First Look: Turner Flux Carbon - Singletrack Predator

Aug 25, 2016
by turnerbikes  
Press Release

The Flux side view


The Flux is a new generation trail ripper. The lightweight carbon chassis and 120 mm of suspension creates a lively and flickable ride, but its modern geometry and 67.5 degree head tube angle make it equally well suited for tackling more aggressive terrain. Much of the ride quality comes from the Flux’s DW-link which is engineered to provide amazing bump absorption without pedal feedback. It inspires confidence when it’s held wide-open, but doesn’t sag and put you in the backseat when you want to stomp on the gas. The Flux weighs in close to XC race bikes, but because of its design and suspension kinematics, it can truly unleash on challenging descents and rip like a much bigger bike.


Non-drive cable routing view.

The dropper post is stealth routed and easy to work with.
DW link suspension

Rear axle is 142x12mm purpose driven for the 27.5 wheel standard.


Construction

Turner’s renowned construction utilizes carbon for its impact strength and durability. But carbon offers more than faceless utility. It also allows us to build seemingly impossible shapes that serve both function and form. Turner bikes are recognizable the world over for their enduring quality and timeless aesthetic. As carbon technology continues to progress, we remain focused on to creating machines that both ride and look like bikes you want to ride today and for years to come.

Internal dropper post routing enables clean function free of excess housing, and the detachment method on the spec’d post allows for easy service and removal when needing to pack the bike for travel. The rear of the bike has practical design features aimed at aiding both performance and maintenance. The brake caliper is conveniently located on the seatstay to facilitate easy adjustments and pad replacements, helping ensure excellent brake function. The mount features replaceable nuts to eliminate the possibility of stripping threads out of the frame, and the dropout houses a lightweight and smooth-functioning quick release through axle.

Room for a water bottle without disrupting cable routing.
The Flux features user-friendly and easy to service external cable routing. Cables steer clear of impact zones negating the need to run them internally, and makes them easy to access for occasional service or replacement. And because the routing is simple and clean without unnecessary bends, the Flux delivers the quick and crisp shifting you expect from a premium quality bike.


Engineered for Speed

The DW-link equipped Flux was designed for chassis rigidity, pedaling efficiency and responsive shock actuation to manage the full spectrum of hits along the trail. Because the linkage provides a variable axle path and is position-sensitive, the bike does not squat under load, delivering clean power transfer while climbing and accelerating. As the axle moves farther into its path, the DW-link works with the front suspension providing a balanced feel and lends a bottomless quality on chunky, big hit descents. It really is the best of both worlds, bringing together the finest elements of Turner and DW design in one bike.

DW linkage in all it s glory
The DW-links and pivots are designed to deliver lasting performance. By combining the strongest materials and the smoothest, most durable bearings available, we are confident that the Flux will provide hours of fun for the ultimate singletrack experience.

The Flux is purpose built for use with 27.5 inch wheels and relies on 142x12 mm rear spacing. By taking this specific approach, we have eliminated the need to look to Boost spacing to help support multiple wheel sizes as is currently the fashion among some brands. The 142 mm standard is a fantastic complement to this chassis which is optimized to work perfectly with 27.5 inch wheels and DW-link kinematics. And as an added benefit, it allows you to continue using wheels that may already be in your quiver.

Flux geometry chart
The Flux climbs like an XC bike




The Turner Flux The Singletrack Ripper


Build Options:

Based on rider feedback, the Flux will be offered with both Shimano 2x11 and 1x11 builds. The frame is designed to work with a direct mount front derailleur and is also Di2 compatible for those looking for an electronic shifting option.

All Turner Bikes are custom built to order, we have five build options listed to get you started but always encourage the customer to create the bike they'll love. *All prices listed in USD. For more details on custom builds, visit Turner Bikes.
Turner Flux with Shimano 1x front drive


SRAm GX Build

XT Build

XO1 Eagle Build

XX1 Eagle Build

XTR Build


The Flux feels at home on singletrack


Turner - Uncompromising Performance - Since 1993




Posted In:
Press Releases



138 Comments

  • 90 3
 can we PLEASE talk about the cable on the shock...
  • 22 1
 Just ziptie that cable to the brake line and it should hold it back. But yeah when companies design a bike that has cabes touching the shock, it worries me...
  • 7 5
 @chillrider199: I was drawn immediately to the cables in general. I can't figure out why there isn't more internal routing. The one hitting the shock doesn't concern me that much. You can zip tie it out of the way but my guess is it wouldn't be an issue anyways as the shock won't travel that far down even on bottom out.
  • 28 0
 Easier and cleaner than a zip tie- Run the housing underneath the lower shock bolt and then up. Problem solved.
  • 2 0
 @ninjatarian: That's how I run it on my Burner
  • 4 1
 My RFX has a similar routing, no issues.
  • 18 1
 More of a builder error than manufacturer. Make that cable 2-3 inches longer and it sits well below the shock. This bike looks outdated, but the more I analyze it, it looks ideal for my area and daily rides. Steep seat angle, slack enough front, and not crazy long. I am kind of impressed they didn't follow the super low and long trend, and I bet it's better for most users.
  • 2 7
flag artistformlyknowasdan (Aug 25, 2016 at 14:36) (Below Threshold)
 no
  • 8 13
flag hifiandmtb (Aug 25, 2016 at 14:50) (Below Threshold)
 Yes, internal cable routing can be painful but at least when it's installed it looks neat. This is some of the worst cable routing I've seen on a new bike in ages - it's an explosion of mess.
  • 5 1
 @hifiandmtb: Youve obviously never looked at a GT Force. Because this bike is actually pretty organized.
  • 1 4
 I saw pic two with the hose running over the side of the rear stay and came straight to comments to see I had missed some even worse routing! - in the same pic!!
  • 2 7
flag richierocket (Aug 25, 2016 at 16:28) (Below Threshold)
 "Cables steer clear of impact zones negating the need to run them internally, and makes them easy to access for occasional service or replacement." Easy way to say that they are too lazy, not advanced or it just a cheep frame ($4895.00 though?).
  • 9 1
 I run all my cables against my stanchions...
  • 1 0
 @ilovedust: uh, Giant does that kind of routing. Actually a lot of companies do. I dont know what bike youve been looking at.
  • 2 2
 @richierocket: um, sometimes a company doesnt want to do a lot of internal to make it not difficult and a weak frame. External routing looks just fine. I honestly cant zee your big problem with what they did.
  • 1 1
 @richierocket: I meant to say see* and not zee. Im not trying to pull a pun haha
  • 2 0
 At least I thought that section could be cable routed.
  • 2 0
 A cleaner cable line will be featured as an upgrade in Flux 2 Smile
  • 2 0
 Its not that close actually, and with a longer run of cable will stay out of the way just fine.
  • 43 7
 So beautiful. Simple, relaxed and clean. A breath of fresh air next to all these curvy sleds
  • 19 4
 This looks great. Simple and too the point- exactly what a good trail bike should be. Keep up the good work Turner.
  • 5 0
 The frame looks like it could look good with a different color/build. But for some reason those completes look a little off, maybe it's the longish stem.
  • 12 4
 Turner perfection strikes again and we love it.
  • 7 1
 I like curvy sleds...
  • 35 3
 I think a lot of people don't understand Turner's design philosophy and his primary customer base (the "Homers"). When you understand the both, then the design of his bikes make sense. A few points:

1) Overall design- Turner has always been about the details of ride quality and handling, with long frame life and serviceability as important design features. As a result, his bikes often look rather bland, but ride extremely well. Long, low, and slack have been part of Turner going back further than the original 5 spot in 2003, when its 69 degree head angle was considered very slack, as well as its "long" 24" top tube in a large, as well as a bottom bracket that was 1/2"-1" lower than many contemporary bikes. Over the years those numbers have changed a bit as new bikes have come out, but his bikes are now middle of the road in geometry. What the numbers can't tell you is how the bike actually rides, and in that regard, Turner's are always extremely well sorted. Finally, as to internal routing, it is a pain in the rear to work with and often noisy (as cables can bounce around inside).

2) Life Cycle- Turner doesn't do model years. He builds a bike until he builds something better or there is a change in market (i.e. the change from 26" to 650b). Turner owners tend to keep and ride their bikes for years and Turner designs them to last for a long time. As a result they are often slightly heavier than their competition.

3) Boost- Turner has stated that he will transition to boost as some point. The reason he hasn't so far is that a large number of his customers ride high end wheels and want to keep their current wheel setup. Rather than force them into adapters or wheel sizes, he was waiting for boost to become more mainstream. This will probably be the last non-boost bike they design.

4) Point of Manufacture- Turner towed the built in the the USA frames as long as he could. Unfortunately, with the cost of labor, the price of the aluminium frames built here were nearly the same as carbon frames built overseas. The bottom line was he couldn't sell US made aluminium frames in a quantity that allowed him to remain profitable so had to go to carbon built overseas. Even if he were willing to lose money on US built frames, there is nobody left to build them, Zen Fabrication closed. That said, I would love to see an aluminum line of Turner's build overseas at a lower price point than the carbon bikes, which would allow greater access at a lower price point.

If you have a chance to ride a Turner, I highly recommend you do. They really ride amazingly well and their execution of design puts them at the top of their class. I have had several people that have tried one of my Turners (starting with the old gen 2 burner, then a TNT 5 Spot, now a Burner 3.0 and DHR) that have ended up buying them.
  • 5 0
 ^ This. I have a 2014 Flux and I love it to bits. I really wish he would continue to make aluminum frames though. Being from another continent I would have a lot of trouble with warranties if I went carbon (just in case). I am wary of going carbon if I we don't have a good local dealer.
  • 6 0
 There are only something like 7 guys that work there, and Dave as well as the rest all ride. They guy knows how to build bikes.
  • 3 1
 Homers? I would say advanced riders that are fit enough to not need need that extra suspension or overly slack head tube angle. That bike is a weapon with the specs all the big wigs will be after next year. It is ahead of it's time by a few years.
  • 3 0
 @SithBike: 'Homers' was the name given to longtime Turner fans on the MTBR.com site. If you go to the forums and have a look at the Turner forum, you will see how active it has been in the past. The number of threads to the actual number of Turner riders is quite disproportionate!

Full disclosure, I would consider myself one of the Homers Smile
  • 42 17
 This bike has the aesthetic of a bald, 240lb, plaid shorts, aggressive white oakleys, and corona sandal wearing guy.
  • 16 0
 Hey... that's my buddy that you're talking about!
  • 4 0
 Hey, bald gets me laid ok...
  • 3 0
 Wow! Thats a specific market
  • 3 1
 Bald 240lb fat guys with plaid shorts and white oakleys usually ride fat bikes, because they bought the hype.
  • 3 0
 That sounds like the "yells at wife in public" starter pack.
  • 2 1
 Actually I think that is the Santa Cruz Demographic
  • 16 2
 I don't understand the criticism of how this bike looks. It's got some nice, clean lines. I think it's pretty sweet. I also like the Turner RFX. Maybe it's the simplicity of their frames I like. Definitely something to be said for it. Between this and the new Rocky Mountain Slayer, today has been a good day for bike porn. Beyond that, I was hoping Turner might come out with a long-travel 29er. Maybe it's in the works.
  • 3 0
 Yeah I demo'ed a Turner RFX and really liked it, but I'm holding out for a long travel 29'er (that takes an FD).
  • 5 0
 I think the bike looks ace. Clean, simple, not trendy. I am sure it's an awesome ride.
  • 16 0
 White colored bikes are strangly rare if you actaully think about it....
  • 4 0
 I have a white SC SOLO which soon after became the 5010. Is that extra rare Smile
  • 16 3
 I was getting pretty excited for xx1 eagle and kashima for 6k but then saw "wheel set not included" wtf who doesn't include wheels?
  • 13 1
 Yes......where' s the crappy OEM wheelset.....
  • 6 1
 No wheels but you do get a tubeless kit...HUH!?
  • 16 1
 @high-end-bikes: Wheels ARE included, just not in the price quoted. When you order the bike, they smartly let you pick your specific preference of wheel from a wide range, with an appropriate up-charge. This is half-way to a fully custom bike, and waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay better than sticking you with some flimsy throw-away set on the low-end, or sticking you with the ultra-chi-chi carbon expensive set at the high end. Actually, a neat approach to picking a bike. Yes, would be nice to have a choice on the fork too, but I assume their build+shipping system and supplier relations have some influence on that.
  • 4 0
 @cerealkilla: Right on. I agree with everything you say here. The wheel option is a pretty good deal, and you're getting the wheels for a little less than you would if you had bought them separately. One question I have is, this bike comes with Fox, their RFX comes with Rock Shox. That makes me wonder what their supplier relation is, exactly, and why they couldn't offer a choice of either Fox or Rock Shox on either bike.
  • 1 0
 RED FLAG ALERT! OK, I see now that they do get included, you just have to pay extra. Weird
  • 2 0
 @spenceratx: He does it because as stated multiple times in the thread many people don't want the wheels as they have a set already or have something special in mind. There are cheap to expensive choices available in the pull down. You're not paying extra, you're paying for the wheel if you select them, and don't if you choose that options. Since all the bikes are built to order its easy for them to do.
  • 7 0
 Demoed this (actually Dave Turner's personal bike, thanks Dave) a couple weeks and it easily kept up with other 140mm travel bikes that I tried that day. The DW link was incredibly plush, and this would be a great all around bike for more moderate trails.
  • 5 0
 Turner bikes are great and as a mechanic external routing is fantastic.....if you want to follow the crowds look elsewhere but if it is about how a bike rides then no doubt the new flux will rock.....there is a reason Dave is willing to demo his bikes all over the place because once you ride one you realize how awesome they are.
  • 9 1
 I can barely see the wheel graphics...they should make them bigger.
  • 6 1
 Why did we go to internal routed cables? Because externally routed cables were in "impact zones"...and impact from what? When was the last time an impact destroyed your cables? Maybe I don't crash enough to understand this?
  • 5 1
 If you place cables on bottom of downtube, debris can hit them and they get damaged on a tailgate pad. It's not about crashing. Internal cables look cool, but they make it harder to service the cables so you just put up with sub-par shifting because it's too long a process to change the housing. This system is relatively easy to service your entire cable, housing and all, in just a few minutes. I hate pulling my crank to route a cable, or trying to fish through the frame with piano wire, makes the job 10x harder than it needs to be for a relatively frequent maintenance item.
  • 3 0
 @chimp75:
I hadn't thought about cables on the downtube rubbing against the tailgate because the only bike I own with that routing is a road bike.

I briefly reflected on how much of a pain it is to replace internally routed cables. When I worked in a shop I cursed the department store bikes that did that. I never thought I'd see it on anything other than some aero tri-geek bikes. Not something I'm interested in.
  • 8 1
 Fresh looking bike right there!
  • 13 11
 The non-boost rear and cable routing, make this bike feel like models that other brands will soon be replacing in their line-up, or have already. Not saying that is a reason not to get it, but it can't help sales. Sometimes the best business is to follow where the industry is going, even if it doesn't make complete sense.
  • 18 2
 Sometimes the "best business" for a small company is to offer a unique product that matches their customers wants and needs. Turner isn't a brand that is built around pleasing everyone.
  • 7 1
 BTW if a small brand followed where the bike industry is going they wouldn't last very long. Things move quickly and with little reason except to introduce marginal performance gains, fashionable colors, and marketing b.s.
  • 5 2
 @silkyrhino This +1000
Turner likely started designing this model a couple years ago (after finding themselves already behind the competition) and decided not to make any additional changes before releasing the final build/design spec. I agree that that decision to save some $$ at the front end will likely cost them sales on the back end.
  • 5 1
 I agree that many brands are moving to boost, but i don't think boost is necessary for this bike (probably not necessary for most).
  • 1 0
 @Sycip69er: That is true if they are targeting specific people, eg. those don't wan't boost or don't even know what it is. Aside from this bike having a feature that most other companies are moving away from–I'm not sure what is unique about it? I'd love to see Turner release something truly unique, but right now it seems they are just playing catch up in the Carbon arena. It must be a very challenging business landscape.
  • 9 2
 @jdendy: Boost is for 29ers and Plus bikes, which this is not.
  • 5 2
 Let's go back to why boost was originally introduced, it provides somewhat better rear end stiffness and wheel stiffness but the best thing about boost was the ability to run bigger wheels with shorter stays. So for a 29" bike or a new plus bike you'd need Boost. This is a bike built around 27" wheels, which have a strong following even though many have moved to plus wheels there is a large contingent of people just getting on 650B. This bike is for them, it's not trying to be anything it's not.
  • 3 1
 @chimp75: I agree. I have a non-boost Intense Tracer 275, and I don't feel any gross amount of flex or durability in the wheels even from the low end stock wheelset. Then again, I have a 2006 Turner RFX with a straight headtube, 135mm quick release rear end, and a smaller handlebar diameter which feels plenty stiff.
  • 6 0
 Guys, non-boost is fine for 27.5 wheels. Boost it's also fine for 27.5 wheels and in 2017 nearly every new 27.5 bike will be using that new "standard." That wont take away any enjoyment from shredding on your current bikes.

Since this bike doesn't come with wheels, it could be that their entire strategy is to sell it to the segment of people who want a new bike, but want to keep their current wheels. The article does say... "allows you to continue using wheels that may already be in your quiver." Interesting strategy, that is for sure.
  • 3 1
 @chimp75: my 29er has the old 142x12 standard and the tire fits. My fat bike has a 135mm axle and somehow fits wide tires too. I'm not convinced that boost is needed for plus size tires.
  • 4 1
 @dhdezzo: industry is desperately trying to convince ppl that they actually need Boost. And probably some people might feel and enjoy the benefit, most of us, however, will not notice any difference.

hell, I'm 1.7m tall and 62kg and I feel my 29er hardtail with QR Front and Rear PLENTY STIFF lol , not even felt the need to add 15mm up front
  • 3 1
 Vernon Felton wrote in today's industry opinion piece regarding standards: "Boost 148 spreads the hub flanges apart six millimeters, which improves the spokes’ bracing angle. The end result? Stiffer and stronger wheels. It’s impossible to argue with that. Really. You may not like that Boost suddenly outdated the expensive 142x12 wheelset you just bought, but it’s math. Not only did Boost 148 make for stronger wheels, it also allowed for shorter, wider chainstays to co-exist with larger tires. If you like to descend and you like tight trails, these are obvious wins. If you want to go plus-size with your tires, it opens up your options there as well."

And again questions how rapidly "standards" should proliferate. A "standard" is not a Standard until it's been excepted by the industry at large and for a duration of more than a couple model years. These should be called "features" and not passed off as "standards". Standards are your three-piece crank on the old beach cruiser, the gooseneck... The Italian BB in your steel road frame.

So while the industry is "going boost" they're largely doing it to catch the excitement of "plus" being interchangeable with 700c wheels (Mountain Bikers call them 29ers) and have passed over the last "standard" that was introduced. This allows a frame manufacturer to make one frameset that appeals to buyers of both options by simply changing the wheels or the build.

I feel partially to blame for the 27", 27.5, 650B, 27B #nooneknowswhattocallthisthing #halfling wheel size of 27.5 having helped to introduce it, but I could not imagine we would be in this state of chaos in terms of interchangeability. We have just barely migrated all the "26 isn't dead" crowd out of that size and into 27" by killing production of their rubber and wheel options only to slap them with more proprietary combinations of things that are sometimes confusing and lead to marginal gains but allow manufacturers to offer "system integration".
  • 1 2
 @dietersanchez: totally with you. Boost is supposed to result in stronger wheels but the fact is that good carbon non-boost wheels are a helluva lot stronger than wimpy aluminum boost wheels. Just ask my friend who has replaced half a dozen spokes on his $2500 (complete) Trek Fuel.
  • 4 0
 @silkyrhino: The purpose of boost is to make 29" wheel builds stronger, and offer more room for plus wheels. That's it, you can make shorter stays without boost. This bike is built for people who know how to ride and don't want bullshit.
  • 6 2
 Almost $5000 for a GX build and no wheels? Wow.

Also interesting that the front fork and rear shock is the same across all build levels...
  • 3 2
 Yeah I was like... $5k for a Turner... that's not bad. Then I realized no wheels and went... well... never mind. You're essentially talking about $6500 for a base level built out. There are enough companies making similar bikes that I'd personally look elsewhere.
  • 5 2
 I like they're spec strategy, although I think many people won't look deeper than GX and align it to every other GX bike and pricepoint.

Realistically, the price difference (and performance) between drivetrain levels is not that significant, the cost of nicer builds comes in suspension.

Turners builds have buyers investing the money where it matters, and giving buyers the option of wheel selection. Pretty smart, actually. If you look at the XX1 and X01 builds, they are competitively priced, if not better than the competition.
  • 1 0
 Better then a slayer "frame" for 4 grand!! Lol
  • 2 0
 As a massive fan of Turners and only recently sold a 5Spot I am saddened that there is no longer a beautifully welded aluminium frame in their line-up – that little Stars and Stripes on the back of the seat tube was a big bonus when I bought it. And yet, through the pressures of cost and reduced facilities they have chosen to go full (non-US) carbon and charge yet even more – that just seems a little bit backwards if you ask me, but business is business. Just a shame they didn't hold onto that industrial, raw aesthetic.

Oh hai Nicolai!
  • 2 0
 Yup. It's a shame about the loss of aluminum. I will be hanging on to my 2014 Flux for a long time. It's one the last aluminum frames. Haha.
  • 2 0
 "The brake caliper is conveniently located on the seatstay to facilitate easy adjustments and pad replacements, helping ensure excellent brake function"

Well ain't that some high grade marketing nonsense. Is it also lavishly equipped with knobbed tyres to aide with grip?
  • 1 0
 its actually a really clean and sorted bike IMO but all i can see is the after thought cable routing. why cable route on top of the chainstay? the cable on the headtubes are just aesthetically erghh! i understand why but they could have done something neater. and the one on the none driveside chainstay should really be on the inside face not the outside.
  • 4 3
 Thanks for not using boost but man trail bikes are boring these days. They literally all look identical and if the HT angle is 67+ than I'm not interested. I have a SC 5010 that I put a 140mm fork on to slack it out into the 66* range. Its rips for sure but honeslty I would rather ride my hardtail. I don't know what it is but everytime a new trail bikes comes out I just think about how they have been stale for years now, my bike from 3 years ago is just as good.
  • 3 1
 And before somebody goes, "Well what do you find interesting then???"

The new RM Slayer. That is some sweet as shit.
  • 1 1
 @warmerdamj: The RFX is the equal the the slayer as far as travel and geo.
  • 1 0
 Why a boost fork then? That doesn't make sense, especially if you have a (non-boost) wheelset you want to use.
  • 1 0
 Turner rider since 99. They grow on you. I'm on a Burner v3, Nothing to complain about. I would spec a 170 alloy crankset as my 175 are bashed to all hell. The cables will run great btw. Does this have a threaded bb? Max tire clearance?
  • 2 0
 Nice and differentiated from the RFX. Although, a carbon iteration of the Flux does make me wonder if the Burner is going to get the same treatment.
  • 1 1
 "Turner’s renowned construction utilizes carbon for its impact strength and durability." So, carbon is used for its impact strength?.. But it doesn't resist impacts. My damn 1 month old carbon frame has a cracked rear seat stay because of a small fall on a rock after stalling the bike. I'm not happy. Weak as fook for impact is carbon..
  • 5 1
 Very nice. A bike for those who know what they want, not trend chasers.
  • 4 0
 Turner is still turning them out. That's a sweet looking bike.
  • 4 1
 Geometry table is in foreign, help please
  • 10 2
 There are 25.4 mm to 1 inch
  • 3 0
 Thanks babes
  • 2 0
 I guess there is no point in wondering if the shock is "metric"...
  • 1 1
 if you go to the turner website you can see the whole geometry chart in metric.
  • 1 3
 roflmfao
  • 4 1
 A 29er of this would be better.
  • 2 2
 Yep.....Turner bikes are one step behind everyone else. I remember back in the day when Turner ruled the roost for the boutique brands.....especially in Southern California. There was Turner, Intense and coming in 3rd....Santa Cruz. Now Santa Cruz is huge, Intense has some great new offering and Turner.......well there plans are to make a 29'er trail bike out of alloy.
  • 1 2
 i think its a nice , clean looking bike...but...no way would i consider a 5k bike and still have to add wheels at an additional cost. I really wouldnt want a cable just lying on my shock either. They should have done better than that on 5k bike .
  • 2 0
 can the dropper cable just be routed under the lower shock mount so it doesn't rub against the shock???
  • 4 0
 This bike looks rad
  • 2 1
 very nice. I sort of wish this was around 2 weeks ago when I bought an Evil. It would have muddied the waters.
  • 1 0
 This is the most beautiful bike I've ever seen. Then again, I find hammers sexy.
  • 2 0
 Says boost is not needed, adds a boost fork to all build kits... ?
  • 1 0
 It says in article that they have boost forks on build kits because of availability issues. I guess Fox is going all out on boost so non-boost forks are not available in large quantities.
  • 1 0
 @ACMI54: i've read the article twice and can't find anything about fox not having non boost forks in stock. Where did you read it?
  • 1 0
 weight: 6.5 regardless of size... what?
  • 1 0
 It'll be interesting to see what shocks people throw on it.
  • 2 0
 Newest FOX Kashima coat, replace it? What? what could be better than that?
  • 3 1
 @chimp75: well a NEWEST newest FOX kashima coat

probably triple disc director's cut blu ray adamantium nano coated kashima mark 2 FOX shock
  • 2 4
 No Boost, sloppy external cable routing. It would be pretty sad if Turner wasn't able to keep up anymore. Seems like they haven't fully adjusted to the timelines associated with developing carbon bikes.
  • 2 4
 Not the end of the world. but LAME!!! they didn't get a molded chainstay protector to route that derailleur cable through by now. Their cable guides/routing on this frame looks like a "home made" afterthought....
  • 1 0
 Im just here for the pun.
  • 3 2
 Made in??
  • 5 2
 A factory.
  • 1 0
 looks pretty clean
  • 3 2
 I love that Kona look
  • 1 1
 Sorry...but I'm still drooling over the new Slayer...I'm outta here.
  • 1 1
 Sad to see the elevated stay go.
  • 1 1
 That's a good looking 2013 bike.
  • 3 3
 Time to Turner over
  • 1 2
 I like it - looks a bit like a refined Giant Trance from the early 2000's.
  • 1 3
 Nice bike. Shame about the cable routing...
  • 3 5
 Stays are .5" too long.
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