Prototype Turner RFX - Dave Turner Speaks!

Sep 22, 2010
by Mike Levy  
First we got up and close with the new DHR, now we talk to Dave Turner about his second generation prototype RFX dream machine at Interbike 2010. Inside you can scope out all of the photos and info as long as you promise not to get too excited, you'll also get a video tour of the prototype RFX by Mr. Turner himself!

Read on...
Watch the video to get the RFX lowdown from Dave Turner himself:

Views: 8,130    Faves: 9    Comments: 9



Is this the abominable snowman of mountain bikes? There have been whisperings and there have been sightings, but Turner's RFX has remained out of the reach of average consumers much longer than they would like. What would you prefer though; to have it last season and not be quite up to Turner's high standards, or wait a bit longer for a finished product that is as dialed and refined as his other bikes. If you saw our Interbike coverage from last year, you no doubt saw the first generation prototype that was being oogled by everyone. The second generation prototype is shown above and it features very different lines to the previous model, with the frame having a very 5.Spot look to it. The reason for that is that the Spot and new RFX will share much of the same tooling in order to greatly reduce costs, something that a lot of us will appreciate. The RFX is certainly made to handle more serious terrain than its shorter travel brother, despite looking similar from a distance. Rear wheel travel is 6.7
Is this the abominable snowman of mountain bikes? There have been whisperings and there have been sightings, but Turner's RFX has remained out of the reach of average consumers much longer than they would like. What would you prefer though; to have it last season and not be quite up to Turner's high standards, or wait a bit longer for a finished product that is as dialed and refined as his other bikes. If you saw our Interbike coverage from last year, you no doubt saw the first generation prototype that was being oogled by everyone. The second generation prototype is shown above and it features very different lines to the previous model, with the frame having a very 5.Spot look to it. The reason for that is that the Spot and new RFX will share much of the same tooling in order to greatly reduce costs, something that a lot of us will appreciate. The RFX is certainly made to handle more serious terrain than its shorter travel brother, despite looking similar from a distance. Rear wheel travel is 6.7" and the stock head angle will come in at 66 degrees, but that can be easily modified by dropping a Cane Creek AngleSet into the RFX's full length 1.5" headtube. By doing so you'll be able to pick from either half a degree, one full degree, or one and a half degrees of adjustment. Bottom bracket height has a drastic effect on how a bike handles so you'll be interested to know that the bike pictured here sits at 13.7" and one of the design goals was to have a B.B. height of under 14" regardless of tire size. I see some serious carving in this bike's future! Because the new RFX could see either a double (or even triple) ring crank set, a single ring and guide combo, or HammerSchmidt, it features some extra heavy duty ISCG05 tabs to keep your options open. This looks to be one of those category blurring bikes that will span a gamut of uses.

What else did you expect to see?! Dave Weagle worked his fingers over the RFX's suspension layout and the result is a 6.7
What else did you expect to see?! Dave Weagle worked his fingers over the RFX's suspension layout and the result is a 6.7" travel dw-Link controlled machine that should excel at both getting you to the top of the mountain and coming back down. While the upper link looks quite svelte, the lower link is a stout unit that should make for a sturdy rear end. Like all of Turner's bikes, the RFX's pivots rotate on bushings that can be maintained via grease fittings at all of the important points.

The chainstays taper towards the rear of the bike, a first for Turner, and the bike features a 12 x 142 mm axle to keep everything stiff and in place. I'm sure that there will be countless negative comments regarding the 12 x 142 standard for me to read below, but the fact is that it is here to stay and it does make sense on a bike like the RFX. This is a machine that deserves a thru-axle and the 142 mm system will suit it well. Death to open dropouts and quick releases! It should also be noted that 142 mm rear wheel spacing uses the same chain line as a 135 mm system, something that is very important considering the bike's pedal friendly 73 mm B.B. shell width.
The chainstays taper towards the rear of the bike, a first for Turner, and the bike features a 12 x 142 mm axle to keep everything stiff and in place. I'm sure that there will be countless negative comments regarding the 12 x 142 standard for me to read below, but the fact is that it is here to stay and it does make sense on a bike like the RFX. This is a machine that deserves a thru-axle and the 142 mm system will suit it well. Death to open dropouts and quick releases! It should also be noted that 142 mm rear wheel spacing uses the same chain line as a 135 mm system, something that is very important considering the bike's pedal friendly 73 mm B.B. shell width.

The decal says it all. This is the second generation prototype, expect to see another more refined version before the bike goes into production. While it still won't be inexpensive, it will retail for less than the first generation prototype would have, which was about the same as the new DHR! When will you be able to pick one up? Watch the interview with Dave Turner above to find out!
The decal says it all. This is the second generation prototype, expect to see another more refined version before the bike goes into production. While it still won't be inexpensive, it will retail for less than the first generation prototype would have, which was about the same as the new DHR! When will you be able to pick one up? Watch the interview with Dave Turner above to find out!

Visit the Turner website to see their full range of bikes.


I like it, but I'm easily won over by the RFX's factory looking raw finish. You know the drill, state your opinions below and be prepared to back them up because I see a good debate about this machine coming on!


Stay tuned for more Interbike coverage!



71 Comments

  • 7 0
 AM bikes now on my WANT list, 1. Carbon Nomad. 2. Mojo HD. 3. Turner RFX!!!!! So sweet all these bikes coming out that can do EVERYTHING! Want.
  • 6 0
 Yup, it is a tough time to be a mountain biker, isn't it?
  • 2 0
 It is! Too many choices to chose from! Frown

:P
  • 10 0
 Mike don't laugh it can be real hard... the most people I pity is those who have lots of monaey and can afford any bike they want... When I was buying my bike I said to myself once in a lifetime I will pay bullocks for a bike (so naive I was) That was the worst thing to do. I spent months choosing between Nomad, SX trail, Giant Reign X, Trek Remedy and few more: it was terrible! The fear of being not fully satisfied! After so much money spend and months of research!

Fortunately Nomad C is out of my range... temptation is strong but weaker than the account credibility. If it was like 500$ cheaper I would already have another secret to keep from my wife... yes honey I changed my old frame for that and Im aaa yea... that was a good deal - isn't it this one you were speaking about the other day to Chris, super light rocket science for 2500$? yea rocket science for 2500 you said. And when you bought the old one as new, you told me it was 500$. - No no honey this one's a plastic replica, come tap your nail on it... - I know what Carbon Fiber is! - ok I lied! I lied! That's my old one, and aaa Billy polished the welds and did this paintjob and I spent two thou...ykhem hundred, hundred! (FFS silently he thought to himself as he went away very fast...)
  • 2 5
 what the hell are you on about?! but no seriously how can you pity the rich people most?? all they have to do is get one, and if they don't like it sell it on and buy another! it's the people who can never afford anything like this that have a hard time
  • 4 0
 sarcasm my friend.
  • 2 0
 bikeaddict I was kinda both... Im not rich but I can afford Nomad Alu. The only thing stopping me from buying Nomad Carbon is my cute wife dreaming about a small house, and buying a bike worth the bathroom is just, my conscience can't do it to her Smile

Darkstar: a bit of sarcasm but a dose of honesty also:
When i didn't have the money as a student, choice was easy what to buy: stuff you can afford! and trust me that was a limited choice. A rear mech is on my agenda right now? 5 years before Alivio! Now Im scratching my head a lot, spending hours wondering Saint, XTR or X-9. Im not a happeir person to be honest... Wink sometimes I sit on my wifes bike similar to one I rode in student days, take a spin inthe woods and I feel: it is so damn fun! And the day after I ride my Nomad and comeback home bitter...
  • 2 0
 Very true. I can certainly relate, if I could show my bike now to my 15 year old self I would shit my pants. Although picking between Atlas FR and Saint cranks last year was a nice "problem" to have. I can remember the days when a broken bike meant working nights at a local restauraunt untill I had enough loot to fix it. I think thats why I always defend Kona's and the like. Its nice that companies offer such great bikes at affordable prices so folks can just enjoy riding. Thats really what its all about at the end of the day.
  • 1 0
 ^ Defo. My first "proper" mtb was a Giant XTC team, with old 03 Fox Floats and Hayes 9s haha. If I got my Double and Blindside back then, i'd be amazed.
  • 1 0
 hahaha ah Waki best comment in a long time "The only thing stopping me from buying Nomad Carbon is my cute wife dreaming about a small house, and buying a bike worth the bathroom is just, my conscience can't do it to her"
I am in the same boat, the engagement ring is worth my new bike!!!
  • 8 0
 Dave Turners' honesty is rad. Always says the blunt truth... Now if only I could afford the DHR.
  • 2 0
 Love his dig at people who weight-weenie long travel heavy duty frames.
  • 1 0
 Kinda sounded like he was diggin' at the new Slayer 'cause that is one of the main selling points of the bike. Both bikes are sweet nonetheless.
  • 1 0
 looks nice like every turner does, hows about that direct mount rear? seein that on more frames lately, good idea. super slack head angle for that kinda frame too Smile rear end tubes looks real skinny tho for an ali frame, wonder it it'll be stiff enough for AM carvage?
  • 1 0
 Im sure it is, this bike looks so good. I really dont know what to choose for my next frame, alot of options out there right now.
  • 1 0
 switched to the dw-link 5.spot last year and if my budget permits...will NOT have any other brand in my garage in the future. love the new rfx...can't wait for the actual launch...even if it would mean just drooling over it...
  • 1 0
 I used to be very sceptical with Turner and also Morewood. I just felt they are overspriced. So simply looking bikes made from alu at the price of CF Santa Cruzes or even higher... lately I spoke to a guy who owns a retro handmade steel road bike: how much is this wee beauty? I asked as I wanted to buy something similar for commuting: 3200$ for the frame and fork - he said as if that was something totaly normal... So that experience enlarged my tolerance Big Grin
  • 1 0
 lots of comments about the price tag...

I been selling road bikes that run, $7000, $8000, $9000 and more.
I don't sell many of them but it strikes me funny how much extra you pay for "less" bike, as in less weight. The last blingy road bike I built up was 14.8lbs (with pedals). a super tricked out Look just like the ones you see at The Tour De France. It's pure economics -- why do people buy golf clubs for $800 or more when it's just a pole with grip on one end, a funny looking club at the other. We should get Obama to head up the bike industry that way we can all pay the same (oops, a political slant). Even buying at "employee" and wholesale, I have a hard time choking down some of the prices out there. It's just part of the game.
  • 1 0
 142mm has exactly the same hub spacing and wheel dish as 135mm. The 142mm hub is slightly wider to allow the hub to slot into the frame in a similar way to a 20mm thru-axle Rockshox fork allows the hub to slot in place before you insert the Maxle.....it is to eliminate the hassle and time it takes to line up the thru-axle rear wheel before inserting the axle (DH bikes are a hassle in this regard)

It will save you time on the trail if you need to fix a flat!
  • 1 0
 summeroshun has it right. In addition to his points, 135mm hubs can also be adapted to fit the new standard (with new endcaps, for example). Hub spacing, rotor placement, etc are unchanged. It's not about adding stiffness or dishless wheels it's about user-friendliness. I think we'll see 150 on big hit and downhill bikes, and 142 on everything below that.
Some manufacturers are even including hardware to run 135 or 142 as it's so easy to swap.
Great system imo.
  • 1 0
 way too much cha-ching for me...
I would love a Turner but my budget only allows mortal bikes like my 2009 Marin Wolf Ridge (my all around play bike that can handle just about anything).
  • 1 0
 real tight looking frame! Nice that he's able to use the DHR tubes to keep costs down. 7.3lb frame is not bad for this bike. Curious to see exactly how stiff the rear triangle will be!
  • 1 0
 most important wha is the weight? Looks like the perfect Diablo/Highland machine for those who don't want a full on dh bike or who can oly afford one bike
  • 1 0
 Frame weight is mentioned in the movie.
  • 1 0
 7.3lbs projected for the frame plus RP23
  • 1 0
 i picked up a 07 turner for pretty cheap, and not much as changed the past few yrs so it still keeps up with the times. this bike looks awesome tho
  • 1 0
 turners are awesome, iv got a 5 spot. more xc but still handle drops like a dh bike, would love on eof these tho
  • 1 0
 I agree. The 5.spot that I tested certainly had a XC feel to it, but felt super stable when landing a bigger (for the bike) drop. Stiff!
  • 1 0
 mike, noticed u have a remedy aswel, what would u say was the better rig. turner 5 spot or remedy 9. just i got the remedy 9 to replace my ageing turner 5 spot but just cant seem to let her go lol
  • 1 0
 I'm afraid to know the price of this thang but it looks like they nailed it.
  • 1 0
 An all mountain bike that is slack and is able to pedal really well! I need a few grand soon
  • 1 0
 btw 66 HA with a 180 fork and a normal HS cup under... is not SLAAAAAAACK anymore, wake up.
  • 1 0
 it is not a DH bike for what the intent of this bike is 66 is slack and can be used with a Cane Creek angleset.
  • 1 0
 "...up behind me IS some really good trails..."

"...the RFX and the 5 Spot HAS always shared parts..."
  • 1 0
 looks like and sounds like the perfect bike!!!
  • 1 0
 strange chainstay system,but nice bike ofcourse
  • 1 0
 Some what old tires, Rubber Queen is now Trail King. Which is what I'm on.
  • 1 0
 from those angles, that rear wheel is mighty close to the frame
  • 1 3
 Dave Turner sounds like a space cadet, lost in his very own technical schpeil. Also, thats some terrible cable routing, rubbing straight on the top pivot link anywhere past 1" into the travel.
  • 2 0
 Yah totally agree. He should say rad, brah, yo homies more. Would that be more Ontario?
  • 1 0
 Sorry Dave, just ONE question.

Does it come with Duke Nukem Forever ?
  • 1 0
 Thats such a nice bike I wish I had it
  • 1 0
 very cool bike how much travel is the fork ?
  • 1 0
 mmm so slack. looks pretty sick
  • 1 0
 Thats pretty sweet
  • 5 0
 loving the slack head angle
  • 3 0
 i smell sweet slopestyle builds with that frame eventually
  • 1 0
 Weight ??
  • 1 0
 That thing looks amazing.
  • 11 4
 "Death to open dropouts and quick releases"...How bout death to the 142mm system? What's wrong with the 135 and 150mm that already exist? I mean, you couldn't come up with something a little worse? Like...a 136mm? Razz

On the topic of the bike, This thing looks like it would RIP. It pains me to see that high of a seat with a 180mm fox fork though Razz

Regarding you predicting all the negative comments about the 142, What IS there to be gained running the 142x12, versus a 135x12 or 150x12? Am I missing something, or is it just a different size, because it seems about as useless as the 15mm axle...
  • 1 0
 weight = 7.3lb frame with rp23
  • 1 0
 apparently the 142 makes clamping the wheel to the bike easier? i hate these new "standards"...keep it simple.
and don't quote me on this one, but i'm pretty sure i've heard something about a 12mm front thru
  • 3 1
 no no no guys. It's nothing about axle clamping etc.The whole purpose in a 142mm hub is to allow for a 0 dish rear wheel, thus creating a stronger wheel. I have a 0 dish on me tomac and it's bomb proof. It's a great idea and has been proven time and time again. Only issue is it takes an off hub size to allow it. After all, there are things that limit flange placement on a hub. Rotors are one of em. It's a new standard so might as well accept it now. It aint going anywhere... it's established now multiple massive mainstream companies are on board. Just like 15mm, it's here to stay. And just like 15mm axles, there are multiple benefits from it.
  • 2 0
 is that a fox 36 180? or 160? IMO 180 seems a little much for a bike like that. sick looking bike though
  • 2 1
 What does that even mean? 0 dish? And why can't they just do that with a 150, no reason for 8 mm to change the way the whole set up works...

And if someone comes out with a 12mm thru axle...I will probably shove it somewhere. And it won't be in their fork.
  • 3 0
 SUICIDEDHER look at the spokes in your 135mm rear wheel. the non drive side spokes go closer to the frame than on the drive side. the rim is not central betweeen the hub flanges. on a dish-less wheel, the rim is centralized between the flanges, making a stronger build. 142 does make kinda sense.
  • 1 1
 Seriously bro you don't know the difference between a dish and 0 dish set up? You have the most opinionated comments of most people on here. Until you have a good list of facts on why 142x12(or the 15mm axle) isn't a good idea, your comment will still be just that, an opinion.
  • 1 0
 @Raleigh, Thanks for clearing that up for me, I thought that's what it was, but wasn't sure. And that can't be done with a 150?

And did I ever claim it to be anything more than an opinion?
  • 1 0
 Suicide to answer your above Q to Raleigh, yes it can be done on a 150. Hubs with 150mm spacing are often stronger because it can run the 0 dish set up. Specialized Demos used to run a dished rear wheel and was later redesigned to run a 0 dish, don't know if you heard but that was how I learned of dished wheels.

Monkey see, monkey do. When people see you talk down on a product, bandwagoners will follow and think it's a good idea, and the new product that will make things easier becomes 'useless and dumb'.
  • 2 0
 hmm, the zero dish makes sense...why hasn't anybody said that before? nobody had a good explanation for it.
  • 2 1
 Wait, So, going off of what you just said, the only advantage of a 142, can be done with a 150? SO...Back to my original point, why 142?
  • 1 0
 Because some bikes are designed around 135(xc/am) opposed to 150(fr/dh). But I think the idea of 142x12mm isn't to create something new to confuse everybody, but to fix issues with 135x12 and improve overall ease of use(not always a bad thing).
  • 1 0
 Chainline of a 135mm hub (which matches up with 73mm cranks, which pedal better and are lighter) combined with the zero-dish aspect of a 150mm hub. Makes perfect sense to me. New standards are lame but it makes sense if you think about it.
  • 1 0
 The idea is to keep it as close to 135 as possible guys. They are trying to avoid the issue of running the heavier 150mm hubs. Think of it this way, its more than just hub width that 8mm adds, it's the combination of 8mm of hub, 8mm of axle, additional metal allowing for the wider rear end, etc. All hubs can be designed to be dishless, but like said, you have rotors to worry about, clearance, etc. Remember, the trend right now is to get the bike as narrow as humanly possible while still allowing good strength. So with a 142 they are cutting a decent amount of weight when you consider all the tiny things that 8mm effects, you are strengthening the wheel which will be stronger than a 150mm dished wheel, and also allowing for rear frame flex still, being you dont want a completely rigid frame unless it's a plow bike. Kinda a jumbled post of mine but meh.

I dont even bother fighting new tech anymore AS LONG AS IT MAKES SENSE. And thus this standard gets my approval IMO. (IMO GUYS)
  • 1 2
 looks like he's trying to hit the same market as transition is with the blindside, big all mountain.
  • 5 1
 transition cannot compete with a Turner. The quality and suspension design is worlds above a tranny
  • 1 0
 Agreed, Transitions still sick though they are doing some real nice things with their new lineup. This RFX is on my watch list to keep track of in the future.
  • 1 1
 transitionbikes.com/Bikes_Covert.cfm

I'll take a TBC any day.

Turner's are sweet but I can't justify the prices.
  • 2 0
 having owned a Transition the quality does not compare at all. Price wise they are too expensive for what they are
  • 1 0
 AMAZING!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.038384
Mobile Version of Website