Video: How to Survive Winter Mountain Bike Rides

Jan 23, 2020
by Pinkbike Originals  


Heated insoles, suspension set up, line choice and more. Christina Chappetta breaks it all down so you can have a better time on your winter mountain bike rides.








268 Comments

  • 113 3
 Please add "IN VANCOUVER" to the title, thanks.
  • 32 1
 Or just PNW. Same crap weather in Seattle and Portland. The solution is just to book tickets to the desert.
  • 7 0
 @gafoto: yep, I went deep on waterproof pants, jackets, socks, and gloves. Then you get the joy of washing your bike down post ride, which in apartment life means a 5 gallon jug and a 12v pump. It’s definitely a commitment.
  • 20 0
 lol good point this doesn't hold up in vermont
  • 8 0
 @cyrways: Get one of those pump sprayers from the hardware store filled with water and a large towel. I clean my bike off trail side before I go home, makes cleaning a lot easier.
  • 61 0
 If you live somewhere with clay soil, 5 gal is enough to clean mud off of about 1 crank arm. Need a priest to perform an exorcism to get it all off.
  • 6 1
 @vonroder77: the 12v pump is operated off the cigarette plug trailside, $35 on amazon.
  • 13 3
 @50percentsure: clay-based soil should be avoided in theses conditions, no?
  • 6 1
 @gafoto: nah... get out there!! embrace the muck!
  • 10 1
 @gafoto:

It's been way too cold in AZ. Been in the 60s for weeks! Best to just avoid it.
  • 4 0
 @azdog: Damn, that’s 8000m down jacket weather for sure! Hope you haven’t lost anything to frostbite.
  • 1 0
 @cyrways: always worth it though eh?!?
  • 3 0
 @vonroder77: those things are rad! I've seen them a lot at the trailheads and I'm highly considering investing in one
  • 3 0
 @azdog: ahhh... must be nice
  • 1 0
 @christinachappetta: Works good for me, and they are pretty cheap.
  • 8 1
 @azdog: That's like 15C. Shorts weather for northeners.
  • 1 0
 @bishopsmike : this is squamish good sir
  • 3 0
 @christinachappetta and @vonroder77: I got one too, great use of 30ish bucks. I think I got mine on eBay and comes with the sprayer, hoses and all that. Quickly rinse down my bike and my buddies bikes. They are always quite impressed. No need to get the 100+ dollar ones at all
  • 1 0
 @pittman9: Skills with Phil even has a video on how to quickly modify the nozzle to use as a mini compressor to set the bead on tubless tires.
  • 4 0
 @christinachappetta: What are the pants you are wearing?
  • 3 0
 Truth. Watching the video, I kept looking for snow and ice. The conditions as depicted could occur anytime between May and October in the Rockies... Still, good tips on a general approach to cool and wet riding.
  • 2 0
 @cyrways:
I have second "winter" bike built from many spare parts and low price and quality components good enough to ride in poor conditions. Best thing is that I clean this bike once a year????
  • 1 1
 @FarmeR57: says Imba....pffft
  • 3 0
 @takeiteasyridehard: can't tell if you're joking...
  • 2 0
 @pittman9: Gotta check that out. Would be nice for the bike but I really need if for my trail dog. Bastard loves to roll in deer sheeit and dead animals.
  • 2 0
 @Aikow: Dakine Thrillium , quite comfy
  • 1 0
 @christinachappetta: +1 Dakine Thrillium. Great stuff.
  • 1 1
 @FarmeR57: I'm joking. If I ride mud, I make sure they're illegal trails.
  • 1 0
 well in California aluminum foil and plastic bags are only used for sandwiches and weed.
  • 1 0
 Im looking to move to squamish to experience this lol
  • 2 0
 @cyrways: I was looking at an apartment recently that has a bike wash station in the parking garage and it honestly seemed like a great selling point.
  • 1 0
 @Oreithya: that sounds great, haven’t seen any in my experience. Had one some time ago with a car wash area, which I used. Now if just be happy to have an electric charger for my car.
  • 67 2
 That's what summer riding looks like. If a bit dry.
  • 7 2
 Was thinking the same thing. Plus, riding Cedar roots isn't like riding Pine roots! Winter... warmer gloves, hoodie, shred. Complain about the head wind on open sections haha.
  • 16 1
 Exactly. That's not winter, there's no mud. There needs to be a UK version to show how to slop surf properly.
  • 7 1
 @fartymarty: pretty much every Dudes Of Hazard video. Dress a little warmer, smash on
  • 2 1
 @mashrv1: fair call
  • 3 1
 Another englishman thinking the same. Had an Aussie friend over to ride last summer and he couldn't believe what we consider to be 'dry' conditions! Haha.
  • 2 0
 If you're from the UK that is hahah
  • 4 0
 @fartymarty: DOWN!!! Make it and throw it up there. I love watching you brits surf the slop!
  • 4 1
 @fartymarty: oh 4k again brexit babies INGLES WINTER, last time ben in uk 2 weeks a go dry sunny weather and +10
in some places we call it summer
  • 3 0
 @vitality: the difference between summer and winter is whether you need to take lights on a lunch time ride.
  • 53 0
 Watching this with half a meter of snow and -20C out. I live in the wrong part of the country.
  • 13 2
 Bromont ain't a bad part of the country, dood!
  • 27 1
 Fat tires and studs. The winter is when the east coast gets flow trails.
  • 4 0
 We're above zero today but the four feet of snow in my yard is still a challenge... #kootenayproblems
  • 4 0
 I actually wish we had some snow to shred...just rainy shmoo here right now
  • 10 0
 Wanna swap? I'm sick of beaches and sunshine.
  • 12 5
 @schlockinz @christinachappetta I'm gonna seem pessimist but I don't have another 2k$ to put on another bike than my main bike on which I already put too much money on.

Regarding the weather and trail conditions where there is snow, either its:
1. Unbelievably cold so you can't ride more than 10 min before you sweat and then freeze to death because of soggy gear, on top of that trails are icy (see point 2 which happened 2 days before point 1) and you get no traction even with 250$ studded tires
2. Its too warm, you dig in the snow in every corner and you finish with half your clothes wrapped around your waist.
3. Snow is too fresh, we just got 15 cm and the heroes who create the flow trails you are referring to have not yet had the chance to do them.

Whenever 1, 2 or 3 is not happening, I'm at work, or or i'm checking out videos of people shredding on actual DIRT.

In the end.. I just want to ride DIRT!

Cheers!
  • 3 1
 Dude, used fat bike, and use some drywall screws to stud your tires. Also, proper layers and you won't get frozen, I promise.
  • 9 1
 Engineer my ass
  • 46 3
 Winter riding you say, cute. And you call yourselves Canadian....
  • 13 0
 Uh, like it’s a wet cold, man
  • 37 4
 PB needs to open a east coast office....You can have your surf in the morning, bike at lunch, ski in the afternoon winter! Around here winter riding means fatbike, ski helmet, snow pants/jacket, lights, winter boots, pogies. Wet and near zero is called spring and fall not winter.
  • 16 0
 not even east coast. just "everywhere except the greater vancouver area". Interior BC is under like 10ft of snow right now
  • 1 0
 Yup.
  • 2 1
 This couldn't be more true. Different perspectives would be real nice.
  • 23 4
 hey pinkbike, how about an article on how to ride in the cold and snow? you know the things most Canadian winter riders deal with.
  • 3 1
 Like these?? (shameless plug) hafta.ca/winter-riding
  • 3 0
 And that mentions that you should not ride trails in the weather from the vid above in places like southern Ontario because you'll ruin the trails (and add about 15lbs of mud to your bike at the same time).
  • 4 0
 @jcklondon: password protected...
  • 8 0
 I thought you guys switched to hockey and curling in the winter. Who knew.
  • 3 0
 @Biocoug1: those two sports never stop here in the frozen north Wink
  • 21 0
 @Biocoug1: I think you mean skatey punchy and slidey sweepy
  • 1 0
 @Biocoug1: that's for when the sun goes down at 3pm
  • 2 0
 @jcklondon: You said it JJ! Fat bikes, snow and frozen extremities.
  • 5 0
 @christinachappetta: you know what, you Canadians are awesome! Actually my grandparents are from and currently reside in Cape Breton, NS. Amazing place
  • 1 0
 @Biocoug1: sounds lovely...I'm actually American though haha been in Canada a while though, but never left BC because why would I?!?! kidding aside, I need to see more of this ginormous country!
  • 19 0
 Nice work Christina! Natural presenter!
  • 5 0
 Agree. Good for the industry.
  • 5 0
 Need more from Christina for sure. Like her style.
  • 5 0
 THANKS Jesse!!! Super appreciated. Watch out though...you'll be on my radar coming up!
  • 14 1
 My new thing this winter has been to put hand warmers (those little packets) between my shoe and shoe cover over the toe region. Makes a huge difference. I've never been able to truly keep my feet warm with any combination of fancy winter shoes and socks. And now I come home without my toes being frozen! Amazing how much different your ride feels when your hands and feet aren't cold.
  • 3 0
 I just live with cold feet. It only hurts like hell for a minute of two when you get in the shower. Cold hands are a different matter
  • 3 0
 Another easy trick is to rip the top off a sandwich bag and slip it on over your sock. It acts as a wind and water barrier although the water may eventually seep in. The best part is that if you end up doing some unplanned hiking you don't promptly obliterate your expensive shoe covers. The worst part is that it's not terribly environmentally friendly unless you're diligent about cleaning and reusing the same bags.
  • 1 0
 super clever idea actually. One of my batteries dies last week. I panicked and purchased the toe warmers immediately!
  • 2 0
 @christinachappetta: Have you tried Seal Skinz or Showers Pass waterproof socks? With a thin merino wool sock and then the outer waterproof sock, its pretty awesome. You get extra insulation, wind protection and waterproof enough to stand in puddles without a hint of issue. You may need to adjust your shoe size by 1/2 or play around with thinner insoles to achieve a fit thats not too tight. Get the taller over calf length socks. Paired with riding pants, you will be set. I prefer the Seal Skinz with gripper, but Showers Pass are decent. You wont go back to you E-insoles!!!
  • 3 0
 @christinachappetta: my soccer hack is to put vaseline on your feet. the cold water can't stick to your feet or socks with it. it has never failed me
  • 2 1
 @andrewgiesbrecht: great for post ride activities with the wife too
  • 2 0
 @JDFF: Yes I actually have and I feel silly for forgetting to mention those! They are awesome! But true about the bigger shoe. I usually rock a slightly bigger shoe in the winter to accommodate my foot "issues"THANKS!
  • 1 0
 @fartymarty: Has anybody found electric gloves that are not puffy jacket huge?
  • 2 1
 @arrowheadrush: Two feet would be abit of a squeeze lol
  • 1 0
 @christinachappetta: tinfoil? Are you related to the Hanson brothers?
  • 16 0
 I just hop on the ol' rigid fatbike and blast through the snow if I can.
  • 3 4
 Never ridden fat bike but super keen to try! Some places offer E fat bikes which sounds pretty rad
  • 2 0
 @christinachappetta: Honestly with the efficiency of the 1x drivetrains and geometry of newer fatbikes, there's really no need for the ebike. I did a group ride a few weeks ago and one of the guys had an e fatty and it was more heft to throw around than anything.
  • 12 1
 Microdosing Psilocybin(Magic Shroooooms) works great in the winter! Enhances athletic ability and motor control, warms you up nicely by increasing body temp, and no matter how crappy the ride is it will feel like the best ride EVER and you will love everyone and everything you come across, win win! lol tup
  • 4 0
 Get in touch with Waki, he sounds pretty knowledgeable about intended and unintended side effects and alternatives :-)
  • 4 0
 Don't forget that nausea. My favourite for a ride.
  • 9 0
 Good tips Christina. I would add having a thermos of hot tea waiting for you at the car is really nice in the winter, and don't forget to lube your chain after you wash your bike so it doesn't rust solid. thanks!
  • 7 0
 For sure! Coffee is life.
  • 5 0
 And a flask for the top of the climb.
  • 10 0
 why would you slow down your rebound when you ride slower? for me i open the rebound 2-3 klicks when its cold and slippery
  • 12 0
 not to mention suspension moves slower already when the temps get low.
  • 12 0
 This is a preference thing, but the thought of fast rebound pushing your back tire around on wet roots/rocks is the reason that comes to mind for me.
  • 7 0
 @ReformedRoadie: The only snow in the video is the stuff she had in the back of her truck. That there's t-shit weather.
  • 8 0
 @MartyFluxMcFly: This was literally the last day to ride before snow hit Squamish hard! I had to shovel out my truck to get my bike in that am in Whistler. Crazy what a quick drive down the road can offer!
  • 3 0
 @gnarnaimo: That was my thought... I don't tend to ride as fast and take as many chances in the cold/freezing weather
  • 1 0
 @ReformedRoadie:
And that air springs sometimes fail at -40???
  • 2 0
 @christinachappetta: My 1st thoughts were "Did she drive down to the trailhead? From where winter was, to where it isn't?
  • 2 0
 Yeah, I prefer to get the tire down a little faster on the ground, but gotta make sure you no bucking bronco.
  • 2 0
 @MartyFluxMcFly: basically hahah Whistler to Squamish is only 30-40 min but pretty much different worlds
  • 2 0
 @christinachappetta: Oh I know... World class biking and world class climbing on the same day. Every time I go there, I feel like there's a 50/50 chance I'm not going home.
  • 2 0
 @Dangerous-Dan: I think at that point not losing digits is a slightly higher priority
  • 7 0
 Proper layers are key! You dont want sweaty clothes at the top of a long climb. I'll even bring an extra base layer shirt in the pack.( I know from experience )
The idea is to not sweat too much, but getting the right combination of breathable insulation can be tricky.
Love the lightweight merino next to skin. For really cold rides I alternate wool/silk/wool, then shell.
  • 17 0
 As long as its not pouring i found windproof/softshell jackets to work much, much better than any kind of waterproof shell. The moment i put on anything waterproof all breathability is basically gone, no matter how fancy the gore-tex.
  • 5 1
 @Ttimer: My norrøna jacket has some armpit ventilators that I can zip open. Those are the difference between being soaked in sweat and actually being comfortable
  • 3 0
 @brodoyouevenbike:
I have one as well and is been a phenomenal investment, i wear it with a wool (on the thick side) long sleeve t-shirt and i have been comfortable in about 20 F or -6 C . I have even used it to run and is been great, is been very tough also. So far a couple of big crashes and still looks new.
  • 3 0
 @Ttimer: Agreed. I'm going to experiment more with soft shell gear. The same happens to me. Every time i wear my hard shell, it is soaking inside from sweat, and it's breathable WITH pit zips. I may as well be in the rain...
  • 2 0
 Since, it is near impossible to control the moisture, the best thing I have found is the micro-fleece compression thermals. They can hold water but stays warm.
  • 1 0
 @Ttimer: for sure! I usually go for the windproof layers and leave the "sweat bags" at home, unless it's properly raining, or I'm a cold wimp
  • 1 0
 @brodoyouevenbike: pit zips are key!
V-neck zipper on merino base layer top is important to staying cool on climbs and is another way to minimize sweat.
  • 9 0
 Haha south coast BC folk getting chirped haaaard haha. Meanwhile PNW residents just be slowing walking backwards towards the door. Lol
  • 3 0
 hahahaha love it
  • 10 0
 survive "winter"
  • 10 0
 Christina's back! Yew!
  • 5 0
 THANKS!!!! videos will get more exciting as spring moves in hahah
  • 5 0
 I dont consider myself a fair weather rider but f**k me, winter here is brutal. Its my first winter back home for about 8 years and I don't want to do it again if I can help it. SURE there is fun to be had but its generally disgusting. Haven't even had the crispy, clear freezing days this year. Wind. Rain. Slop. BAH and HUMBUG!!
  • 8 0
 just stay inside and get fat like everyone else.
  • 10 2
 "How to Survive Winter Mountain Bike Rides"

Go skiing.
  • 1 0
 I'm a "fair weather snowboarder" meaning.... I only really enjoy POW days haha not the PNW elephant snot.
  • 7 0
 Man those conditions are harsh, I cannot believe you'd even go outside when its like that!!
  • 2 5
 I hope that is sarcasm...
  • 3 0
 The toughest part of winter riding is managing the moisture inside your jacket and pants. If you ride at any level above sunday stroll, your body is going to put off moisture. Water/wind resistant jackets and pants can never get the moisture out quick enough. The lightweight softshell is better, but it is not the most wind resistant.

The best thing that I have found for keeping warm in winter riding is the micro-fleece compression thermals. Even though it still holds moisture, it works like a wetsuit and stays warm.
  • 3 0
 Seconded on the boot dryer. Best piece of gear I've bought since moving to coastal BC. Dries shoes and gloves after biking, ski touring, dog walking and just about everything else where you go outside for 30 minutes and get soaked.
  • 7 1
 Or just leave your bike at home and fix some trails.
  • 7 0
 but my bike would get very sad and probably not talk to me any more
  • 2 0
 Or do both?
  • 6 0
 How to survive single to low double digits. Gtfo
  • 6 1
 Wow Letty traded in the Silvia for a MTB!? Wonder how Dom feels about this...
  • 4 0
 Winter riding in New Mexico is pretty uneventful and is mostly dry, sunny, and warmish. Tons of trails too statewide. Come get you some!
  • 2 0
 More a Spring/Fall tip as we have a couple feet of snow here on the powder highway right now and despite regular peer pressure have not purchased an obese bike yet, but as a follicularly challenged man (bald), I find when it gets cold one of the most important items is something to block the cold surges through the helmet vents. My item of choice for this is an Icebreaker bandana. Not that pricey, packs small, high quality and can be used for a bunch of other things as well as needed.
  • 1 0
 full head of hair works well for me... but when I'm commuting a bandana or hat would be cozy
  • 2 0
 No mention of any hat or beanie? I get away with regular socks and shoes without getting cold feet below zero but my ears start to hurt if I don't cover them when it's below 10 °C.

One tip for the barehand folks: try wrist gaiters! I just got a pair and I'm amazed at how much more cold my fingers are able to tolerate just because the blood flow is kept up through warm wrists. I wear them as intended during ascending and transfers and roll them up a bit (getting the thumb out) to get full contact between the palms and the grips when dropping in to a descend. Well worth a try.
  • 2 0
 Great vid, @christinachappetta! I hope we see more of you!
One thing before you go straight plastic-bag though, is getting some Goretex socks

Also, now that you're a PB employee, shouldn't they give you a complimentary, super-sweet PLUS account?
  • 1 0
 hahah I'll know I've made it big when I get the PLUS added on, thank you!
  • 2 0
 Some great tips and pointers here, and a few new ones for me that I’m gonna remember when I’m out riding in New Zealand in June-July. Might be worth mentioning brake set up, natural compound versus metal. We could definitely hear what you were running in those wet conditions in the metals going to give a little more bite, and last longer with all the wet
  • 5 0
 NOW I KNOW WHY THERE ARE NO FATBIKE REVIEWS................................
  • 8 3
 How can you run 20 Psi without destroying your tyres?
  • 9 0
 She doesn't look heavy at all to me and she probably knows how to pick the right lines
  • 6 0
 It's taken time to trust those low pressures hahah but it's wild because bigger guys than me run even less! Especially if they have a tire insert.
  • 4 0
 The secret is to weigh 50kg haha
  • 2 1
 @christinachappetta: Tyre inserts seem like the bomb but I'm the stubborn type that has to try a pool noodle before spending 100 bucks on some!
  • 15 0
 @brodoyouevenbike: I definitely weigh more than 50kg and I run around 19psi, tire inserts are great.
  • 2 0
 @JesseMelamed: Jesse are you running inserts with DH casing tires? Or one of the thousand Maxxis casing options that's less than full-on double thick DH casing?

PS- which inserts are you running? Always fun to hear what the actual fast guys use, not just us fast typers.
  • 2 1
 @JesseMelamed: yup! and you take wayyyy spicier lines than me haha
  • 3 1
 @brodoyouevenbike: amazing! you must be an engineer
  • 7 0
 @VTTyeahyouknowme: I used to always run DH, but now with new DD tires in the proper tread and casing size I have been using them more. 2.5 Assegai DD on the front and a 2.5 DHR2 DD on the rear. I do run a cush core in the front and the rear. I'm too used to them and like them too much to change that.
  • 3 2
 Those 100% Brisker gloves are not efficient when it`s cold. Don`t buy them. What is written on paper is nice, but in reality these are not winter gloves; for Greece or Portugal winters may be, but not for a french winter and even less for a - true - canadian winter. Some better solutions exist I guess...
  • 4 0
 That particular day was great with the Brisker's... when it's colder I choose the Hydrobrisker which is thicker, higher cuff and waterproof
  • 3 0
 It all depends on your body, too. I have warm hands and the Briskers are fine right down to freezing and even one or two degrees below. Just don't get them wet or use them for wind protection.
  • 2 1
 @softsteel Portugal can confirm,those gloves only work well above 5º.
  • 2 0
 I like to wear my Sugoi RS Zero gloves until I'm nice and toasty then switch to the Briskers. They are a nice intermediate glove but not great for truely cold weather.
  • 2 0
 MEC cross country ski gloves work very well in real Canadian winter conditions.
  • 2 0
 @bholton: That's virtually what the Sugoi gloves I have are, just marketed for cycling.
  • 5 0
 Holly shit. Dominic Toretto's girl biking now too.
  • 5 1
 Umm... Yah... But what if i live in Alberta and have 2 feet of snow outside, and its -30?
  • 2 0
 Sno-go I think it’s called?
  • 2 0
 @DHhack: LOL
  • 4 0
 I think they got the title wrong; "How To Survive Your First Ride Ever in the Summer"
  • 4 0
 You know you are living in the right place when they have bike racks at the car wash.
  • 1 0
 Disclaimer: I'm not an engineer.

I rarely winter ride and to be honest have only ever done it on a full rigid. However, I'm a fan of acclimating the bike to the ambient temp. Sometimes that's enough to lower the tire pressure naturally and just the right amount, or, allow you to actually add a couple more if it's super-mega-frozen. I would assume the same with fork/shock pressures.

As a non-engineer, I'm also thinking that actually speeding up the rebound a touch would help as the shock/fork will naturally slow down as the oil becomes more viscous. Of course, I could probably test this right quick on a trail if I were not winter-lazy. Oops, got an aft ice time, hafta smash some pucks.
  • 5 1
 What 100% model are those glasses?
  • 2 0
 Speed craft! amazing coverage for sure
  • 1 0
 @christinachappetta: Cool thanks! Ya they look huge which is a positive!
  • 5 3
 Mud on the dropper stanchion can scratch it up. A Lizard Skin velcro-on chainstay protector does a great job on the dropper without affecting its performance.
  • 8 0
 I protect my dropper post for years with a cutted inner tube properly installed with Rilsan straps. It`s clean, discreet, resistant, it costs nothing, and the stanchion is absolutely preserved from mud. It`s just strange that almost nobody does that... and the price these shits cost!!!
  • 4 0
 @softsteel: I love that idea! Thank you!
  • 1 1
 @softsteel: The problem with the inner tube is that for either internally- or externally-routed dropper, you have to remove the saddle to work the inner tube over. I used road-bike tubes, so there wouldn't be so much material bunching under the zip-ties. The Lizard Skin can be installed and removed without saddle removal, and you don't need to zip-tie, although I still use them to keep errant debris from finding it's way in.
  • 7 1
 That sounds like a great way to trap dirt and mud underneath the protector, grinding it into the dropper stanchion with every use, actually making things worse.
  • 1 2
 @freerider11: I've used it for two years, and no trapped dirt or mud.
  • 2 0
 @softsteel: I’ve been the same for years.
  • 5 0
 Mudhugger for the rear tire. Hate having my butt covered in mud at the best of times. Even less in the winter slop.
  • 5 1
 @Geochemistry: Yeah but you're in Nevada. I'd imagine your version of a mud ride is lot different than most. Anything wrapped around the stanchion is going to trap dirt and just make things worse. There's a reason those lizard skinz neoprene fork stanchion protectors from years ago never took off. Just let the seals do their job as they were designed.
  • 1 1
 @freerider11: Reno? Tahoe? Pah Rah Mountains? You don't know your geography. Ski Tahoe!
  • 2 1
 @Geochemistry: Yes I do, and I still stand by my statement.
  • 2 0
 @Geochemistry: @freerider11: @christinachappetta: Sorry you misunderstood but I wasn`t clear: I don`t use the tube in its tubular form, but I make a proper mudflap. I cut it, open it, and shape a piece which is about 10cm wide saddle side - attached with 4 small Rilsans around the rails after piercing 4 tiny holes aligned at the right place, and 4-5cm wide at the bottom, attached around the seal ring with a big Rilsan. You can make that super clean with a pair of scissors, concentration, and talent of course!
The stanchion is NOT entirely covered, just the rear side is protected from mud and stones/gravels projections, the rest is at open air, and it`s actually enough and super efficient like that.
The system makes the stanchion accessible to check it, wipe it, and grease it sometimes by unscrewing the seal ring - I use 2 KS Lev 125 on my 2 bikes.
Aesthetically, I don`t like a whole piece of tube system, nor the Lizard Skin`s stanchions protectors, and as said freerider11, it would probably accumulate dirt and damage your stanchion at term.
  • 1 0
 @gary-prime: Yes a Mudhugger saves both your dropper and your butt.
  • 1 0
 @softsteel: So you made about the same thing as the Lizard Skin. I know your design works. I used to just work the inner tube over the seat clamp, which is why I know installing was a pain. (A razor removed it in a second.) And as I've stated, I've used the Lizard Skin for two years, and last year was particularly nasty. No inside accumulation. @freerider11 doubted my ride area; I ride primarily in the Pah Rah Mountains, which are volcanic, not intrusive igneous. There are lower areas where the coarse quartz sand accumulates, also accumulating in my pack, saddle, and under the fenders. But higher up is decomposing ash. A lot of that ash is vesicular glass shards, particularly nasty for bearing surfaces. It too accumulates on the backsides of every tube on the bikes, but it doesn't infiltrate the Lizard Skin, and, since zip-ties are cheap, I can clean the protector as easily as every other part of my bike. As far as which dropper I use this on, the list includes a KS Lev (external), PNW Cascade (external), Magura Vyron (electronic), and a Giant (internal).
  • 1 0
 @Geochemistry: No Man, if you read my explanations, this is NOT as a LizardSkins stanchion protector. It`s a mudflap, it`s flat, not tubular, it`s behind the stanchion, not around it; installing it is not a pain, it`s super easy, and it has nothing to do with the seat clamp! Should I take a shortcut and post any pictures of it?!
  • 3 1
 Geographically related content. Here: freezing rain, layers of ice, and the trail turns to mud at 27*F. Winter riding is indoors.
  • 1 0
 In the Pacific Northwest. I see riders in shorts with no gloves.All year long. I wear pants and wind stopper gloves. What I love are my warm dry feet . Gore Tex socks for saturated trails.
  • 3 0
 Wheres the version for riders that sweat like crazy? I could never wear that wind proof sauna she's got on.
  • 1 0
 that's me! I sweat like a pig, bur seriously.... The jacket I was wearing has huge pit vents, but when it's too bad... I wrap it around my waist or bars like the old days, and put it back on for the windy downhill's
  • 3 0
 Christina is such a natural in front of the camera, great stuff !!!!!!! thank you
  • 3 0
 What brand are those insoles??? My lady's bday is coming up and she could DEFINITELY use a pair of those things.
  • 1 0
 Mine are Sidas but many companies make them now. Bought 1 set of batteries and 2 sets of the "heating elements" bc I swap them between my snowboard boots and bike shoes and even my hiking boots when it's cold out. I am that pathetic, yes. Best purchase ever
  • 2 0
 The shoe dryer is awesome. I bought one this year. Dries shoes, gloves, and pads easily and they are dry and ready for the next day.
  • 3 0
 That frame shot at the start is the janky ramp on Rupert, in Squamish. Trick move for most even in the warm bone dry.
  • 2 0
 agreed. It's harder than the video makes it look.
  • 2 2
 Can we get a guide on how to survive riding in toxic orange smog, dust storms, hail storms, rains of mud, temperatures that don't drop *below* 30 degrees Celsius overnight and max out in the mid-40s, and of course, the still-raging infernos of fire? What tires should I use for ash?

Also, for goodness' sake, can all you northern hemisphere people just go skiing already and stop bloody whinging?
  • 2 0
 In Sydney, we sometimes need to wear long sleeves in winter, but only if you start the ride early. Wait til the middle of the day and summer riding kit is good to go!
  • 3 0
 Cold snap is over, Let's shred!!!
  • 2 0
 let's do it!!!! Raining in Squamish so our odds are looking up!
  • 2 0
 @christinachappetta: Let me grab a NEW freshy bicycle and i'm IN
  • 5 0
 Anyone coming to Squamish to ride this weekend will be shot on sight!
  • 2 0
 @audric: you can borrow one of my smalls
  • 3 0
 More like how to help your bike survive winter rides ...
  • 2 0
 poor baby bike! She gets loved on 3
  • 4 0
 Cotton kills. Stay away
  • 3 0
 That was great, thanks! Christina is a natural.
  • 5 2
 That sound you hear is Minnesota fat bikers laughing.
  • 1 0
 Yah the title says mountain bike rides not "fat bike" rides
  • 2 1
 Lately, I’ve been thinking that a light vest would be perfect for riding Central Coast CA during the winter months. A jacket gets too hot and just a t-shirt is not enough.
  • 1 0
 I like my bib chamois, keeps my upper body a bit warmer..but a vest is a great idea too!
  • 3 0
 100% Briskerssssss no doubt
  • 3 0
 Natural presenter on and off the bike.????. Great job!!
  • 2 0
 How to survive winter rides.......move to England where it's always wet and cold!
  • 1 0
 Has to be SRAM brakes, If you can ride with your face uncovered, it is not winter riding. Remember the first time my eyes froze open, goggles after that!
  • 1 0
 Shimano XTR actually
  • 2 0
 Sick six dollary-doo score Christina! Rad to see you on here and looking forwards to seeing some more content from you!
  • 1 0
 Thanks girl, love ya long time
  • 1 0
 Great video Christina! Like @gary-prime said mudhugger fenders make a huge difference! Definitely the best change I made for this winter.
  • 4 1
 Shaaaaawing!
  • 2 0
 Step 1: Ride all the skinnies
  • 2 0
 I pray for trails that dry. Good vid tho
  • 4 3
 Winter? Is that a new wheel size? We don't have winter in California! And yes, we are all Dentist here!
  • 3 0
 Right? I almost considered wearing a long sleeve jersey the other day!
  • 2 0
 @Dmrides: Too cold for short sleeves, too cold to ride. Just wait a day.
  • 1 0
 Even in Northern California I am still wearing shorts every ride. Plus nothing is on fire in the winter.
  • 2 0
 Apparel, whats wrang with clothes
  • 2 0
 Endura MT500 shoecovers made the diffrence for me!!!
  • 2 0
 Or you can live in Greece.......
  • 2 0
 Here in the Alps a lot of cold but dry.
  • 2 1
 ... no snow... its not -20... its clearly not winter... just another video of how to ride in Van.. like the first guy said..
  • 2 0
 Looks too warm for winter riding.
  • 2 1
 Someone using toe warmers and at the same time, wearing just a one layer of underwear and think jacket, what a joke!
  • 2 0
 I have chronically cold toes... and usually overheat in the upper body. So I would confidently say that.... everyone is different :-)
  • 2 0
 Y’all put snow in the bed for extra effect?
  • 2 0
 how could you possibly call that winter? that's september at best!
  • 2 0
 Step 1: don’t go on a winter ride
  • 2 1
 Christina your winter riding experience would be better if you moved to socal and married me, jus sayin.
  • 2 0
 Single speed, rigid, unfashionable guards, done
  • 1 0
 Winter is my prime mountain biking season. Trails are damp and grass is green.
  • 2 0
 Lake winter shoes
  • 1 0
 Winter? I wish spring looked like that around here.
  • 3 1
 *laughs in desert*
  • 3 0
 Let us know how things are in July.
  • 2 0
 @COnovicerider: *applies second bottle of sunblock*
  • 1 0
 @cactuspunch: huh? Dude, good luck riding in the AZ desert from May through October. No thank you.
  • 1 0
 @COnovicerider: I mean I live here what else am I supposed to do from May- October?
  • 1 0
 @beanandcheeseburrito: Flagstaff, Prescott, Payson, Pine, Globe, hmmm okay sounds good man!
  • 1 0
 @pwhite2021: true but those aren’t in the desert. Enjoy!
  • 1 0
 “Winter” they said...
  • 1 0
 For the cold weather Scottish Shetland and the rain jacket.
  • 1 1
 I love the desert, always got a place to ride, not too cold, not too hot, no mud. I feel your pain, snow and mud suck!
  • 1 0
 i love the desert but this is all wrong.
  • 2 0
 Good job Christina!
  • 1 0
 weather looks great, go ride your fucking bike!
  • 1 0
 Heated insoles? Numb feet add character (type 2 fun)
  • 2 1
 SKI
  • 1 0
 It is simple. Stay home!
  • 2 1
 Great job Christina!
  • 3 4
 This was a bit of straw grasping content plug.
  • 4 6
 Use the aluminum foil method on my balls no jingle balls going on.
  • 1 4
 she's cute 3
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