Video: Hover Shocks, German Trail Bikes, and Finnish Tire Inserts - Eurobike 2019

Sep 5, 2019
by Pinkbike Originals  


The second day of Eurobike 2019 is wrapped up, but not before we managed to find some interesting new products in hall A2, home to a handful of European brands marching to the beat of their own drum.

Intend Suspension does exactly that, and the result of that thinking is their air-sprung Hover shock that's unlike anything else offered by the big boys. Huck Norris was up next, with their new Mega Norris inserts using multiple densities of foam and being named after bread-based products. Seriously. Last but certainly most German is Nicolai and their new Saturn 14 trail bike that's all about options; pick your wheel configuration, choose from countless geometry options, and either 130mm or 140mm of travel.


43 Comments

  • 27 3
 If you want "coil-like" everything just get a coil shock
  • 9 0
 I think the idea is Coil-like feel with airspring adjustability. But quite frankly, the Intend BC stuff is a treat to the eye to look at in real life, unlike anything else out there.
  • 3 0
 I partially agree, but i can see the merrits in this design. As far as i remember, the designers reasoning for going air was that he could achieve the same performance with an airshock and had nothing to gain from going coil with this sepcific design. Obviously there's a lot more going on with the shock's design than what they talk about in the video, so i'm inclined to believe his claims to some extent. At least the smaller shaft suggests a lot less friction, positively influencing breakaway forces. So that's at leat one step in the right direction. I'm very intrigued by the Hover, even though i'm a die hard coil fanatic. It sports quite a few features that make sense in a real world application for factors like durability and ease of use. And if the reviews are to be believed,the Intend stuff has been backing up its claims rather well so far.
  • 3 1
 To be fair, every coil shock I've owned hasn't been the epitome of greatness as far as I'm concerned. That bottoming out, "BOOONNNGGGG" that sends vibrations through the handle bars. Plus the weight. Maybe the small bump sensitivity is better, but that's about it. I could see wanting a coil for cruising around in comfort, but otherwise I really don't see how they're some sort of bench mark. You can't even adjust the stiffness without buying a whole new spring.
  • 5 0
 Yeah, right. I've been waiting 3rd f*ng week for an 375lb spring from EXT. So I had to BUY 3 springs to actually find the proper one. Something that would take me like 1 day for air shock took me like 2 months with coil. No thanks.
  • 1 0
 @Kramz: Right, it may be really nice for "ground and pound" riders, but for lots of playful riders the attributes of a coil make for a worse riding experience. It gets annoying when "Coil like" is lifted up as the best thing achievable by man.
  • 1 0
 @Hand-of-Midas: yeah it is though. Air shocks feel gross compared to coil shocks. There’s a reason nobody uses air shocks except mountain bikers. If weight wasn’t such an issue you’d never see air shocks.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: They work for totally different riding styles. If someone rides like a trials rider and throws the bike around, they're going to not only want an air shock, but put all the tokens in it for all the progression.

The reason other industries don't use air shocks is no car or truck company is going to tell the person that just bought a dump truck "Yeah bring it into the shop every 50 hours so I can replace seals". It's more a durability thing.
  • 1 0
 @Hand-of-Midas: trials riders don’t ride full suspension so?! Air springs make terrible springs they work in mountain biking because we need our bikes to be light otherwise we’d never even consider them like nobody else does. If there was any advantage at all we’d see them but we don’t. Are you telling me F1 teams who build a new car for every race with multi million pound budgets are using coils because they can’t afford the service charges on a air can?
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Yeah dude, Danny MacAskill, you've probably heard of him. Research his suspension setup. Also, research how Richie Rude sets up his bike.

Some of us ride trails with techy wall rides, meter tall ledges we have to hop UP without assist, stuff like that on our big day trail rides. Coils might be great for how you ride, but they are not better in every circumstance.

Saying a coil is better in every way for every style rider is just thinking what is good for you is good for everyone.
  • 13 0
 What about a Magnetic shock? Is that even possible. Armchair engineers? Thanks. Sincerely, and art student.
  • 5 0
 theoretically possible but the performance would be total garbage, super soft to real firm with mega kick back. plus magnets are very heavy and the design that would be needed to have them work at all like a traditional shock would also make them super heavy, large and convoluted. it very well may be possible in the future because you know...science but for the foreseeable future its not at all likely. as far as i'm aware
  • 2 0
 @grundletroll: Thanks! Makes sense. Heavy and smushy. I can see how that would be. But who knows? Cause, like you said, science. Peace.
  • 1 0
 @grundletroll: what about if you ran a magnet through a coil to adjust resistance, bit like a reverse rail gun or something? (knowledge on subject = 0%) using electro magnetic resistance to control shaft speed
  • 2 0
 There absolutely could be ways to use magnetism! Not sure if they're practical, but the laws of physics allow it. As ctd07 said, you could use induction. Or you could have a series of magnets in a shaft and the body, controlled by some circuitry - dynamic spring rate.

There have been actual applications: White Brothers (purchased by MRP) actually used a magnetic blow-off valve in the Stage fork for their climb mode. Decades ago, Noleen used the piezoelectric effect to modulate their damper. More interestingly, some automotive dampers use a magnetic damper fluid (iron particles in the fluid) and the flow can be controlled electronically.

I'm not sure we'll see any of these on bikes in the near future, but it's not impossible.
  • 1 0
 Magnets, how do they work.
  • 1 0
 @R-M-R: very good points, magnets and magnetism can be used to aid in suspension but very unlikely to be used as the system itself. the real question would be, is any of those things work the extra weight and and cost compared to the traditional shock let that be coil or air or oil for dampening. im sure some of these technologies will trickle down and be experimented with because companies are always looking for the next great thing. im interested in the magnetic damping fluid ill have to read up on that
  • 3 0
 @grundletroll: A magnetic "spring" system may not be inherently heavier than a coil, but yes, cost and complexity are likely to be barriers. A magnetic / electrical damper could be competitive in all parameters, including price.

Here's a good starting point for dampers: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetorheological_damper

They've been available on production cars for nearly twenty years!
  • 7 1
 nikolai mutator bikes looks like a banshee with all the modern upgrades people want that theyve been too scared to add. I want one
  • 6 0
 That Huck Norris DH version at 250 grams is essentially the same weight as a CushCore Pro. I know which one I'd go for.
  • 2 0
 I started to suspect that my huck norris was shifting to the sides when I still got dents. I like the inserts that hug the rim and don't rotate within the tire in the river of sealant with each climbing pedal stroke. *woosh, woosh, woosh, woosh*
  • 1 0
 Having used both the older Hucks and the current CushCore, I tend to agree about the later being better for the weight. Then factor in how much easier it is to install/remove with the Hucks, and the decision still doesn't becomes any harder for downhill/enduro. The Sandwich would be the preference winner on my trail bike's insert.
  • 5 0
 That "Sandwich" insert literally looks like a kitchen sponge.....makes me think...
  • 3 0
 Just buy conrete expanding joint foam, a stanley knife and some garden velcro tie straps from your local hardware store, hey presto, tyre inserts for $5
  • 1 0
 @ctd07: Does this actually work?
  • 6 0
 I’ll take that Nicolai with the intend shock thank you very much!
  • 5 0
 More about Nicolaii and Geometron bikes please @Mikelevy!
  • 3 0
 Hover shock- awesome Nicolai Saturn- dope Tire insert- ghey
  • 1 0
 I think all the products looked great and they all have a source of reason behind they’re geometry and layering. I really like the Hover shock grabbed my attention
  • 2 0
 If you can squeeze it with your fingers, how could it protect your rim?
  • 1 0
 Cant remember the word for it, but polymers can have a speed sensitive response to deformation just like a shock damper. Try compressing it really fast and it'll put up more of a fight.
  • 4 0
 @jpcars10s: I think you're thinking of non-newtonian fluid, like the D3O pads.
  • 2 0
 Now that i think of it why no one makes insert with 3do and such? that would increase the protection a lot.
  • 2 0
 Mike Levy in flip flops at 0:28... gross
  • 6 0
 Just be glad his previous pair of tradeshow sandals was forcibly retired.
  • 1 0
 Are tire 'insets' a bit like tire inserts?
  • 1 0
 talk about an oil change.
  • 1 0
 “He asked for a 13, but they drew a 31....”
  • 2 2
 that three wheeled e-bike with closed cockpit looks amazeballs!
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