Unior BikeGator+ Repair Stand - Review

Feb 24, 2016
by Mike Levy  

There are really only three different types of repair stands: your buddy when he's nice enough to hold the bike up off the ground while you tinker; heavy and expensive shop-quality stands that are super sturdy but aren't designed to be moved, and folding repair stands that are hopefully still sturdy but can be transported easily and don't cost as much as the bike they're made to hold up. Unior's $299 USD BikeGator+ slots into that last category, and at 12.5 pounds it's easy enough to throw it into the back of your truck for a race weekend or road trip.



BikeGator+ Details:

• Quick-release folding repair stand
• Adjustable height
• Adjustable clamping head
• Height when extended: 66"
• Height when collapsed: 38.5''
• Footprint: 34.2''
• Tool tray w/ replaceable foam organizer
• Maximum load: 66.1 lb
• Manufactured entirely in Europe
• Weight: 12.5lb (w/o tool tray)
• MSRP: $299 USD
www.uniortools.com / @uniortools
Unior BikeGator repair stand review test

The BikeGator+, which Unior says is the only stand manufactured entirely in Europe, features mostly aluminum construction, including both legs, the main upright, and the supports that connect those three pieces. Both the stationary upper and sliding lower quick-release clamps are also aluminum, and all of the hardware is replaceable if need be. Sturdy rubber feet have been stuck on to the ends of both legs, and a thick rubber cap covers the bottom of the main upright, all three being points of contact with the ground. A third quick-release lever is used at the top of the BikeGator+ to hold the steel clamp in place - loosening it allows you to rotate the head to angle your bike up or down as required.


Unior BikeGator repair stand review test
Both legs, the upright, the connecting links between the two, and the clamps are all aluminum.
Unior BikeGator repair stand review test
Large quick-release levers allow the BikeGator+ to be set up or folded down in mere seconds.


Unior has also come up with a nifty tool tray that slots into the clamp that adjusts the repair stand's height. The tray's metal base sees a foam tool organizer laid over top (it's held on by four bolts), with holes for screwdrivers and hex keys, as well as different sections to keep all of the tiny bits and pieces separate once you've taken them off your bike.

It's been said that being organized is the key to success, so hopefully this keeps you from ending up with leftover parts after you're done with a repair. The tray can also be purchased on its own, just in case you're so unorganized that you manage to lose the organizer.
Unior BikeGator repair stand review test
The clip-on tool tray features a replaceable foam organizer.


Arguably the most important part, the clamping head is the business end of a repair stand. Unior's steel unit is fairly basic - there's no spring-loaded mechanism - with a linkage to bring the clamp down onto your bike's seat post. A threaded rod allows it to be adjusted to work with tubes from 24mm to 40mm in diameter, which is a wide enough range for any seat post out there, as well as some frame tubes (be gentle or suffer an embarrassing and costly mistake), and a rubber-coated handle is used for operation. One nice touch is the deep slots in both rubber clamp faces that allow the cable for a dropper seat post to go unmolested so long as you get it lined up correctly. Both the entire clamp and jaws can be purchased on their own.


Unior BikeGator repair stand review test
The sturdy steel head is not spring-loaded, so it needs to be adjusted to fit different seat posts. The stand spent a lot of time outside, and some of the steel hardware eventually began to rust.
Unior BikeGator repair stand review test
A quick-release clamp holds the head in place, making it easy to adjust the angle of the bike while you work on it.


All of the above adds up to 12.5 pounds, which is much lighter than a beefier stand that's intended for use in a bike shop, and the BikeGator+'s 34.2" footprint is also smaller than many other folding racks that use three legs instead of the Unior repair stand's two leg design. It also folds down to only 38.5'' long, and can easily fit under the bench seat of a vehicle, especially if you remove the quick-release head.



Performance

Anyone who's lived with a folding repair stand knows that sometimes you have to push in just the right place to make it transform, and it's no different with the BikeGator+. Giving it a shove on the lower, sliding clamp while pushing or pulling on the legs does the trick, and the whole thing moves smoothly once you get that figured out. You do have to squeeze down on the quick-release clamp pretty firmly to keep it from slowly folding down over time, but a good press of the lever does the trick. Once it's up, the tray simply plugs into two holes on the upper clamp and then you're good to go.

The clamp feels extremely sturdy, which is nice, but the fact that it's not spring-loaded means you have to get the tension just right if you're looking for a snug grip on your seat post. This probably won't be noticeable to most people who will only ever be clamping one bike in the stand, but those who work on other bikes with differently sized seat posts will need to adjust the clamp's tension each time. The steel rod can be turned with just your fingers - no tools are required - and it's easy to do with one hand while holding the bike up with the other.

Once the bike is in the stand, changing its angle was as easy as loosening the top quick-release and rotating it whichever way, but be sure not to pull the bike towards you as you do it or the entire head will pop out of the stand.
Unior BikeGator repair stand review test
The BikeGator+ isn't as stable as a three leg design, so it's best used on lever ground.

Sometimes it's the simplest things that we're so thankful for, and the BikeGator+'s tray is one of those things. Most folding stands don't include a tray, and using one never really popped into my head, but having all of the tools you'll need, as well as a place to put parts is extremely handy when you're in the middle of a repair. This is especially true if you're on a road trip and trying to fix your bike in a parking lot or campsite; sure, you can put stuff on the ground or the tailgate of your truck, but a tray makes things easier and cleaner.


Unior BikeGator repair stand review test
  The stand folds up to well under 40'' long, and both the head and the tray slide out to make storage or transportation easy.

Now we get to the most important part: how stable is the BikeGator+? The dual leg design certainly makes for a smaller overall package, as well as a smaller footprint when it's unfolded (especially important if space is tight in your garage or apartment), but it's also nowhere near as steady as a three leg, folding repair stand. This is especially noticeable on uneven ground when you're outside, and pushing on the bike or bumping into it can send everything tipping over backward. Lowering the height of the stand, as well as tilting it forward, does help this, but the bottom line is that it's not as anchored feeling as I'd like it to be. You'll definitely want put your bike on the ground if you need to crack a bottom bracket or set of pedals loose.



Pinkbike’s Take:
bigquotesA repair stand is definitely a luxury, but, once you own one, it's also something that you won't know how you ever lived without. The BikeGator+ is certainly better than just leaning your bike up against the wall when you need to work on it, but its unstable two leg design means that there are better options if you aren't pinched for space or won't ever need to move it to a different location. That said, it's a practical, compact repair stand that's best suited to being stashed away in your car or truck for use during race weekends and road trips. - Mike Levy



Visit the feature gallery for high resolution and additional images




90 Comments

  • + 8
 Ditto. Awesome stand
  • - 7
flag dirtdoctor (Feb 24, 2016 at 22:08) (Below Threshold)
 This is one of the few good products mec might actually have in stock. What a laugh finding something in your size, why does that person still have a job after all these years of 'out of stock'? Seriously dude you suck at your job so hard, it's predictable!
  • + 7
 I have this one and it may work even gooder!
www.mec.ca/product/5011-381/feedback-pro-elite-repair-stand-with-tote-bag
Thanks family for the great Christmas gift!
  • + 7
 @justincs @highrocker1298

have you guys ever used a stand with 2 legs(like the one above)? I too have a 3 legged stand, a Spin Doctor G3, and it seems less stable and rigid as my friends Park Tool PCS10(which is a two legged like the one above). The clamp on my mine is terrible, but besides that the stand is very flexy. Also, if I want to bring my stand inside, the footprint takes up a lot of room due to the three legs. The two leg stands can be pushed into a corner and take up less space.
  • + 3
 @csermonet yes, I have used a 2-legged stand and it is substantially less effective. Better than nothing, but not as stable as the 3-legged version. I eventually gave it to a buddy who had nothing.
  • + 2
 Yeah, mine sits in the back yard to get my tires up off the ground. That, and it's better than not having anything and having to ask someone if you could borrow theirs so you can lube your chain. Other than that, I'm not a huge fan of it. It likes to fall over randomly.
  • + 11
 My ex-girlfriend's dad gave me one like justincs'. It's brilliant. We broke up nearly two years ago but the stand remains dependable. Buy one.
  • + 5
 For $5 more, the Park Tool PRS-25 is 10 times better than this half way out-dated and out-performed BikeGator+ stand.
  • + 20
 Doses it come with rusty fasteners or is that extra?
  • + 0
 @justincs: I have that exact stand, and I hate it, but it seems to get good reviews, so now I'm curious. I'm gonna bash on it, and you can tell me if I'm wrong.
- It's very unstable. I have to have my bike positioned quite precisely when I take the back wheel off, or it might tip over. If I accidentally bump it while I'm working on it, it's very likely to tip over. Eventually I got into the habit of mounting the bike so the front wheel is between two of the legs. This seems to be the most stable, but still sketchy.
- It's super flexy. Wrenching on anything with a moderate amount of force causes things to wiggle all over the place.
- The clamp is a major pain in the @ss. It takes at least 10 seconds of holding my bike at an awkward angle to get it mounted tightly.
- The part where it telescopes just can't be tightened enough. Even with as little force as I exert spinning the cranks while wiping the chain causes the stand to turn, which causes it to lower.
- I will say that it folds up really nicely. It'd be a good trailside stand, but not at all what I was hoping for in the garage.

I notice these issues with my Intense Carbine mounted in it, and to a lesser degree with my XC hardtail. But neither of them are 40 lb DH rigs. I just think this stand was meant for road bikes. Again, it gets good reviews, so maybe my standards are too high. Thoughts?
  • + 4
 That will cost you extra its the vintage model
  • + 1
 I've used both the Feedback Pro and Parktool PCS 10 and I've found the Parktool stand to be more stable on uneven ground.
  • + 1
 The first thing I see is rust... The first thing I think of is poor quality fasteners. I would expect stainless or coated fasteners at that price.
  • + 1
 The feedback stand with the tool tray blows everything else out of the water value wise I think. I much prefer it my buddies PCS-9 and the PCS-10 is just way over priced.
  • + 1
 So much for advertising... Ha.
  • + 2
 I have that stand too. It works but i agree it is sometimes sketchy. But if you think about it you have the wight of the bike out on a 1 foot lever and then you go to tighten something down and there is a lot of force all in one spot, and not a whole lot to combat it. I just think there is only so much you can expect from a light folding stand.
  • + 22
 $300 for a manual adjustable tube clamp?
No stainless parts!!!
BUT THAT RUST!
Rather stick with a Park.
  • + 2
 Unior sells versions with spring-loaded clamps at the same price.

Personally I prefer the manually adjustable clamp, since the seatpost diameter of 90% of the bikes I work on is identical anyway.
  • + 8
 1st thing I noticed was the rust. Makes me not want to buy one.
  • + 1
 Seriously. I live in Santa Cruz. That sucker would rust in my damned garage from the moisture in the air. I see zero point in purchasing this stand over others that are already in market and proven.
  • + 1
 Its funny because in the pictures shown, there is already rust on the bolts
  • + 13
 Needs a wrench to adjust the clamp? No thanks. Might as well get a Feedback or ParkTools at that price.
  • + 1
 big time
  • + 2
 You do it by hand... Its not that tight. I have ised the head and its a good preforming tool.
  • + 2
 Used* damn!
  • + 3
 He said you can do it with your fingers
  • + 1
 Use your fingers to loosen it so you can fit a bigger tube in?
  • + 1
 My word is that posible? Yes yes it is.
  • + 7
 Paid about $125 on sale for my park pcs-10 and fix my Huffy beach cruiser that must be 90lbs. Never once did I think it was going to tip over or even wobble a little. I wash my Nomad on it all the time and I see no rust. I think I will pass. You should do the same.
  • + 5
 Bike stands of similar or better quality can be had off ebay for £35. Why are manufacturers ignoring this and trying to sell us £300 pieces of crap that arent worth half the RRP.
My Lidl/Ebay special is completely tool free, fully adjustable, rotating clamp and 4 legs. i can buy 9 of them for the price of this! INSANE
  • + 4
 I'd rather hang my bike from the ceiling with hooks. This looks so flimsy you would need to own a carbon. Otherwise you would have to bolt it to the wall, to take the bike weight.

Plus if you keep an eye out. You can always get on used cheap from someone who blew 15K to be "hip" and owns a 10K bike, that never gets ridden. For about 50-100$ (or at least thats been my experience)
  • + 6
 $300 for a stand that rusts. And is $50 more than the Park and Feedback Sports equivalents. WTF!
  • + 1
 I would have said that in other words, but I can just agree with you Ade
How can you present a product that rusts...
Thank PinkBike, you saved us 300 $
  • + 5
 Unior Tools have infringed on Parks trademark by using the color blue together with bike tools. That's why they do not sell them in the US
  • + 5
 They are coming to the US, bust as you said Parks have copyright on blue bike tools, so in the US Unior will be sold in red.
pbs.twimg.com/media/CZezkI2WAAAJiHu.jpg
  • + 12
 I thought Specialized invented the bike stand?
  • + 36
 No just the Colour red.
  • + 6
 Bought one from the Lidl couple of years ago for €30. Still works fine.
  • + 2
 just bought this one www.cyclingdealusa.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=YC-100BH its by BIKEHAND they got a nicer tripod version on their actuall site its the YC-300BH too. not sure on price but Cyclingdeal in City of Industry had yhis 100 version for under 100$ and you get a folding tool plate and its magnetic also. I got the padded bag for an extra 30$ still great deal . for a great looking stand.
  • + 2
 I have the same one, works well
  • + 2
 For what its worth i have park tools stand, but i was away for a few months and needed a temporary solution, bought this on amazon prime
www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00EQ5G446?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o08_s00

and i've not used the park tools one again. This is light completely stable and really portable and all for £40 and this Unior one is $300 and it doesnt work......
  • + 1
 PRS-15 or nothing.. After working in a shop and getting used to a quality stand, I hated every portable stand until I tracked down a PRS-15. It was expensive and it's now discontinued, but hands down the best portable/ home use stand ever.. I have no problem cracking bottom brackets and holding old school DH 50lbs bikes vertical.


www.parktool.com/product/professional-race-stand-prs-15
  • + 4
 In Europe, buy a Lidl one. I got for for 30Euro and it's fantastic. Don't even think about it, just do it.
  • + 3
 "replaceable foam organizer" = great replacement part marketing!
But, it is compact enough to use in a small apartment or dorm room.
  • + 1
 The head is different but the stand looks the same as the pro workstand. Pain in the arse to use as every time you try to put the bike in it it topples over! You need to put your feet on the end of the legs which means you are too close to the stand.
  • + 1
 I though camming clamps on bike stands were a thing of the past, due to the potential during the high pressure phase to crush thin tubes like droppers? I like a lot of the stuff I'm seeing out of Unior, & Park really needs the competition, but this smacks of a product not well thought out. Back to the drawing board boys, you've got to be better than Feedback, or cheaper, but you can't be more expensive and worse.
  • + 1
 Am I the only one who thinks that a few stainless tubes and a well-designed, functional clamp shouldn't cost more than a hundred bucks? This isn't about engineering, technology, weight, style or anything else that might make other simple-appearing bike parts expensive. A couple tubes and a clamp... super handy, but really? $300?!?
  • + 1
 Just stainless tubes alone would cost almost a hundred bucks. Ever bought steel?
  • + 1
 If you're going to make a product that already exists and already works... it must be better. This is not better. There's no reason to purchase this stand... no reason. Period.

Unless you work for them and you get them for $50.
  • + 2
 I use this one.

www.lidl.de/de/powerfix-fahrrad-montagestaender/p189671

Costs 24€ and it works well. For 300€ I can buy more than 12 of this,
  • + 0
 Yep Amazon sells it for like 47$ sold.
They take us for idiots I would smack the sh?t ou of them with that stand they would come back to reality.
  • + 2
 When are manufacturers going to get with the times and make some longer slacker stands to match contemporary bicycle geometry?!
  • + 4
 This was a stand up review Wink
  • + 0
 I didn't know bike stands were such a big deal. Maybe if I was building a bike from scratch it would be useful, but even then they aren't 100% necessary. I would have to say that the only time I would ever use a bike stand is if I was a professional DH rider, and the team worked on my bike with me.
  • + 1
 endurorider.pl/2011/04/rowerowy-stojak-serwisowy-velomann-bike-trim-v-2500 in constant use from 2011 and it's still fine. Not the most sophisticated construction but it gets the job done. And it gets it very well.
  • + 1
 "only bike stand manufactured in Europe"... who cares?! Most bikes are made in Taiwan so why not get a stand made there too for half the price!
  • + 2
 $300 for a bike stand? Holy crap man, am I the only one that thinks that's insane?!
  • + 7
 Yes. That's a cheap stand.
  • + 1
 I guess I just see a few tubes and a clamp and can't see how it costs more than $50 to make that thing to justify the price tag. But hey, no one ever said this sport was cheap.
  • + 2
 Or you can always get the x-tools repair stand for less than half the price.
  • + 1
 "only bike stand manufactured in Europe"... who cares?! Most bikes are made in Taiwan so why not get a stand made there too for half the price!
  • + 2
 Aluminum??? I need a carbon stand to match my bike. (Please neg prop this.)
  • + 2
 Yup, Carbon is much more stiffer and nicer to wrench.
  • + 2
 Why is the clamp on the lock ring for the dropper post? That is the worst place to clamp.
  • + 2
 ...Pro Components...Shimano quality...
  • + 3
 I only ride PARK...
  • + 1
 Im really suprised this didnt infringe on any of parktools technology because it is super similar
  • + 1
 But more importantly, you will a bucket for all that RUST its producing. Look at the pivot joints!
  • + 2
 Ive got a £25 one from Aldi. Does the job perfectly!
  • + 1
 second that,, ive done a ton of jobs on mine and its holding up fine,,, and when it doesnt who cares as i have a second one new in the shed ready git it at the end of the sale period as a back up but so far never needed it,, stands are way over priced but then most mountain bike stuff is these days ,,, dropper posts anyone
  • + 2
 My Llidl one works much better
  • + 1
 All unior tools I've used equals one thing..shite.
  • + 2
 Mike Lever
  • + 1
 You pay 300 for bikestand and you dont get rostfrei bolts...
  • + 1
 What the hell are they?
  • + 1
 No idea something that is already rusty as it seems from the pictures =/
  • + 2
 I agree rastafari bolts would have been much better Smile
  • + 1
 The Jenson off brand one works great and for a fraction the price
  • + 1
 Looks similar to the Minoura RS-5000.
  • + 1
 299$ only if the bike is included
  • + 1
 Can't beat a park tool stand
  • + 1
 Lol 299$ what a ripoff, At amazon they sell a nice one at 58$
  • + 1
 Looks good
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.068314
Mobile Version of Website