Video: Ibis's New Aluminum Ripley is More Metal, More Slacker

Jan 19, 2021
by Mike Levy  


Ibis' fifth-generation Ripley AF goes all-aluminum to create a 120mm-travel trail bike that's far more affordable than its carbon fiber predecessor, with the Deore-spec model shown here selling for $2,999 USD while a frame costs $1,800 USD.

For some perspective, you'll have to part with $4,200 USD to get a carbon Ripley with a similar Deore spec, while a carbon frame and Fox shock sells for $2,833 USD. If you want your aluminum Ripley AF with an NX/GX drivetrain mix, it'll be $3,299, please. Due to the pandemic's effect on OE component availability, Ibis will offer only two versions of the Ripley AF.
Ripley AF Details

• Travel: 120mm rear / 130mm front
• Wheel size: 29"
• New aluminum frame
• dw-link suspension
• Threaded bottom bracket
• Weight: 32.6 lb / 14.8 kg (as shown, size L)
• MSRP: $2,999 (as shown), $3,299 USD
www.ibiscycles.com


There are two Ripley AF models to pick from, the $2,999 USD model shown here with a Deore drivetrain and Fox suspension, or the same frame and suspension with an NX/GX drivetrain for $3,299 USD.


Carbon VS Aluminum - What's Different?

No carbon means less cost, but it also means a bit more weight; Ibis says that a Ripley AF frame comes in at 7.45lb on their scale, or somewhere around 1.45lb heavier than the carbon frame that retails for a little over a grand more. Whether or not that price-to-weight calculation is something to consider will depend on your priorities, but here's something more noteworthy: the Ripley AF is a full degree slacker up-front than the carbon version.


The aluminum frame is said to weigh 7.45lb, or 1.45lb more than the carbon version. The new aluminum bike is also a degree slacker, with a 65.5-degree head angle.


A new frame gave Ibis a chance to tweak the bike's geometry a bit, with the head angle dropping from 66.5-degrees with a 130mm fork on the carbon Ripley to 65.5-degrees with the same fork on the Ripley AF. That adds a bit of length to the bike's wheelbase and front-center, of course, and the 475mm reach on a large-sized frame remains unchanged. Other numbers that haven't changed include the 432mm chainstays, 418mm long seat tube (on the large), and a 76-degree seat angle.

The aluminum bike's slacker geometry raises the obvious question of an updated carbon Ripley in the near future, to which Ibis had this to say: ''The Ripley is a unique bike. We've seen people throw on 100mm SID forks and rigid posts, to create 23 lbs BC Bike builds. On the other hand, there are riders mounting up a Pike or lowered 140mm 36, DPX2 shock, and burly tires. It's super versatile. We knew the AF customer would be different than the typical carbon Ripley buyer. For one, they're not as hung up on weight. Many gravitate towards aluminum because they have carbon fatigue. They just want to beat on a frame and not worry about it and they're more gravity oriented. We listened to that feedback. You can easily achieve a slacker head angle on the carbon Ripley by installing a 140mm air spring in the stock 34, running an AngleSet, or using an eccentric bushing. Neither of those things will void your warranty.''


The alloy frame gets most of the features found on the carbon model, including a removable ISCG adapter and threaded bottom bracket, 148mm Boost hub spacing, room for a large bottle on all frame sizes, room for a 203mm rear rotor for the big boys, and Metric shock sizing. The Ripley AF also gets internal routing but does without the tube-in-tube system used on most carbon frames, as well as some serious frame protection.


DW Link Suspension

The frame material is different but the suspension ain't, with the same 120mm of dw link-controlled travel on the back of the Ripley AF as you'll find on the carbon bike. That means you should expect a trail rig that values speed and pedaling efficiency, with the Ripley long being known as a short-travel trail bike that's designed to cover ground quickly.


The Ripley AF sports the same 120mm of travel via a dw link suspension layout.


That fast, efficient ride comes courtesy of the dw link suspension, with the two co-rotating links employing a relatively high anti-squat number that helps to give the bike its speedy demeanor. Just as on the carbon Ripley, the bottom link and bushings are actually borrowed from the burlier Ripmo chassis. That should aid frame rigidity, but it also means that the same replacement parts can be used on essentially all of Ibis' full-suspension bikes. And speaking of that, those bushings in the lower link come with a lifetime warranty (there's a seven-year warranty on the frame, too), while you'll find sealed bearings at the upper link.

The new Ripley AF is a perfect fit for our upcoming value trail bike Field Test where we'll be pitting it against other machines that put affordability ahead of fancy. Stay tuned for those video reviews in the near future to find out how the new aluminum Ibis compares.


326 Comments

  • 216 3
 Deore for $2999 vs NX/GX for $3299...

No brainer.
  • 82 2
 Yep. Deore has made entry level builds a viable option again. Which is great.
  • 53 0
 Given current supply chains, it will be a no brainer when only one or the other is available at a time. They will sell a boat load of these things, like a Model T of mountain bikes.
  • 47 4
 Deore delivery in early 2023
  • 47 39
 I have had a TON of shimano warranties on their 12spd stuff. When SLX and XT came out I was very impressed with the value and performance. However, over the last year the number of warranties including XTR has made me embrace sram again.
  • 32 50
flag Lukefuelex (Jan 19, 2021 at 9:32) (Below Threshold)
 how is sram even still in business, i ride an x01 eagle drivetrain on my full sus and prefer the deore xt 1x10 on my fat bike
  • 17 1
 @xlcheese: Do tell. Any common themes?
  • 4 1
 @jason3559:
@xlcheese

yes, are you talking about clutch service (which sounds like it needs to be, regularly), or something else?
  • 2 0
 @kcy4130: I would add mid level bikes as well. It performs as well as SLX/XT, just heavier.
  • 36 6
 @jason3559: Broken cassettes that sheered off. Broken chainrings. The XTR rear derailleur carbon cage has a tendancy to explode with minor bumps. The clutches on the derailleurs develops a lot of slop. The clutch also needs to be rebuilt frequently or you'll risk the cage sticking and failing to spring back. I have three XTR shifters with the same problem sitting on the desk waiting for warranty inventory to come back in stock.

When the 12spd shimano started rolling out I was super impressed and sold a ton of bikes with it. It performed great and was a better value than SRAM. I still think they are great performing drivetrains, but the number of failures makes me shy away. When shimano has inventory they are superb getting warranty stuff taken care of.
  • 7 0
 @jason3559: I’m curious if xlcheese had the same problem as me - clutch cover seal failed to keep moisture out. I had to warranty an SLX derailleur because it got corroded and the clutch wouldn’t work. I had to keep the replacement greased very frequently with Shimano’s special grease and it would barely stay working. Looking online, there were definitely other people experiencing the same thing.
  • 8 11
 @xlcheese: yeah ive bent 2 gx eagle casstte cogs in 1 month and had to buy an x01 casstte, but the 10 speed deore casste on my fat bike is still dead straight after 8 months
  • 5 0
 @lj17: My SLX rd started working badly, and replacing shifter cable/housing and rebuilding the clutch didn't help. Then I lubed my pivots with some Tri-Flow and it's back to works-like-new. Seems like the derailleur pivots just got a little crusty. Have you tried that?
  • 7 0
 @Lukefuelex: not a huge surprise tenspeed on a hardtail works quite sturdily though
  • 4 1
 @xlcheese: I recently had a 6 month old XTR derailleur in and the pivot bushings were destroyed, it had close to 2mm of play
  • 3 4
 @Lukefuelex: I SO agree. Shift quality is fine! But I still have no idea how anyone gets on with SRAM ergonomics....
  • 14 1
 What do we think about a 10- or 11-speed GX or XT groupset that is priced similarly to Deore/SX?

Probably would have better durability, and honestly, do we all need the crazy range of the 12 speed dinner plate?

**I will note that I have no clue if dropping to a 10 speed would actually have any cost savings, so, there's that.
  • 23 0
 @Lukefuelex: That makes me wonder if you have some other issue- I've got 3000 miles on my current GX cassette and derailleur. No issues, quite a bit of climbing. I keep the chain lubed pretty regularly but nothing else special.

The GX has been bullet proof for me.
  • 9 2
 @Lukefuelex: Ha, I have a full X01 drivetrain on my bike (but only because of a fortuitous situation and didn't pay for the upgrade). My previous bike had a a full GX drivetrain... beyond the weight difference (which is nice), I haven't noticed any other differences... I guess the shifter feels a little nicer? Maybe? If it was just a few hundred dollars difference to get that lower weight, that would make sense, but there is like a $1000+ difference in price... which is insane!! For anyone wondering... unless you are a crazy weight weenie and have the cash to burn, X01 is not worth the steep upgrade price.
  • 2 0
 @xlcheese: I have a deore 12spd thats almost brand new. With the clutch on it wont shift down from the 12 & 11 cogs. With it off it has no problem. Does it just need a clutch service?
  • 4 1
 @xlcheese: But, the XTR rear derailleur doesn't have a carbon cage?
  • 6 0
 @kbecker: sounds like your clutch might be too tight if it's new. It's got a little cap on the derailleur where you can actually loosen the clutch a little bit. I had that issue on the first XT derailleur I had. I got one of the first ones that came out.
  • 1 1
 @rickybobby18: Good info, but it was definitely the clutch on mine, especially the first one I had to warranty. It was all rusty and nasty. The second one would work okay, but I had to keep it greased really often and try to keep water away from it. Just a pain.. I have a different bike now so no longer have the SLX.
  • 5 1
 @xlcheese: @xlcheese: This is sad but true, though I haven't gone back to SRAM. In 2020, I had an XT shifter fail, an SLX chainring bolt (one of the 8 anti-tamper bolts) back out and a chain spontaneously erupt on me, 8 miles from the trail head. Not super reassuring. I'm running SLX/XT mix drivetrains on two bikes now. The warranty chainring took 4 months, but when it showed up it was an XTR, so no more stupid bolts to fail.

I also broke an SLX brake lever blade - not a warranty issue, I dumped hard in a rock garden. Replacement is still unavailable, so I replaced the whole lever with a Deore. Indistinguishable on the trail, same price. My trail bike is now an XTR/XT/SLX/Deore hybrid.

Gold standard for reliability for me is 10 speed XT; I'd build a new bike, set up the shifting, maybe give the barrel adjuster half a turn after the first couple hours of riding... then ride it until the chain wore out. Just flawless.
  • 3 0
 @BrambleLee: THe outer cage plate is carbon or some sort of resin. THe M9100 long cage.
  • 3 1
 @Glenngineer: I had an SLX chainring blow up too. The bolts that are non-serviceable.
  • 3 1
 @BrambleLee: The XTR has some sort of composite cage. Mine skipped of a rock and exploded. Something any of my previous SLX/GX mechs would have shrugged off. The rest of the system still shifts great, though.
  • 2 0
 @BrambleLee: feels pretty plastic to me

@xlcheese: just give me a 10-13-16-19-23-27-31-36-41-46t X-Dome, 300g $300, a Saint shifter, and an XTR der with a metal clutch lever and I'll never comment again. In dusty conditions Shimano 12 gets noisy at ring after an hour, even with lightly lubed chain. Maybe the ring will wear out and it will get quieter. We need drivetrains that are global-warming compatible
  • 9 7
 @xlcheese: Alternatively, me and just about everyone I know have been riding various levels of Shimano drivetrains for the last 20yrs and have had exactly 0.0 issues, aside from destruction when hitting solid objects at speed.
  • 9 1
 @kcy4130: I have a Ripmo AF with Deore and DVO bits and I do not feel like I'm riding a low-end bike, and that's after being on XT for years.
  • 2 1
 @xlcheese: Same here. It was XT 12 speed on my Wife's bike. First the clutch stopped functioning, Then the paws on the hub froze XT hub, Being a ebike (commuter) that gave the bike the ability to shift while not pedaling, as the front chainring would just keep on spinning. I am running a 12 speed XT on my Sentinel and have yet to encounter any problems but only like 10 rides in with it.
  • 4 0
 Wow kicked in the nuts for only $300, seems worth it.
  • 4 0
 @kbecker: I had this exact problem with my XT 11-speed derailleur. Wouldn't shift down from the biggest cog unless I turned off the clutch. cleaning/re-greasing the clutch helped, but it is still a little flaky.
  • 3 0
 @rickybobby18: Tragically overcomplicated design... XTR is one piece, fortunately, like pretty much every other 1X direct mount ring.
  • 19 1
 What's wrong with NX/GX? I had GX for 6 years and it literally never missed a beat! Previous Shimano gears and brakes were nothing but trouble. Dont understand this hatred for Sram value groupsets.
  • 8 1
 @MattP76: GX isn't really value anymore - more like their mid-upper tier. SX is really their value package, and that is just... not good. NX in my personal experience has been a nightmare, as well. Once you get to GX, everything is golden in my experience, but under that it feels like you're rolling the dice w/ durability (I had two NX drivetrains blow up in 2 weeks of riding on XC trails...)
  • 3 0
 @snowwcold55: Totally agree with SX, it's crap I bent my SX rear mech in not time at all. However my NX replacement has been mint since. I suppose it shows how bad SX is when NX is an upgrade!
  • 1 2
 @islandforlife: Yeah... big jump in price from GX to X01. Really, if you are making that jump you might as well throw in a couple hundred more for XX1. The X01 should fall in the middle of GX and XX1...
  • 5 1
 @ICKYBOD: I've got 250 miles on nx (I know not much, new bike) and it has worked flawlessly. Zero complaints. I think the hate against NX is way overblown. SX is obviously a different story though.
  • 2 0
 @xlcheese: multiple warranty issues on my shimano xtr. Went back to SRAM.
  • 1 1
 @xlcheese: I had to warranty my shifter and was lucky to find the right spare XT shifter at the LBS. If that fails, I'm up sh*t creek since these are basically all out of stock. That pretty much makes the whole drivetrain worthless if this shifter spring breaks too. I went through the whole warranty process over the phone and they won't say anything about the replacement parts solving the apparent faulty spring issue. Who knows if or when the replacement shifter will ever show up. That was last October, not a peep from Shimano. If I were to choose right now, I'd steer clear of Shimano till either stock is readily available or they are clear about the situation being resolved. A fun bike is one you can actually ride.
  • 3 0
 @islandforlife: hmm ngl long term XO1 is better than GX. Cassette lasts longer, chain lasts a million times longer, shifter definitely feels nicer, AND (never thought I would say this) the derailleur is definitely stronger. Had the cage get caught in my spokes one time (ripped three spokes and bent the hanger) and the derailleur still works perfectly. Might be placebo, but I would say XO1 is worth it if you have the coin.
  • 2 2
 Don't trust deore. Derailleur cages are bad quality steel plates that bend like butter. That cost me a full rear wheel a couple months ago. It also developes early play. I have had the same deore brakes for 4-5 years of abuse though.
  • 2 0
 @Zeeroone:
Lol yeah when I was installing my M6100 Deore I was like, wtf. Why is the cage so thin?
With little pressure from my fingers I could squish the cage easily.
I measured the cage and it's 1,7mm thick, while my old 10 speed Deore is 2.4mm.
My NX mech was even thicker.

But so far it works great. I hope it stays like that.
  • 1 1
 @ICKYBOD: no i lube my chain evry other ride wash my bike, replace the shift cable, i just do lots of out of the seat crankin'
  • 1 0
 @xlcheese:
Yep, since Shimano 12 speed last June, on my third cassette (XT and SLX), third rear derailleur (XT and SLX), 4 chains (XT, SLX). It has all added up to be quite expensive to run their 12 speed system so far with no issues on 11, 10, 9 spd Shimano before over past 15 years. Shimano 12 speed is just too fragile, finicky and wears too quickly for me in comparison that it feels like a big “money grab”. Throw availability issues for replacement parts now, tough pill to swallow. Nice bike, strongly considering Sram GX myself for these reasons
  • 1 0
 @MattP76: My experience Matt is that the basic SRAM stuff feels cheap. When I built my son's Five up in April/May last year I actually send the NX groupset back and bought a 12 speed Deore groupset and I have to say it feels a lott more sturdy and performs really well.
  • 1 0
 @snowwcold55: totally agree. My NX lasted less than 4 weeks before der exploded. XO is superb but pricing is !! Shimano XT 11 speed is all you could ever want/need. My mates are holding on to their 12 sp GX but rest are back on XT 11sp as shimano has cut too many corners with their current 12sp.
  • 128 0
 I think the product managers here deserve a standing ovation for their choices on the "NGX" build. By using the GX cassette and XD driver on the hub, they leave the door open for drivetrain upgrades down the line without needing a new wheel. The "easy" choice from a showroom perspective would have been a GX derailleur and shifter, and NX everywhere else, but they really did make a more customer-friendly choice here.
  • 10 34
flag rickybobby18 (Jan 19, 2021 at 12:04) (Below Threshold)
 Customer-friendly, for me, is HG instead of XD. If I planned on upgrading I'd rather have HG so I can put the new Deore on, or older SLX/XT, or NX, or Microshift, or Box, or or or...
  • 21 0
 The Ripmo AF and now Ripley AF are both superbly specc'ed platforms from a product management standpoint. Your observation on the hub driver body is a good spot.
The whole move to aluminium was a big gamble for Ibis, as it could have been read as a devaluation of a high-end brand. They clearly understand the needs of the everyday Joe rider, and by working the suspension design, frame finish and spec choices so hard they've created some great products (in the Ripmo AF at least, and I'm sure this Ripley AF will be similarly well received). So far it's only served to enhance their reputation.
  • 20 2
 @rickybobby18: No Shimano 12 speed cassette (including the new Deore one) will fit on an HG driver.
  • 2 0
 @nogirlsatgt: I thought the new deore was also available in 10/11 speed?
  • 3 0
 @rickybobby18: you are correct, there is a wide-range 10/11 speed HG that looks amazing and nobody talks about. really want to see some in depth reviews of that 10 speed vs box and microshift.
  • 1 0
 @halljam: this is in now way in depth... I’m running a 10 speed HG 11-46t with SLX derailleur/crankset and Deore shifter on an old hardtail and while it’s not as smooth as the GX on my other bike, it’s not far away. Significantly better performance than the microshift i was running prior and is now on my wife’s hardtail.
  • 79 2
 So happy to see aluminum back on more bikes.
  • 33 20
 For everyday use it's just so much better. My trail bike has had a dent in the seatstay for years now and it's been just fine. Had that frame been carbon it would be in a landfill instead.
  • 20 0
 Agreed. I feel like I have been priced out of carbon so more aluminum options are welcome. The added 1.45 pounds of weight is less than one percent of my total body weight so not a huge (pun intended) deal for me, and I save $1000 over the carbon frame.
  • 66 7
 @gnarcissist: The truth is you don't actually know that, but sounds good in the comment section.
  • 58 5
 @gnarcissist: Actually if it was carbon you may just have a paint chip there and no frame deformation at all.
  • 10 17
flag BenTheSwabian (Jan 19, 2021 at 10:15) (Below Threshold)
 Not happy to see a frame that weighs 3,4 kg though, not on a bike like the Ripley. Especially now that Specialized and Giant showed the world that aluminium XC bike frames don't have to be heavy at all. I really don't get what Ibis was thinking.
  • 8 2
 @gnarcissist: My Trek Fuel EX 9.8 has had a minor crack in the carbon seat stay for over a year now without an issue. Carbon frames don't always explode on impact.
  • 7 4
 @yupstate: While you think a paint chip does not indicate frame deformation, it is possible that you could have carbon fiber delamination. That is one of the bad things about carbon, BVID (barely visible internal delamination ) is the start of bad things to come.
  • 13 1
 @gnarcissist: Carbon can sometimes be repaired better than alu. Welding alu can undo the heat treatment. A friend of mine had his bike's carbon chainstay repaired it it was fine.
  • 3 0
 @BenTheSwabian: looks to be the same tube set used to build the ripmo af. I’d venture to guess people who are seriously concerned about weight aren’t looking at the af version of ripley and would probably also embrace the steeper angles of the carbon version.
  • 6 9
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: I had to cut over 100 cracked carbon rental bikes in half last summer because of a weak point in the carbon around the headset. While yes technically some carbon damage can be repsared big stuff leaves you open to liability big time.
  • 7 14
flag gnarcissist (Jan 19, 2021 at 10:33) (Below Threshold)
 I suppose my main point then is if you're going to be using your carbon bike hard all day multiple times a week it IS going to fail, its just a matter of time. Our failure percentage on carbon frames in a single season (from pretty much every brand we had demo bikes for) was about 80%.
  • 5 1
 @BenTheSwabian: It sounds like they designed this one to handle abuse- heavier links of big brothers, burley welds and slack angles. You hear 120mm and think one thing, but then you look at the directions they took on specifics and it makes sense. More norco optic than xc.
  • 5 3
 @BenTheSwabian:
Lighter aluminum, Really? The Specialized stump jumper comp alloy costs $299 more than the new Ripley AF and weighs more too: 14.9kg to the Ibis with deore at 14.8 kg...
  • 11 0
 @gnarcissist: I guess I must be lucky because I have 100% carbon frame reliability. Nothing broken on any of mine and I ride them hard and have had them flung into the woods many a time.
  • 3 11
flag BenTheSwabian (Jan 19, 2021 at 11:04) (Below Threshold)
 @ICKYBOD: Sure, but if you want to do exactly that, and your option is a Ripley AF that weighs 15kg, why not go to the long-travel, more capable Ripmo AF altogether? I just don't think a "burly" Ripley makes sense.

Not with that half-assed geometry anyways. If they wanted a really capable trail bike, they should have gone down the route of the Optic. Full-on 65° HTA, 510 mm reach, 35 mm stanchion fork, Super Deluxe DH rear shock, etc.
  • 4 0
 @BenTheSwabian: Seems like the motivation behind the aluminum bike is price point, so likely focussed more on low price than weight, and demonstrated by the lack of build kits rivalling the top carbon builds. Anyone seriously concerned with weight will likely not be looking at a $3K deore/nx/gx regardless of frame material.
  • 6 1
 @BenTheSwabian: touché. I agree that if my bike weighs over 32 lbs, might as well have a lot of travel.
  • 7 0
 @bedren: Sure, carbon can be damaged, aluminum can be damaged, all of the above. I guess the point is that as @maximesl said, carbon doesn't just explode on impact. I feel many folks who may not have a ton of experience with carbon bikes just think they are explosions waiting to happen. I have 3 carbon bikes, have owned 4 total and knock on wood they have been very reliable. Paint chips and all! :-)
  • 6 1
 @gnarcissist: That has absolutely nothing to do with your original comment.
You do not in fact know that the incident that caused the dent in AL would have made a carbon frame unusable.
  • 3 6
 @BenTheSwabian: The Ripley is not a XC bike.,
  • 2 0
 @rossluzz: For me...the $1000 price difference is not enough to choose AL over C (assuming you don't have a preference for AL). I might be tempted if it was half the cost of the carbon frame at $1400.
  • 6 0
 @BenTheSwabian: Not sure why this was downvoted... makes perfect logical since. Why take such a weight penalty on a short travel rig? The Ripmo AF weighs the same and is so much more capable.
  • 2 0
 @gnarcissist: So a broken seat stay means you throw the entire bike away vs, I don’t know, just a new rear triangle? You know how dumb that sounds, right?
  • 4 4
 @ICKYBOD: ... except it isn't comparable to a Norco Optic. That is exactly my point. It's shorter, steeper, has flimsier or lower-tier components and the Ripley's suspension system doesn't lend itself to shredding. A "burly" frame isn't going to change much about it.

Don't just take my word for it but look up Vital MTB's comparison test of short travel 29ers. Their verdict: When it comes to riding hard, the Ripley isn't even in the same league as the Tallboy or Optic.

A better option for someone who wants a short travel alloy bike that can shred would probably be the Banshee Phantom.
  • 3 1
 @gnarcissist: ... then what ever brand you had probably just designs bad bikes in general. Also a bike breaking because of a design flaw literally has nothing to do with the frame material, but with shoddy engineering.
  • 2 1
 @BenTheSwabian: Mine shredded pretty damn well. I did, however have a 36 at 140 and a DPX2 plus SC Reserve wheels. I took it all over, Fruita, Moab, North Shore and it handled everything fine. I would say it's definitely in the league of a Tall Boy, I haven't ridden an Optic so I couldn't tell you. The stock version wasn't very stable at speed so I can agree that it needed some work to make it capable. But it has the blood for it, if you want it.
  • 2 1
 @SlodownU: It's a hardtail. If you wanna try taking the seat stay off and gluing a new one on you're more than welcome to try.
  • 2 2
 @BenTheSwabian: the banshee phantom v3 is 0.5 - 1 degree steeper, slightly shorter reach, slightly less travel, but you're confident it's a better option for shredders because of what exactly? Marketing?
  • 1 0
 @BenTheSwabian:
The Optic is like $750 more then Riply AF Deore. So not really a good comparison.
  • 1 2
 @thegoodflow: Weight and suspension performance. The Ripley's linkage has barely any progression, 4% to be precise. Also the impressions of the Vital MTB testing team.
  • 2 0
 @BenTheSwabian: the AF has different angles than the carbon version. Seems like different enough to be meaningful so not taking vitals test into consideration for this bike.
  • 60 10
 not feeling the shape/taper of that top tube
  • 15 4
 Right? that whole bike would look so much better the TT just went straight into the ST without that little curve at the end.
  • 3 64
flag preach (Jan 19, 2021 at 9:47) (Below Threshold)
 not to mention that this single pivot design looks kind of weak, not something you'd take off of a 4ft drop.
  • 9 0
 @preach: single pivot? Twin Link - Co-rotating I believe...DW Link
The Ripmo and a bunch of other bikes use that and they race Enduro on them so not sure what you're talking about.
  • 17 7
 I agree, Ibis bikes rides damn fine, but I wouldn't buy it even if it would be last bike on earth. For me it is ugly in pictures, even more in person. Don't know why, don't hate me on it, but I loved how they rode. If you find it nice, consider it, it is good bike to ride.
  • 17 1
 @preach: most XC bikes will survive multiple 4ft drops. It’s actually the Pole Stamina that’s the least capable of surviving a drop.
  • 6 4
 Do you see that under cut on the down tube and head tube weld.....I cringe when I see weld defects.
  • 5 4
 @Zorlac: I stand corrected.
  • 3 3
 It's like the top tube can't decide if it wants to be curved or straight. Looking like a spaghetti noodle flung against the wall.
  • 4 4
 Yeah agree, at this point ibis is like the uncle that still has a mullet. Even pivot and niner have come around, c’mon ibis
  • 4 3
 Until you realize that the shape allows a massive dropper if you want it. I have a carbon Ripley in L and can run a 200mm dropper. Overkill for most situations but worth it when you need it.

You don’t buy one of these for looks, I can’t tell what it looks like when I’m riding it, but I can tell it’s a blast.
  • 4 3
 @mtallman2: Um, the shape of the top tube has nothing to do with the seatpost insertion length.
  • 1 1
 Mmmm reminds me of a Giant Anthem and my ball balls not like that right angle top tupe
  • 42 8
 Bummer that the only suspension option is Fox Performance. Not that the new Grip damper is bad but the DVO parts on the Ripmo AF really made it stand out in its category for $3k.
  • 8 0
 I was bummed not to see DVO as well. I guess the lack of a DVO air shock without piggy back was an issue.
  • 2 0
 @westeast: they allegedly have a non piggyback shock in the works. I bet the next model year ripley will have dvo
  • 10 0
 @Dlinsky: It could be supply chain, we don't know what DVO can commit to.
  • 4 0
 @rustiegrizwold: a friend told me that Ripmo AFs that were supposed to be delivered with DVO suspension came with Fox parts because of supply chain troubles, so they might have wanted to mitigate that risk right from the beginning
  • 5 3
 Serious question- Fox stuff is pretty good, even if DVO is better. However, once a rear shock crosses a certain threshold of performance, then how much benefit is there for a short travel, 120mm trail bike? A bike like this shouldn't be spec'ed with a piggy back, so really how much performance benefit is there in a DVO shock at such short travel?
  • 6 0
 @hamncheez: Some would say that the less suspension you have, the better it needs to be. Some people also want adjustability to the nth degree.

I have Fox Performance fork and shock on my carbon Ripmo. It’s good stuff. But it’s not DVO boutique cool stuff.
  • 3 1
 Check out Bryson Martin's carbon Ripley build on his IG. It has a DVO Topaz + Sapphire 34 and is easily one of the best looking Ripleys out there.
  • 2 1
 Ok I 100% get bling factor. Some of us are now in the stage of our life where we have more spending money than free time, and since we can't get out on the bike as much as we want we instead bling up what we have. DVO stuff certainly is more bling (and better looking).

That being said, isn't the whole point of bling to put non-stock, non-oem stuff on your bike?
  • 3 4
 @hamncheez: For me, I’m not even sure it’s the bling as much as it is just having something different. I actually wanted the RipmoAF, and that’s what I went to buy but was first warned about wait times, then offered a brand new V1 for a smidge over what the AF was going to cost me. I’m still very happy overall.
To me, Kashima is bling but it feels meaningless and non-impressive. “Cool, you spent a lot. Can you ride or even make sense of all those dials?”
  • 3 0
 @hamncheez: PC building and woodworking have entered the chat.
  • 4 1
 @hamncheez: A piggyback shock doesn’t necessarily have better performance, it offers more oil volume and cooling surface for better temperature control under long high speed descents. Shorter travel bikes are unlikely to see use that would overheat a traditional inline shock, so the weight is not justified. Like anything, it is about balancing the tradeoffs.
  • 1 0
 @mrpfp: my experience is that shorter travel bikes don't need the greatest shocks, as there's less wallow to control.
But they can still benefit from them if the rider chooses one.
E.g. I had a ccdb air on my old smuggler and it was sensational, but hugely changed the character of the bike.
  • 31 0
 With only 120mm, will I have to do some of the work?
  • 19 2
 The work will be done for you : Let my Ibis do the Job

[somebody had to do it]
  • 3 0
 With that 14.8 KG weight, you'll have to work on the uphills, but on the downs the Ibis will still do the work Smile
  • 26 5
 Me: Shut up and take my money!!!


The industry: Sorry, bro, you have to wait till the end of December 2021, because you know...
  • 25 6
 Man this is probably the bike most people should be on instead of their 170mm trail deafening Capras.
  • 18 4
 Yes, exactly. And they'd have more fun.
  • 5 0
 @mikelevy: would be nice to see this go head to head with the 2021 Norco Optic. The 2021 optic has had a couple of tweaks over the 2020.
  • 1 1
 @IMeasureStuff: The only tweak we want is an alloy option tho. Optic looks perfect on paper and has great reviews.
  • 4 1
 Some people just don't have the chedder for more than one bike mate.
Yeah if you put on your smart cap optimizing ya bike for 80% of your rides makes sense, but when that damper is a pumping, the bikes a dancin' and your brain fades into the gnar zone... Worth it.
  • 2 1
 Ugh...tell me about it. I have a Banshee Rune V3 (170/160) and it's a beast. But I'm not a beast. And my trails are not made for beasts. I would sell it but I put so much time and money into it and I don't want to deal with lowballing a*sholes. Plus, I've never ridden a short travel trail bike but it's what everyone says I should be riding.
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy: so I've been riding a SC Bronson last 6 yrs and can't decide on the Ripmo or Ripley.... Unfortunately due to Covid I'm unable to demo either. I ride a bit of everything and spend at least 30days in the summer riding park with my kids even tho xc is my favorite. Any suggestions or comments? I'm 5'8, 170 and ride medium frame????
  • 18 0
 Show me a mullet HD5 AF.
  • 2 1
 Maybe mallet-able with over forking, over shocking and reverse offset bushings?!
  • 13 0
 Excited for the Affordable Trail Bike Field Test!
  • 32 0
 You mean the Available Trail Bike Field Test?
  • 9 0
 @stevemokan:

This needs to be done.

Some sort of Parody film that reviews the best affordable available bikes/components. Emphasis on "whatever was actually available to buy", which likely means not complete bikes.

Because personally, I'm not sure how a frame with no parts would stack up against a pair of non-branded pedals.
  • 2 0
 @ocnlogan: if you do that, it will be for only 2 days, because these would be then out of stock also
  • 13 2
 "I haven't ridden this bike" is the best comment in that video. Very helpful guys.
  • 27 2
 I like to help
  • 11 1
 Glad to see that the Ripmo AF has informed Ibis that AL framed bikes can, in fact, sell. Love seeing the option of the AL Ripley here.
  • 13 6
 I am not a weight weenie, but 32.5 pounds is really heavy for a 120mm trail bike. My Turner Burner (140mm with 160 fork) weighs that with pedals, WTB Vigilante tires, and a DVO Fork, so not a light build. I have to think they are understating the frame and wheel weight.
  • 4 0
 Are you also comparing all the drive train components on your bike with the NX/Deore stuff on these bikes? They could get that overall weight down a lot lower if they were doing a higher end spec. I've got a Ripmo AF, and they're very accurate on their stated weight difference between the carbon and aluminum frames. The low-end parts spec adds quite a bit of weight.
  • 1 2
 @mammal: Should be similar, I am running GX 10-52, but carbon bars. Wheels are easton arc 30 rims with hadley, so not a light build, about 2000 grams. I am speculating the AF frame is probably a pound heavier than advertised and the Ibis wheels combined with the 2.6s another 1-1.5 pounds heavier than my bike (27.5 v 29 wheel with tire weights can make a significant difference).
  • 4 0
 My Turner 5.spot is 30.5lbs with a Pike, 30mm carbon rims, carbon handlebar, King hubs, 10sp XT drivetrain, dropper, and 26x2.4” exo tires. So for another pound we go up to 29” wheels with 35mm aluminum rims? Sounds completely frickin’ reasonable. Shockingly good, actually.
  • 1 0
 Get a killer set of carbon wheels and you will drop weight and drastically transform the performance of the bike. I’ve ridden all types of sleds and never thought I’d be riding a 6” travel bike weighing under 30lbs, but with the modern geometry, etc., I don’t even notice the extra 3-5 lbs. I’m stuck on enduro for now until something comes out better: I’m all smiles (:
  • 6 0
 This is objectively a better bike, but for $750 savings I might go with the Giant Trance 29 (speculating it gets updated this summer). Money saved to spend on things I'm going want to upgrade anyways. For a little bit more than this the Occam H20 probably would be a better suited purchase (for me personally, not necessarily in general) at the ~$3k price point.

Now a $3000 Mojo AF with DVO 130/140mm Topaz and 140/150mm Diamond D1 would absolutely get my purchase.

Anyone else curious about the listed 11-51T Deore 6100 (12 speed) cassette. Perhaps a typo or perhaps Shimano is really putting the nail into SX/NX.
  • 2 0
 I saw the 11-51T cassette and sent Ibis an email about it. I’m guessing a typo, but maybe Shimano is doing all us old farts who want 12sp without needing to replace wheels a favor and we’re getting an 11-51T 12sp cassette!
  • 2 0
 I passed on the Occam to get this. Occam was available, but rode a little to "XC" for me. It was light, looked great, but I took a gamble and pre-ordered one the of the Ripleys my shop is getting. Guess we'll see if I made a good choice. LOL
  • 2 0
 I got a reply from Ibis: it was a typo on the website and the cassette is the normal 10-51T 12sp Deore.
  • 19 14
 I don’t know about you, but in the east coast these codpiece downtubes will get more contact than David Bowies spandex clad eggplant from Labyrinth. I know everyone wants waterbottles but at some point the lost clearance with logs and rock step-ups is an issue
  • 39 1
 I'm trying to picture it, but I can't. What scenario would cause you to hit something on this frame that you wouldn't hit anyway with the chainring?
  • 5 2
 @jpat22: The things you lifted your front wheel over but set it down too soon on. You were either going too slow or forgot the pedal kick to keep the front up
  • 7 0
 Cool! I’m excited to see some reviews! A short
Travel mashers are awsome!
  • 4 0
 Easiest riding bike I've ever been on. I took it the the Palm Canyon Epic on Sunday and couldn't believe how much easier it was to ride than my Bronson. It doesn't feel like a 130/120 bike on anything but the climbs... feels like a cheater bike without being a cheater bike.
  • 3 0
 Have you ridden a trail pistol? @PJJ205:
  • 7 1
 I bet that's the first time in history a Brodie has had clipless pedals on it.
  • 1 0
 Ha, at least an 8-Ball!
  • 7 1
 More metal and more slacker? Does that mean we can look forward to seeing one doing more work on a Friday Fails soon?
  • 9 2
 Closest modern day incarnation to the Kona Process 111
  • 10 6
 Except Kona's own 2021 Hei Hei has almost exactly the same geo while being better in every objective way.
  • 2 0
 I had the same exact thought!
  • 3 0
 @jpcars10s: Except price
  • 2 0
 @ryan77777: Indeed. If they treat it the same as the Process line, a new Alu Hei Hei will be out in a year or two with awful half-assed spec.
  • 1 0
 It's a good contender for the modern day P111 title, certainly more so that the new Hei Hei - which looks like a light trail bike rather than the bruiser the Process was. Banshee Phantom is another contender. Dunno what Transition are doing about the Smuggler now that they have the Spur. As a former P111 and Smuggler owner, I'm now riding a slackened-out Orange Stage 4 and loving it. The new Stage Evo seems like a fine bike too.
  • 7 0
 That is a killer bike for $3k new.
  • 7 0
 Just add a XT shifter to get that double upshift
  • 1 0
 That’s the eighth move for sure.
  • 3 0
 *right move ????‍♂️
  • 3 0
 I wish they had another option that was 1 tier higher than the NGX model, slx or GX, 4 piston brakes, etc. I like the aluminum frame, but I'd prefer uniform, mid-range components. Probably still under 4k but no "down the road" swaps necessary.
  • 3 0
 My guess is that it's just not available right now... sell what you can get these days.
  • 1 0
 double post
  • 1 0
 I read in another article there was/is a plan to offer higher spec options but supply issues led to just these initial offerings.
  • 1 0
 Totally agree, I’d rather spend a bit more initially and have an alloy frame with a better spec and not buying the more expensive bits like forks and wheels later. A build with a decent pair of wheels and some Pikes up front sounds like the type of bike that would do me for the stuff I ride here in the UK.
  • 5 0
 Awesome bike looks tempting for the build, just get the Deore and upgrade from there- no need for NX/GX...
  • 5 0
 Now if only some other brands would wise up and Transition to more aluminum options...
  • 2 0
 Watching Ibis rake in the dough should really Spur them on.
  • 9 4
 MACA. Ibis has Made Aluminum Cool Again.
  • 24 0
 Banshee says aluminum was always cool
  • 8 0
 @BillT999: So does Canfield.
  • 3 0
 Commencal?
  • 4 0
 @BillT999: Knolly too.
  • 4 0
 Sounds like only the SRAM build will be available at launch, since the Shimano supply chain is such a mess.
  • 1 0
 Let's go over the trail bike checklist...

- Does it have a gimmicky steering wheel - no it doesn't
- Is there a lot of carbon fibre.. no there isn't
- Can it fit a box.. no, pass

Oh wait... wrong channel... Smile

I feel like that was an artfully done homage by Mike
  • 2 0
 Everything comes full circle. Aluminum is back! Not hard to believe when entry level carbon crept above the $5K mark and XTR builds where over $10K.

Next headline will be the Deore version is sold out through 2023.
  • 1 0
 If in 2021 with all the new standard s we have coming monthly nobody finds a better solution to having a water bottle than that fugly hump that you keep covering with the crank even when the pic is from the right or the left I just don't get it. Make a custom bottle and holder damnit. They make custom everything but the cheapest things. Oh my....
  • 1 0
 TBH unless a bike weight difference is going 2+ kg or more I really don't notice a huge difference on the trail for an average 9-15 mile trail ride that splits the ups and downs. The modern geometry, suspension and huge drivetrain range of current bikes really makes worry free riding of aluminum bikes more practical and economical. Really hope this trend continues.
  • 4 0
 Angled headset cups work too.
  • 2 0
 It does, but not perfect. My Cane Creek Angleset upper bearing just exploded after 2 years of duty on my old Ripmo V1 and now my AF. (yes it was installed properly, once by LBS, once by me) We'll see how the Works Angleset fairs.
  • 2 0
 @coletrane-mtb: I think you'll have better luck with the stout Works cups/bearings. Good choice.
  • 5 0
 Bravo Ibis!!!!
  • 3 0
 If I hadn't moved away from New England, this would have very likely been my next bike.
  • 9 5
 That top tube is a among the ugliest I have ever seen.
  • 2 1
 nice to see such killer deals, more and more people can start MTB with decent bikes!

I surprised that no-one use suntour/xfusion forks / shocks to reduce price even further ?
  • 1 0
 UK prices

Deore build £3399
NX/GX build £3499


But USA price for Deore build is $2999 straight conversion is £2200

£1100 price bump for UK ????

I know the new part brexit customs system adds costs, but that's insane
  • 4 0
 Unavailable to Buy AF?
  • 3 1
 @mikelevy - looks like you missed a detail:

Ripley Aluminum Foil in case anyone was wondering about the acronym.
  • 1 0
 These Ibis aluminum bikes are some of the best bikes for the money. I always recommend them to new riders who want something decent.
  • 1 0
 So, if you were to slap a shorter stroke shock on a Ripmo AF could you basically accomplish the same thing? I don't want to do that to mine, but if I ever moved, maybe...
  • 1 0
 Does anyone have an idea what a 120mm fork would do to the geo? I think this frame built up light with a Fox Stepcast or one of the new SIDs would be amazing for my trails.
  • 2 1
 It’ll steepen the head and seat tube angles by almost a degree, lower the BB by a few mm, reduce the stack by 20mm, and increase the reach by a smidge.

You can get a head tube extension and/or and external cup lower headset to eliminate most of that.
  • 4 1
 Anybody else eagerly waiting for a Mojo AF?
  • 2 0
 Sure are a lot of YouTubers rocking this bike on their channels today. Bet that chaps some hides.
  • 1 0
 Hahaha "do some squats instead of spending money you don't have"

Instead of spending money, just get stronger is solid advice
  • 1 0
 You can install a 140 mm air spring on a 130 fox 34 and bump up the travel? (Which also decreases head angle?) I need this and someone can take my money.
  • 2 1
 That bike looks like an enduro with alot of travel, hard to believe it only has 120mm. Just looks like alot more.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, a lot.
  • 2 1
 Wonder how much for frame only... 2018 ripley ls is looking for some update
  • 4 0
 $1,800 USD.
  • 1 0
 The beginning of the article says $1800 for a frame, but I don't see that option listed on the Ibis website yet.
  • 2 0
 @opetruzel: With the supply shortage I doubt there will be a frameset available until end of 2021. Other brands aren't offering frameset currently or simply don't have any available.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: is it available parts only?
  • 1 0
 $1200 for solid fork, shock, dropper, wheels, drivetrain, brakes.. amazing!
  • 2 0
 aaaaaaand it's sold out...
  • 1 0
 So... what is the name of that sweet track that's playing in the background?
  • 1 0
 Davis Absolute - Stigmata
  • 3 3
 We really need that Kona Process 111 comparison. Pretty sure it's lighter.

Why are new alloy bikes so heavy? Doesn't make much sense...
  • 4 1
 Off the top of my head - wider rims, wider handlebars, huge 50+ tooth cassettes, dropper posts (depends on era you're comparing to), wider and tougher tires being specced more frequently today, more durable frames, thicker stanchion forks, return to threaded BB's.

Basically, bikes are better and they also weigh a bit more as a result. If you look at the carbon versions, they're also up in weight generally. Short of being a top level racer in your category, a couple pounds isn't going to hold you back.
  • 2 0
 Between Two Ferns: Levy compares a Brodie 8-Ball to an Ibis Ripley.
  • 2 0
 I have a xl Ripley v4 frame for sale if anyone is Lookn
  • 2 0
 Nice move Ibis ! Hope Transition will reply with an Al Spur !!
  • 1 0
 Finally another AL frame from Ibis, it sold so well no choice heheee next MOJO and HD5?? COMONNNN 650b gang
  • 1 0
 the comment section on pinkbike is why i left the bike industry none of you can be happy with anything
  • 1 0
 Like the Ibis Primo but 3300 for the carbon frame is beyond me. The alloy version, a bit like this, looks good.
  • 1 0
 Is it just me, or is that water bottle mount suspect? Looks like those cables would interfere with a bottle.
  • 2 1
 nice.
Can you fit a piggy back shock on it?
  • 5 1
 absolutely, but a Rimpo V1 rider will laugh....
  • 2 0
 This is progress!
  • 1 0
 Sweet! We have on the way and excited to review it!
  • 2 1
 Keen to hear how this compares to an Optic, seem pretty similar on paper?
  • 2 1
 That's a damn shame they didn't update the linkage progressivity.
  • 1 0
 Why make it slacker??? The Carbon Ripley is amazing!
  • 5 8
 Anyone else bother by the fact that a $3,000 USD bike is being called "entry level"? I guess the "budget value" is being measured against current bike prices. But $3K five years ago went way further than it does now. Bike prices have sky rocketed.
  • 9 0
 With inflation, $3k today was $2700 in 2015. Personally, I'd take a $3k bike today over even a $4k bike 5 years ago.
  • 3 0
 Orbea and Marin offer carbon frames with decent builds for under $4K. Rift Zone Carbon 1 has a mostly SLX drivetrain and a Bomber Z2 for $3500, whilst the Occam M30 is $4K with a Fox Performance and and SLX/XT drivetrain.

Orbea also let you spec the H20 and H10 Occams with Fox Factory for an extra $550, so H20 with Fox Factory fork and shock is $3650.
  • 6 1
 This ain't Giant. This is Ibis. Compared to how their bikes are normally priced, I'm fine with someone calling this their "entry level" bike.

Unlike a Giant "entry level" bike in the low $2k range this isn't going to require a bunch of upgrades if it's being ridden hard. Plus it's a dw-link bike which has never found it's way onto a bike this affordable.

But to be fair, I'm open to hearing about all the awesome $3k bikes from 5 years ago that are better than this.
  • 1 0
 @WasatchEnduro: I never implied that bikes from 5 years ago, and also cost less, would be better. Of course they weren't. I was implying that you could get a well enough spec'd bike for less than 3K, with basic build kits (NX, Deore) that a budget oriented rider would be happy with. I don't see that from most of the manufacturers right now.
  • 4 0
 @WasatchEnduro: The most recent version of the Trance 29 runs the new Deore 12 speed drivetrain, Shimano MT401 4-pot brakes, Fox Performance DPS shock and the Bomber Z2 fork and comes fitted with a DHF on the front and an Aggressor on the rear, all for $2350. What of that will need upgrading if "it's being ridden hard" vs the almost identical components on this Ibis?
  • 3 0
 @ChiefSilverback: What brand can compete with the buying power of Giant? Specialized, maybe? Giant bikes will always be a bit cheaper than the rest of the competition, based on scale. Not much the other manufacturers can do about that.
  • 1 1
 @mammal: That is entirely true but it runs against @WasatchEnduro statement that a Giant will require upgrading in short order compared to the new Ibis. I'm genuinely interested to hear their response because a friend and I have long marvelled at how $5000 carbon 'super bikes' (Yeti, Pivot, SC etc...) seem to be so popular on the local trails...
  • 1 0
 @ChiefSilverback:

Just checked and that bike looks really, really good. Component-wise I think Giant's wheels, especially their low end ones, are flimsy and weak compared to what Ibis is offering on the Ripley. Don't know about that Praxis crank. Obvious differences are the geo (just the seat tube angle) and platform design which combined with wheels/crank are selling points to spend the $700 more.

But the comparably priced Trance X 29 (2400) w/ SX looks not as nicely specced as the non-X.
  • 2 0
 @WasatchEnduro: A friend of mine got the non-X 29 in the fall and it's a nice bike, but as a whole the Trance line is confusing with the 27.5, 29 and 29X running different components, geos and travels. I assumed they couldn't be hitting those price points by volume pricing on components alone, so saving some on in-house wheels, stem, bars etc... makes sense.

Personally I've got an Orbea Oiz H10TR on order which is priced at $3300, with a full XT drivetrain, Fox 34 Performance fork and DPS shock, and a RaceFace wheelset.
  • 2 0
 @mammal: it's not just the scale (though it is impressive), it's the fact that they're vertically integrated and actually make their own frames and probably a lot of their own components. That additional margin savings can be passed directly to the consumer in the form of lower prices.
  • 2 0
 @Giddyhitch: Sure, all that is true. I'm not sure how people can really expect smaller players like Ibis to beat Giant at the bottom line game, which was the point I was trying to make.
  • 7 6
 I have to admit i think that ibis make kinda ugly bikes
  • 1 0
 Why are you always hating on the 8ball?!
  • 3 0
 It's because he's mad that he has to ride all those nice new bikes for his job instead of being allowed to only ride the 8ball, the greatest bike that there ever was and ever will be.
  • 4 2
 ew thats ugly
  • 1 0
 Where are the looks like a Evo comment?!! It's raw aluminium!
  • 3 2
 That top tube looks like it was inspired by a cat turd
  • 1 0
 This is the frame I want. Drop my 36 to 130 and let’s roll.
  • 1 1
 Does look like they welded the top tube the wrong way around. But would still buy one..
  • 1 0
 the Clevis is different. looks like aluminum now?
  • 1 0
 Wonder if they are offering frame only?
  • 1 0
 Dibs on the SLX cranks. Hit me up when you're ready to upgrade.
  • 1 0
 But will this Ibis do the work?

I can't believe no one has asked this.
  • 1 0
 Not on the uphills with that porky weight.
  • 3 2
 That frame looks flexy AF.
  • 1 0
 Would love to see an aluminum Mojo.
  • 2 2
 Should have put the DVO suspension on it, like they did on the Ripmo, rather than that gash entry level Fox stuff.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy please include Polygon to the upcoming value bike test!
  • 1 0
 I'd love to see a carbon version of the Ripley AF geometry.
  • 1 1
 nice, I wonder if it rips mo' better than the last version.
  • 2 1
 Same geo as Ripmo V1
  • 4 4
 32lb short travel 29er? Meh.... Pat S's riding? I could watch all day.
  • 2 1
 Absolutely nailed it.
  • 1 0
 Awesome!
  • 1 1
 Bikes are getting Grimmer and Grimmer....there is no denying that.
  • 1 1
 Sweet another bike for us consumers to dream about being able to buy. fun.
  • 1 1
 15kg for a trail bike ? thats nice for uphill...
  • 1 1
 Another fun, snappy-handling bike dumbed down into a mini-brodozer. Sigh.
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