Video: Jeff Kendall Weed Goes Cross Country with an XC Bike Strapped to his Motorcycle

Jul 30, 2021
by Jeff Kendall-Weed  



This is why I ride mountain bikes.
An Exie Adventure.

video filmed by Logan Nelson and Jeff Kendall-Weed // words and video editing by Jeff Kendall-Weed
One of my favorite parts of mountain biking are the adventures that come alongside with the quest for new trails.


After using an old DRZ400 with a homebrew bike rack to pop around the various trailheads of Sedona, AZ, I got a little inspired to carry the concept further. I saw how cheap some touring style motorcycles were, such as the older VSTROM 650 and Versys 650 models, and began to Google “what is the safest motorcycle.” Of course, no definitive results came up, though in many forums people were quick to suggest the VSTROM name as the safest. Safest, I have no real idea, most Dad-bike, well, it might just be that.

After the obligatory local trail shake down rides, Logan and I went out for a quick overnighter to some smaller ridges on the foothills of the Cascades. I wanted to get some nice, “fancy” video of riding the bike, and also I wanted to see how the trails in the mountains were running. Turns out the trails were great, but the mosquitoes are absolutely insane this year!


In early 2020, my relationship as a sponsored Ibis rider came to a conclusion, and we found a really cool way to creatively continue as allies. This also meant I could ride bikes from other brands, which has been something really, really cool. Since then, I’ve enjoyed bikes from brands such as Chromag, Intense, Orbea, Rocky Mountain, Niner, Yeti, Norco, and Evil. Having been so focused on just Ibis, it’s been quite enlightening to ride some other bikes- and I have yet to find a dud in that selection! But since I do have such a lasting relationship with Ibis, I’ve been lucky enough to be entrusted with a few bikes to ride and film before public release, including this here Exie.

This particular bike is a prototype- heck, it might even be the one that RC used for his excellent article on this very website about the bike.

The Exie is an ultra lightweight, XC race bike with a 4.4 lb (WITH shock!) frame weight. With a relaxed 67.2 head angle and 73.8 seat angle, the geometry is well suited for highly efficient riding while seated. This is a significant departure from the slack head angle, steep seat angle, 140-170mm bikes that I normally ride. As an aging BMXer, I love to find random jump lines through natural terrain, and that means a lot of landing flat- and that’s a situation where the bigger enduro bikes do really well. This also meant that with nearly 10lbs less bicycle to hump up the mountains, I should be able to climb steeper mountains and ride just a little bit further. If you know how I think, that means the smaller bike should simply mean more opportunity for adventure. And if the theme is going to be “less is more”, then a bike-on-a-bike set up would fit with that perfectly.

The North Cascades are an amazing place- lots of jagged peaks. Lately I’ve been on a bit of a kick to explore many of the old trails that wind through these jagged peaks. On a side note, these mountains are relatively easy to explore because they are all very low elevation- the highest we’ll ever get is only around 8,000’, which is much more convenient than the 12,000-15,000’ peaks elsewhere on the continent.


On this particular day, we were hoping to get to an amazing ridge with some unique Basalt formations and breathtaking views. We made it to the views, but even the first “baby views” were well beyond the USFS’ progress in clearing the downed trees. Hundreds to fallen trees required constant hiking- and at several points it was hard to locate the trail.


I’ve heard of a few places being referred to as the “North American Alps”- from the Trinity Alps in California, to the jagged peaks surrounding Telluride, Colorado, to the jagged Sawtooth Mountains of Idaho. While I haven’t explored those yet, if they are comparable to the Cascades, then they should be pretty spectacular! Oh, and the bike rips, too.




The only reason I’m including this picture is to show off my leg muscles! Dad bods of the world, unite!


Wheelie for safety!

Back to the moto hunt- after yet more research, it turns out that ABS brakes are a big deal on the street, and with the rain we get here in WA, traction control seemed prudent. After a bit of a hunt online, and a few phone calls, I found this low mileage 2014 VSTROM 1000 for sale across the state. After a test ride, I was going to pass on the bike entirely, and make the smart move to instead get a nicely upgraded KTM 150XCW to enjoy in our local harescramble series. But then, the seller dropped the price on the ‘Strom significantly, I realized that I could afford to try the bike for a few months and then resell it without losing my tail. Life is certainly about adventure, and this would be a turn-key way to bring the bike-on-a-bike experience to the level I dreamed about while riding the DRZ400.

I will be the first to admit that this setup is completely ridiculous. Definitely a departure from my last touring motorcycle, a kick start only XR650R desert racer.

The sheer silliness of this whole operation is quite amusing, but at the same time, that does add a little to the fun. Riding this beast, loaded down with the bicycle, bicycle gear, camping gear, vlogging gear, and requisite motorcycle gear, whether it be in town or on the highway, is totally fine. Up until now, I have always poo-poo’d 500 pound adventure motorcycles. Well, when you’ve got ~100 pounds of gear with you, and are riding in 30mph cross winds at 75mph, it turns out that the extra weight ends up being a saving grace. The motor is strong enough to chug along on the highway at 3500 rpm, right in the meat of the V-twin torque (76 lb-ft) and the wheelbase is that goldilocks length that cruises decently but still handles curves like a sculptor handles wet clay- cutting in where necessary, and smoothing out the rest.

My favorite road of all time- Highway 20, the North Cascades Highway, heading east just past Newhalem. The water feeding into the Skagit River has this amazing turquoise glow to it that is absolutely breathtaking. Also visible here, the somewhat embarrassing Shoei zombie edition helmet I found on Craigslist (in like-new condition).


My whole life, I’ve been terrified of riding motorcycles on the street. At this point, I’m still not thrilled at the uncontrollable, often unnecessary risk that comes with trusting both texting commuters and exhausted cement truck drivers to actually stop at red lights. Even a collision with a random deer jumping out of the bush goes from being a mere inconvenience in a car to a possible fatality on the motorcycle. I’ll likely sell this VSTROM and transition to something like a Husqvarna TE701, and instead focus on slower speed dirt road adventures. Complexity, however, goes way up with doing that. Bellingham, WA, is an amazing town, but to get to sanctioned alpine, backcountry riding, it requires at least a couple hours of freeway and then highway riding. Moving on to a more dirt worthy machine would require trailering, parking, and staging- or an absolutely miserable time on the interstate, at low temperatures, in the rain, in traffic. Maybe I’ll just return to camper-vanning?



As anyone who’s ever done any sort of road trip can attest, packing always takes twice as long as you think it will. This put my departure into the late afternoon, and I was riding well into the evening. Luckily the stock VSTROM headlight is surprisingly proficient.




As I was riding towards my eventual campsite, I could see the orange glow of a small forest fire. It was far enough away and so high on a mountain that I didn’t worry about it much, and signs leading down Highway 20 had said there was “fire activity ahead”. Unfortunately, that status would quickly change.


Had I skipped riding that morning in lieu of heading east, I would have made it through this gate. This closure added 216 miles to the trip, and put me a full day behind my admittedly rough, yet ambitious, schedule.


Camp on the second night was glorious. The grass was both greener and soft, the trees blocked the wind, and it seemed likely I’d make it to some great trails by the afternoon. With the previous day’s detour and frustrations, it was reassuring to wake up so close to the state border.


Made it! Prior to this trip, I had never once ridden a bicycle in Idaho. When returning from Arizona in the spring, I had plans to ride with both Braydon and Kyle in Boise, but some surprise snow storms shut that down.


The trek to the trailhead was slightly more exciting than I hoped. The VSTROM is about as dirt worthy as a 2wd pickup truck- and about as maneuverable. I do think I could have made it up this route, but I decided to not have to explain to Ibis that I tipped over and smashed the prototype bike into a boulder.


Folks keep suggesting to try riding actual XC tires. I dunno, I just feel like lightweight tires might not survive these kinds of rock gardens. I do enjoy climbing on light tires, but I don’t enjoy running out of spare inner tubes after multiple punctures.


The riding in Idaho is drier than Washington, but it’s still excellent.


There were a bunch of cool rock lines here, but with minimal safety gear and flying solo, I did not want to introduce my knee to Mr. Rock. I feel like it’s totally OK to not push limits when riding in backcountry locations. Heck, come to think of it, I didn’t encounter a single other mountain biker on ANY of the trails I rode on this trip.


The smoke from the fire that caused my massive detour was omnipresent for my three days in Idaho. Luckily, despite the visibility being somewhat affected, the air quality wasn’t all that bad to breathe, and while it blocked the view west, it made for some neat lighting conditions. Let’s turn that challenge into an opportunity!


Gold Creek Lodge is a famous off road motorcycle destination, and I’ve seen videos filmed here dating back a good 10 years ago. To realize it was right around the corner was pretty cool, and it was also a great spot to top off my water supplies. Greg Smtih, one of the employees, is a former RedBull Rampage competitor, finishing 2nd place, just behind Wade Simmons and ahead of Robbie Bourdon, in the inaugural 2001 event.

The moto trails are best enjoyed with a throttle, but here and there some of the sections are amazing on a bicycle.


Returning to WA state, I had to pick my daughter up from her school the next day, so pressure was on to beat that deadline. The cross winds had picked up big time, and what had been a hot, but otherwise mellow, ride east turned into a total handful on the return west. Winds were at 32mph, and I swear they were coming in from multiple directions.


I’m not a big fan of trying to find campsites in the dark, but sometimes that’s the name of the game. I’d much rather be using a cell phone light in the woods than parked on the side of the highway calling hotels!

The final ride of the trip was a great one. I jokingly mentioned in a vlog that to find trails I just look for what has the lowest rating on Trailforks. Ratings are so subjective, but I have found that trails which require most folks to get off and walk features can often result in some wonderfully challenging sections for someone with the right attitude.

Dropping in from the alpine just past tree line and into the forest!


I mean, c’mon, that's Mt Rainier out there!


Riding home from this trip, I had removed my bluetooth headset and instead threw in some ear plugs and simply reflected on the trip. The highlights were the most spontaneous things- finding unexpectedly great campsites, meeting friendly folks on the side of the highway, high speed wheelies aboard the Exie on trails that looked to be possibly too rugged for such a small bike. In the age of information, when preparation means having a bulletproof itinerary and a purpose-built gadget for every situation, the simplicity of a trip like this hits the reset button. Each day, the trip became easier. Once you’re in the swing of things, of loading and unloading the rolling gypsey caravan of a cycle, of finding food that will last without refrigeration yet is healthy, of staging the camera and tripod for videos, everything does begin to find a flow.

The return trip to Bellingham was standard interstate affair- heavy traffic and many semi trucks. While the backcountry exploring and adventures that come along with trips like these are the stuff of memories and stories for years to come, the hours spent “slabbing away” are significantly less glamorous. Oh, and that fellow in the gray shirt? That’s a decent sized revolver hanging off his belt.

If there are any recurring themes from this, I kept noticing that I was yelling “THIS IS WHY I RIDE MOUNTAIN BIKES” from various mountain tops. Cheesy video title? Sure. But it’s honest. The physicality of doing stunts on a bicycle is one thing, and there are many places that are purpose built to practice that. But after a constant exposure to some of the best riding destinations, part of the joy of mountain biking becomes the pleasure in finding places that are so special you have to understand that your own words and pictures will never be enough to convey the feelings that they inspire. And with hours of time to self reflect, that’s completely OK.

Follow Jeff on his Instagram, subscribe to his YouTube, or follow him on Facebook. Hope you enjoyed this video!




MENTIONS: @jeffweed / @loganpnelson / @jensonusa / @pnwcomponents / @ibiscycles / @IndustryNineOfficial



107 Comments

  • 70 0
 Looking at the pictures it kinda makes you wonder why he even brought a front tire. Could've saved some weight.
  • 19 0
 You think his fork sponsor ever gets annoyed?
  • 8 0
 Hahaha thanks Dave! Since I was self-shooting most of this (minus an overnighter with Logan before the moto trip) I didn't have many shots that weren't blurred heavily, and the manual screen grabs from the drone were the most intersting things I could use for this. Thanks again!
  • 9 0
 @Maurice-Byl: Hahahaha right?! Fox has been super kind and helped me a bunch these last few years, but I'm not currently formally sponsored by a suspension brand. It's actually really nice not having a ton of sponsors (compared to years past), and instead just focusing on a few awesome brands.
  • 6 0
 I literally came to the comments to say something about all the wheelies hahaha.. Seriously tho, big props to Jeff for sharing this adventure with us. Keep shredding, bro!
  • 4 0
 @danielfloyd: Thanks Daniel!
  • 1 0
 @JeffWeed: It really cements the impression that you had a blast both out on the road and in the woods. Congrats for the refreshing content!
  • 22 0
 I always love the JKW edits. He is such a great example of a true professional, great ambassador for the sport and the brands that support him.
  • 6 0
 Thanks so much 96, that means a lot to me!!!
  • 12 0
 sometimes I read articles on Pinkbike and think "what am I doing with my day".
then there are articles like this that make me think "what am I doing with my life".
  • 5 0
 Wow, thanks Amateur!
  • 8 0
 @JeffWeed: I prefer 'total', but no thank you!
  • 6 0
 @TotalAmateur: LOL!!! Excellent username either way! Sure beats mine, heck, I forgot to include 33.3% of my name when I made it.
  • 9 0
 Jeff,

Bike skills and gifts for story-telling aside, I'm consistently impressed by your willingness to engage and answer questions. I can imagine the time required to respond to people on multiple formats (Youtube, PinkBIke, Facebook, etc) really stacks up. Thanks for being such a great cheerleader for the sport.
  • 10 0
 Thank you! To be fair, I don't answer that many comments on the regular social platforms, there are often 100+ popping up every day and I do indeed struggle to get my editing done as it is. Pinkbike comments are critical though, anyone on this site is through and through a mountain biker. I can't think of a better way to engage with my audience than here on Pinkbike. Heck- I even made a whole video (with Kirt Voreis) after getting the idea through the Pinkbike comments!
  • 2 0
 @JeffWeed: Anecdotally, you've replied to comments I've left on pinkbike, youtube (your personal channel), and facebook (ibis fanboy page). . . so I guess I've got the trifecta!
  • 3 0
 "I jokingly mentioned in a vlog that to find trails I just look for what has the lowest rating on Trailforks. Ratings are so subjective, but I have found that trails which require most folks to get off and walk features can often result in some wonderfully challenging sections for someone with the right attitude."

Bingo. And there's SOOOOO much of this raw backcountry singletrack in Idaho, it's crazy.
  • 1 0
 I almost didn't want to spill the beans on my techniques there! I don't mind a bunch of hike a bike either, though. I'll head back to Northern Idaho (and possibly MT) soon!
  • 4 0
 VStroms really are the perfect motorcycle and the back roads of Washington state are some of the best motorcycle roads around.
  • 2 0
 I agree. VStroms are underrated. I loved my 650...it was so much better than my BMW 1150GS.
  • 1 0
 And sound amazing
  • 1 0
 The Strom is great! The price vs performance ratio has been solid. But it has got me wishing for something a little better in the dirt, likely with 21/18 wheels, like a T7. On the street tho, the Strom is super chill!
  • 1 0
 @JeffWeed: T7 is probably the best all rounder
m.youtube.com/watch?v=5WJvQqeQpe8
  • 1 0
 @DizzyNinja: I'll admit, I constantly give the 'Strom the beans just to hear those 1000cc rumble! A T7 would be amazing but they sell for double what I got the Strom for. Trying to get a proper dirt bike again before upgrading the ADV rig!
  • 2 0
 Great job all the way around JKW! I’ve thought about packing a bike on a motorcycle (2 wheels only trip) but I really enjoy the comforts of car travel too much. Glad I could vicariously live this dream through you today!
  • 3 0
 Thanks Homey! Yeah the actual travel can be pretty uncomfortable- and that can affect the MTBing- but the overall experience was awesome. I found myself focusing on trying to get good sleep and rest, and it ended up being fine. I've actually had van trips that were far more exhausting!
  • 1 0
 Love the setup! I've got the same thing going with a '12 Strom and a Pivot. I've found that sliding the 2x2 fork rack rail all the way forward helps a lot with stability and keeps the weight closer to the center of the motorcycle. Especially when I've got a 50lb backpacking bag strapped between the fork and the downtube of the mountainbike.
  • 1 0
 Way to go Greaseman! Post some pics/vids of that! 1000 or 650? I was running the stock 2x2 fork mount pretty far forward, but it actually bent severely on a test over nighter, and I had to rig up a new mount with a beefy fork mount and some angle iron. The new mount is already bending, too, so it's likely time to go full custom. I did mount the 2x2 rack over the passenger seat, as opposed to on the luggage rack, as I almost had a few bad wrecks on the DRZ400 when the rear wheel of the bicycle hit the ground on some wheelies.
  • 2 0
 @JeffWeed: 650 but it's geared a little higher so I can cruise freeway miles easier and with less vibration... My moto has been my main mtb transport vehicle for awhile now(gas is stoopid expensive here in UT, so the van stays home lol) and having a 47t in the back while revving at 6k all day was a little obnoxious.

Crazy that you bent that rack! That thing is raw iron. I guess I'm lucky to have not had issues with bending regardless of if I have my 23lb XC-bike or my 35lb trail bike mounted.

How did you rig up your mount on the passenger seat?
  • 3 0
 @cgreaseman: Higher gearing?! Wow! The 650 is definitely a bit different, heck I just bought a 2t lower countershaft sprocket and a 2t larger rear to gear mine a ton lower- the 1000 doesn't really even "need" 6th gear until ~80mph, so I'm trying to get better off road performance. I was tempted by a 650, but I got such a good deal on the 1000 that is was cheaper than all the 650s I looked at.

The 2x2 bent apart on a dirt road that had a bunch of water bars that I may or may not have been hucking... Hey, it was the first ride on the Shinkos!

I got some L brackets from the hardware store and used those to hit the bungs that the forward most part of the rear rack attaches to. The rear most part of the 2x2 platform hits the rear rack attachment points. It's solid AF but I can't remove the seat without removing the 2x2. I'll be posting an in-depth moto check to my channel next week- as they say- LikeShareSubscribe!
  • 4 0
 [PI=21021716nopbcaption cropHeightBy=5% offsetTop=5% scrollZoom=5% scrollOffsetTop=5%]

One of my favorite parts
  • 1 0
 Totally! That was also what kept me so into racing for so long- we wouldn't bat an eye to drive 1000 miles to do a race in some cool new place. Nowadays, one of my favorite aspects of videos are that they help give that extra motivation to travel to new trails. Some folks are able to just randomly send all kind of killer trips, I've found I need some sort of external motivator. Anyhow, thanks for the note!
  • 1 0
 When you, Kyle, and Braydon ride, there needs to be a Strava category for "on rear wheel". My money is on Braydon for anything with climbing (so odd seeing an enduro brah not take a shuttle to the top), and Kyle for anything two-wheeled timed downhill, and Jeff if he times the Boise riding on one of our two rainy days of the year. Can B and K ride in anything but loose over hardpack?
Excellent feature, JKW!
  • 3 0
 Hahaha thanks for that Writer! I was just in Boise when returning from AZ this spring. Braydon and I were hoping to ride, but it ended up snowing, so that didn't work out. I did make Kyle and April dinner that night, as the were zonked from building out their new office. Would be great to get the whole band together some time!
  • 1 0
 Having watched a fair number of his videos, he rides all his bikes the same from a hardtail through the big bikes. I want to see him hit one of these trails on a kid’s bike, it would be a hoot to watch. Keep up the good work.
  • 2 0
 Cary- thanks for watching my stuff!!! I've actually been dreaming about EXACTLY that for a few years now- and I can (somewhat) manual my daughter's Prevelo! However, I would never hear the end of it from the family if I wreck her bike. The square taper cranks have me nervous. Not an issue for our 32lb gal, but when 170lb me hits some doubles...
  • 1 0
 @JeffWeed: check out Cleary bikes. Supposedly they don't have a weight limit (or they didn't when looking for my kids).
  • 1 0
 @JeffWeed: I made a few high speed passes on my daughter's Pello Romper (14"). it's hard to land jumps with out being over the front end and the fact that I only run a few PSI in the tires for her makes it sketchy for someone my size.
  • 1 0
 @bikingrolo: Thanks Rolo, I was looking at a Gecko back when that was about the right size for my kiddo. I don't think Prevelo has a weight limit, but I know from painful experience that square taper BBs don't get along well with my riding style!
  • 1 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: hahaha sketchy! The Prevelo Zulu is a 16" bike with a 67° head angle. It feels really good! At least until about 18mph, when the speed wobbles take over the tiny wheels.
  • 1 0
 I used to ride a 2004 Vstrom 1K, the poor mans GS - loved that bike, crashed it, fixed it, kept loving it... but ultimately sold it because when I have free time, my free time is better spent on a bike, getting in shape, versus twisting my wrist. I miss motorcycles, but not going back that way any time soon.

I had a buddy that had an R1200GS, such a killer bike, and he did the bike rack on mororcylce thing - I always found it just ridiculously unwieldy. Gearing up to ride a motorcycle, packing the bicycle gear, whole rack structure and big old bike strapped to it... Both hobbies are fun, but I preferred enjoying them separately. Before I had kids, some of my favorite saturdays I'd ride the motorcycle in the morning, mountain bike in the afternoon.

TLDR; don't have kids.
  • 2 0
 lol nah man, kids make it all worth it!!! A big part of why I wanted to spend some time using the moto to get around is that my Promaster camper van is heinously uncomfortable to drive. It's been far more motivating to have the 'Strom to use for the closer to home trips. I probably wouldn't have done a few of the simple overnighters lately if I didn't have the 'Strom. It'd be really cool to build a Yamaha Tenere 700 up to allow for better access to places where the camper van could never get.
  • 1 0
 Man, what a RIDE! And an awesome story!
WTB tires really don't get the respect they deserve, the Vigilante especially is such a versatile tire and does everything well... other than be light and fast rolling haha. Slower, Burly tires > Fast, Flimsy tires flatting all the time.
  • 1 0
 Thanks Avanwin! Yeah, I've just forced myself to acclimate to the heavy tires, and that has saved a ton of down time patching lighter tires or throwing in tubes or what not.
  • 1 0
 After about a decade of wanting an adventure bike, i finally picked up a KTM 1090r. One of my first plans is to set it up with a way to bring a bike(enduro/XC/road depending on location) with me on some trips! Once the drive/ride to the destination is part of the fun, it makes a 5hr trip to Santa Cruz feel effortless.
  • 2 0
 Right on Dunc, the 1090 is sweet! I'd love to have a more dirt worthy ADV set up, but this motorcycle was about half the price of an equivalent KTM. Careful parking the bike-on-a-bike set up in SC though, bikes got stolen FAST in that town! Bring a big lock!!! Some locking panniers would be SO NICE for in town riding. The soft panniers are great for off road though.
  • 2 0
 Most exhausting part of that setup is answering questions while pumping gas. I like the camp cooking as a change of pace. Keep up the great edits
  • 1 0
 YES!!! The whole set up certainly screams "LOOK AT ME!", but folks are always super nice when they ask about it all. Thanks Randy!
  • 1 0
 This would be 100 (instead of 99) if he was on an electric motorcycle (eg, Zero)! You can do 110 charging anywhere, and 220 (level 2) in a lot of places, such as Sedona. This is awesome.
  • 2 0
 Thanks Slayer!
  • 1 1
 Guy I know raced motorcycles professionally for several years. After moving in from that career he played around with ultra running and cycling.

He bought a Ninja 250 and built a rack for it. Put 100,000 miles on the 250, but moved on after blowing his second engine.

Here is him testing the rack he built for his MT09:
youtu.be/rvAOnbGRQUM

The 250 in action in the Advanced Group at a Laguna Seca track day:

youtu.be/h8fD0A-50kU


He is the guy responsible for me getting into mountain biking. I raced he would race minimoto for fun sometimes.
  • 2 0
 Thanks for sharing JS, that's awesome! Love how high the back wheel is on his rack set up.
  • 1 0
 Great video Jeff! If you were going for an all day adventure ride, do you take the Exie or the Ripley? Not necessarily racing, but trying to cover a lot of ground quickly and comfortably. Thanks!
  • 1 0
 Hey Steamboat, thanks for the note! Ripley vs Exie depends on what you're trails are like. The Ripley is going to be better if you're riding rougher, steeper, or jumpier trails. If the trails are pretty smooth and not crazy steep, the Exie is noticeably lighter and zippier. If you emphasize getting rowdy on the DH, and efficiency isn't absolutely critical, the Ripley is great. I think the Ripley actually is the most versatile bike in the Ibis line up, and it compares VERY similarly to the Norco Optic, and is a tad more aggressive than a Spur. Lots of great bikes out there these days! FWIW, I only ride the Ripley with a 140 fork.
  • 1 0
 Great article and pics Jeff. Many years ago in my motorcycle racing days a fella used to transport a KX250 in his side car. Front wheel out, forks bolted to mount in side car, rear wheel on the ground and away he went.
  • 1 0
 Thanks man! And wow that's sketchy! If his shifter bounces outta neutral, that bottom end is toast! Did he at least pull the chain off?! Side cars are wild!
  • 1 0
 @JeffWeed: yeah mate, he used to remove the chain. The KX was actually modified for road racing with different wheels and slicks fitted, oh, and a somewhat larger front brake.
  • 1 0
 JKW, you should do a vlog showing you manualing in every state and province in NA. You must have enough content to pretty much do an edit by now?
  • 1 0
 Hahaha great idea! I may just take you up on that, hopefully I can remember where the idea came from and credit you correctly! I'm certainly short a few states, and definitely short a lot of provinces (only been to BC and AB to ride). This was my first time ever riding in Idaho!
  • 2 0
 Love when JKW gets a highlight on PB! Great story, I enjoyed following it on YouTube.
  • 1 0
 Thanks NRZ!!!
  • 2 0
 best video this year. adventure motorbikes trips natural bike trails nice riding skills great thank you Jeff
  • 1 0
 Thanks so much!!!
  • 1 0
 The only pics in this article that make sense are the ones where his bike is without a front wheel.
  • 1 0
 Hahaha thanks Maurice!
  • 2 0
 Reading this in my office in darkest , wettest Yorkshire. Looks fun.
  • 1 0
 Send some of that rain our way Tommy, we currently have the opposite problem! Thanks man!
  • 2 0
 This is a wheelie good story!!
  • 1 0
 Thank you Armand!
  • 2 0
 Queue the 'its a motorcycle' idiocy
  • 3 0
 lol it's either that or my gas guzzling camper van! I've been meaning to do a "bike-on-a-bike" video with an eBike on the motorcycle, but I had to send all my ebikes back and got kinda tired of them in general.
  • 1 0
 @JeffWeed:
The riding style you were doing with them appeals to me. Big backcountry rugged rides. What made you get tired of them?
  • 2 0
 @Ososmash: I'm tired of eBikes because I have to jump through all kinds of hoops to ride them. I have to drive to a place where they are allowed (not permitted on our local trails), I then need to bring a generator and some gasoline to charge the thing overnight, and its a lot more work pushing them up the super steep hills than a regular pedal bike (legit climbs are usually too steep to ride the ebike). Also, on more traditional MTB flow trails, all that extra ebike weight is a chore- and for many of those, average descending speed is well past the 20mph motor cut off, so the e factor isnt that helpful.

Ebikes are an amazing training tool- there's no better way to lose weight than to ride an ebike, as your heart rate will be kept at that zone 3/4 area for WAY longer than on a traditional bike, and you can certainly log more DH runs. I'll have another ebike one day, but I'm not losing sleep over it.
  • 1 0
 Really enjoyed watching this with my 6 & 8 year old boys, they were really stoked on it!
  • 1 0
 Awesome!!! Say hey to the boys for me!
  • 1 0
 I wonder if @JeffWeed even knows how to change a front tire. They probably last forever for him.
  • 2 0
 Hahaha thanks man!
  • 1 0
 Slap a mtb unicycle on the back of the Ibis and you'd have the turducken of bikes.
  • 1 0
 lol!
  • 1 0
 We should call this conversations with Jeff. Props to the stamina in responding to EVERY comment. Love your content
  • 1 0
 Yep, Jeff pretty well always responds which is very cool and respectful, there are a few other pro dudes who take the time to reply to comments but not a whole lot.
  • 1 0
 There is nothing better that riding to go for a ride. I have my 650 vstrom rigged with a rack too.
  • 1 0
 Such a sick video makes me want to ride some more downcountry riding
  • 1 0
 Thanks Isaac! This whole trip was a lot of fun, and it was nice to throttle back a little on the "gnar" factor. I might do some more stuff like this before the summer is up!
  • 2 0
 Could we borrow some of your rain?

Sincerely, choked by smoke in Idaho.

Edit: This was supposed to be a reply to the guy complaining about how wet it was in Yorkshire. I blame Outside.
  • 2 0
 @atourgates: Hahaha I replied to him with the same comment!
  • 3 0
 @atourgates: I think the rain is behind a paywall! #f*ckingoutside! #sarcasm
  • 3 0
 @pedalhound: Have to admit, I lol'd!
  • 1 0
 Nice write up. This feels like the first Outside Magazine article posted.
  • 3 0
 LOL I'll take that compliment! If Outside wants to hire me, hopefully they know where to find me- but I may be too much of a gas guzzlin' moto head for that. FYI I have no relationship to Pinkbike or Outside. Pinkbike makes plenty of their own content, but they also post a ton of user created media, like my article here. The equivalent of "landing on the explore page" is to land on the PB homepage. If something is zesty enough that the editors think it'll earn some clicks, they'll often share it.
  • 1 0
 So! He's the guy i randomly see motoring around with that setup...
  • 1 0
 Hahaha most likely! Say hi some time!
  • 1 0
 @JeffWeed: come to Bend, check out the locals only stashes....bwahahaha.
  • 1 0
 I think I’m on the wrong site, I mostly looked at the motorbike pics
  • 1 0
 Don't worry Ninja, I won't tell on ya!
  • 1 0
 Great vid Mr. Weed. I shall purchase this product for my wife.
  • 1 0
 Thanks Weeno!
  • 1 0
 This is a awesome video Jeff. always enjoyed ur video learn a lot from u.
  • 1 0
 Thanks so much Tumal!
  • 1 0
 awesome video, have a list of all the trails you rode?
  • 2 0
 Thanks Robin! I'm no longer publishing specific trail names publicly. I only film on sanctioned, public, legal trails, but I don't want to drive an unreasonable amount of traffic to them. Feel free to pull up Trailforks and find some amazing places, access has never been easier to sort out!
  • 1 0
 Can’t wait to see you, motorcycle and bike in the $ lot!!!
  • 1 0
 Hahaha it'll happen soon enough! For in-town stuff, I'll admit it's usually easier to just drive the gas guzzler. And I can get groceries without having to worry as much about my bicycle getting stolen off the back of the moto!
  • 1 0
 Jeff Kendal straps Weed to Motorcycle and drives across country
  • 1 0
 great stuff @JeffWeed
  • 1 0
 great video jeff

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