Video: How Much Do the EWS Pros' Bikes Weigh?

Jul 5, 2019
by Enduro World Series  


Right from its inception enduro racing has been a sport of compromise and at the heart of this has been balancing bike technologies. Bikes must be strong enough to survive torturous rock and root yet light enough to remain efficient across long, brutal days in the saddle.

We hit the first ever shakedown day here in Les Orres with some (fairly) high tech equipment in an attempt to establish just what the current enduro race machinery weighs and, perhaps more interestingly, how much importance the pro’s place on heft.


Bike Weights (many include tubes, tools)

Josh Carlson's Giant Reign: 15.09 kg / 33.3 lb
Noga Korem's GT Force: 14.2 kg / 31.3 lb
Robin Wallner's Ibis Ripmo: 14.85 kg / 32.7 lb
Ines Thoma's Canyon Strive: 14.12 kg / 31.1 lb
Vid Persak's Orbea Rallon: 15.2 kg / 33.5 lb
Greg Callaghan's Cube: 14.5 kg / 32 lb / Covered in mud: 15.8 kg / 34.8 lb


130 Comments

  • + 235
 Enduro is the best thing that's happened to trail bike design for us non-racers who like to get after it. It took the focus away from weight, and put it on reliability. Thank you enduro!
  • + 11
 Fork yeah!! Well said brother
  • + 10
 Can’t upvote this enough. So true.
  • + 8
 Yes exactly. I am 230lb and ride hard and light bikes always show me their true flex colors. Thank you enduro boys.
  • - 18
flag thenotoriousmic (Jul 5, 2019 at 13:39) (Below Threshold)
 Yep finally got the bikes we should have had the whole time that and along with e bikes.
  • + 15
 Kona Stinky likes this.
  • + 11
 Tbh, I think that freeride bikes kicked the door open for enduro bikes to roll through regarding durability versus pedal-ability.
  • - 9
flag alwayslivingthedream (Jul 5, 2019 at 14:53) (Below Threshold)
 Yeah and they keep making the races shorter. Soon you'll be able to ride your DH bike.. Hey there's an idea. Lets have DH races. Oh wait! WTF!
  • + 6
 Ebikes added durability too. Just buy ebike version of everything. Fox 36, steel n/w chainrings, chains.
  • + 19
 for people with less power and pedaling.."prowess" weight is important. i mean why not get it as light as you can with reliability that works for you?
  • + 24
 You're about to get super heavy trail bikes...be careful what you ask for. I think the frame and component designers could improve on their materials / methods / simulation models. I'll take a 30lb. burly bike over a 33lb. burly bike all day long.
  • + 2
 Mini super d at double the price!
  • + 3
 It was a great change for us racers who can’t ride a downhill bike that often too. Suddenly I get to ride a bike every day similar in weight and shape to the downhill bike I race on
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: I agree with you on this. e-bike components are ingenious for gear-thrashers!
  • + 4
 @megatryn: i bought a steel n/w chainring for my SLX, costed whole 20€ and will last for years
  • + 6
 Wait!!, what do you mean, they don't focus on weight...
I have 2, 2003 enduro bikes that have 7 inches of travel 63 degree head/seat tube angels, 2.7 tires, and are 45 lbs plus my old fat ass.....annnd I rode them up hill all day long, but we called them freeride bikes. I would say enduro bikes are just lighter better freeride bikes that, goes faster, climb better and still you can huck them without them folding in half...
  • - 1
 @WAKIdesigns: how are we getting downvoted for saying thanks to enduro and ebikes we’re finally getting decent components that work and last? Honestly I’m starting to think this isn’t even a mountain biking page anymore. Ha
  • + 1
 I heard that!
  • + 1
 Oath to that@thenotoriousmic:
  • + 0
 @thenotoriousmic: try not use the E before BIKE Smile

Bike weight is important.
That being said, doesn't mean that all should go total weightweenie on all components.
Frame - I dare someone feeling a 350grm/400grm between same model
Suspension / brakes - it matters more how it perform than actual weight
Points Of Contact (rider/bike) - If you are not for bling/weightweenie, just go for something costly effective (price/reability/maintenace)
Tyres go for performance

try using light cassete and rd... and that's it you've got a 15/16kg enduro bike
  • + 1
 @dustyyoungblood: Add 50lbs and EVERYTHING flexes, lol. I never break gear, but dammit do I pinch constantly unless running higher pressure than I'd prefer. #ClydesUnite.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: yup, ebikes only benefit has been getting the companies to make stuff for those that weigh over 175lbs, let alone those of us that weigh over 200lbs and actually spend a little time in a weight room. DH brakes have been a no brainer for me in a trail bike. Now they relabel them as e-bike approved. I think Scott is shipping the Genius now with an ebike Fox 34 for better stiffness, heard from a rep at a demo.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: also Sram 15€ NW steel chainring. 100g instead of 50g for Al, and since it wears so little it also spares the chain, and expensive XD cassette
  • + 1
 @downcountry: not me that extra weight is insurance that I won't be walking my bike. I choose reliabuility over weight savings.
  • + 89
 They should switch to carbon mud to save some weight.
  • + 2
 Brilliant.
  • + 2
 Why not Teflon coat the bike so nothing sticks to it?
  • + 3
 Pole wouldn't have it, it would be boltless mud that gets glued to your frame
  • + 1
 Kashima mud>>carbon mud
  • + 3
 @RussellTinka: It's called SC1 by Maxima gets some.
  • + 69
 Thank you for summarizing weights at the bottom.
  • + 4
 2nd that, much appreciated...
  • + 38
 Here I was thinking, “oh that’s lame, weigh the bikes with mud on them. How much could it add?”

....then they did. And the answer is a lot. Mud weighs a lot.
  • + 27
 Yea, not surprised. The "lift the bike into the bed of my truck" scale always told me mud weighs a lot.
  • + 14
 Spray your frame and fenders with Pam, mud (mostly) falls off... old xc racers trick.
  • + 31
 @g123: who's Pam?
  • + 21
 @g123: Are you saying Pam? or Pan?
  • + 3
 @kiksy: anti-stick cooking spray. Used to do this myself as well.
  • + 19
 @g123: and ROTORS, "go faster, stop less" make Friday fails fraternity!
  • + 11
 @g123: Pam? Does she have a sister?
  • + 9
 @kiksy: she must be a squirter
  • + 2
 We had races in the mud in our rzr’s And the caked on mud would tear off fenders and bottom out suspension.
  • + 2
 @g123: I used to do this to the bottom of my cleats when I played football or paintball on particularly muddy fields. Works great.
  • + 1
 I thought just now that applying one of those nano particle sprays would keep most of the mud from sticking to the frame and save some weight. Most of it is still on the tires though.
  • + 2
 @evanrichards00: I think it's Pam with two m's. That's the confusion.
  • + 1
 @g123: Downhillers also use this trick, they just spray the Pam on their rotors Smile
  • + 1
 @wasea04: I tried that once...broke my wrist.... or maybe that was the time I was riding with a concussion....I can’t remember....
  • + 2
 @meathooker: my dirt bike once got so caked in mud near the end of a 6 hour race that I could no longer pick it up. I may have cried.
  • + 24
 It is all about the downhills. If climbing stages were timed, the answers would be quite different.
  • + 3
 Then it would be xc from early 2000’s. We used to race down the cat 2 dh course in cat 1 xc! That’s what got me into dh racing. Would race cat 2 dh Saturday on my xc bike to pre-ride my course.
  • + 2
 @scotttherider: Kinda. It was just a random crazy thought. Timed uphill stages, have a rest break, then the timed downhill stages. So it wouldn't be true XC with rest breaks between all stages. However, the bike focus would change a lot. It would be an interesting race, but XC racers would likely dominate.
  • + 1
 @tacklingdummy: the problem there is going up takes much much longer than going down. A light XC hardtail would give you the biggest gains in overall time. The climb time would have to be x 0.25 or something.
  • + 1
 @kiksy: Yeah, that is why XC racers would dominate because of the climbs.

.25 climb time is interesting as well. It would definitely decrease the advantage of XC racers and bike would change. Less climb time = More enduro-bro bikes. More climb time = More XC-dude bikes.
  • + 1
 @tacklingdummy: you're assuming the XC racers would be slower downhill.
  • + 2
 @tacklingdummy: This would be quite interesting actually, especially for the influence on bike design/setup. There would now be a real penalty for running heavy bikes, DH tires and DH shocks. It would bring an additional element of strategy into the mix. Could a super-fit guy on a light bike win over a former downhiller on a heavy, burly setup? Would racers select a setup that helps their weaknesses (climb vs. descent)? (Assuming the climb time is adjusted to some "reasonable" proportion to the DH as mentioned above. Maybe adjust so that the average racer takes equal time on each.)

I'm not saying the current format is bad, just that it's more one-sided and I would find the additional setup intricacy quite interesting for the format you propose. Plus, it would guide bike design/spec to maintain more of a good balance between climbing/descending, weight/burliness.
  • + 2
 @Climbtech: Maybe some race organizers may try some of these types of races in the future just to test and see how well it is received.

Lately I have seen some new formats being used. The enduro race where you are placed on your best time and can take as many runs as you want. That is pretty cool as well. Different formats keeps it interesting.
  • + 14
 "I think instead of trying to get a light bike, we should lose a couple of kilos on our stomach or something. Its a bike you just pedal it."

Keegan Wright is right. Just pedal it you weight weenies!
  • + 0
 A couple kilos off the bike makes a MUCH bigger difference than a couple kilos off yourself.
  • + 1
 @skelldify: Beg to differ. I ride a 37lb alloy beast and still beat everyone up the hill with their 30-32lb bikes. Depends on your motor, not the bike
  • + 2
 @RFrogh: I'm proud of you! But if you lose two pounds are you any faster? I doubt it. But I bet if you took two pounds off your bike you would be.
  • + 1
 @skelldify: Sold the alloy and got the carbon. Lost like 5 lbs on the bike. I'm still the same speed
  • + 9
 My nearby go-to workout lap has a tremendously steep and rocky descent that also requires a 1600-ft (~500m) climb. My bike (and skills) need to be on point to handle the descent, but that's only 20% (or less) of my ride time.

I'm always in the minority on this, but I adore my light all-mountain configuration, 28.6 lbs (13 kg) XL, and for a particularly important reason: With a light bike build, I get the pleasure of doing a second full lap with every visit! My second run of the day, in fact, is usually faster both uphill and downhill. I can't imagine missing out on the fun of that.

All of that said, I completely respect the different needs of an EWS racer.

I do think the typical rider should consider the amount of time they spend climbing when choosing or building a bike. I see too many fellow riders exhaust themselves pedaling expensive but heavy bikes all day for 10 minutes of descent glory.
  • + 2
 The main reason, by a huge margin over everything else, that I am out on my bike at all is those 10 minutes. I optimize my bike, within my budget, for a better experience of those 10 minutes. So brakes, suspension, and durability over weight. At my meager power output and 200 plus pounds, the 7ish pounds between your bike and mine costs, depending on grade, some 5-10 minutes on a 500m climb that takes me well over an hour . It would cost several thousand dollars, or some 50%, again to ge my bike down under 30lb with the same reliability. Not worth the money for my priorities as I have a limited budget. You have optimized for your priorities and constraints, why assume other people are doing anything different?
  • + 6
 More significantly imo, many are using soft-compound DH casing tires with inserts... and climbing massive vert on them, plus riding stages with climbing and pedaling involved. The strength and fitness required to ride what they do on those bikes is amazing. Not many riders are in such good shape, so weight and tire choice matters a bit more, especially when a big day of climbing is involved.
  • + 1
 So true - we casual riders don't know how insanely strong and in-shape the pro's are to do a full day (or two) of climb/liaison stages in-between the pressure-packed timed downhills which are also physically grueling...on top of the mad riding skills they have....those little things like tire casings are more important for the top-10/20 riders.
  • + 0
 *push bikes up climbs
  • + 9
 Why i love XC, love my 22lbs Anthem Pro
  • + 9
 I thought they were heavier.
  • + 3
 15 seems to be sweet spot; i have park /enduro bike with 15 kg weight;

Do i want lighter bike - yes I do!
Do i need lighter bike - no i don't;

Since it does not cause any reliability issues of the course of several years;
  • + 6
 Cushcore, worth every ounce!
  • + 3
 I'd go with the ARD, have you ever tried to change a tire with a cushcore????
  • + 3
 @brownstone: the ARD basically turns into a floppy messy after two months. Worth it if you don't mind frequently changing them out
  • + 0
 @Mntneer: tell me more
  • + 3
 @Jimmy0: seems to soak up sealant or loose it's shape due to compression. Flops around inside of the tire, makes noise, can be felt wobbling around, etc
  • + 2
 @Mntneer: interesting
. I haven't experienced that but I'm about a month in, thanks for the headsup
  • + 2
 @Jimmy0: you can just take it out, cut about 2” out of it (place it up against the rim to check how much you need to cut out) and glue it back together as it does seem to expand and can be heard banging around.
  • + 9
 LineChoice, worth every ounce!
  • + 1
 @Mntneer: Are you running inserts in a trail bike? I just switched to a new tire manufacturer and I am not impressed. I was thinking about maybe trying one of these inserts.
  • + 1
 @rmt: thanks for the tip!
  • + 1
 @wcjrush: downhill and trail bike

The would be great if it didn't become floppy
  • + 0
 I've been running the Tannus Armor and it works pretty good, and way easy to install
  • + 4
 Cushcore - £144 pair - 250g per 27.5" insert
Nukeproof ARD - £50 pair - 130g per 27.5" insert
Rimpact - £37 pair - 90g per 27.5" insert

Rimpact is the only one I've tried, but so far I've been really happy with performance. Easy to fit and remove and no sealant absorption.
  • - 1
 @Malky79: I just run tubes and fill them with slime....can’t recall the last flat I’ve had....
  • + 1
 @scotttherider: I bought the Rimpact for rim protection, but I found a noticeable reduction in chatter. I tend to run heavier casing tyres. The only flat I've had in the last couple of years was running a Hans Dampf in the rear. Came with the bike and didn't get re-fitted.
  • + 1
 @Malky79: Rimpact website is down... they still in business?
  • + 1
 @jaydawg69: It's working in the UK - must be a glitch.
  • + 1
 @jaydawg69: They posted 2 hours ago on Instagram - looks like they are alive and kicking. Ali Clarkson is testing their inserts at the moment, so you'll get to see how they stand up to some serious square edge hits soon. They do post overseas, so if you continue to have problems with the website you could message them to let them know. They're a small company and I'm sure they'd appreciate a heads up if web problems are costing them sales.
  • + 2
 @jaydawg69: Working from here...with Canadian IP
https://www.rimpactmtb.com/
  • + 2
 @loopie: wasn't working from work pc. Working on cell so all is good.
  • + 3
 @brownstone: You're not doing it right. After installing my first set, I wondered what all the fuss was about. If you follow their instructions verbatim. It honestly took less than 10 minutes for both tires, installed with cushcore, sealant, and ready to roll.
  • + 1
 @wcjrush: I’ve got Cushcore in the rear of my trail bike and I can CONFIDENTLY say it’s the best investment I have ever made in my bike. I have a nasty habit of being able to break literally any part on a bike, especially wheels. I’ve wrecked 2 rims this year already but haven’t even scratched the newest one that was built up with Cushcore. Aside from that, the traction benefit and vibration damping are magical!
  • + 1
 @HurricaneCycles: good info. I’m definitely done with flat tires this year. Seems I better try it out, thanks!
  • + 1
 @brownstone: i bought it in may and after 1.5 months i can hear them rattling massvely in my tires- get cushcore, i have it on my other bike and its holding up for years. Nukeproof should recall ard, it loosens that bad.
  • + 1
 @mtnbykr05: Its not the installation that bothered me, Have you tried to take a tire off? It seems like a whole new world of hell. I think I'm going to need some metal tire levers. As for the ARD, on and off pretty much no problem, I haven't noticed the stretching yet though.
  • + 1
 @brownstone: I didn't even need levers to install my first set, and removal wasn't much harder. I found the cushcore made it easier to seat the bead, because it holds the tire against the rim.

The instruction video on their site is spot on.
  • + 1
 @brownstone: Installed and removed. Yes. Follow the instructions in reverse. Push the bead to the center, then use Pedro's lever to pull.
  • + 2
 The Pro Enduro racers responses just underscore the fact that they get timed on the downhills, not the uphills. That and not finishing due to a flat/ blown up wheel is a serious detriment to their entire race weekend.
Just don't think that the Pro enduro racers' positions on weight apply to those of us trying to go our fastest overall, including the climbs. Also, their bikes aren't that heavy.
For all of us we have to choose parts that are likely to survive most of our rides.
I WW, but I also run inserts F & R, use a DH layup rear rim, and do some other non-WW stuff because it's what works and will survive the vast majority of my rides. But I tell you what, I'll pay to remove weight wherever I can cause it really does make a difference on the climbs.
But hey, to each their own.
  • + 2
 TFW my bike probably weighs waaayyyy too much for what it is. Maybe I'm just being pessimistic, but it feels capital HEAVY. I tried to hold it, and stand on the scale, and the scale went over maximum. Probably just being pessimistic, also getting weaker, and older.
  • + 4
 maybe I'm just odd but I've never really paid attention to how much my bikes have weighed
  • + 3
 Totally, it’s always just been “godam that’s heavy” or “eh it’s fine”
  • + 5
 Keegan said it perfectly. " A bikes is a bike at the end of the day...."
  • + 4
 I'm sure his sponsors are stoked with that comment! (even though it's true)
  • + 2
 My 2007 Dirtbag has 170 rear, 180 up front, weighs 37lb with DH casings, crushes the downhill and does OK uphill... I’d say this weight and travel class has existed well before Endur-Bros prompted the development.
  • + 2
 How do you even get a Ripmo to 32.7?

Mines an XL with mostly GX, 2.6” Minion up front, and with pedals, bottle cage, Garmin mount, etc it’s 29.5lbs. Sooo many places I could cut weight.
  • + 8
 Getting them ready to survive through nasty terrain adds a fair amount of weight pretty quick. I'm 215lb and race expert in a rocky part of the country. My large Ripmo with Float X2 shock, X01, DD Agressor rear, EXO+ Assegai front, DT EX511 rims, Cushcore front+rear, Saint brakes+203 rotors, chainguide, Renthal Fatbar carbon, OneUp EDC tool, spare tube, plus flat pedals weighs around 32.8lb. I used to have it down around the 30lb range but I value performance and durability more than weight savings.
I recently added Cushcore because I'm destroying about 4 rims a year from rock strikes with 26/24psi. Any more pressure I was deflecting off everything in sight and couldn't hold a line. With cushcores I'm running 25/20 and love them. Took me a total of 1 ride to get used to the extra weight
  • + 1
 I'm guessing DD or DH tires, inserts, various tools/etc. lashed to the frame.

My L Ripmo with XO is 29 lbs without pedals, 30 with.
  • + 2
 They say that it’s not light ,but they have all that gadgets sticking on the frame and heavy duty tires and still only 15kg ,no SR they are light
  • + 4
 pretty funny how none of the athletes care about the weight... Smile
  • + 1
 Mud can really make a difference racing Dh as well. By the end of the course you can collect 6 or 7 pounds if you fell or dont equip fenders
  • + 1
 Weights not important yet they're scraping the mud off before they drop in...
  • + 1
 Geometry has helped the stouter and heavier bikes. Steep seat tubes makes pedaling a 30+ lb bike more reasonable.
  • + 1
 38.5lb sentinel anyone?

Alloy wheels, frame, and cranks.
Cushcore F+R, EXO Minions
Coil and a 36 with flats...
  • + 2
 I'm scared to weigh mine. XL frame, metal everything, DH case minions. Still, only notice the weight when I'm taking it off the rack.
  • + 2
 New transitions seem to be a bit hefty. My alloy patrol with carbon wheels, cranks, bars and gx drivetrain weighed about 36lbs in a medium with dh times.
  • + 1
 @beast-from-the-east: To be honest a 4hr day can get a bit rough, but it loves to go down.
  • + 1
 That sounds like a lot!
Radon swoop for me, no coil but vivid air and supergravity/DH tires. Haven't weighted it though but it could get in the same range I guess
  • + 1
 richie rude prolly has some mega burly factory switch infinity on there that yeti doesnt want weighed LOL
  • + 1
 Less bearings/pivots = less weight. Carbon bikes with 12 bearings weighs more than aluminum with 2. Keep it simple stupid.
  • + 1
 Light .strong .cheap . Pick any 2
  • + 1
 HTH is my duro ripmo 4lbs lighter than Robin's
  • + 1
 I don’t feel so bad about my 33lb Canfield now!
  • + 0
 It`s cute, but it could have been important to mention the weight of each rider as well...
  • - 2
 since when is rowan atkinson a sponsored cube rider?
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