Unno Bikes - Exclusive Interview

Apr 20, 2016
by Paul Aston  
UNNO Bikes


UNNO Bikes

Something interesting is brewing in Barcelona. A disused textiles factory has been restored to glory and houses the Cero Design studios, and now begins to break the mold with Unno Bikes. The man behind it all, Cesar Rojo, has a strong palmarés including top ten World Cup DH finishes, multiple national championships and is reigning Master's World Champion, a title he captured riding a bike designed and built in his own studio. We asked Cesar a few questions about his latest project:



Hi Cesar. What is your background in mountain biking, engineering and design?

I used to race during the late 90's and early 2000's the World Cup DH for Global Racing, at 21 years old I finished 11th overall in the WC and 6th in the final race, that is my best ever result. I raced a bit later on in 2009 doing a few top 30's I believe, I'm four-times Spanish national champ: 2x junior, 1x elite and 1x master 30. I'm an industrial engineer, but mainly now I manage Cero (we have over twenty-five people here, working for many clients. One of the big ones is KTM where we help with production motorcycles) and focus on taking care of projects, kinematics, and geometry. We have an outstanding team of engineers and designers that do an amazing job putting together the pieces.

Which brands and bikes have Cero Design previously worked with? What was your role in the development processes? Mondraker Dune/Foxy/Summum, Canyon Sender?

We did all the Mondraker stuff starting with Zero Suspension, Forward Geometry and the design for those frames. Forward was completely our own proposal. We have nothing to do with Canyon Sender, our DH frame was designed 2.5 years ago… Why is the Sender so close to our frame, who knows… Designers come and go.


UNNO Bikes
Personally, I can't wait...


Where did the name Unno come from, and what does it mean?

Uno, with one 'n' means One in Spanish, and as the studio is named cero (zero) after my name (CEsar ROjo), Jaume came up with this idea that after zero comes one, so we all found that made sense to us. The problem was trying to register uno with one 'n' as Formula One was giving us a lot of problems, so decided to use double n.

Did you race an Unno prototype at the Masters World Championships last year?

Yes, that bike is not only a prototype, it's exactly as the production frames will be, bear in mind we are putting more than one year of riding on each frame, not only field testing, but we’ve been extensively testing the frames here inside for fatigue, impact and performing a lot of stiffness tests to be able to replicate the aluminum feeling - that we love - into our carbon frames. So we're trying to avoid this over-stiff feeling of carbon frames that you find now on the market. More controlled flex helps with traction, this is something we have so many experiences of in Moto GP, where you need to have flex to be able to turn, otherwise the bike just chatters and does not turn due to different alignment of suspension and the bump direction… But I can make five pages about this and probably some people will end with their eyes bleeding after so much nerd stuff, so let’s leave it at this.

Why did you feel the need to bring Unno Bikes to the market? Are you planning to fill a gap that's missing?

The idea behind it is on one side to show what we are capable of as a studio and to do something without any limitations, you won’t be hearing any marketing BS from us, only facts, that you can agree with or not. We know every single thing about these bikes and there is a reason behind everything, I know this itself sounds like marketing BS, but you can throw any question about the bikes or production at us, we have an answer. Try to ask others out there what temperature their frames are cooked at, how long, the heating ramp, how many different layers, which carbon orientation is the used, weight of the fiber used, I can just go on and on only about this small part. As I said there is not a single question we cannot answer about the whole process, from layout, how molds are made, to the final product. Also very important to us was to make something super exclusive, that means super expensive, but no detail is forgotten.


UNNO Bikes
An interesting looking entry port for internal cable routing, plus I don't recognize that stem and top cap - will we see a range of components too?


Why have you chosen carbon fibre over other materials?

Because of its properties and because the amount of room for improvement. In Asia, you are basically stuck with T300 from Toray (or similar from other brands, Toho and Mitsubishi) for cheap carbon, or slightly higher-end T700 and T800 (really high end and only some small reinforcements). We are working now on T1000 type of carbon (T700 is around 22€/sqm and T1000 is 115€/sqm), but it's a high modulus, high strength fiber that with the same amount of weight gets much better properties, but this means you can reduce it if you want, even if now we are playing very safe, this fiber is not really available in Asia, they won’t sell to them. Then you have all these other very special fibers used in F1/aerospace/hypercars that are special for impacts, abrasion. Even the resin type for the pre-preg, now we are trying some organic ones that are environmentally friendly (this is a future step). There is so much to choose from and this is why carbon is so amazing and our reason to go that direction, because the room for improvement is huge.

Is it viable financially and environmentally to produce carbon bikes in Europe?

For sure it is viable, but I don’t think so if you want to sell at a competitive price, financially as you can imagine with salaries over 10 times or even higher here makes a difference as this is so labor intensive. We are looking at 40 to 50 hours of work per frame, plus material, machined parts, it adds up so quick! Environmentally, here in Spain everything is super controlled, what you do with waste, transportation, there are a million regulations for emissions. This means it's much more environmentally friendly, for sure it's more expensive, but it's our responsibility to take care of the earth and do as much to help. For us, this is a big plus and we want to learn more how to improve the environmental impact in the future. It will be our goal to do so. Also employing locally is something we believe in, a future investment, reducing the amount of transportation from Asia (a boat burns a lot of fuel) is a big plus for us too… We want to be super happy with our product, proud of it, I know that sounds like a topic, but it is what it is.


UNNO Bikes


You say all the bikes will be handmade. Will they be made to measure? If not, how do you plan to make a geometry and kinematic to suit a wide range of riders abilities?

They are handmade, I would even say handcrafted. Not tailor made because if you want to do a monocoque construction this is almost impossible to do, also between sizes you should be adapting your layup, so this is not easy. We will be targeting some average height consumers for now.


UNNO Bikes
Every single piece of carbon-fiber needed to make one frame.


Can you expand on what will be included in the line of bikes? DH / XC / Enduro?? What travel numbers? Forward Geometry? Wheel size, Plus size? Boost? etc?

As you can see on the bike range image, all will have modern geometry, this includes XC which hasn’t really changed since the 80s. We are looking at two 29er XC frames, two enduro frames with 29" or 27.5" wheels and one 27.5" downhill bike. No plus size, we feel these are performance bikes, we tried plus sizes and in very technical trails the tires on holes makes you lose precision. We feel a normal tire is still much faster for a skilled rider, that is what we believe are the riders looking at this. Sure boost, only 1by…




For more check out Unno's Facebook and Instagram.


MENTIONS: @paulaston




157 Comments

  • + 199
 The picture depicting every piece needed to make a carbon-fiber frame is pretty mind blowing. No wonder they're so pricey.
  • + 62
 That pic made me click the article.
  • - 3
 @Jim-laden:
Me too :-)
Not sure I like the look of the bikes, but still interesting.
  • - 9
flag RedBurn (Apr 20, 2016 at 6:18) (Below Threshold)
 It's the manpower who costs most of the money when it comes to carbon frames .... That big sheet of carbon fiber of which from all these littles parts can be cut mustn't be so expensive !!!
  • + 18
 the vid makes it look as easy as baking a cake
  • + 22
 This is good stuff PB. Keep it coming.
  • + 18
 One of the coolest bike-design images I've seen in a long time!
  • + 2
 DH bike where is it?!?!?! Smile
  • + 9
 I d unno what to think about this??
  • + 9
 @RedBurn: read the article. He explains the cost. Now the amount other brands charge for carbon frames using the mentioned 22€/sqm just seems even crazier than before
  • + 22
 That picture is indeed a bloody smart idea for advertising and informing at the same time. Brilliant - Love it!
  • + 5
 @RedBurn: read the article, the carbon that they use costs about 110 euro/square meter
  • + 2
 POY 2016 !
  • + 13
 Redburn is kind if right because if they say they spend 50 man hours per frame, while man hour in EU can easily cost 30€, then even at 120€ per sqm, the material cost is not that much of a concern. Big companies shoot their prices over the ceiling and I think companies like YT and Canyon show that pretty well.
  • + 1
 Black Opps
  • + 3
 I'd quite like a framed version on the wall
  • + 3
 @bonastab: I'm just glad that they didn't went with the Plus crap.
  • + 2
 blows my mind..and I thought it was crazy cutting my templates and steel tubes by hand. Still, LOW CARBON steel FTW!
  • + 2
 Just hypothesizing, so the uber-premium carbon + more costly labor is going to lead to what..... a $10k DW-link frame? I'd buy a Turner or Ibis before this, of course, but they do look sweet!
  • + 12
 "But honeeeyyyy. It's about safety. Do you really want me riding around on cheap Chinese carbon that only costs 22euros/sqm?"
  • + 4
 As to their use of carbon, from what I've read (and it may be worthless, it was some article about top road frames, on example of S-Works Venge) the higher the T number the better the strength to weight ratio gets but at the same time material becomes more brittle and less compliant. Some carbon expert please?
  • + 1
 @Jim-laden: That pic made my click hard!

Wait, what?
  • + 4
 welp its already out dated... no metric shock mounts lol
  • + 17
 @WAKIdesigns: Brittleness is more a component of the resin matrix, and fiber orientation. Longer working resin tends to make for more flexible and durable parts. Think of epoxy, and the differences between the cure times. Additives may also be combined into the matrix to augment other qualities. Unidirectional fibers will always be the most brittle torsionally and laterally, think of it like plywood vs pine. A weave that is based on a 45 degree will be the most flexible and durable part, stiffness can be added be adding layers of "uni" with the fibers running in the direction that you want. Curing time, temperature, and pressure also affects the stiffness/flexibility ratio. This is what I learned on the job, manufacturing carbon wing spars at a former leading small civil aircraft plant. The is some serious "black magic" going on in the resin matrix and curing processes that require an material engineering/chemistry degree to fully grasp. As much as I got to learn, it even more left me scratching my head in awe.
  • + 5
 @WAKIdesigns: we will be making soon some posters soon out of it and giving them away Wink
  • + 2
 @CustardCountry: We are doing so soon and giving them away, check our FB page for that Smile
  • + 2
 @enrico650: We are glad too Big Grin
  • + 2
 @WasatchEnduro: no DW and much cheaper than that hands down...
  • + 5
 @WasatchEnduro: Still aluminum is 2 to 4€/kg, so to compare that to the carbon, have in mind that 1sqm is 150gsm, so that means 1kg of the "cheap" carbon is still around 145€/kg and if you have in mind that approx 30% is wasted due to patterns you end up at 188€ per kg... so a bit more expensive than aluminium Wink
  • + 4
 @rideunno: would you accept back a poster from Antidote then Wink
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: That is high modulus, but this is high modulus, high strength carbon, you can check this graph to better understand. On road frames they use high modulus, the M line, so M40 or M46
www.carbon-fiber.com/range.jpg
  • + 3
 @HerrDoctorSloth: Not really truth, resin had to do, as there are milion types of resing, thoughened ones are the ones we use, but you have a milion types... Is really due to type of fiber... What you are in need is high strenght and high stiffness... Ideal high of all, the higher the strength, the better it can stand impacts. So as you see for mtb T1000 is the best you can get, for road if you don't mind the bike desintegrating on the crash then you can go high modulus like M46...
www.carbon-fiber.com/range.jpg
  • + 2
 @rideunno: what do you think: have you done any research into making bikes from hemp fiber and low-toxicity resins? How strong would they be, how much would they weigh in comparison to aluminium? Most importantly: would it really be more environmentally friendly?
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: is something we are looking at as I mentioned, we are in contact with a few companies, let's see how it turns out. But is not really about the resin itself, its about the process of making that resin that is much more enviromentally friendly, but as I mentioned, we still haven't gone deep on that road yet. Just made initial contacts.
  • + 1
 And that's the exact purpose of this pic: justify the price of a carbon frame with just a picture an no word to anyone who read this article. Perfect example of the power of suggestion of pictures. Because with any word, the reader think exactly what is suggested with the feeling he arrives himself to this conclusion.
Way better and more convincing than "A carbon frame needs hundreds of pieces wich is why our frames are soooo expensive."
  • + 1
 @Pitrouille: It's still good to add that frame is made in EU where employees get just wages and social care, while production is subjecto environmental standards. There's plenty of uninformed people and cynics who cannot grasp the idea that there is a reason why manufacture in Asia is do cheap. The True Cost is something to get educated about. I would love to see an honest documentary about manufacturing in Asia, especially when it comes to carbon. When I hear of a guy who gets fkd up on a counterfeit frame I am not concerned by any means. It's good to get what you deserve.

m.youtube.com/watch?v=oagmlbhobnY
  • + 42
 wicked vid, i have been making carbon boats for the last 19 years! now i want to make bikes. Unno do you have a job for me, i make a wicked cup of tea!!
  • + 27
 oh man, can you imagine if all you needed to get a great job was a wicked cup of tea....that would be the best.
  • + 11
 Wicked cup of Tea is a strong argument, not sure the Spanish value it as much tho lol
  • + 5
 @Balgaroth: Yeah, he needs to work on his Spanish drinks if he is gonna land the job. I guess sangria and espresso?
  • + 2
 @unclethunder: It would, us Brits would rule the world again!
  • + 7
 @Fix-the-Spade: Dear Brits, here is America back, thanks for the Tea!
  • + 3
 Amazing to see little snip-its of all the parts of the process to make one bike. Now think of all the bike models and then every size needing their own molds...the investment must be staggering
  • + 29
 I hope they keep the 12k/checker pattern of the carbon; this looks so damn sweet!

I like the "made by engineers, not marketers" kind of speech but hey, that's what people want to hear! They're only trying to sell their stuff!
  • + 80
 "The greatest trick the Marketer ever pulled was convincing the world he didn't exist."
  • + 8
 @darkmuncan = Kaiser Souzé
  • + 12
 Just that exactly got me wondering really, why use a carbon fibre weave when fibre reinforced plastic make most sense over something isotropic (like sheet metal) when you orient the fibres in the direction of the forces? Or are they just doing prototypes with prepreg weaves and start using unidirectional fibres once they've got the geometry dialed? I'm definitely not saying it doesn't look great fun already!

The other thing I wonder is if they're going to stick with using so many patches of material? I understand that this could be due to the fact that they're using prepreg material with limited (shear) flexibility so to fit it in such a complex curved shape they'll need multiple small patches to avoid wrinkles. Another reason could be that they want thicker walls in one place and can do with thinner walls elsewhere so layering is a way to achieve that. The downside is that if you have multiple small patches, you have more free edges. And as the frame is always going to flex a little, these free edges will wiggle with relative to the underlying larger patch and work themselves loose. That is, you'll have delamination. Or do they apply a larger sheet on the inside as well to fixate them? I couldn't figure that out from the video clip.

Don't get me wrong, I have no doubt the engineering is amazing and I think it is great they do so much in house. Cesar just made me curious when he said we could ask the technical details. So @paulaston if the invite still stands, could you pass these questions on?

As for the bikes, I think they look amazing. The low top tube makes them look good fun to move about on and it is good they design some flex in them. The higher price doesn't seem like a terrible issue considering what you're getting, it is just that current "progress" in bicycle component standards scare you to invest in a valuable chassis. My eight year old steel hardtail (DMR Switchback) is still going strong, with IS disc brake mounts, 1 1/8" straight steerer tube, 26.8mm seatpost and 26" wheels obviously. The lastest and greatest is not going to fit, except for the brake with an adaptor obviously. No problem for me, but what if it were some sweet titanium hardtail? You may not see it fit to swap out your old Fox fork out for something from Suntour even though it may perform as good or even better than what Fox was back then. So what if you get an amazing Unno now and want to upgrade some components six years from now? The new forks have a tapered metric 40mm/30mm steerer tube, shocks have got metric mounts, the brake calipers have radial brake mounts and by popular demand on PB, the industry went back to 26" wheels. I think this is drawback of an industry of component manufacturers who, with presumably good intentions, keeps fixing stuff that's never been an issue to the actual rider. And as I mentioned above, I can definitely see this backfire on the companies who stick out and build something truly amazing.

That said, I'd definitely love to see them proceed build the best stuff out there.
  • + 7
 @vinay: The weave layer looked like it was non structural to me. If you look at the layers coming off the cutter they look unidirectional. It's pretty standard to put a twill layer over your structural material to highlight that it is carbon, and make it pretty. The weave/twill is what most people think of when you say carbon fiber
  • + 2
 @ReformedRoadie: =tommy cooper
  • + 1
 @ReformedRoadie: = Giorgio romani
  • + 3
 @vinay most Carbon fames are pit together using that many pieces. Most mountain are around 90ish I think. The Scott plasma 3 uses around 220.

I believe that 12k visible weave pattern is probably for asthetics. When carbon comes out of the mold, it is super uneven and not smooth/uniform. The frames have to undergo sanding to get that smooth carbon look. The sanding doesn't do anything structually.

I haven't heard of a a bike using all unidirectional weave. It makes more sense to use intersecting fiber weaves (the angles the angles between the fibers can be varied to affect the amount of torsion or flex).

Bicycling magazine does a very nice article explaining the carbon frame building process used by Look. I also wrote a 1500 word paper on the process from carbon acquisition to frame painting. I can send you it if you would like. It gives a good overview of the process.
  • + 3
 @vinay: Hey let me go by parts!

We are using weave on the outside, mainly because it can stand much better impacts so you don't have delamination issues, at least not as bad as with UD, but under the skin we are using UD to better use of the carbon properties. Have in mind weave can only be used in 0-90º and +-45º, so for any other angle, either you go custom weaves (you can get special angles and even tripple direction ones), or you go UD.

There are a lot of patches, but not that many really, you don't want to go to a very heavy fiber, we use 150gsm, so you need quite a lot to get the bike covered and on target weight. Also small patches are to reinforce critical areas, radiuses, were mainly loads change directions... This layup took us 1.5 years to get here... We've broken easy over 15 frames in different tests, but on the other hand now we are passing double EN test loads.

Cheers for that @vinay, keep questions comming, or don't hesitate to post over in our FB we get you some real answers, no marketing BS for us.
  • + 2
 @j12j: not at all, the weave is really good for impact resistance, that is why we use it on the outside. UD tends to delaminate more easy on a impact.
  • + 2
 @brightbmx: I mentioned already in another comment here so you can look up, but weave is for better impact resistance, rocks and so on... All taiwan made (or most have UD on the outside, what is no good for impacts)
  • + 1
 @rideunno: Hi Cesar, thank you for your clear reply. I indeed understand that a weave is better for out of plane stresses like impacts (just like you'd use multiplex wood for the seat and backrest of a chair if it has to be thin). But if the main purpose of that layer is for impact, I'm sure you'd have considered using aramid fibres (by the large public known as Kevlar as made by DuPont) or at least an aramid/carbon hybrid weave. Now as you've still chosen for a full carbon weave on the outside, I'm curious why you still prefer that over aramid.

Good to know you've gone for UD for those smaller patches, actually I already expected you know your stuff and don't fall for the same traps as all those who produce "black metal" products (that is, those who design with carbon as if it were sheet metal).

Sorry I don't see myself ever bothering with FB so thank you so much for coming over to PB! Obviously I wouldn't mind if you copy this discussion to your FB page so that others can benefit as well Smile .
  • + 1
 @vinay: Cheers! We've looked for aramid, but there are also other fibers that are better suited now for that than aramid. Even if we experimented also with a company that makes a material that goes in between layers. There is so many new materials out there is crazy.
  • + 1
 @rideunno: Thanks again, cool to know! Yes I was aware there are other capable options out there (I once had a lecture series about Dyneema by Akzo Nobel who claimed it was actually much stronger than Kevlar) though having sufficient impact resistance in carbon fibre is new for me. Aramid (branded Twaron by Ten Cate) once saved our ass big time in a crash during a test drive with our car where the carbon and epoxy completely disappeared. But that was abrasion as well, not impact exclusively.

Cool to see you're open for what's currently out there that might fit the bill. Gets me excited to see what will be next we'll see on your bikes. Organic resins sound cool, especially if it is competitive with epoxy. As you're working with prepreg, you could perhaps even try working with different resins for different layers. Never tried that, but could be interesting. In my experience thermoplast resins cope better with impact than thermoset so these might be good for the outer weave. Not sure if these are going to bond nicely with the thermoset layers inside (for structural stiffness). If the thermoplast material even stays put during the curing cycle, that is.

I love this stuff, thanks for being on the leading edge of bicycle design Smile !
  • + 22
 Yes this is all interesting but he didn't ask the eight questions what we all want to know is how many water bottle cage mounts the dh bikes will have?
  • + 20
 There is a 2L bladder built into the down tube.
  • + 6
 @darkmuncan: there is a moss adventure bike with a tap below the bottom bracket so you can serve the whisky stored on the seat stay.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=OdG6xEowmis

its around minute 4 if you want to check it out.
  • + 3
 We might be still on time to get them, how many you think should make sense? I'd rather put a Swiss chocolate storage on the DH though... Big Grin
  • + 20
 As an engineer, and back-of-the-napkin bike designer, that edit was fantastic.
  • + 14
 Much respect for paying good wages, accepting enviro. regs. as a necessary cost of doing business that serve a real purpose, and not outsourcing to Asia. Nothing personal against Asians, but weak regulations and low wages drag down wages and weaken important regulations everywhere. Now if only I were wealthy, I'd buy a carbon bike made in the USA.
  • + 3
 So you wouldn't buy this one?
  • + 3
 Not one made in Barcelona, come on!!
  • + 6
 @rideunno: don't worry I'm sure it's not personal. Most Americans probably don't know wether Barcelona is in the same country as Madrid or as Jakarta Smile
  • + 11
 This is the type of manufacturing we need to get back to. Years ago a person made a large purchase and that item would last for years and years, that company would employ people who made a decent working wage. Now everything we have is junk and made to last a couple of years at most, or its not "in style" anymore so we replace it, and the people who make this junk are being taken advntage of. Its far more environmentally sustainable to make less bikes that last alot longer. Greed and boredom have got us to the point of replacing items far earlier then they should realistically need to be. The bike industry is a great example of this. A current $5000 bike will be "obsolete" in 3 years. Whether its a great bike or not. This is the main reason why i wont buy a new bike. I built my last bike out of the pb classifieds and its old but still a more capable bike then i am a rider, and i know im not alone.
  • + 4
 did you or anyone else see this piece from chris king on that other site a few days back?


vimeo.com/134528247


he talks profiteering, and other manu issues.........
  • + 12
 so it comes to this.....T1000 beats T600!
  • + 4
 Pretty sure the good old T101 beats them all in the movies
  • + 1
 @CustardCountry: t1000 creamed it.
  • + 2
 Yes but T800 beats T1000!!!!
  • + 1
 @CustardCountry: I guess I should have read further, my joke isn't funny now... just repetitive... it is T800 though, just sayin'.
  • + 2
 @Earthmotherfu: watch Terminator 2... you will see.
  • + 8
 I wanna have Doos o Trres Unnos !
  • + 4
 We want you to have as many as you want!
  • + 4
 Empresas como estas hacen sentirme orgulloso como amante del MTB y de la ingeniería y como español.

Business like these make me feel proud as a MTB and engineering lover and as a spaniard too.
  • + 1
 Gracias!
  • + 5
 Hopefully someday when I want a new bike I can walk down the street a ways and stick my usb stick into a big machine that prints out my own custom bike.
  • + 4
 this is another video thats pretty cool about how carbon frames get made. its the Giant ADV factory
www.youtube.com/watch?v=wSUKM3bvcyk
  • + 3
 Thanks for that - I had no idea how much true hands on work was involved.
  • + 4
 Interesting that people go on and on about working conditions in Asia. Didn't look like a sweatshop to me. Notice that the Giant employees had protective gear on unlike at Unno. So glad you posted that.
  • + 6
 Unno what? I forgot what I was going to say.
  • + 5
 Holy mother of God!!... Almost dying watchin the video... wonderful, awesome!!!
  • + 4
 I love the fact that they are willing to give you straight answers on carbon layup and mold production. No marketing BS, just straight engineering facts.
  • + 1
 Any time Smile
  • + 5
 Global Racing Team has the most badass jersey of all time in the DH history...
  • + 5
 Looks like a carbon process 153 to me. The way the top tube, shock mount and seat mast look ect See kona it can be done
  • + 11
 I suspect this will cost more than a Kona.
  • + 3
 for a bike video, there was sure a bunch of walking! Kidding aside, it looks amazing! Can't wait to take a good look at the DH bike.
  • + 5
 Praying to get a job and save lot of money to buy an Unno
  • + 0
 Ya puedes rezar xD
  • + 11
 Dont pray. Go and find one.
  • - 6
flag The-Catalan-Rider (Apr 20, 2016 at 6:25) (Below Threshold)
 @ajayflex: He's spanish, it's easier for him to complain.
  • + 11
 @The-Catalan-Rider: No he's Spanish and the unemployment rate in Spain is still around 21%.
Best of luck @jorgeyarza81
  • - 8
flag Benito-Camelas (Apr 20, 2016 at 11:03) (Below Threshold)
 @jorgeyarza81 no es que quiera parecer un engreído pero el artículo antes del sustantivo "unno" no es correcto, tendría que ser una A.
razones fonéticas.
  • - 4
flag jorgeyarza81 (Apr 20, 2016 at 12:09) (Below Threshold)
 @Benito-Camelas: ostras... pues lo acabo de mirar y tienes razón (yo pensaba que delante de vocal siempre era "an"), resulta que, como tu dices, son razones fonéticas. Me lo apunto Wink
  • - 5
flag sergiorgdh (Apr 20, 2016 at 13:56) (Below Threshold)
 Me gustaria verte bajar pinos con semejante Unno. jajaj
  • - 4
flag jorgeyarza81 (Apr 20, 2016 at 23:44) (Below Threshold)
 @sergiorgdh: igual con la Unno no... pero si las cosas van bien a final de año tendré una Canyon Sender
  • + 2
 Wow. Love that video. Really puts it into perspective of how much time/money/planning/designing/material/cutting goes into making this amazing works of art that we slay trails on! Cheers Unno!
  • + 5
 Please Cesar we want the 5 pages of nerdy stuff!
  • + 2
 @Uuno we will keep them comming! Keep checking our FB and don't mind asking. There will be a lot of nerdy stuff comming up.
  • + 1
 It seams when to famous people have a love child they always give em a weird name... Looks like it's the same for the bike industry, Kona and specialized having an enduro love child named UNNO
  • + 4
 already out dated. Not metric lol
  • + 3
 I don't have the money to buy one, but I'm convinced. This looks like proper high-end.
  • + 1
 "we’ve been extensively testing the frames here inside for fatigue, impact and performing a lot of stiffness tests to be able to replicate the aluminum feeling - that we love - into our carbon frames. "

Love it!
  • + 4
 No marketing BS? Have they read their own press release?
  • + 2
 We haven't read it, but we did wrote it though. You tell me where do you think the BS is, and I get you a straight answer and reason to it. If you come up with something that we've made out and is not real, you have a free frame!
  • + 1
 @rideunno: Hola! Well, sorry for this but I am going to take my chance:
With all due respect when you write "reducing the amount of transportation from Asia (a boat burns a lot of fuel) is a big plus for us too… " it really sounds marketing BS to me. I mean I doubt your carbon fiber and resin is made in Barcelona and I am pretty sure it came to you or to your provider from the same kind of boat you are talking about. Worst: considering the waste of material used in making the frame in BCN you are importing heavier amount of material then the weight of a frame. So actually more consumption.
Also I doubt you will have distributors all around the world to sale your bikes, at least for a moment so you will sale directly from your house to the customers and probably shipping them one by one by airmail for oversea and even for a big part of european places. This is by far the very worst method for "environmental impact". And I will end my argumentation here to get a free frame, wait...PLEASE!! Now is done.

The point is I actually get back here googling for dyneema carbon+unno as I am pretty curious about this new material and find out the post of vinay. This material is certainly going to play big in the cycling industry in the near future: marketing BS or not.. but now I am sure you already know about it.

About me, well I am still looking for a bike to get back to this sport that I stopped when I left Barcelona 10 years ago. But my father still live there...sure it could take the frame at your door. Best in class environmental friendly business.

Congratulations for your work Unno, it takes balls and a lot of passion for this journey. Saludos.
  • + 2
 Unno your bikes are as cool as your video. Very impressive article. Nice clean shop. Super sick bikes. I hope to be able to test one out soon.
  • + 2
 Thanks so much @properp !!! Cheers
  • + 2
 Just yesterday I rewatched the short film on BTR fabrications, it makes this overload of technology, imacs, and hospital rooms appear even crazier Big Grin
  • + 2
 That video simplified things a lot I think, but it was great to watch, and to get a feel for the process.
  • + 1
 @Kramz, for sure it is simplified and some things not even there, but we didn't want to have people sleeping in front of the computer Big Grin . We will keep informing more each week in our FB page.
  • + 1
 Seriouly, this is one of the best videos Ive ever seen. The bike looks great and it is pretty interesting to see these guys working. I want.
  • + 0
 Okay, so I have to be of average height and stinking rich to buy one of these... I guess one out of two is okay. Too bad I'm so tall, hahaha.
  • + 1
 does anyone actually buy an Unno to ride it or are they like supercars and too expensive to ride?
  • + 1
 They are made to be ride, and performance riding, not to cruise around Big Grin
  • + 2
 that was a wicked video. nerding out right now
  • + 2
 So does it really cost upwards of 50k to produce a mould?
  • + 7
 It can.... Design time (man hours) as well as the cost of the billets themselves. Then machining time (often billed by the minute unless you own your own CNC machines, which are prohibitively expensive) and so on and so on.

So 50k (EUR / USD) - not outside the realm of possibility.
  • + 9
 Sure, I have working in an injection molding factory, not even a big one, and the most expensive mold we had was 250k.
  • + 1
 @cptmayhem: They are not as expensive as they used to be, and are even cheaper second hand.
  • + 2
 Ten years ago the Giant Anthem mold was US$90k.
  • + 3
 @glasvagas not really, a mold for one size is around 6 to 10K, then add up sizes, but there are other molds invoved, so... It adds up a lot. In our case also we had to design the moulds, program for the milling machine... It adds up a lot of $$ in working hours...
  • + 2
 Nice looking bikes. I wish them good luck.
  • + 2
 That teaser video was awesome!
  • + 1
 Remember those paper airplanes we had in grammar school called 'White Wings'? This is like, Black Bike.
  • + 2
 that's a cool video!
  • + 1
 can anyone say stumpjumper?!?!
  • - 2
 Or Jeffsy? All bikes look the same: a weak and complex link.
  • + 3
 Looks more like a short dual link, not a Horst-link.
  • + 1
 it could be a miniPivotPhoenix...
  • + 1
 trying to be the Ferrari of mountain biking hey...
  • + 1
 Seems like one to keep an eye on.
  • + 5
 I d-unno about that.
  • + 2
 The bikes look great!
  • + 1
 Is the big 29er jonnes approved?
  • + 1
 yeah but how well can it go around corners
  • + 4
 @downhillnews: Thats exactly the kind of video a company that doesnt do marketing BS should have put up
  • + 1
 Unno is Spanish for stumpjumper
  • + 1
 Going to sell outside of Europe?
  • + 0
 AWESOME!! LOVE IT !!!!! is that the lightest full suspension frame out there ?
  • + 1
 I hoped you saved money for marketing
  • + 0
 it was like watching Hardcore Henry
  • + 0
 Looks like a Kona Process
  • - 1
 One of the best articles we will see for the year...
  • + 4
 they know their stuff
  • - 1
 The front of the Unno frame looks like a very stealth Kona Process
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