Trickstuff Direttissima Brakes - Review

Feb 24, 2017
by Paul Aston  
Trickstuff Direttissima Review


Trickstuff have been machining overly sexy, intricate and geeky mountain bike parts in Freiburg, Germany since 2003. Their first product was a humble brake pad, and they have added innovative and useful metalwork to their range ever since. The Direttissima is the king of their range, boasting massive stopping power, low weight and proudly marked with a 'Made in Germany' etching. Trickstuff even describes the Direttissima as"fiercely expensive" which I cannot argue against at €375 each.


Trickstuff Direttissima Review
Trickstuff Direttissima Details• Intended use: downhill, enduro, slowing down quickly
• 4-piston caliper
• Mineral oil
• Goodrich or standard hose options
• Average Power [Nm]: >150
• Weight: Front brake 277g / Daechle 203mm rotor 192g (actual)
• Pick your own colour options
• Made in Germany
• Price: €375 each / $396 USD (approx)
www.trickstuff.de


Trickstuff Direttissima Review


Construction
The Direttissima is machined in the Trickstuff house in Freiburg, Germany. The part-time environmentalist in me likes the buy local theme, joining Hope and Formula as the few remaining brake manufacturers still producing in Europe.


Trickstuff Direttissima Review
Trickstuff Direttissima Review


An 11mm-wide, band clamp connects the lever to the handlebar. There is an extra support, which braces the lever again the bar, decreasing flex, but also widening the total width of the lever clamp 24mm. This width could cause some problems for riders needing the levers close to the grip. It might also make it hard to find space for other controls. Trickstuff, however, has a range of mounts to combine the brake clamps with shifter or dropper post levers.

The lever has four cartridge bearings on each side for super smooth action and durability. There is lever reach adjustment from "I like my lever hitting the grip before it works," all the way to "I have giant hands and want the lever miles away from me," via a 2mm hex key. There is no bite point adjuster or tool free option.

The main lever reservoir capacity is 3ml of mineral oil, Trickstuff boasts that this is the largest on the market and will give the same power even when the brake pads are worn and the pistons are extended further towards the rotor.


Trickstuff Direttissima Review
Trickstuff Direttissima Review


The caliper is a two-piece, CNC-machined, alloy unit. There are four Teflon coated pistons to lower friction and avoid lazy piston retraction.


Trickstuff Direttissima Review
Trickstuff Direttissima Review


There are nine anodized colors to choose from, and customers can pick their shades of the lever, lever body, top cap, bolts, and caliper to suit all of their wildest `90's ano dreams.


Rotors, Pads, and Housing
The Daechle discs have a trick stuffed up their sleeve that makes slotting wheels in a breeze – the outer edge of the rotor is beveled on each side at 60º, so the rotors won't catch on the brake pads when installing the wheel. Does this turn the rotor into a sharpened cutting blade? No, there is still a flat edge on the outer surface of the rotor, this gives it a rounded feel to the touch, and is less sharp than two 90º edges.

Discs are available in 140, 160, 180, 200 and 203mm sizes, in a six-bolt pattern. A few other weird shapes and sizes for Rolhoff'ers and Coda hub riders are available.


Trickstuff Direttissima Review
The Daechle discs are beveled to simplify wheel installation.
Trickstuff Direttissima Review
Trickstuff's NG+ brake pads share the same shape as Shimano, to make finding replacements simple.


Trickstuff's NG+ brake pads also share the same chamfer as the rotors. The plus sign of the NG+ relates to the pads which are thicker than most brands at 2.3mm, compared to 1.5mm-2mm on many brands (SRAM Guide pads are 2mm for reference). It may not sound like a big deal, but Trickstuff claims that difference can provide you with 15% to 50% more pad life than you currently enjoy (depending on which brand of brake you currently employ). The pads handily share the same shape as Shimano XTR-XT-SLX brake pads, so finding replacements should be easy wherever you are in the world.


Trickstuff Direttissima Review


The Direttissima lever and caliper are connected via a standard kevlar hose, though I opted for the legendary Goodridge hose upgrade. Goodridge hoses are renowned as the strongest on the market; they're basically unbreakable, uncrushable and provide a more solid feeling since there is almost no expansion of the hose under brake pressure.


Bleeding
The brakes arrived pre-bled with the hoses cut to the consumer-requested length, so installation was a breeze. After a few months, I decided to change to internal cable routing to tidy up my frame, which required bleeding. Trickstuff provides an in-depth bleeding manual on their site, with two options: the 'Quick and Clean' method and the 'Slow and Dirty.' The first method should be used for emergency use and the second for a 'perfect bleed.' Cornelius Kapfinger, from Trickstuff, suggested that most bleeding manuals and methods are only 90% accurate, where the Trickstuff method, although seemingly complicated, will achieve 100% accuracy and provide many years of trouble-free braking.

I went for the Slow and Dirty method. Slightly complicated by the number of steps, the repetitious failsafe method, the need for two syringes with different size threads (one M4 and one M5) and only having two hands. With the help of a friend and some spare minutes, we managed to bleed the brake with success first time.

I suggest adding the €29 Heinzelmann bleed kit made specifically for this brake. I made my own from various other syringes, but adding another few euros to the shopping cart won't hurt. You might even manage to get to four figures just for your braking setup.


On the Trail
The Direttissima's have an unparalleled, lightweight lever throw before the brake pads contact the rotor. There is no noticeable pressure or friction to overcome, giving a weightless feel. The lever's pivot placement provides a great ergonomic angle, not bending my index finger out of line. The contact area at the fingertip is larger than that on most levers. It's also flat and smooth, which provides a sensitive feel.

And to the power. The power is huge. I think they generate more power than Shimano's mighty Saint, and are getting close to Magura's superb MT7. But, power is nothing without control, thankfully the modulation of the Direttissima is light, followed by superbly progressive. The angle of the piston in the lever changes throughout the stroke, giving a true progressive curve and increasing power with more finger power.

The bite point is solid, but not grabby, and builds through the stroke. Cro-magnon style fist-clenchers may have an issue feathering the power, but for the masses, controlling this brake should be safe, easy and intuitive.


Trickstuff Direttissima Review


Issues
The original pair of Direttisma's I received last June did spring an oil leak at the top cap. Trickstuff said that this brake was an earlier model that didn't use thread lock on the top cap screws, which led to it coming loose. I lost some oil, and in the process of re-tightening, the seal got damaged. I returned the brakes, and they were upgraded to the thread locked screws and a new version of the seal – the Direttissimas were trouble free afterward. All production brakes have since been upgraded.

I also broke a 180mm Daechle disc; luckily I spotted this before anything untoward happened. Trickstuff says they did have some problems with earlier Daechle discs when riders performed trials-like maneuvers and the rotors were stressed in a rearwards direction. These rotors have all been replaced by a new version with improved strength.

Tiny hex bolts. The 2.5mm bolt for the lever clamp is too small, and the brakes wouldn't tighten enough for a solid fix on the handlebar without risk of rounding off the bolt (this is more of a problem with carbon bars). In the end, I could the tighten the bolt enough to make the levers stay put during riding, but it was still possible to move them easily by hand. I'm sure there are reasons for tiny bolts, like stopping people overtightening things, saving weight and letting the levers move in the event of a crash, but fiddly is frustrating. I had a similar gripe with the Trickstuff Deckele 'star nut.' In total, the brakes need 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3 and 5mm hex wrenches, plus a Torx T10 and T27, then an 8mm wrench – of course, this is what's required for a full, nut-and-bolt rebuild of the brake and not the general adjustment, but I like simplicity.



Pinkbike’s Take:
bigquotesThe Trickstuff Direttissima's have really set a standard of performance and power in the braking world. The price and lack of tool-free adjustment puts them out of line of the general consumer, but racers and serious riders will love the feel and power, as will anyone who purely wants to add a touch of class to their machine. - Paul Aston



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162 Comments

  • + 217
 "Dentist-Only Model"
  • + 13
 Ok that's funny.
  • + 8
 Can you explain the joke? I didn't quite get it... (I'm a dentist so I feel like I should, but really, I don't).
  • + 38
 @Aprilfisheye: Dentists make a fair bit of money so they can afford buying really expensive stuff. At least that's the joke.
  • + 53
 @Aprilfisheye: Because 'Dentists' ride $10,000 Carbon Enduro* bikes flossing maxed-out bling on the intermediate trails.

*Dental Hygienists ride Capra$.
  • + 35
 Floss your cassette, brush your chain, douse your brakes with a hefty amount of Crest, only service your fork with Colgate, Oral-B is my main sponsor.
  • + 8
 Dentists know... An electric toothbrush makes cleaning the chain so much quicker. When there is a rotten link in there somewhere, just drill it and eventually pull it out. If they hit a log with their chainring and bend it, they just use a brace to get it back in line. Dentists must love their chainrings I guess. It is a conspiracy that keeps the belt drive from breaking through. Hey, they're the ones keeping the gearbox down. They don't like gearboxes, they like conventional drivetrains. Because these have more teeth. Ehm... RC is a dentist?

That said, the only bicycle specific floss I ever got was from Planet X. So Planet X and On One must be the brand of dentists I guess.
  • + 67
 4 out of 5 dentist recommend these brakes over other brands on the market.
  • + 1
 In Shimano Saint, i trust .
  • + 16
 Dentists only use 32 tooth rings.
  • + 3
 @LucWicklund:
So much money they can even shoot the lion king in Africa.
  • + 1
 @LucWicklund: said dentist isn't doing trial maneuvers and torquing the rotor backward. Come to think of it I'm not either.... : ( Also I'd like to see the damage it did. Taco'd rotor Would be cray cray##etc
  • + 5
 Awhile ago I contacted a guy on Craigslist about a 2015 Santa Cruz Nomad CC - X2 shock, ENVE wheels/cockpit, full XTR - ridden three times and he was a dentists.
  • + 3
 @iamamodel: Those with less wisdom use 28 teeth
  • + 74
 I think that the broken disc and tiny screws that prevent a good tight fit on the handlebar would have warranted a more critical review, no?
  • + 91
 @headmechanix: totally agree.

"These are awesome brakes made in Germany that retail for $800 USD a set. Unfortunately the top cap leaked oil, the screws are too small, the levers rotate on the bars all the time and the rotors will break if you put a backwards load on them"

I'll stick with Shimano.
  • + 31
 I'm pretty sure he explained that both issues were addressed.
  • + 13
 Sorry, he explained the rotor, not the clamp.
  • - 7
flag RedRedRe (Feb 24, 2017 at 9:09) (Below Threshold)
 It seems that many of the German Engineering (TM) companies comes from people without a racing background.
They may look good on paper and pictures, no so much in real life.
  • + 32
 @redcorn: why were they there in the first place? they were seemingly known issues that weren't rectified before the product went out. this isn't a mass-produced product where that should be acceptable. these are made to order and should not be sent out with known issues.

"oh yeah, we know the bolts need lock tight and we've addressed that...just not on yours. and, oh yeah, the rotors break and we've addressed that...just not on yours"

how many "just not on yours" end up leaving the factory?
  • + 7
 @saturnine: I suspect they were issues that were found after having a few hundred test riders put them through their paces. I don't doubt that they did a good deal of their own testing before putting them in production, but there's only so much of that you can do with a limited number of protos, in a relatively short development cycle before having to get them to market and actually start (hopefully) making money. That said, they have fixed 2 of the 3 issues, with the 3rd one being pretty serious. My money still goes to Shimano.
  • + 18
 I'm somewhat sick of the "early model" excuse as well, if there selling the product it deserve a critical review.
  • + 8
 @Gregorysmithj1: easy to deal with if you are a mass producer like Shimano or SRAM, but remember it takes longer for smaller manufacturers to deal with issues like this. I'm not excusing the flaws, but pointing out that when you have small, slow production runs it takes time to re-design, re-engineer and change things out as flaws become noticed.
  • + 14
 Ha. Pinkbike doesn't want to be critical. They want more high fives from everybody for giving out good reviews.
Have you met anybody in the bike business that wants to be critical?
  • + 5
 Once again Pinkbike won't say good or bad either because advertising issues or reviewers getting free stuff.
  • + 1
 How much can two Ti bolts cost? Problem solved with bling. Smile
  • + 12
 @enrico650: No, I respect that PB are treading lightly in this review. If they slated the brake, no doubt it would put this small company out of business. If you are capable of reading, and presented with the facts, you shouldn't really need PB to help you draw a conclusion.

Any small manufacturer won't out-Shimano Shimano, but they have other qualities that some may value, also as highlighted in the review.
  • + 5
 @Mojo348: If there not going to review they should just label it as press release, manufacturers who submit items for review should know a risk of a bad review and stand behind it.
  • + 2
 @Mojo348: Then they shouldn't have provided a set for review.
Can't hang out with the big dogs
  • + 9
 @enrico650 @Gregorysmithj1 : Go read the review on Enduro MTB. They had a good set, with amazing results.

Bad sets happen, even to the big players; it wasn't long ago that Yeti chainstays were snapping in tests, Reverbs are STILL pieces of garbage, Cane Creek inlines regularly foul up, the Kronolog almost sank CrankBros and Evil couldn't seem to put a bike together that would stay together.
  • - 1
 @ratedgg13: Then probably you should stay with Enduro mtb.
The problem here is the Big claims and the Big price.
For those reasons they needed more testing and time. We all know what happened to Avid
  • + 4
 @enrico650: summary of both reviews: big claims and big performance. Pinkbike found some technical issues, but ones that are clearly being addressed. I don't see why that's such a huge problem for you.

And yeah, sram got their shit together, had avid start fresh and now builds some of the best and most popular brakes on the market. What's your point?
  • + 5
 @saturnine: I'm just going out in a limb here, but it seems like these may have been a pre-production set that he reviewed.

Unless we were to ask them directly we won't know if any production models even left their factory before they fixed these two issues.

I'm curious if any brake manufacturer actually tests a rearward braking force on their rotors, besides maybe Echo, Hope and Magura since they make trials specific brakes. Maybe they don't have a trials nerd (I ride trials, yes I'm a bit of a nerd) working for them who would have thought of testing that. In a world where we as riders are weighing our purchases (literally) by how how many grams something weighs, maybe they were just trying to shave a few grams.

And as far as the top cap bolts go, maybe they assumed that the elasticity in the seal would act as a dampener and that the bolts wouldn't require loctite, I had a set if Hope M4s and they didn't have loctite on the top cap threads. Maybe when this guy noticed it starting to leak he over torqued the bolts. How else would he have damaged the seal? Torque much?

Maybe we should be happy that someone is trying to make a sweet new brake and be happy with the fact that they are addressing the issues instead of not fixing anything for years on end and just warranting every other set of brakes like sram did. I know someone who started with sram's something-5 brake and was warrantied all the way up their line to the X0 because all of their brakes sucked. He then sold the X0s and bought something else.

Hope brakes for life. (But interested in what these guys are doing.)
  • - 1
 @PullMyBrakeLever: But But you can have any colour you want, they look pretty standing still because they will be with the oil leaked out, power is nothing without oil !!!!!!!!!!!!
  • + 41
 The $400 per end stopped me faster than any brake ever will. I will stick with my MT5s which work great when you are a clyde.
  • + 7
 I second on the MT5. I'm no Clydesdale, but I was looking for powerful and (pretty) light disc brakes and the new 4-pistons Maguras MT5 and MT7 got me covered. The MT5 sell for cheap in Germany and as far as I'm concerned, they offer everything you need for much less than the above. Of course, they're not as bling, but for ⅓ of the price, I can live with that.
  • + 3
 @cool3: half the price of one end... for 180 eur you get a complete MT5 set..
  • + 5
 Will stick with my Saints. They do the job nicely.
  • + 1
 @Lagr1980: Even better! Smile
  • + 38
 Get your wallets out panty sniffers
  • + 14
 Drop your panties Sir William, I cannot wait until lunch time
  • + 14
 @WAKIdesigns:

My nipples explode with delight!
  • + 21
 this thread got kinkier than a poorly cared for brake hose.
  • + 1
 @adrennan: Better upgrade to that legendary Goodridge hose.
  • + 29
 Bevelling of the rotor is a nice touch.
  • - 17
flag AviMoore (Feb 24, 2017 at 8:21) (Below Threshold)
 for more finger slicing capabilities
  • + 3
 I really dig that.
  • + 1
 Dosent match anything. Im out.
  • + 2
 That's pretty much the only thing I liked about these
  • + 19
 Its a nice to hear that something that is more expensive than the competition actually works better - There are too many products that retail for big numbers because of brand image. If I could afford some I would buy some, I have a thing for powerfull brakes nowdays as I am fatter and slower and tend to be heavy on them - for now my Hope's will have to do, which are brilliant to be fair.
  • + 20
 Never heard anyone say "My Hopes will have to do."

Normally hear "f*ck these [Insert brake Brand]. I'm gonna fit my Hopes!"
  • + 3
 @haroman666: Haha - thats why I fitted the Hopes in the first place, I couldnt stand how my Saint's bite point would be all over the place - I have warped a few non-hope discs though on uplift DH runs as I am a complete hack on the brakes (Brakes are so much more important to slow people like me than the fast guys who dont drag the crap out of them)
  • + 3
 That's weird, because I went from Hope V2 to Saint for exactly the same reason. My hopes were not even close to the stopping power of a saint no matter how many times you rebuilt them. Now I am on a MT7 and I don't think I would ever go back, just because I like the better modulation. But as Freiburg local I would love to ride the diretissima. The price however keeps me from even considering it.
  • + 12
 Not as powerful as the Magura and about as powerful as Saint?

I want to know why these reviewers got a different result than Enduro-MTB's dyno tests.

enduro-mtb.com/en/best-mtb-disc-brake-can-buy/2
  • + 8
 I didn't feel they had more power than the MT7 (Enduro-mtb tested the MT5). But the differences could be in power delivery as your braking finger won't have perfectly even power through the lever stroke as a machine would. So finger strength at different points could be different with different brakes in different positions.

I also spoke to another brake manufacturer with no connection to any of the brands mentioned. They suggested with their testing process the Magura was more powerful than the Trickstuff brake.
  • + 8
 @paulaston: Interesting. Here's a thought for Pinkbike to consider. It is possible, by measuring caliper and reservoir piston stroke and diameter, to straight up calculate the mechanical advantage of a brake. Maybe instead of using different test methodologies, one could simply measure these quantities and calculate.

I say this making an assumption that these braking systems are simple. It is still possible, with the help of a student of physics, to calculate the mechanical advantage in more complicated systems.

NASA wrote up a guide to these sorts of calculations back in 1996. Worth a gander.

www.grc.nasa.gov/www/k-12/WindTunnel/Activities/Pascals_principle.html
  • + 5
 Note that the Trickstuff brakes were also the only brake in that shoot out that had Goodridge lines installed. I'd be curious to see how they'd compare with a stock, non-upgraded line. There's no doubt in my mind tha Goodridge lines add to a brake's pucker power.
  • + 5
 @WaterBear: there are a couple of other parameters you have to consider there - lever geometry being one of them (and where your finger sits does vary a bit from brake to brake, but you could get a fairly good idea from that), which would allow you to calculate outright clamp force. However to calculate actual braking force, you also need to know pad/rotor coefficient of friction, and centre of friction for idealised cold braking.

The problem is that that still only shows you the maximum, ideal-case braking force. In my personal experience as a pretty heavy rider who lives somewhere that is generally steep, the biggest problem my brakes face is dealing with heat - once you cook the pads, they glaze over and never have the same amount of bite again. The result is that managing heat becomes as important as outright clamping force, because that is what keeps your coefficient of friction up high, and right now Shimano are unquestionably doing a better job of this than anybody else in the bike market.

@ExxonJuan hose stiffness affects the feel of the brake (as in, rider's perception) but actually doesn't have any real effect on the braking power on offer as a function of how hard you're pulling the lever - it just means you have to pull the lever further before you're pulling it as hard. It's a bit counterintuitive, but it's kind of like standing on scales whilst holding a spring in your hand, vs standing on the spring on the scales - obviously the scales will read the same thing even though standing on the spring means you compress it a certain distance before it builds up that same force.
  • + 1
 @VorsprungSuspension: Mechanical advantage of a particular lever is easy to account for once we know where the rider's finger is going to be, as you say. Once you calculate both numbers, multiply them and be done.

It is enlightening to hear about the heat management problem. I am only suggesting that we could be more scientific about this process. If one brake has a mechanical advantage 1.5 times higher than another, that puts to rest the question of comparative force amplification, although practical power - power by the definition of physics - is another question because of considerations you've raised.

My only point here is that it wouldn't take superhuman effort to make more accurate - and independently repeatable - descriptions of these products, as a tester. What good is it to me as a consumer to have 5 reviews whose conclusions are all more or less random re-orderings of each other?
  • + 14
 Hope for €250 give a V4 one piece caliper......
  • + 9
 That logo looks like it belongs to some kind of family fun center. Then again I am very shallow so... The product, however, is gorgeous, and as someone who has done work with engineers in Freiburg, the culture of quality is awesome. i would trust this product just based off of my regional experience.
  • + 8
 Hmm... no single-piece forged caliper, no easy peezy flip-flop automotive style reservoir & bleeding with two hands, no super strong bar clamp, no tool-less reach & bite adjustment, no floating rotors much less vented for the big boys, all for about a 40% premium.

Ano options, braided hose availability? Check.

Call me a fool but I will stay with Hope's power, modulation, build quality, and proven reliability for life regardless of what they want to charge me. They had me once I had to bleed (once, years ago, after crash damage to the hose) and the thorough lack of needed maintenance. The incredible performance is unmatched if you are talking feel and power together. Wish they made brakes for motorcycles & autos, they'd have me all around.
  • + 10
 I would expect nothing less than awesomeness from a company who employs a man named Cornelius Kapfinger.
  • + 7
 So, not as powerful as the Magura, 'maybe' more powerful than Saint, a pretty ugly lever/reservoir combo with no tool free adjustment . . . .

For just $800? Fantastic stuff.

I love fancy stuff as much as the next guy, but logically there is little reason for these to exist unless they are the best in all areas.
  • + 11
 those would brake the bank
  • + 9
 So... They broke a few times, weren't overly reliable, cost a ton of money, and don't perform any better than Saint brakes... Yup, they sound awesome.
  • + 12
 One word:
SAINTS
  • + 11
 how to fix trick stuff brake. Step 1 Put them in the Buysell category Step 2 Buy 2 sets of saints for the same price.
  • - 4
flag chrisclifford (Feb 24, 2017 at 9:09) (Below Threshold)
 @bikeordie2772: you could buy two sets of Saints for the price
  • + 9
 @chrisclifford: that's what I said
  • + 6
 @bikeordie2772: yes, you could buy two sets of Saints for the price
  • + 2
 @Sontator: He just said that's what he said.
  • + 1
 @vinay: what? Who are you?
  • + 1
 @Sontator: That's what she said!
  • + 9
 There's a saying, something like "If a headline for an article ever asks a question, the answer is always no."
  • + 5
 I know I sound like one of the older riders on this site with this comment, maybe it’s because I now have toddlers, but ALL rotors should be rounded (if possible) on all edges inside and out. Just google brake disc, rotor, fingers, slice, and worst of all, nephew loses finger when filling around with bike’. I’m sure there’s extra cost involved but I’d gladly pay it.
  • + 7
 I'm with you on adding safety features (because why not?) but as I understand it most people lose fingers by sticking them into the rotor while it's spinning. There's really nothing you can do to any edge of the rotor to prevent that from slicing a finger off.
  • + 1
 @WaterBear: I read somewhere rotors are ‘blanchard cut’, not sure if that’s true or what it means exactly but we all know they’re crazy sharp. I’m thinking fingers would stand a much better chance if the edges weren’t super sharp. Maybe a broken or crushed finger but that super sharp edge has to count for the slicing quite a bit. You’d stand a better chance anyway.
  • + 3
 @jeremiahwas: I think it's blanchard ground. Makes the surfaces flat and parallel at the cost of razor sharp edges that cost too many cents to round off. (Bean counters. Feh.)
  • + 7
 "Intended use: Slowing down quickly."
Classic! I like companies that have a sense of humour. They know they are expensive and they roll with it!
  • + 4
 Do anyone else coat their pistons in PTFE/teflon, it burns at 200-250°C which is around the boiling point of brake fluid and the piston is always going to be hotter as it has to transfer the heat from the hotter pads to boil the fluid.
  • + 2
 Most brands use ceramics pistons as ceramic is self lubricating and more heat resistant
  • + 1
 These use mineral oil, whose boiling pt is even lower than brake fluid too ...right?
  • + 5
 Beautiful, but who buys this stuff?

I mean really?

I know quite a few guys with 10K+ bikes and none of them run exotic brakes, forks or suspension that's seems incredibly cool and marketed to the "dentist" crowd.
  • + 3
 Show up on any big event in Germany or France,and you will be amazed. People like it custom over here.
  • + 2
 People like me that wait until they are 70% off on blowout. Sounds like the Kitbow shots I just bought. Really nice, but would never spend $240 for them. While I am not a "Dentist", I do ok as an attorney, but if I paid full price, I couldn't support the 13 yo downhill habit.
  • + 8
 No bite point adjust an two piece caliper at that price?
  • + 1
 Being one piece doesnt seem to hold performance back - may help with servicing in the long run and as the price is so high you will want to keep them working for a long time!
  • + 0
 Since when a one piece caliper is a good thing in practical terms? It does look good on a list of features though for folks whose life choices that cannot be criticized led them to have little understanding of that particular issue.
  • + 3
 Stiffer, lighter caliper. ala hope, formula an other brakes in this price range
  • + 8
 Nearly was tricked into buying this stuff
  • + 7
 Only $400 each? What a deal!
  • + 3
 "
The part-time environmentalist in me likes the buy local theme, joining Hope and Formula as the few remaining brake manufacturers still producing in Europe.
"
A few years ago all Magura stuff was made in Bad Urach (Germany). Currently a lot of their production moved to Asia but the top end brakes MT7 and MT8 are still being produced in Bad Urach. Then again North American west coast environmentalists are probably better off with something made in east Asia than in mid/west Europe Wink .
  • + 7
 $800 brakes don't have access to the "pre-production model" excuse.
  • + 2
 Good evening bike friends, this is Trickstuff speaking:

The described problem with our clamp, which is said not to clamp, is no big problem. It only occurs on handle bars which do not feature the standard diameter of 22.2mm. Our clamp works great on handle bars from 22.1 up to 22.3mm. As you know, handle bars should have 22.2mm.

If the bar is thinner, you can easily help yourself by adding a thin metal sheet (coke can).

The clamp bolt is - by far! - strong enough to hold the BMC in place, don't worry about that!

We designed the clamp this way because it acts as predetermined breaking point and thus protects the BMC from breaking in case of an accident. Even if the clamp breaks completely the BMC can be fixed to the handle bar by using a simple zip tie which may be crucial if you are far away from civilization.

We experienced this clamping problem only a few times, mainly on low quality carbon bars. But, as I said, the problem is easy to fix.

Greets, Klaus Liedler, CEO, Trickstuff
  • + 2
 No bite point adjust is a bit disappointing for sucha premium product. Don't care about the tooled reach though. Tool free reach adjust is such a nonsense feature. Except on a rental bike maybe. I never adjust the reach on my brakes except when first mounting them. Trickstuff obviously needs to increase their level of quality assurance if they want to warrant the price.
  • + 2
 " I opted for the legendary Goodridge hose upgrade. Goodridge hoses are renowned as the strongest on the market;"
And to think that my Hope V4's came with the very same hoses, yet I haven't had any rotors come apart on me, nor had any leaks due early production "errors", and I only paid 1/2 of what these cost, thus I'm not left walking bowlegged or farting blood indefinitely.
WIN-WIN!
  • + 4
 My Hope V2s leaked and faded with goodridge hoses. And are you really comparing the hope rotors that were on the market for like 10 years with those pre production rotors that only existed for a couple of months tops? It's like a 6 year old kid saying to a toddler 'dude, I bet I can run faster than You'. Also the clicking noise of hopes floating rotors is unbearably annoying as soon as they are warmed up.
  • + 3
 I usually err on the side of mocking high priced bike stuff, but those look pretty cool. Not that I'd spend that kind of coin on brakes when you can get like 6-8 sets of SLX brakes for the same price, but hey.
  • + 2
 How does the modulation compare to Guide RSCs? XTs?

I've always valued modulation over raw stopping power, I run Guides, but am curious how these compare in both stopping power and modulation to Guides.
  • + 1
 had opportunity to try them ( parking lot test only though)
felt decent but not worth the price at all. modulation seemed nice , but not overly better compared to my xt sets. i would say somewhere inbetween xt a and hope e4 in terms of modulation.
  • + 4
 Even the most basic Shimano brakes feel powerful on a parking lot test.
  • + 3
 @passwordpinkbike: because the power of deore brakes should suffice for 99% of riders; they are powerful
  • + 4
 I can't believe it took brake manufacturers this long to add bevels to the outer edges of discs. I hope others follow suit.
  • + 2
 Pistons getting 'lazy' Seema to be the main sticking point for even the best brakes. How hard would it be to use some sort of easily replaceable elastic film that shields the Pistons from contamination?
  • + 9
 Except these things get really hot, so that probably rules that out. Probably should have had another cup of coffee and thought it through a bit more.
  • + 1
 @g-42: so maybe some titanium chain mail draped over your pistons.
  • + 3
 I have never really understood the toolless reach adjust. I guess if you feel like using a different hand for the day it could be useful.
  • + 1
 I don't get the hype for Shimano xt brakes. . They feel like crap. Saints work but are either on or off.. codes feel good but require constant bleeding.. but magura mt7's.. baller brakes. These sounds fantastic other than some minor gripes which can easily be remedied. You have to remember that other brake companies have had a long time to fix minor issues that pop up along the way. These guys have come out with something amazing. . With the next model being perfect. . Yes they cost money but so does quality and ultra tight tolerances.
  • + 1
 I like the wear on the surface of the rotor where the pad doesn't touch that corresponds with the silver spot on the caliper that should still be orange.
Inconsistent piston travel?
Too narrow a rotor slot?
Don't know how to set up brakes?
Or you bent the rotor?
  • + 4
 So between these and the Magura MT7 DANNY MACASKILL I can blow my annual bike maintenance budget on brakes alone.
  • + 2
 Get the regular MT7 or the MT5 (same thing, just a little more heavy and not as flashy) and save $$$.
  • + 6
 Considering the great reviews they get, Magura could go back to metal master cylinders because there is no way I would pay this much money for something that looks like the sprayer from the top of a bottle of a window cleaner.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Magura doesn't do the casting and forging in house (at least not a couple of years ago) but injection moulding with (mid length fibres) is their expertise. So it just makes more sense for them to do that wherever possible.
  • + 1
 "they used tiny screws to save weight"..are you kidding me? . i also lost count of how many differnt size head scews these use. These are a great example of "exotic", and to each their own, but there is nothing in this review that would make me wish for these brakes. Shimano, in my opinion, already have the bases covered. Simpicity, durability, power, price, easy maintence, reliability..I mean, Deores get the job done let alone slx, xt, xtr, zee, and saint... i guess if you just have to have $800 worth of exotic....
  • + 1
 How much power do you need? At 175 lbs, I can lock either wheel at any time with pretty much any properly-bled brake set over $50. Fade resistance is more about rotor type and size than fluid volume. What am I missing?
  • + 3
 Dear PB, Can you please stop reviewing ridiculously expensive equipment all the time. Regards, Theaveragerider
  • + 8
 How is this not heavily upvoted? You actually should do Tests with cheap vs expensive and take a close look if the more in money matches the more in performance?
  • + 2
 I own such a break. I do not have any issues with the clamp/rotors/lekage....
He probably tested a Monday model..

This thing is f*"%ing nice!! Its worth every single cent!
  • + 0
 "Brake", "leakage".
  • + 9
 @stumpymidget: He hails neither from king nor colony. Give him a break. ... Wink
  • + 3
 @stumpymidget: Thank you :-*
  • + 1
 @WaterBear: "Queen". ????
  • + 3
 @stumpymidget: My apologies. I was going too far back in the day.
  • + 8
 You are from Switzerland after all,so this must still be a budget brake for you.
  • + 3
 @Muckal: yeah your right, we are all millionaires.. :-) but I rather invest my money in a good brake (thank you again @stumpymidget ) then in, for instance, carbon rims
  • + 2
 cool and super bling, but not as bling and proven as a hope M4... why someone wouldn't opt for a hope brake with this kinda money is beyond me.
  • + 1
 Solid review but with the price tag and issues. You would think the would work these out before selling them. Good effort, but they need some work. I'll stick with my flawless Hopes for now.
  • + 3
 Any reason to choose them over saint/guide/hope?
  • + 3
 Several issues and such a high price. All I can say is HOPE.
  • + 3
 If I can recommend a business, it's bike parts.
  • + 2
 Sorry for under £500 I can have hope v4's with vented disks. That's more bling than most can handle..
  • + 3
 With that price, I want abs and traction control.
  • + 4
 the price...
  • + 1
 I'm a buyer! I notice expensive stuff makes going out for a ride even more exciting. It's a nice sense of pride. These look to be great!
  • + 3
 I was HOPEful on the price, but na
  • + 2
 Welcome back to the 90's, next thing you know they'll be releasing matching bar ends.
  • + 3
 Levers are too long
  • + 9
 for what, putting in your bum bum?
  • + 1
 @Racer951: you might be into a long one in yours but I'm not
  • - 6
flag justanotherusername (Feb 24, 2017 at 9:22) (Below Threshold)
 @andnyleswillriot: Well its good that you admit it at least!
  • + 1
 Nice train_style brakes. But what about spare parts? Service kits? Or it will be just a one-season buy?
  • + 3
 Next
  • + 2
 The Daechle discs are beveled to simplify AMPUTATION Blank Stare
  • + 1
 Lynyrd Skynyrd - Freiburg.mp3
  • + 1
 One brake for the price of 2 !!
  • + 1
 Looks like they share a brake pad pattern with Saint/Zee, not ,XTR/XT/SLX.
  • + 1
 Ah this will go nicely with my Ohlins! Wake up aiman wake up! #daydreaming
  • + 1
 I'll stick to my Shimano Saint's. Especially for the price difference.
  • + 0
 Isle Apes and Trumpers dont know Carbon Paste?Humans with brains can use Trickstuff without problems.
  • + 1
 Anybody else notice the pads were antique xt 4 pot pads?
  • + 1
 Yeah I did.
They're definitely not the same pads as current or even previous generation XTR/XT/SLX pads.
As you say @shmoodiver, they actually look like the very first generation of 4pot XT's from the late 90's.
I wonder if this is because the patent on the shape of these has run out.
Whatever the reason, I can't see them being easy to find, as claimed
  • + 1
 Must try harder if they want me to swap out from my sweet Hope stoppers
  • + 1
 well i guess i wont be getting these seen the price and kept scrolling
  • + 0
 I much prefer being one of the "dentist" that can afford these things. It's worth the trash talking any day of the week!
  • + 0
 If I had money I would purchase this product
  • + 1
 One word: HOPE
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