put together an excellent overview here), but the success of Commencal's Supreme DH, piloted by Amaury Pierron, and GT's new Fury, underneath Martin Maes, certainly refocused the spotlight on the potential of that design. Commencal, Norco, and GT are the three biggest companies producing DH bikes that have a high pivot suspension layout, but I'm sure there's a lot of off-season experimentation going on.

We also have Forbidden Bikes' still-unnamed creation to look forward to, which uses a high-pivot design on a shorter travel trail bike. I don't foresee a wholesale switchover to this design, but I do think we'll see a few more contenders enter the mix.


ARD tire insert
Nukeproof's ARD system is the latest addition to the closed cell foam tire inserts world.
Interbike 2018
Maxxis' new EXO+ casing falls in between their regular EXO casing and their Double Down casing.

Tire Tech

The quest to end flat tires once and for all still is still underway, and there are more companies than ever offering all sorts of foam inserts to help keep rims from breaking, tires from tearing, and air from escaping. There's no sign that the insert industry is going to slow down, either. The good news is that there's a wide range of options available depending on how much protection you're looking for.

The same goes for tires – there are more thick-but-not-DH-thick casings available that provide a little extra measure of security compared to the paper-thin, 700 gram options out there. Hopefully we'll start to see more bike companies spec proper tires on their enduro and all-mountain bikes – nobody wants to shell out thousands of dollars for their dream machine only to tear a hole in the single-ply sidewall a hundred yards into the first ride.




Don't Forget, It's Still a Good Time

You know what's really worth looking forward to in 2019? The fact that mountain biking will still be as fun as it ever was. No matter if you're on a fully rigid hardtail with a coaster brake, or a fancy superbike bedecked with all-carbon-everything, it's still tough to beat ripping around in the woods for a few hours, and that's never going to change.


278 Comments

  • + 153
 Is Levy's article singularly responsible for "downcountry"? If so, I hate you @mikelevy.
  • - 54
flag WAKIdesigns (Nov 15, 2018 at 12:32) (Below Threshold)
 No. The rise of Enduro is. Mike just coined this niche. Some people identify with their bike a lot but don’t want to be identified with racing.
  • + 58
 #upcountryaintdead
  • + 316
 Sorry. I hate me, too.
  • + 112
 @mikelevy: I only hate vacuums, so you're cool in my book don't sweat it.
  • + 144
 @IamTheDogEzra: I'd prefer to be liked by all the dogs than all the people Smile
  • + 55
 @mikelevy: Or in this case a schizophrenic man posing as a dog on a biking forum (likely Waki feeling lonely on a cold Swedish night)
  • + 5
 @IamTheDogEzra: you only hate vacuums? Are you a cat?
  • + 4
 @mikelevy: Carry a wiener ..................................in your back pocket, works every time.
  • + 17
 @adrennan: It's only natural to abhor a vacuum.
  • + 6
 I read that as “I’d prefer to be LICKED by all the dogs, than all the people “ Which was slightly disturbing and gross. But not as gross as putting wet 4 day old cycling shorts ( under baggies). And then finding out that they are your mates. Which I have done????
@mikelevy:
  • + 5
 I prefer triple x c or xxxc as they say
  • + 7
 @gcrider: technically,that means you pretty much had sex with him.
  • - 11
flag WAKIdesigns (Nov 16, 2018 at 0:55) (Below Threshold)
 @Gamsjaga: oh... so I was mistaken... so evil Following and Fuel EX are not downcountry bikes... huh... ok @mikelevy I hate you for introducing a new genre between XC and Hypegods only know what the fk is that 120mm thing with Enduro forks and tyres...

Can I get educated now... so we have:
-Gravel, Marathon XC, XC, Down Country, "Trail?!", Enduro, Freeride and DH? are 140mm bikes all mountain bikes to make it more complicated?
  • + 9
 @WAKIdesigns: you obviously missed all mountain.
  • + 3
 @Gamsjaga: don't forget Superenduro. It sits between Enduro and Freeride....oh and also race DH (29") and Park DH (26 and 27,5") bikes. Sub categories are available as hardtails.
Muhahaha
  • + 9
 @WAKIdesigns: there are only XC bikes, trail bikes, slope bikes and DH bikes. Enduro is a racing format. If you ride up and down hills/mountains/trail/etc then that is called XC as in across the the countryside or if you don not like the term call it trail riding. If all you do is shuttle and/or take lifts to ride downhill then you are a downhiller. All those people that say they ride enduro are just trailriders unless they actually mean enduro racing. Also it is not your bike that defines what type of riding you do or are but what you actually ride that does. I have a 180mm "DH" bike that I riding everything with but please don't call it a super enduro rig...
PS: Freeride bikes are DH bikes that are setup in a different way
  • + 0
 Sooo yeah, anyone notice the distinct whiff of MountainBike Action in the air on the one?

Those who have been around a while remember the whole "Black Diamond" push....

I mean, I know RC is on the staff here, but if you mofos start talking about wanking on the bar-ends and how an XC bike would be a much better descender with the addition of some monster T's I might start questioning your competence.
  • + 121
 When do e-bikes get integrated sound systems, Honda Goldwing style?
  • + 41
 Why no A/C also?
  • + 123
 Fits the demographic. People with trail speakers and people with ebikes deserve each other.
  • + 20
 And a reverse gear. Wait, do Goldwings already have a walking aid like ebikes? They could learn so much from each other!
  • + 53
 I want an ashtray for mine.
  • + 17
 I think we're onto something. TLD soon to release a range of leather waistcoats, with custom air brushed designs, maybe even a '3 wolf moon' collab.
  • + 19
 @sspiff: trail speakers should be a 'banned from the park" offence.
  • + 8
 @excavator666: i want heated Grips, saddles and pedals.
  • + 5
 @excavator666: you cant have an ashtray without a beer bottle mount.
  • + 7
 I'm still waiting for electrical steering, because it made cars so much better...
  • + 3
 @Stevel-Knievel: I fully support this. When in Austria last year we came up with 'Troy Lederhosen', a pair of leather shorts with fully integrated support braces. Would look plush with a leather jacket to top it off Wink
  • + 2
 Skip the bottle cage and add some cup holders.
  • + 4
 @Stevel-Knievel: sheepskin seat cover is a must
  • + 8
 That's it, I'm converted. Going to buy an e-bike, but scrap the motor and just have the battery powering a load of random but essentially useful stuff. A whisk, slow cooker, angle grinder, foot spa etc...it won't be long before these things start to appear on Specialized's 'Turbo Extras' web page....
  • + 3
 And reverse mode
  • + 1
 @Kirky86: No doubt! Trail speakers and buttholes deserve each other!
  • + 42
 "You know what's really worth looking forward to in 2019? The fact that mountain biking will still be as fun as it ever was."

@mikekazimer, but I'd argue that it's even better than that. There are more kick ass trails, and more kick ass people to ride and build them with than ever before, and that's before you even look at bike parks popping up everywhere. Bikes are better than they've ever been - you can buy bikes that hold up to use (we all remember when that wasn't the case...), provide better range of use (we now have trail bikes that are remarkably capable on everything from XC loops to stuff that would have been considered way too gnarly for anything but freeride or DH bikes a while back; modern enduro bikes are as capable as DH bikes of not too long ago but aren't a total chore to earn your turns on). Components are better, too - there are brake and drivetrain choices that give you solid performance for what used to be entry level pricing as the higher-priced tech trickles down. And you can buy a decently spec'd bike with up to date geometry and well balanced performance for what used to be bargain basement closeout prices (and that's before you even figure in inflation). Even better - there's now competent, highly effective instruction and coaching to be had, so new riders progress more quickly, and everyone has the opportunity to up their game and have more fun that way.

It's the freaking golden age, and while some keyboard wankers may be grousing about how it's not like the old days blablabla, I, like most riders I know, sure as hell am enjoying the crap out of it.
  • + 14
 You sound like one of those people who adapt and are happy. Which is all well and good until you welcome in our robot overlords with open arms. Di2 may become sentient
  • + 2
 Would argue mtb has lost some of its fun factor, back in the day the bikes were a bit shit but you went out and rode in the forrest with your mates and had a laugh. Yes the bikes are great now but its easy to get caught up in the wank tech factor, too many people scoping out your bike in the carpark. development has been huge in the past few years but I think it will slow and people will be able to just enjoy the ride and forget about the bikes
  • + 7
 @zyoungson: I say just ignore it and enjoy it. That's what I do. One of my favorite questions people ask me is always "how much does your bike weigh?". I just look at em and say "enough". I'm with @g-42 in that it's the golden age of mountain biking. I know I still come down with a big grin. Possibly even bigger considering the trails are so darn good these days!
  • + 7
 @zyoungson: That's you getting older, not mountain biking changing. There was just as much "My bike has more purple anodising than yours" then as there is "I have custom tuning in my suspension" now. You just didn't notice it because you were too busy dicking about in the woods with your mates.
  • + 2
 @browner: Oh no, I've got a fair bit of that 'old man yells at clouds' thing going on, too. It's just that the riding is too damn good around here to freak out about stuff related to what's at heart a bunch of kids of all ages playing bikes in the woods.
  • + 4
 @zyoungson: But here's the thing - with the level of growth and progression that's taken over the sport, there's a shit ton of snot-nosed little kids ripping really hard on janky old hand-me-down bikes with shit-eating grins. Keeps the wanker factor down, and the fun factor up as they inspire us old dudes to try stuff. The other thing that seems to really have helped the sport is the influx of women - it's well established that the overall social intelligence of a group goes up as gender mix approaches parity, and I think we're seeing that in mountain biking, at least in my little neck of the woods here.
  • + 1
 @zyoungson: hey, I like wank tech factor!
  • + 1
 @zyoungson: I remember those days as well. I think we should appreciate the fact that everything is so much better today. I rode one of my 20 year old bikes this summer and I realized why I practically quit the sport for a number of years. Old bikes sucked and the riding could be both fun and frustrating. Yes, today there can be as much talk about the bikes as there is about the riding but that can be part of the fun as well. I have dentist friends and friends who clean their bikes once a year. We all ride together and have fun. I am damn happy to be still progressing after 30 years in the sport.
  • + 30
 I don't think I'll ever be interested in electronic shifting for a trail/enduro/downcountry mountain bike. Cables and housing are just so simple and reliable (not to mention light).
  • - 7
flag N-60 (Nov 15, 2018 at 13:53) (Below Threshold)
 Man they're not that reliable all things considered, after tires they're the most likely thing to have an issue with in my experience.
  • + 14
 @N-60: True, but a snapped cable is going to be a hell of a lot cheaper to fix than broken electronics. And if you have a spare and a couple tools could even be done mid-ride.
  • + 29
 @N-60: ever since the death of the front derailleur shifting has been super reliable
  • + 2
 I used SRAM eTap on my road bike for a while. Awesome, quick, precise, with one big exception-big downshifts were slower than with cable actuated systems where you can easily grab a handful of gears—not as big an issue on the road, more so on a mountain bike.
  • + 5
 @N-60: I used to have issues before I read the moniker that you should get the most expensive shifter, cables and housing you can and an average mech. Still cheaper than electronic
  • - 8
flag zyoungson (Nov 15, 2018 at 16:54) (Below Threshold)
 Cables are a pain in the dick, if sram can get the wireless shifting right it will be a good thing, unlike shimano where the bike is rigged like a high school electrical project.
  • - 1
 @zyoungson: if they come up with a good way to do the big downshifts I’d buy Eagle eTap.
  • + 6
 Huh? Cables get dirty, rust, wet and require adjustments and replacement.

I charge my di2 2 times a year while I sleep.
  • - 2
 @heffernw: @heffernw: Okay, it is easier to fix a snapped cable than fix broken electronic shifters, but if I trash a derailleur or shifter it's getting replaced probably regardless of if it is cable or electric. If your electronic shifter is wireless, there are no cables to snap. If it it is wired, you can strip a little wire and twist them together and it will work, easier than fixing a cable at least temporarily.

I could see myself getting wireless shifters on some of my bikes someday, but increased maintenance isn't what is stopping me from doing it now.
  • + 7
 @warmerdamj: changing cables happens once a year and its a good chance to have a beer in the garage. any chance for beers in the garage and bikes wins
  • + 0
 @zrider79: A good reason not to put sealant in your tyres. Each night I have an excuse for a good pump in my workshop.
  • + 16
 @warmerdamj: I used to just ride my bicycle until it was unridable, man those were better days. Now it's all diddling with the diddliest diddlers.
  • + 2
 The only problem with electronic shifting is it doubles the cost of your rear derailleur. Fine on my road bike where I don't have rocks/stumps to rip it off and crashes are rare. Wouldn't risk it on a MTB for the same reason I won't buy high end derailleurs.
  • + 3
 I think mean SRAMs. Shimano never had any problems working or being reliable for 2x or 3x @DarrenV:
  • - 1
 @heffernw: just to play devil's advocate... a broken electric cable is a damn sight easier to splice back together and make work on the side of the trail than a broken shifter cable.
(I know that there is a lot more that could break in an 'e' system, I'm all for simple personally)
  • + 4
 @zrider79: I'm allowed to have beers inside my house.
  • + 1
 @N-60: Both my Shimano and Eagle have been near flawless.. Its all about that little bit of maintenance every so often
  • + 2
 @Obidog: I won't claim to know much about wired e-shifters but it doesn't seem to me that the wires are particularly accessible. If you have to pull it through the frame to splice it back together and then get it all plugged in together again I would think it would be easier to just shove a cable through an existing housing on a traditional setup. But that's just me.
  • + 2
 @Kramz: my memory of mountain biking in the 90s was a constant process of breaking sht with the occasional bike ride thrown in. Today’s bikes are insanely better. So count me among the diddlers I guess.
  • + 1
 @DrPete: Yeah, I now own the best mountain bike I've ever owned, and I'm like half disabled.
  • + 30
 Everyone: man, reverbs kind of suck. I wish Rockshox would update them so they stop sagging and work in the cold.
Rockshox: We put batteries in the same thing! What could go wrong??
  • + 2
 @ ranchcampvt - you've gotta almost admire how they have managed to put a ton of work into evolving their product, and have found ways to make it suck in roughly the same way through all these iterations, despite all the new clever engineering they've added. As a native German, I recognize that as the same spirit that's turned German cars into works of art I don't want any part in having to own/maintain.
  • + 29
 You forgot to mention the experimentation with mixed wheel sizes that is going to happen on the DH scene this year...
  • + 2
 Any evidence if this yet?
  • - 32
flag englertracing (Nov 15, 2018 at 14:42) (Below Threshold)
 @arthom: unfortunately the uci doesnt allow it in their races so the rest of us miss out on the possible benefits.....
  • + 23
 @englertracing: wrong, UCI approved mix match just recently.
  • + 13
 I'm really hoping someone comes out with a 29er rear, 12er front called 'The Dragster'.
  • + 2
 @bigtim: aka the "I-dare-u"
  • + 20
 so we got rid of tubes to save weight and now were adding foam and weight. its like the nicotine patch of the mtb world
  • + 20
 Or buying a carbon bike with carbon everything to save weight and putting two waterbottles on it.
  • + 73
 If weight was the main reason you went tubeless, these products aren't meant for you
  • + 13
 Although tubeless was initially about saving weight, it was the improved ride characteristics and ability to run lower pressures without risk of pinch flats that really made it great. Weight be damned. I want to have fun and the best way to do that is by maximizing handling and minimizing time spent fixing tires on the trail. Whether the latter is due to pinch flats or sidewall tears, I don't care. They both suck.
  • - 19
flag LOLWTF (Nov 15, 2018 at 12:25) (Below Threshold)
 @rellinger: guess what dumdum the bottles don't weight shit once you've hydrated yourself. Why the hate?
  • + 8
 Don't care about the weight of a tube... it's ability to pinch flat when I sneeze is why they don't belong in my tires.
  • + 1
 So what's the vaping equivalent?
  • + 12
 @LOLWTF: So by the time you finish your ride your bike is back to weighing what it should. Cool story bro.
  • + 1
 @rellinger: would you rather have that weight on your back though?
  • + 13
 Tubeless was never about weight. Not in the MTB world. It's been about function. Reducing flats. Reducing failure points, etc. It's never really been a weight savings at all. Have you weighed all that STANS you're putting in there?

The average rider doesn't need tire inserts. Carry an emergency tube with you. Or a plug kit.
  • + 11
 @rellinger: Or buying a bike with carbon everything when you're carrying an extra 10+ kilos of fat. (Welcome to road bike world.)
  • + 1
 @me2menow: uhhh... ebikes?
  • + 2
 @LOLWTF: I guess I'm not smart enough to figure out WTF you're on about.
  • + 4
 @onemanarmy: I am an average rider. Cushcores had the biggest effect on my bike of any upgrade I've made in the past 5 years. The last really noteable improvement was a charger damper replacing an r2c2. Tyre inserts kick ass.
  • + 6
 @rellinger: just because we have cool carbon bikes doesnt mean we dont need water.
  • - 2
 @underhawk: f*ck I downvoted you by accident.
  • + 1
 @rellinger: And a tube. And a pump. And a tool. And a seat pack.
  • + 1
 @big-red: As soon as they figure out a tire insert strategy that's just light enough to prevent bottoming then I'm in. Huck Norris didn't seem to do anything. Cushcore is way too heavy. But the Nukeproof and Vittoria solutions seem like a good balance. Though I can't help thinking if the tire casing was beefed up by 150g maybe that would be better. I guess I should try some DD casing tires first.
  • + 1
 @gabriel-mission9: why do you like cushcore so much? It was recommended to me by a shop but i didn't really see much advantage...
  • + 2
 @warmerdamj:
Basically:
They dont weight much more than an average inner tube. I know no one runs those any more, but at the same time it kinda shows that although the weight looks high on paper, its not like a tyre with an inner tube rides drastically worse than a tubeless set up. Before the tube punctures anyway. So the weight doesn't make a huge difference.

They pretty much eliminate rim dents. 90% of the time I have to replace a rim it's because of some sort of impact damage or another, so eliminating that is a big deal. I spend 2 weeks in Morzine every summer. Normally I hear a good few dings and bangs coming from my rims every run, especially in rocky areas. I usually buy a new rear rim after I get back every year, it's not cheap. Last summer, with cushcore I heard one faint ping noise from my wheels in the entire 2 weeks. And that was from my front wheel landing directly on the edge of a reasonable sized rock from about 20 ft out. That is a huge difference. No new rims needed after the holiday as they were both in perfect condition. In fact I'd even consider running lighter rims now. Or wider but no heavier, or whatever.

You can also run lighter sidewalls on your tyres, making the whole setup significantly lighter than your standard tubeless set up, and still less prone to damage. Might improve grip too, having a more flexible tyre carcass, but then again it might not be noticeable. I haven't ridden a non-heavyduty tyre sidewall in years so I can't really comment.

They noticeably improve tyre stability at low pressures. I got a slow puncture a while ago, and didnt even notice till it was down to about 10psi. The grip was immense, tyre roll was still better than a normal tyre at 20psi.

I honestly can't say enough good about them.

Downsides? They are expensive and a pain to fit. Once they're on your bike though, they rock.
  • + 2
 @gabriel-mission9: cool thanks man!
  • + 1
 @big-red: The first iteration of tubeless was NOT good for low tire pressure, unless you were slow and cautious!
If you rode aggressively, your back tire would come completely off the rim! Minimum of about 35 LBS of pressure, just to keep the tire on the rim!
  • + 14
 Do people genuinely have problems with the exo tyres other than when they really should be riding dh casings? Having ripped holes in other tyres in my early days of tubeless, I've been through 2 sets of exo tyres without a problem. (I may be lighting the blue touch paper here?)
  • + 22
 The problem that I run into is that the exo casing isnt stiff enough and has a tendency to roll more
  • + 11
 Used to flat the Exo casing almost every ride during rocky trail rides. Punctures, sidewall slashes etc etc. Switched to a doubledown tire and have not had an issue since.
  • + 4
 My beef is how squirmy they feel. I tore one once, but I was riding DH, so thats on me.
  • + 5
 I've had fantastic luck with EXO casings for DHF, DHRII, Rekon and Forekaster. The only one I flatted on was the Forekaster. The one DHF on my 140/160 bike has 1400 miles on it, zero issues and only loses 1-2 PSI if I let it sit for several days. I have a spare ready to go, but it keeps on going (knocks on wood). Also remember that destroying rims and tires means you're a good rider. I'm not very "enduro".
  • + 3
 @Tr011: That's my same issue, switched to Magic Mary Super Gravity.
  • + 8
 EXO tires tear like paper here in the Rockies/Western US. They are fine in areas will lest sharp rocks or less aggressive riding I suppose
  • + 3
 I have two set of wheels,one with DH Assegai/DHR2 and the other one on EXO DHF/DHR2. Both sets I have a HuckNorris and it is working fine for me...Just swap the wheel like a pro...
  • + 1
 EXO is definitely enough for weekend warrior type riders, but the thin carcass requires too high of PSI for fast and gnarly riding and, even then, could still rip. Doubledown with maxxgrip is pretty damn slow when the weight is added to the grippy compound so this EXO+ could be a good compromise.
  • + 1
 Yes. In the front it's fine, but in the rear I cannot run EXO without flatting in the first few weeks of getting it. I live in a rocky area, weigh 185lb, and like to go fast. DD is the only casing I've run that doesn't flat regularly - usually my DD rear tire gets too worn down and replaced eventually rather than flatting.
  • + 8
 double down rear, exo front
  • + 1
 @islandforlife: It really is a fantastic front tire...SG FTW
  • + 3
 EXO is fine for xc/trail but for anything more they are a waste of money! Same with Specialized grid. Double down is good. Super gravity is good. The new Michelin rock R2 enduro is good. This new exo+ has me thinking its Maxxis trying to sell us something we don’t need. Just go DD if you tear exo, or if exo is fine stick with it!
  • + 6
 FYI for anyone looking for a lighter, faster option than doubledown and super gravity.. Specialized's Blckdmnd casing is slightly lighter than doubledown but has a carcass nearly as rigid as super gravity. The gripton compound they're using with blckdmnd is hard-wearing and durable in the center tread and super soft on the corner knobs. Its worth a look if you have not found your goldilocks 3C yet (Casing-compound-Combo)
  • + 1
 @thesharkman: these are only just new out yeah? Thanks for the comparison! Good stuff
  • + 2
 Exo casing is fine for some mellower trail riding, and for rowdier stuff there's DD. I see abbsolutely no point in making a fifth casing option.
  • + 2
 @hirvi: exactly!
  • + 2
 EXO are too fragile and flexy for my riding, but DD seems fine. E13 single-ply casing seems stiffer and tougher than EXO, so perhaps EXO+ will be similar to that.
  • + 9
 I ride almost as fast as Randy and don’t have any problems with EXO.
  • + 4
 Nobody has problems with anything in the mtb world. Thats not why they make new things.
  • + 2
 They should stop putting DH tread on XC carcass. It confuses too many people.
  • + 3
 in europe EXO 3C stands for "EXtremly Overpriced tire that holds for 3 Corners"
  • + 2
 @K1maxX: exo is overpriced only on German websites because they get nice pricing from Schwalbe in exchange of selling Maxxis and Michelin tyres at full MSRP. If you buy your Maxxis tyres on French or UK websites, you get them for 10-15€ less and it makes them cheaper than Schwalbe.
  • + 8
 @K1maxX: Man, I did NOT expect such hate for the EXO casing. Either my trails are all super smooth or I really suck at riding, along with everyone I ride with. Are you all riding lift-access DH with EXO casings or something? Even when I've ridden lift-access and hit several single and double-black diamond trails my EXO casings were OK last year. I think I need to re-evaluate how sh!tty I am at smashing trails I guess. The only people I've ever had complain about flatting EXO casings are former or current pro/semi-pro Enduro guys. If I was a newbie reading this I'd assume EXO casings are for the paved bike path and golf courses only.
  • + 3
 Double down , maxterra, 3c exo exo+ what the heck is this, what has happened.

Gimme numbers maxxis, I used to like single ply, dual ply, and 60a etc - I knew what I was buying

I don't need any more first world problems in my life especially when buying rubber
  • + 2
 @yupstate: I have problems only with the sidewalls, not with the knobs nor the base. But I have narrow rims (23mm inner) so it might also affect how the side is exposed or not to the rocks. And over here there are more roots than rocks so I can't imagine if I was riding rocky trails.
  • + 3
 @yupstate: Yeah, I know less experienced guys who destroy wheels riding the same terrain I do. They probably tell people online it's because the wheels are too weak for their riding style...but don't mention that their riding 'style' is casing jumps.
  • + 3
 @yupstate: it can also be about terrain. I run exo rear on my hardtail with little to no troubles, but when I leave my soaking wet loamy island go to the bc interior and it’s dry rocky trails, I am likely to slice something somewhere. I also might suggest you make wise choices on your lines whereas other riders...don’t.
  • + 1
 @VwHarman: I like that suggestion that I have wise line-choice and still riiiiippp!! LOL thanks. I will say the one EXO where I tore the sidewall was a Forekaster and I saw the rock, missed it with my front tire but the back scraped it good. about a 1/2 inch tear.
  • + 1
 @zede: Interesting, not sure if the rim width has an impact on how exposed things are to certain terrain. FWIW I am running 30mm internal on one bike and 35mm on the other. Both have EXO front and rear.
  • + 1
 I've never had problems with exo dhf, but I've trashed 2 exo dhrs after 20 miles - warped casings... Switched to Michelin wild enduro both ends, and it's a different ball game. The stiffer casing has so much more support in corners, you can feel the edge knobs biting in :-) But no wonder tyres are getting so expensive when there are so many options and each one needs developing and stocking separately.
  • + 7
 I, for one, welcome the $400 shift components, $2000 “smart” forks, and the $750 wireless Reverb. I’m sure all that extra money will be Worth It in the form of perfect function, easy maintenance, small parts availability, extreme reliability, and high resale value. That’s usually how it works in this industry.
  • - 1
 underrated comment!
  • + 5
 Hot news- 1. No one will ride reverbs anymore. 2. E-suspension is not for the masses. 3. High pivot designs will become prevalent in three years. 4. Mid- protection tires will still be inadequate and people will still ride DH casing on rear until a miracle happens. 5. Move along.
  • - 2
 Nope only fat Americans need DH tires on a mid travel bike. Super gravity all the way!
  • + 4
 @colincolin: But super gravity are German so they just sort of fall apart and fail , like their cars. My BMW might be made out of schwalbe side knobs come to think of it.
  • + 1
 @colincolin: dont make us come back over there!
  • + 1
 @colincolin: I used to think the same. But then I improved a bit.

I'm still slow and I'm fairly light (70kg) but my rear Maxxis HRII in exo casing start leaking sealant from the sidewalls after 5 rides.

Anyone heavier than me, faster than me, or riding rockier trails probably has to ride DH casing.
  • + 1
 @zede: Exo are rubbish for anything more than XC
  • + 1
 @colincolin: well if you're on Maxxis and you don't use exo then you're using DH casing ?

So I don't get your point... since with Schwalbe, super gravity is just a foldable DH casing, just few grams lighter than the real "DH casing".

Exo is fine for front tyres on mid travel bikes if you're smooth.
  • + 2
 @zede: all I'm saying is mid protection tires are great for lots riders.
  • + 1
 @colincolin: Super Gravity is the same as DoubleDown. Then both maxxis and Schwalbe make actual DH versions of their tires. It goes like this:

Maxxis: EXO - DoubleDown - DH (and will soon be: EXO - EXO+ - DoubleDown - DH
Schwalbe: Snakeskin - SuperGravity - DH

I don't think I've seen anyone on a mid travel bike using a full DH carcass. DD yes, but not DH. Usually those who use full DH tires are actually riding/racing DH and/or ride big parks (Whistler) extensively with DH or long travel enduro bikes.

I'm in the process of putting Schwalbe SuperGravity Magic Mary's on my mid travel 29r.
  • + 1
 @zede: Maxxis has EXO - DoubleDown and DH casings. Now they are adding EXO+

Schwalbe has Snakeskin, SuperGravity and DH casings. Schwalbe also offers a "Park" tire which is a DH casings with a low wearing compound to last longer.
  • + 2
 @zede: I’m 100kg and have never killed a Super Gravity casing. They are also far less prone to squirming and burping under the weight of us big boys. I see no reason for a DH casing.
  • + 2
 @DrPete: my point was just that super gravity casings are almost similar to DH, but I have re-checked, and turns out the SG are lighter than I remembered, and that the surface of the tyre is also different from that of the DH (while I thought it was just a foldable version of the DH tyre).
  • + 2
 @islandforlife: The difference is a Schwalbe Supergravity casing has thicker sidewalls than a Maxxis DH tire because it is the same sidewall as their DH tires! Maxxis DH tires are the minimum I'd ride for proper riding! EXO/DD is for light XC.
  • + 1
 @zede: Supergravity casing has a 2ply sidewall like the DH tire but a singleply top like a XC/trail tire. Plus it has a kevlar foldable bead.
  • + 1
 @SintraFreeride: That's not true... Schwalbe Super Gravity is on par with Maxxis Double Down and then Shwalbe DH is on par with Maxxis DH.

I use Schwalbe Super Gravity, but if DoubleDown was for light XC, I don't think we'd see all the Maxxis EWS team riders using it.
  • + 1
 @islandforlife: Supergravity sidewall is thicker than Maxxis DH 2 ply casing. Have a feel with your fingers. I stopped using Maxxis tires because their casing thickness is too thin (DH included). I believe very few Maxxis EWS team riders use DD casing without an insert...
  • + 7
 I can't wait to see the 77Designz - Prototype frame be released. Should be a ball tearer of an Enduro bike!!
  • + 2
 Same. I want the HPP so bad, it hurts
  • + 8
 Can't wait for the revolutionary Yoann Barelli's "La Baguette"!
  • + 3
 We are not mountain bikers because we like electric things. Industry do one with all your electric crap.
We also (most of us) enjoy the mechanical, the tactile , the ability to wrench on it ourselves and screw it up our own way.
We are not as a breed willing to take our bike to the shop to have every little thing on it fixed. Probably by plugging it in to a computer connected somewhere in the Eheadset.
2020 - electronic tyre pressure gauges - take your bike to the garage coz you can’t adjust the tyre pressures and need a computer to do it.

I’m getting back into BMX
  • + 3
 Get a rigid single speed and you will never have to worry about these things again. Plus it's bags of fun.
  • + 3
 Aka... what our sponsors are pulling out next year and you need to buy...

The wireless reverb must be a joke... take two things that sram cant get to work and wrap it in one package. There are plenty of suckers willing to buy this junk and do free q/a... actually, they pay to q/a. Brillant businesses model.
  • + 3
 You've just summed up the entire tech industry.
  • + 4
 Maybe I’ve just been lucky but nobody from the bike industry has ever held me at gunpoint and forced me to buy anything.
  • + 2
 Bikes are getting a tad too long/slack...

Its more fun riding a short travel bike over its head than a 180mm beast that paves everything and you feel like your riding a sofa down the trail. 130/140 can handle just about anything short of Rampage or stuff 99% of us wont ride anyway.

But thats just like, my opinion man.
  • + 3
 As a taller rider, this movement is allowing me to have a bike that fits for the first time. If companies would mix things up more that might be a nice solution: longer CS/steeper STA for bigger frames. Some of these new bikes are so big for regular sized people it's getting a little crazy. But for us XLs they're finally just right. If the companies did their due diligence on actual size requirements rather than manufacturing convenience we might do better. But the same could be said for these new standards: maybe if some brands had had a conversation we could have skipped gone from 142 straight to 157, which was an existing standard already, rather than mandate an extra stop at 148.
  • + 2
 I think people will realize that there is a continuum of geometry between XC and DH, and the pendulum will swing back to more balanced geometry on bikes in the middle.
  • + 1
 @alexsin: Totally agree. Took my first pedal strokes on my new Yeti SB130, 77-degree STA and all, and it just feels like the perfect pedaling position.
  • + 1
 @alexsin: forgot to add that I’m 6’2”/187cm with a long cycling inseam. The SB130 is a L.
  • + 1
 but there are a ton of really fun short travel, slack bikes out there now. it's the excessive travel that makes a bike feel like a sofa, not the geo
  • + 1
 My opinion is that most bikes are still too short and not slack enough and seat tubes are way too long on the larger frames.
  • + 1
 @clink83: XC bike geometry is still very roadish and terrible for offroad ridng. DH geometry with a few tweeks eg steep seat angles is where we need to be.
  • + 2
 @xeren: amen to that.
  • + 2
 2018 low attendance at Interbike, 2018 TRUMP Tariff, 2018 local manufacturers moving out of state to cheaper locations, 2018 record natural disasters...late wildfires in California....I don't see people spending $10K on bicycles during this Holiday Season when they have to rebuild their lives!
  • + 2
 Help me out. Doesn't a higher offset fork of years gone by, essentially accomplish what the 'new' slacker HTA/reduced-offset combinations accomplish; pushing the front wheel out in front of the rider (both increasing stability)? Doesn't an excessively slack HTA cancel out the traction-benefits of a reduced offset fork??
  • + 1
 Hay?
  • + 3
 nope, the opposite. slacker head angles increase trail, as do reduced offsets. "older" larger offset forks lead to shorter trail.

basically, slacker head tube angles and reduced offset serve to doubly increase high speed stability, at the cost of steering sharpness. supposedly it's a way to get increased stability without making the head angle too slack.

i honestly can't tell the difference between a 37mm and 44mm offset, though
  • + 6
 @xeren: Don't worry, we will move in 3mm increments until you can feel it. You will need to buy 4 forks but the industry will get there.
  • + 1
 @husstler: haha, i wouldn't be surprised if they did this.
  • + 1
 I can’t tell you any of the science behind it but I just got a Yeti SB130 with the reduced offset fork (a 46mm MRP Ribbon) and I felt all the descending advantage and high speed stability of the 65-degree HTA without the front wheel floppiness I was warned about at low speeds and in tight stuff. Feels more nimble at low speed than my Evil Insurgent, which is like 1.3” shorter in wheelbase.
  • + 2
 This.

EXO is a joke.

If you are able to fit a tire onto a rim without:

A. Breaking a sweat
B. Thumbs hurting after the install
C. Tire levers

then don’t spec the tires on a MOUNTAIN BIKE!


“Hopefully we'll start to see more bike companies spec proper tires on their enduro and all-mountain bikes – nobody wants to shell out thousands of dollars for their dream machine only to tear a hole in the single-ply sidewall a hundred yards into the first ride”
  • + 2
 Will Specialized ever make a 29 Demo or will they give up on DH and continue to put all their developement money in to ebikes.

When does the Santa Cruz ebike come out? What if the reason the 29 V10 isn’t out yet and the Hightower LT hasn’t been given modern geometry is because they are putting all their RnD in to ebikes?

Will Superboost 157 take over? How does that fit in to ebikes?

We are at the end of the non-pedal assist era and there is nothing we can do to stop it
  • + 2
 It's a shame that we haven't had a PB comments section throughout the evolution of the bicycle because it would be great to look at the comments that the purists would've had about gears, derailleurs, handlebar-mounted shift levers, the advent of front suspension, and the like. I have a feeling it would look like a perpetual copy-and-paste job.
  • + 2
 So with more of these things being electronic it seems the one welcome new standard would be for a frame-mounted battery with a standardized plug wired to various locations to fuel computer, shifting, seatpost, suspension, etc. I wouldn’t buy it but it would make sense for the bikes that have all the electro-bling.
  • + 4
 I'm excited to try some of this technology 5 years from now when it will be on a used bike I can afford.
  • + 3
 You go getter, you
  • + 2
 Short fork offsets definitely work better to a limit. Better = more grip on the front and less flip flop on the front wheel (Spirit of enduro?)

Try it back to back, isn't a hype, it works
  • + 1
 I have a bike (RSD Middle Chile / 27.5 / 2.6) with a slack front end (64.5) and ordered a shorter offset fork for it, and every time I'm on it all I can think is that this long ass slack bike feels nimble like an BMX. My Process 111 (66.6ish with a 140mm fork / 29 / 2.35) doesn't feel that way. When I switch back & forth I always feel like the steering on the RSD is sharp, but the bike feels very comfortable pointed down and front end traction, even with lesser tires, feels on point.

That's all I got.
  • + 1
 I've got my first few rides on my Yeti SB130 and couldn't agree more.
  • + 1
 "Speaking of downcountry, I wouldn't be surprised to see a fresh batch of new contenders emerge next season, short travel (110-120mm) bikes that are built for more than XC racing, with dropper posts and real tires, but that can still hold their own when it's time to put the hammer down"
... kind of like the bike I'm riding right now (Rocky Thunderbolt) ... that's 3 years old?
  • + 2
 Yeah but not enough people have bought one yet so they are still plugging away at it. Bike sales required there be a bike between hardtail or xc, and new 180mm enduro sleds. But not existing 150mm/160mm sensible sleds
  • + 1
 I picked up a Devinci Marshall frame this summer on clearance and built it up as a burly short travel ride. It’s 130mm front, 110mm rear and Just a little over 30lbs. She climbs good and rips down hard for a short travel beast. Does this now mean I’m now down county?

So confused, I thought I was just riding bikes. Wink
  • + 1
 Off-set hype?! Well I shit you not; it works a treat, like many others that have tried I guess!
From 51 mm to 44 mm on my SC HT LT: pure positive experience; and the best of all: a ton of more grip up front: confidence boost de luxe!
On my upcoming bike it'll be 37 mm, with a 64,5 HA .
  • + 2
 Maybe THIS year will be the year we can put an end to slack seat tube angles on every bike short of a dedicated park bike! It's a crazy dated geometry that makes climbing suck. Really pretty rad for wheelies, that's it.
  • + 2
 The final frontier is steep seat angles and shorter seat tubes. We already have 200mm droppers so come on industry get with the program!
  • + 1
 Liking the evolving geometry, HSP and new tires, but hate the electronic everything. The bike industry doesn’t need that. Also not a fan of the inserts. Never had an issue with my tubeless setup. I just see them as a money grab
  • + 1
 I am also a victim of this new trend. My Mondraker Summum has such a steep seat angle that Fox Transfer doesn't even go down unless I press with it down in a weird position, but it hurts my balls. I contacted Fox (USA) regarding the issue and this was their answer:

"Hi Joni,

Unfortunately we are only open for service in Canada or the USA. Get in touch with our distributor in Norway and they will be able to fix your post… before you have long term damage. Haha"
  • + 1
 I fail to see how a steeper seat angle makes it harder to lower the saddle if anything it should be the opposite. I suggest greasing your dropper instead.
  • + 1
 I plan on putting some form of electronic shifting on my "adventure" tandem. In 3 years I have broken one SRAM shifter and we had to hobble around for the rest of the trip with a single speed. On Skye. Not fun...

I have Campagnolo EPS on my road bike and I am very happy with it. Yes, I need to watch the interface box when I turn the unit on, and if the light on the interface blinks yellow I need to charge it before too long.

In a few thousand miles of riding this summer I charged it twice, and I never ran out of power. Big whoop. I picked Campagnolo because I like their controls. I may see if I can adapt the TT shifters to use on the tandem. The gear range will be the problem.

I know I don't like Shimano or SRAM controls. Campagnolo is simple: small lever for smaller gear, big lever for big gear. Hold it down and it keeps moving (and moving fast) Going up or down 4 gears is not an issue. Front derailleur trims automatically. I haven't seen that since shifters left the down tube.
  • + 1
 Pretty sure the Triathlete bike riders have measured power output and already determined that 74-75 degree seat tube angle is ideal for power production, even though they often run steeper just so they can get down in a more aero position. Has something to do with hip angle and muscle leverage. I think about 75-76 degrees is a really ideal spot to be on a mtb. A bit slacker is probably better for power production, but a bit steeper is nice and comfy for the climbs.
  • + 9
 You forget about sag. @SunsPSD
  • + 9
 Triathlete's aren't worried about their front wheel being too light on a steep climb.
  • + 1
 This is kind of true. Changes in position may affect economy more than power, but steeper sta are more effective for mtb because you’re going up steep hills. But less comfortable on the flat
  • + 1
 @IamZOSO: exactly. Triathletes atemt really climbing up steeps over and over, multiple times per ride/week..
  • + 0
 @SunsPSD: Your climbing gradient averages at 1 degree by that logic? 74 seat angle is just fine on level ground but absolutely sucks on the steep uphills. And some triathlon bikes (Cervelo) come to mind that have a 79 effective seat angle, how do you guys explain that?
  • + 10
 @hirvi: both of my XC bikes have ~73* STA and will climb better than than most bikes. A better way to look at is is that long and slack bikes with short chainstays have crappy geometry for climbing and need those big seat angle numbers to compensate for it.
  • + 1
 Steep STA also leaves you fresher for the run, which is another reason why tri bikes are set up that way. But aero positioning is definitely a big factor too. But it’s not really a valid comparison because the goal on a tri bike is basically to avoid any position changes for the entire bike leg.
  • + 1
 @hirvi: You seem to be only considering the seat angle to the ground. Concerning max power output in a cycling position, I'm concerned with seat angle compared to the BB as that's the power quotient.

I barely notice anything below a 15 degree climb as far as body positioning on the bike goes. Are you going to add 15 degrees of eSTA to cope with some gravity on mild climbs, at the complete detriment to power output?

Look I'll keep trying more bikes as they come along, however I just moved from a 73.6 to a 75.5 and it's a small but noticable improvement that I like, but I don't think I'd want much more than that.

Time will tell.
  • + 2
 @clink83: XC bikes climb well because they are light end of story. XC geometry is utter rubbish. Want a good climbing bike geometry then go for long chainstays (440mm and +), long reach, steep seat angle (+76º).
  • + 1
 @clink83: 73 may be good for you but for many of us we end up over the rear axle once the seat is extended to proper climbing position, especially when steep...and especially if your in between sizes(of bikes).
  • + 1
 What the heck is wrong woth those companies. We cycle up in the mountains to get away from electronics. We just love the simplicity and the freedom and the fact that we own the pistons that provide forward movement. So screw the fancy electronics.
  • + 1
 If you use electronics on your bike someone else owns your legs?
  • + 1
 I loved my version 2 Vyron, but hated its reliability. I built up a 2019 Chameleon plus bike and am waiting to hear any news from SRAM on their wireless dropper..... If I don't hear anything by Feb, then I'll just grab another Vyron.
  • + 1
 I kind of assumed that the Vyron couldn’t possibly move as fast as a traditional dropper. How was it?
  • + 1
 @DrPete: For me it was awesome. It is a different style of operation with the 2/10 of a second delay, as well as only tapping the button and not holding it, but once I had 2 rides on it , it became second nature. I will never own a cable actuated dropper again.
  • + 1
 Highpivots are awesome besides the huge anti-rise. Unfortunately 29er wheels, long reach and slack headangles all further increase the anti-rise which kinda kills the single high pivot idea for those kind of trailbikes.
  • + 2
 I LOVE bikes because they are mechanical, require no batteries, are relatively easy to repair and understand. I will never jump on the electronic band wagon!!
  • + 4
 Ten years later bikes will ride you.
  • + 3
 Sorry, what the hell is "downcountry"? I ride all the time and am here daily, but I feel so outta the loop.
  • + 1
 XC bikes with more "progressive" geometry so you can rip on the downhills. IE Santa Cruz Blur etc...
  • + 0
 Something that will die soon after XC bikes get slacker. It seems the term serves XCers who achieved awakening and are no longer weight weenies and don't want to offend their friends who still ride with 120mm stems, Thunderburt tyres and bar ends. Nino schurters Spark is pretty much already a Down Country bike if he just flips his stem up, eventually add 2-3"wider bars. He already uses knobbier tyres on World Cups.
  • + 1
 @coffeepoop42069: Also they have builds that are more for going down then up. Droppers, bigger tires with more tread, shorter stems, wider bars and they’re usually over forked a bit (atleast 10mm more front travel than rear). Basically an “all mountain” build on an “xc” frame with progressive geo.
  • + 0
 @Daledenton: what is then an Enduro build on "am frame"?
  • + 1
 Blame one of the mikes...I think levy?
  • + 3
 @Daledenton @WAKIdesigns @coffeepoop42069

Ah, funny, it seems I'm very much in the "down country" camp and didn't even know it. Didn't this used to be called "trail" as in, i just ride a fricken trail for the fun parts?
  • + 1
 Downcountry is what XC should have been from the beginning instead of modern gravelbikes...
  • + 1
 @SintraFreeride: yes, but wheelbases are still under 1300
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: If you have a 66º head angle, reach over 500mm, stem of 50mm or under then it is ok if your XC bike's wheelbase is just under 1300mm, hehe.
  • + 3
 My 68HT and 71.5SA, non-boost, short wheelbase, is looking like a XC dinosaur now. It was a solid Enduro rig in 2012.
  • + 7
 Dinosaurs are rad.
  • + 5
 I'm waiting for the 100mm travel, 52" wheelbase, 61 deg head angle, 29er to hit the market. It will be called the "downwheelbarrow".
  • + 2
 @jeremiahwas: chickens are dinosaurs and they truly are rad
  • + 1
 @redsled137: Pole bicycles built something similar a while back but with a steeper 66ºHA and 110mm of travel ;p
  • + 0
 the fork offset thing kills me still. So, slacker 29 bikes steer slower, so, we lessen the rake to make them turn... even slower? 51 = Fisher got it right the first time. I'd still like to ride bikes back to back with the only difference being fork rake. I think it matters a lot in how a 29 wheel turns and tracks...
  • + 7
 You are only looking at half the picture, you make them more stable by increasing the trail, then you recover the loss of steering speed by fitting a shorter stem and combine that with a longer top tube to put your handle bars the right distance away from your pedals. This gives you a more stable bike at speed that still turns normally. As a short offset 29er rider I definitely wouldn't go back. The biggest bonus's I feel are stability at speed and a much more natural feeling turn initiation, oh and more front end grip, thats definitely a bonus.
  • + 3
 Don't forget to plug your bike in, your phone in, and your brain before going out for a ride tomorrow!
  • + 2
 It's a boxed derailleur. But Unno marketing is ready to call it a revolutionizing CVT transmission.
How is one able to patent such a thing? What's new there? It's been done several times.
  • + 2
 @fluider: Hi, i'm no patent expert, so.I can't answer that.

What I do know is: It does NOT have a derailleur. It does have a tentioner, but that's fixed in one position. It's the cassette that's slides sideways underneath the chain. That's what makes this unique.
  • + 1
 @delarscuevas: Hi. Yes, it can be seen. They just turned it upside-down, so that it doesn't look like derailurer in a box but in principle, it is derailleur in a box. Instead of guiding pulleys a cassette is derailed. Innovation!
  • + 4
 How about a seatpost that doubles and a shake-weight
  • + 7
 It's called a Reverb and it already exists - if you shake it while holding the bottom part, the squish in the upper part mimicks the ShakeWeight most excellently.
  • + 1
 So, after fatbikes, plus and e-bikes, what can we expect next for market niches pushed to mainstream by the marketing machine?
  • + 1
 If we can make bulletproof vests, we should be able to make a tire with a sidewall that rocks can't slash. Rubber and fabric are not the materials for the job...
  • + 10
 No problem -they would just weigh 2 kilos each and cost $200.
  • + 2
 Bullet proof vests are most certainly not knife proof.
  • + 3
 MY2020* single crown forks get Boost 20x110?

*available from mid 2019
  • + 2
 ....an electronic Reverb. I am sure that will work like it is supposed to and be reliable.
  • + 1
 Evolving geometry yes but most brands are still taking their sweet time getting up to date! @mikekazimer Pole's new Stamina has a 80º seat angle ;-)
  • + 4
 Casing jumps, not tires.
  • + 0
 I guess the *average* bike is still getting longer/lower/slacker, but I feel like the boundary has already been reached--nobody seems to be pushing it further than the most extreme bikes already out there. Right?
  • + 1
 Nobody is ever pushing it past the most extreme of anything, hence why it is at the extreme end of whatever spectrum. That said, extreme a decade ago is mild now, so don’t be surprised. Maybe not ht angle, but something will be crazy. I for one look forward to the birth of the square wheel!
  • + 1
 The "average" bike keeps getting longer and slacker but not lower (that stopped a while back) because a) most brands are too chicken to make big changes from one year to the next b) mountainbikers are still a pretty conservative bunch and don't take big changes well and c) most bike brands are no where near the limits of geometry. Sure Pole bicycles, Nicolai and Chris Porter have figured it out but they are the exceptions. Most people think those bikes are too extreme but they have actually tested beyond that geometry and then dialed it back! Chris Porter mentioned recently that the new 2019 Specialized Stumpjumper EVO's geometry is pretty close to his Nicolai Geometron bike from 2013!!!
geometronbikes.co.uk/deviant-geometry-goes-mainstream
  • + 1
 High single pivot won't take over IMO. Virtual high pivot could. I don't see trail bikes sacrificing efficiency for higher single pivot.
  • + 3
 Seriously no talk of mixed wheel sized bikes?!!! 79er baby!
  • + 1
 So are we going to see transition from 27.5 to 29 inch wheels next year? Is 27.5 going to die soon?
  • + 1
 DH bikes are always the last to embrace progress and with more and more big wheeled DH bikes coming out I predict all mtbs will be 622mm in 5 years time. 650b will be for XS frames and bigger kids bikes only.
  • + 0
 Really looking forward to a "downcountry" live valve bike. I was disappointed when it turned out the Scott Spark wasn't getting it this year.
  • + 1
 No thank you electronics. I spend enough time as it is servicing, fixing, and replacing stuff on my bike.
  • + 1
 All the 2019 bikes are already out... besides YT. So are we talking about 2020 trends???
  • + 2
 2019 will be the year of the e-bike. Have fun local trail associations!
  • + 1
 I can't even be arsed to change batteries on my lights.
  • + 1
 in 2019 I'm looking forward to riding more
  • + 1
 More high pivot enduro bike options PLEASE
  • - 1
 Why? Genuinely interested.
  • + 0
 @jclnv: I downvote you for beeing a shill #awake
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Not a chance! I'm honestly keen to know what people want from a high pivot/idler bike. BTW I think the above bike is rad.
  • + 1
 and please some nice good looking hard tails please
  • + 1
 Electronics on mountain bikes is bullshit!
  • + 1
 What? No antilock brakes?
  • + 7
 Avid Mechanical Discs locked up that market a while back.
  • + 1
 I just had a flash, Norco Range with a high-pivot design
  • + 2
 I think we've all had that flash
  • + 1
 I am on a fully rigid hardtail hahaha!
  • + 1
 Yup. Mine had a 100mm dropper and that bike was fun!
  • + 0
 this is just shits and giggles
  • + 0
 I am still waiting for my hoseless brakes, now thats innovation!
  • + 1
 bleeding brakes with shimano xts is done like every 6 months
repairing damaged hoses - never ?
what needs to be innovated?
  • + 2
 @devinkalt: I think you meant to say every 6 days? Meh, just pump them as your riding.
  • + 0
 #Iamdowncountry
  • - 2
 Tire inserts are a JOKE.
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