Video: Make Climbing Easier With Proper Body Position

Feb 11, 2021
by Pinkbike Originals  


Love it or hate it, climbing is a necessary part of mountain biking, and after a long winter it can be hard to get the legs moving again. Join Christina Chappetta as she covers the optimal body position for climbing.








146 Comments

  • 303 8
 Stand next to the bike, preferably on your non-dominant side, push bike ahead of you and maintain footing as you walk up the hill.
  • 40 21
 ...alternately- there is a button on the top tub that should look like a circle with a line through it at "12 o'clock"- simply push that button and continue pedaling.
  • 33 6
 @ICKYBOD: I'm no dentist
  • 62 4
 @send-it-bro: Oh, I'm sorry- I didn't realize. I thought everyone here was. My condolences.
  • 63 5
 Stand next to the bike, bend at the knees, engage the core and lats and lift bike into the back of pick up truck. To dial your position move quickly weight forward to the shotgun seat of pick up truck. A tip is to have a significant other or friend that does not bike to operate said pick-up truck. Engage credit card to compensate for shuttles.
  • 37 2
 @dldewar: I have a sticker on my shuttle rig that says "This truck don't run on thanks".
  • 6 0
 @ICKYBOD: only dentist I see is tom bradsaw #YETI
  • 1 0
 @ICKYBOD: thanks, Stu....
  • 1 1
 @dldewar: best comment ever
  • 1 0
 Yeah. Agreed. And further to that when you go to Hertz or national they don’t just charge you for the gas. @powderhoundbrr:
  • 3 0
 @dldewar: LoL last girlfriend didn't mind shuttle driving if I was willing to pay for her lunch while she waited at the bottom (perk of living in wine country). Was a good system while it lasted.
  • 6 0
 @friendlyfoe: My wife drives our two sons and I to the top of the hill once as long as her driving time is less than a quarter the time we are away so she can have a break from us.
  • 1 0
 @dldewar: aren't you a roadie who has an MTB that's too big for you? ????
  • 2 0
 @rollchal: Indeed I am and I only ride green trails and ski areas that are trying to attract summer users. I thought your username was FlexiYetiRidrPG ?
  • 61 0
 I always tended to slouch while sitting on the chair lift myself...
  • 39 2
 2:27 this saddle height is way too high. Standing on your toes when your pedal is at its lowest point from your seat means no power transfer and in worst case pelvis issues in the long term.
Too high is not better than too low, though it certainly gives a better impression.
  • 6 0
 My thought aswell
  • 7 1
 Ya, I had always thought you wanted a slight bend at the knee when the pedal reaches it lowest position (with the pedal flat). She looks like her leg is straight and has to point her toe in order to not over extend.

I could be totally wrong and maybe I'll learn something new here today? Christina is a far more advanced and experienced rider than me... I'd like to hear hers and others input on this.
  • 18 1
 Correct Saddle height + Dropping Heels: Good
The human body is structurally designed to allow us to use muscles as pulleys and produce power to accelerate our body. When the ankle is in the heel-dropped posture, the ankle is positioned so that you have the least power transfer loss; this is known as a “closed pack” position” in medical terms, meaning the shape of the bones lock into place and all ligaments are in tension. This stiff ankle joint position allows every watt to transfer into the pedal.

Toe Down: Not So Good
If your toe is pointed down in the stabbing posture, typically you’ll lose power on the downstroke, as the ankle will suck up some watts in this “softer” ankle joint position. Analogy: “What is more efficient when climbing a steep hill, a bike with full suspension opened up in the rear, or a hard tail or lock out in the rear?” The full suspension example is like having the stabbing ankle posture (too soft and springy), leaking power.

Each individual is different, so the most comfortable, relaxed ankle posture is what’s best for you. However, biomechanically speaking, you may have an advantage dropping the heels during the power stroke to ensure all the power and hard work goes where you want it to.
  • 2 0
 @islandforlife: She's got an OK bend in the knee, but as soon as she corrects (straightens out) her foot position those legs are fully extended. Ideally, that seat height gets dropped a bit, the foot straightens out, and the knee-bend remains.
  • 5 0
 going back to it, you are 100% right. way over extended.
there is a lot of personal style/preference with foot angle, ankle flexion, but it should not be forced by poor position.

I see a lot of people think that because person is a "pro", has experience, or is on the internet, they have some sort of expertise. not true at all... They may have achieved some success, but it is inspite of this, not because.

Seat is too high, and possibly cleats too far forward.
  • 15 26
flag jaredmh (Feb 11, 2021 at 9:13) (Below Threshold)
 Every single article Christina does there's someone saying she's obviously doing it all wrong. It's so nice to have all of these professional bike fitters chime in and let us know that she can't possibly know how setup or ride her bike.
  • 3 0
 @mammal: Yeah, I think a slight bend to the knee is best. That way there is no chance of hyper extending the knee when bonking, (or is it bonked?) and/or making an awkward move. But maybe that's just me.
  • 8 4
 @jaredmh: AND HER BARS ARE WAY TOO WIDE FOR HER!!!!!! Or was that a different women?
  • 9 0
 @jaredmh: If they weren't prescribing advice I wouldn't mind. If she wants to do something wrong more power to her. She is just really really fully wrong and following this advice could lead someone to injury.
  • 8 0
 Way too high. I still find the LeMond method a really good starting point. Some riders like a little higher, some a bit lower, but it generally gets people within 1/2”.

www.gobeyondexercise.com/blog/2020/7/22/finding-the-correct-saddle-height-on-your-bike
  • 12 1
 @jaredmh: I think the point is she is projecting herself as having expertise while having what seems like an obvious flaw in her bike fit/position. It appears if she didn't extend her toes down - she'd have to fully extend her leg and lock out her knee. A lot of people seeing the same video and having the same reaction.
  • 2 0
 @carym: I find the heel-toe method in that article to be the best. I personally like it a teeny bit lower but I'm probably an outlier.
  • 12 0
 @jaredmh: I don't think there's a single person in this comment section who has implied "she's obviously doing it all wrong", or "she can't possibly know how setup or ride her bike". I think most would agree that this video has mostly good advice, but that seat is obviously too high.

This is Pinkbike. You would be hard pressed to find an article where commenters aren't being critical and that's fine. You're allowed to criticize things.
  • 23 0
 The pants are a bit baggy! hahah My legs were more bent than they look I agree it comes across very straight. My foot is already "scooping" at this point. My hips don't shift on my saddle when I pedal so that is an indicator for me. And with the coil I sag a bit more into the bike when pedalling so it works out.
  • 9 0
 @twentyfos: Great info! No way in heck I was going to tackle THAT info in the basic video haha way too much to digest but it's nice to have this open format where people can continue to learn and adjust throughout the comments so thank you for that!
  • 17 1
 @ReformedRoadie: Thanks for your insight! I have had many years of coaching and training experience on indoor bikes so hopefully I don't fall into the "just a pro" category. My cleats are in fact as far back as they go, closest to my arch, and my knee is slightly bent when extended, just hard to see in my loose fitting pants there. The foot is a bit pointed at the bottom, I'll give you that but you can still see the scooping method in action and when pedalling this particular bike in techy terrain, the shock does move a lot more so it's a fine line between too tall and too low. Best to adjust to your own body's needs, bike setup and trail choice.
  • 8 5
 @lefthandohvhater: What about her advice will lead to injury? Her hips aren't rocking side to side. Her leg isn't locked out. She just has a lot of ankle mobility.

And yeah, I see plenty of commenters thinking they're the definitive voice on matters in all sorts of articles. It just seems to be way worse on every piece Christina does.
  • 2 1
 @ReformedRoadie: Good thing those ankles can move. Otherwise we'd have an actual fit problem.
  • 9 2
 @christinachappetta: Thanks for the response. But I am a little at a loss as to how suspension sag or movement has anything to do with saddle position. The BB is not moving at all in relationship to saddle/hips.

With a dropper, trying a slightly lower saddle is easy...
  • 6 1
 @jaredmh: Of course they can. It just doesn't make sense from a biomechanic stand point to rely on your calf muscles to generate watts, instead of your glutes and quads, even your hamstrings.
And being that this is a video about climbing...generating power is kinda, ya know, important...
  • 6 1
 @christinachappetta: hey Christina, please note that unless your BB is mounted on your chainstay and not on the main frame, sag is not affecting your seat height at all.
And unlike jaredmh tends to think, there is absolutely nothing wrong about your work which I personally appreciate a lot, though I mention this one thing that seems wrong to me.
  • 4 2
 @konamat: "please note that unless your BB is mounted on your chainstay and not on the main frame, sag is not affecting your seat height at all."
This! Unless she has the special edition Reverb with the 2 cm sag.
  • 2 1
 @lefthandohvhater: except that method is road-biased and doesn't account for cleat position or flats. For intermediate terrain with lots of unsupported cornering, lowest possible saddle height is most effective. I doubt you're an outlier here
  • 2 0
 @ceecee: ...and that is where the dropper post comes in.
  • 1 1
 @ReformedRoadie: lowest possible max height is still most effective, since lowering dropper x cm is distracting/time-consuming, esp late on corner entry. Also easier to lift butt slightly to help rear wheel over medium-chunk
  • 3 0
 @ceecee: first, I use my dropper A LOT. but to your point, for each corner might be too much. I have mine set-up for climbing efficiency at full extension. I'll lower a few cm for techy sections that require some pedaling. for any sizeable log over, it's all the way down. If you use it enough, it becomes second nature and automatic.
  • 2 0
 @ceecee: "medium-chunk" - hearing those words is the opposite of ASMR.
Also, minimum maximum height?
  • 2 1
 @BenPea: Both the terms he used make perfect sense in context to what he's talking about, regardless of what you consider ASMR.
  • 3 0
 @mammal: ok, I can live with the medium chunk.
You'll have to explain the other one.
  • 3 0
 @BenPea: "Lowest possible max height" is setting the max height of your dropper to the lowest position you can get away with for a proper pedal stroke. That way you have some room to move around above your seat during technical sections, corners etc.. Not backing up his comment, just the way he described it.
  • 1 0
 @mammal: ah yes, on intermediate terrain. I'm getting there.
  • 3 0
 @twentyfos: Agree with twentyfos here re dropping heals technique.

I learnt the same thing from an Olympic rider and couldn't believe the difference in power and ease of riding up hills either short or the long climbs as tested riding up Blackcomb mountain many times.

@christinachappetta to aid in climbing and riding in general, good core strength is just as important too. So don't forget to work on that also.
  • 1 0
 @BenPea: I've got one of those!
  • 1 1
 @lefthandohvhater: Heal method works if the person doesn’t rocks their hips when doing. Everyone ends up with a preferred position, some a bit lower, some a bit higher. My own saddle position has gone up about 1/2” with droppers, as I don’t need to compromise saddle height to get over the back. I do wish my post had an extra extend button to raise it an inch above normal for super steep climbs where I am on the nose of the saddle. I may feel different on my new frame which is 3 degrees steeper than my old one.
  • 1 1
 @mammal: precisely. I won't read the physiological literature, but I bet the 'closed pack' position of foot is flat--heel neither dropped nor raised--with pedal axle under midfoot, and robust arch support. This way Achilles tendon can go either way as required. One potential problem with having toes further forward on heavily suspended bikes should be obvious to all
  • 1 0
 @christinachappetta: Have you thought about modifying your shoes to put the cleats further back? Might not work with every shoe, though.
Works out great for me.
  • 1 1
 @pyromaniac: She already wrote that they are. Also, if you watch her pedaling at the end of the video, everything looks perfect.
  • 1 0
 @DoubleCrownAddict: I meant putting new holes in the soles.
  • 1 1
 I just had a postural study on a road bike with a professionnal who's taking care World Tour teams, and I was thinking the same : saddle too high, etc. And I can say you are wrong.
actually, her position is good. You HAVE to have a light ankle rotation/extension when the crank is on the lowest point. If you are too low, you'll avoid any injuries that's for sure, but your ankle is locked all the time (a bit like Chris Froome), you loose power, and you put almost all the effort on the quadriceps, instead of using the whole chain of leg muscle.
  • 27 8
 I thought climbing was supposed to be hard. I thought mtb was supposed to be hard...what's with all this "make it easier!" crap? What are we, skiers looking for groomers? Commence downvotes.
  • 5 0
 As a fatbiker in cold climates (with a ton of snow right now) the grooming and snowshoeing is extremely welcome. Rest of the year, bring on the tough climbs!
  • 1 0
 would you still see this content if you deselect the ebike filter?
  • 2 0
 Have you watched much uci dh racing lately?
  • 2 2
 @Arepiscopo: fat bikers looking for groomers = skiers looking for groomers
  • 19 0
 Or do it singlespeed-style:
step 1) lower your saddle as much as possible, and forget about it.
step 2) always stand up, during all the climb. Puke if needed.
step 3) repeat.
  • 18 0
 Step 1: drink less beer and eat fewer burritos. Climbing is then easier, but life is less delicious.
  • 14 4
 Step 1: get a bike with a properly steep seat angle.

Step 2: pedal.

Kind of amazes me how much less positioning, shifting, saddle-nose-riding, etc. I have to do when on a modern bike. Going from a 74* SA bike to 77* was revolutionary. Ya just pedal the bike.
  • 6 3
 The Scott spark has a 74 sta and the bmf four stoke a 75.6 sta. One nino rides the other won the xc champs it’s not such a simple thing to yell about sta as a cure all for climbing.
  • 6 1
 @thisspock: it is for schmucks I think. Slacker STAs on XCO bikes allow people like Nino to attack out of the saddle and maintain a full range of motion. Additionally, it allows them to descend far easier without dropper posts. I won't make any assumptions for you, but for myself (and probably Rickybobby1Cool going to the steep STA bike helps us with our style of climbing with little to no disadvantages, because as schmucks we use dropper posts, don't stand up when climb all the dang time, and ride far more simple climb trails and gravel roads than tech climbs.
  • 2 2
 @thisspock: that's because XC racing is different than your typical "pedal to the top, bomb down" trail/enduro type riding. 74 is about right for XC, bikepacking, etc. where you're not climbing steep stuff for long stretches of time.
  • 4 1
 @thisspock: It also greatly depends on the type of bike... a long travel enduro bike has quite a bit more sag which decrease the STA, than a lower travel bike like a Scott Spark. The modern 77 or 78 degree STA's at sag for long travel enduro bikes are probably pretty close to the bikes you mentioned. It's also why you don't want or need a steep STA on a hard tail.. there's no sag.
  • 2 1
 @thisspock: Nino also has decades of neuromuscular development with his SA and his bike position. He’d lose a lot of efficiency trying to adapt to a new position. Besides, with his seat to bar drop that he’s used to, he’d be off balance if he had a forward saddle position. Really steep SA’s are a godsend on upright long travel bikes for climbing. Long travel bikes were always tough to climb with old XC 73 SA.

Having watched old roadie friends deal with neck issues, deteriorated cervical vertebrae, I’d prefer a more upright position for XC than Nino, and at least a 75 SA at this point.
  • 3 0
 @islandforlife: Even further, the sag in hardtail's fork works to steepen the effective seat tube angle
  • 2 0
 @j-t-g: You need a lot of tension in your body to put out the Watts like Nino or the others. Sitting further back and having your upper body bent down gives you this tension. That's probably why road cyclists and especially track cyclists have their bars so far down and we mountainbikers crouch down to grind up a climb, if we decide not to walk.
  • 11 2
 I've always heard that you shouldn't be pointing your toes on the bottom of the stroke. Is it different for flat pedals? I only use flat pedals for screwing around, not real riding.
  • 1 0
 I have a friend that tends to point his toes with clipless pedals too. Never worked well for me, personally. I'll be curious to see what other folks say.
  • 9 0
 No you ideally shouldn't, whatever the pedals.
  • 6 0
 Yeah that is a fully psychopathic seat height and people who follow this advice could actually hurt themselves.
  • 4 0
 @lefthandohvhater: At least she's still got a slight bend in the knee. But yeah, with a very slight decrease in seat height, she could flatten her feet out a bit and all would be well.
  • 3 0
 @mammal: A slight bend in the knee with a nearly flat foot is desired. Excessive seat height will cause the rider to lean to the dominant side and hyper extend the non-dominant knee leading to knee pain and miserable saddler interaction. Also less power and less foot-pedal stability.
  • 2 0
 Flat pedals fixed my pedalling stroke; only took a year of no clipless. Clipped in, I was pointing my toes only on my lead/dominant side, which meant I was kicking down with my quad instead of dropping my heel and pulling through with my hamstring and glutes like you're forced to do on flats and keep secure contact all the way around. Serious muscle imbalance and joint instability. My heel isn't completely dropped now, but it is much lower/flatter compared to what it used to be. It feels so much more natural and fluid, my knees are much stronger, straight and stable. I am looking forward to seeing how much better I can climb being clipped, now that my pedaling technique is fixed.
  • 3 0
 @PartridgeSkillz: Honestly sounds like your seat height was off too. That awful twisting and pointing feeling when your seat is too high is hard to notice until you fix your stroke and/or seat height.
  • 1 1
 I gave some good responses just above ^^ I wouldn't say flat pedals and clips are different. Sure they'll feel different on the foot but they should be doing the same movement overall.
  • 4 2
 Flats for all serious riding
  • 4 0
 @rip8569: Not so much for casual riding?? I'd say it's the opposite, if anything.
  • 1 1
 @lefthandohvhater: That too! it was complete position overhaul. It was just too easy for me to cheat clipped in and it got progressively worse.
  • 1 0
 @christinachappetta: It should be the same and is long as your technique is good! Mine definitely wasn't. I got way too reliant on the cleat keeping me connected, pulling up on my shoe and kicking over the top instead of maintaining smooth contact all the way around. Not an effective or stable way to pedal.
  • 8 0
 elbows wide with your ass on the nose of the seat.
>>>ride in a straight line without wandering your front tire left and right. Every time you change from a bee line you lose a minimum of 30% of the power you had so you have to recover in small amounts. Limiting those moments of front wheel wobble will make you a strong up hill rider. Add breathing out longer and deeper than shorter intakes will lower your heart rate. Relax you got this.
When you get to the top the pain goes away.
  • 6 0
 "Shift Weight Forward" - Amen! If seems like this art is lost on Pinkbike sometimes as they want a vertical seat angle. The issue is that for the other 97 percent of the climb you are too far forward!
  • 3 0
 Yeah, I am still on an older bike but I like sliding a little forward on the seat for technical climbs and then shifting back to a bit slacker position for more rolling climbs or gravel roads.
  • 3 0
 @iantmcg: I don't do a lot of super steep climbing, but I've certainly learned the technique for shifting forward when I am climbing. The flip side is that on the bikes I have tried with steep STAs, I don't feel very efficient on flat ground. It's easier to pull up on the pedals with a slightly slacker STA than it is when you are more overt-the-top of the pedals. Granted, I think I'm pretty average height/leg length, so on my bike with a 74 degree STA, I am not horribly behind the pedals - certainly makes a difference.
  • 4 1
 As usual, great article and tips @christinachappetta! Another lesser known climbing tip - especially for grinding out long fire roads and tech climbs - is to tip the nose of your saddle down a few degrees. This position creates a stable platform to 'push' from while also countering the effects of the incline grade, not to mention, adding a degree or two to effective STA. Nosing down also improves biomechanical efficiency leading to less fatigue and increased power.

Understandably, what many might take issue with is keeping the saddle in the nose down position which isn't the best for descending or on long stretches of undulating terrain which is exactly why we're making the SwitchGrade (launching later this year) which lets riders change saddle angles on the fly!

Queue shameless plug Wink www.aenomalyconstructs.com
  • 10 4
 Step 1: buy a bike with a steep actual seat angle.
  • 3 1
 Are talking about the Slash one? i thought you couldn't say sh*t about Trek slack seat angles on pinkbike
  • 15 2
 The ONLY reason I'm walking this hill is because a bike with less than an 80 STA is basically unridable.
  • 4 0
 Nice.. constantly reminding myself to relax muscles that aren’t being used and breathe. Also,I love that your doing this in segments,
Looking forward to the next one!
  • 2 0
 Read the comments then watched the video. I got good reminders on the tension/shoulders/shifting forward stuff. I already experiment with a longer stem. Even have a decent handlebar around the 'ol piehole now.

What I didn't get out of it, as it wasn't presented as such, is all the bike fit garbage. Much like all the man-splaining bar width garbage, I'm pretty sure by the time you get to presenting for any mtb channel (PB, MTBR, NSMB, whatever), you probably have enough pedigree to have your bike fit and preferences in order. Especially if you're Levy or Kazimer testing and looking for repeatability. All of the tips in the video work (or don't detract) irrespective of saddle height, and if you prefer lower for climbing, then make it lower.
  • 2 1
 Just went and tried some of these tips; the shoulders back and down is a really good one for opening up the chest.

I do find that hinging at the hips really puts pressure on my, ahem, tackle, though. I guess I could tilt the saddle forward more.
  • 1 0
 Steeper seat tube angles have made seated climbing a lot better. I can sit now where I needed to stand previously. My lower back also doesn't hurt like it used to afterwards. Standing climbing is still pretty much the same as always.
  • 1 0
 Great Video! Tom's "cross eyed tip over" Funny stuff-often how I feel on some of the long climbs. Interesting on the discussion on tilting the saddle forward a bit-been doing that myself, anything that helps. The clipped in verses the flats for climbing -Used to ride W the foot binders for decades till a few years back went too the dark-side back to flats.Proper shoes and good pedals -works good enough. Sometimes slower is faster-back it off a notch for the harder bits-instead of you're heart jumping out of you're chest you are only foaming at the mouth like the horse in the Gone with Wind Movie. Good stuff!
  • 2 0
 @christinachappetta Great video, but it seems like a missed opportunity to sell some Trek Rails which can greatly improve anyone's climbing ability. Hahahaha!
  • 3 0
 Happy to see Tom's wheel decal and tire writing sync'd up ... pet peev of mine when mounting tires!
  • 2 1
 Have really enjoyed Christina's content. A great addition to the PB family and very articulate, which is important if your producing content in a sport like MTB. Grow the ranks!
  • 3 2
 No mention of bar ends? They really help with opening up the chest and getting the arms pumping when you’re running narrow handlebars! Wink

Downvotes incoming in 3...2...1...
  • 2 0
 No downvote here. I ride the Ergon GP3 on my hard tail and even though I rarely grip it and rip it on the ends climbing (because I climb like an elephant pushing a shopping cart), it's a great option and also nice on road approaches/mellow/uncrowded terrain as an optional position to spread the hands over. I wouldn't go bigger, and the 2 is a little small...but I might try them on my full suspension.
  • 4 0
 lose weight................................
  • 2 0
 I had a 2018 trek Slash 29 and my biggest gripe about the bike was the slack seat angle for climbing. Always ran the seat as far front as I could as the rails allowed.
  • 3 0
 Is this a new Oneup dropper post? Looks very clean!
  • 2 1
 I have lots of thoughts and questions about my bike geo, fit, pedal stroke etc, and I've been riding for over ten years... Love Chapetta videos, always quality...
  • 1 1
 Nice vid CC! Looking forward to the next one. I'm curious to see/hear the when and why of seated vs. standing climbs, and progression for technical climbing like Lenosky's vids.
  • 1 0
 Ride upright...weight on the front wheel...bit contradictory... I'm more into Wade's diesel approach,although my engine is more like a little euro6 gasoline
  • 1 0
 Who knew that I was pedalling uphill all wrong?!?! haha

My favourite part of this video - that dude Moustache! That has some power....fair play to you sir, I approve!
  • 1 0
 Technical climbing is fun, and newer bikes do very well. I find that successful climbing on steep sections is fwd weight transfer.
  • 4 2
 Christina, can you do a review of the Z1 fork?
  • 2 0
 It's been reviewed before, air and coil as well I believe
  • 4 0
 Just get one they are awesome. One of the best price/performance components out there.
  • 1 0
 @JockoJones: I know all the pros, I want to know some cons.
  • 2 1
 @joshfrandsen: I’ve had one and loved it, but it’s a tank compared to my Lyrik.
  • 3 1
 @joshfrandsen: Here is a comprehensive list of cons for the Z1 coil.

1. Heavy
2. Very heavy
3. Heavy AF
  • 2 0
 About 300g heavier.
  • 4 2
 No E-bikes were harmonized in this video
  • 2 0
 Thanks for the great vid!
  • 2 1
 I think we're missing the main point here, we need a p0rnstar tash to be able to climb efficiently?
  • 4 0
 If you notice when he's climbing the extra weight from the duster is slightly over the bars. This helps not only weight shift forward but also increase the drag coefficient on the top part of the rider. This causes a suction cup like effect while climbing for the back tire.
  • 1 0
 @ne-spoked-b: It's a no-brainer, couldn't have put it better myself
  • 2 0
 Anyone know what gloves she has on?
  • 2 0
 I've got the TLD Swelter gloves on. I use only them in the winter! Much warmer
  • 3 0
 Just Ride your bike.
  • 2 0
 Geez Tom Bradshore, that tach is filthy! Respect.
  • 1 0
 Thaaaaaaaaaanks mate
  • 1 0
 Did i hear get a longer stem? I've been told for years that shorter the better, and I need 800 mm bars.
  • 1 0
 Oh cool, one of the Pinkbike Academy contestants Smile
  • 1 0
 @blackapturphoto . Please watch and watch again
  • 1 0
 Prepare wallet, click BUY NOW on Eeeb purchase. Enjoy life.
  • 2 1
 onlydownplz
  • 1 1
 Step one: Charge your e-bike battery.
  • 2 2
 laughs in singlespeed
  • 3 1
 I just started single speeding and I was blown away at how much faster I can climb on the SS hardtail vs my 130mm trailbike, at certain grades anyway.
  • 2 0
 @Avanwin: all the pain, the only pleasure is getting the climb over with....
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2021. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.023097
Mobile Version of Website