Video: Revel Bikes Produce Tire Levers From Recycled Carbon Rims

Jun 10, 2020
by Revel Bikes  
Views: 2,572    Faves: 2    Comments: 0


Press Release: Revel Bikes

It takes a lot of prototype rims to create a high-quality wheelset like the RW30. We worked with our manufacturer, CSS Composites, and saved every single prototype and every single bit of process scrap and have been busy experimenting with what we can turn all that excess material into. FusionFiber not only creates a stronger and lighter rim, it also uses none of the harmful epoxy found in traditional carbon fiber products. This allows us to recycle every rim and excess scrap material that comes from the manufacturing process. We take great pride in knowing that there is no reason for our rims to ever see a landfill. 


Although it is a small tool, this tire lever is the first step in a very exciting journey of manufacturing more environmentally friendly bicycle components.
  
The old rims and process scraps are chopped up into pieces and them put through an industrial shredder. Those chopped pieces are then brought back up to temperature and compression molded into a tire lever. 

This is the first step in turning a Revel Wheel into a tire lever (or anything else!)

Views: 2,500    Faves: 0    Comments: 0



These tire levers measure 6 x 1 inches and have a nice sturdy feel. Since they’re made out of incredibly strong FusionFiber, they can take on the most stubborn tires. Levers can be purchased at revelbikes.com or at any Revel Wheels dealer for $15 per lever.




171 Comments

  • 128 2
 Pinkbike complains carbon winds up in oceans. REVEL: we have an idea. Pinkbike: It's not good enough.
  • 15 56
flag duzzi (Jun 10, 2020 at 8:13) (Below Threshold)
 $15/lever ... recycling for the 1%
  • 74 0
 @duzzi: Better than dumping in the ocean for the 100%
  • 44 0
 @duzzi: Recycling ain't free my friend. At least this is truly recycling and not just some scheme where things are "recycled' by sending them off to the other side of the world to sit in a landfill.
  • 39 0
 @duzzi: 15$ for a tire lever that will not bend and most likely never fail, take my money.
  • 17 1
 Instead of ocean. We put them in everyone's house and collect a small fee from them for doing so. It's a win-win situation.
  • 4 5
 your right, we shouldn't push anyone to do better... just except an over priced token effort and be done with it.
  • 7 0
 @stiingya: Speaking of token, maybe they could make some fork volume reducers with this stuff. Sure it would be overpriced, but think of the baby turtles!
  • 5 0
 @stiingya: gotta start somewhere.
  • 1 0
 @lifeofloon: agree, have you ever try to change tyre on carbon wheel for baby striller stroller? Regular levers last one change
  • 1 0
 @nickmalysh: no I haven't but I had a hell of a time yesterday with some Conti tires and I9 rims for girlfriends bike. Let's just say I'm down a couple tire levers now and the only one that held up was my Wolftooth tire lever/chain tool combo, it's metal.
  • 1 3
 @lifeofloon: who says they don't break??? Only metal core levers don't break, and then the plastic covering gets destroyed if their used long enough and they still get ruined.

The rims broke in the first place...
  • 55 26
 I greatly support and appreciate Revel's efforts. Unfortunately in my eyes a tirelever is more a downcyling than recycling.
Hope that this is just the beginning for "more reasonable" products.
  • 108 0
 Gotta start somewhere.
  • 53 18
 Don't buy Carbon bicycles. We stop buying it, they stop making it.
  • 16 0
 @chriskneeland: exactly, so how many levers would it take me to build my revel wheelset and will that come out cheaper than buying the wheels straight off...?

Joke.
  • 47 0
 A lot of "recycling" is actually downcycling. It's a widespread misconception.
  • 4 3
 @thewho07: Buy carbon skateboards instead then?
  • 8 4
 @thewho07: Nah I'm good, thanks.
  • 8 2
 @thewho07: Exactly. Glad someone gets it.
  • 8 1
 Could you educate me as to why recycling is better than downcycling? I'm not sure I understand the nuance here, but I am a fan of being educated!
  • 7 1
 @radrider: Carbon = dead fish
  • 5 0
 And the function makes total sense. Metal core levers suck, metal levers suck, park tool plastic levers don't last long
  • 55 5
 @thewho07: And buy what, then? Aluminum? The strip mining and processing for aluminum isn't exactly eco-friendly. And c'mon, man. No one is recycling their aluminum frames. No one.

Steel? I grew up in the largest steel-producing region in the U.S. The pollution is the worst you'll ever see. Steel=dead fish, too. You should see the waves that used to die off on the shores of Lake Michigan near US Steel.

If you don't want a carbon bike, OK, that's your choice, but the only solution as far as the environment goes -- if that's your concern -- is to stop buying bikes altogether. Since none of us are going to do that, maybe buy a bike every 10 years instead of 5.
  • 9 1
 @Will1848: Recycling = retains same value after production, downcycling reduces value after production, upcycling increases value.
  • 8 9
 @TheR: 10 years on a mtb frame may be pushing it, even 5 years is a long time for a frame being ridden hard. However, if I were to ride a frame for 5 to 10 years steel would be the material I would have most confidence in lasting.
  • 4 0
 @TheR: TIme for Bamboo frames?
  • 12 0
 @TheR: No one is recycling aluminum frames? Really?
  • 7 0
 @freakonomics: I have certainly taken aluminum rims and frames to the recycler. I'm assuming they get recycled.
  • 3 0
 @Ajorda: Thanks
Additional info: Value refers to material not the product.
  • 8 1
 @JDFF: I should have celebrated 10 years anniversary of my Banshee Rune V1.5 that is still rocking hard and safe without any signs of material fatigue, surface treatment degredation (unlike Santa Cruz), creaking sounds or cracked welds (unlike V2 gen Banshee frames :-)). The only thing that makes it old is its old school geo. Even doind a mini DH bike for kids is a bit out of todays standards, but still safer, cheaper and more eco friendly than buying another bike.
  • 6 2
 @freakonomics: If you've recycled an aluminum frame, congrats. I can assure you, you are in the vast minority.
  • 10 10
 @TheR: Here's the deal with Plastic. It absorbs what are called Toxic Forever Chemicals. These chemicals never go away and are always toxic. I'll share these again:
www.goesfoundation.com/resources/posts/2020/may/high-microplastic-concentration-found-on-ocean-floor
duckduckgo.com/?t=ffab&q=goes+foundation+microplastic&atb=v224-3&ia=web

None of the materials or processes used to manufacture and deliver bikes are eco-friendly. The health of the Oceans should be more of a concern than climate change (which happens naturally anyway). If we continue to kill more of the ocean ecosystem and cause a collapse we are totally f'd. The data points to that happening well before climate change killing us off.

The thing I find strange about all of it is how it's referred to "Saving the Earth". We are looking to save humankind and other living things. If we or some event kills all animals on earth it will start again in a different form, that is how the Earth works. So what we are really concerned with is Saving Humankind, and preserving our lifestyle to a point. Nature as a whole would be better off without us in our current state. If people were really concerned with saving Earth they would be pushing for ways for humans to leave the planet.

To bring it around town. Plastic is a sponge for toxic substances, some that never go away, and will continue to pollute and kill forever. That is why it is worse than metals. Perhaps we are creating our own proverbial asteroid...
  • 6 0
 @JDFF: I don't know about that. I've ridden my two previous bikes 9 seasons each, both were fine. And yeah, some people go 3 years. Or 2. OK. Maybe try to make that 5 or 3. Or do whatever you're going to do.

I don't have the solution. I really don't think bicycle manufacturing is the scourge of the environment compared to so many other things. And everyone's going to do what they want anyway. Far be it for me to say what people ought to do, when I'm consuming, too. But realistically, if this is something someone is really worried about, the only solution is to stop buying bicycles, or buy fewer bicycles.
  • 2 2
 @zoobab2: Nah. What are the Pandas going to eat? Will somebody please think of the Pandas?
  • 3 1
 @TheR: I'm 165lbs and have broke aluminum, carbon and ti frames. All Mountain/trail/enduro riding, not that much park or freeride. I don't blame the bikes, I just ride a fair amount and respect the lifespan of frames.
  • 3 1
 @DARKSTAR63: essentially all recycling is "downcycling". It's not a misconception. the impurities have to either be removed at great cost or passed on into the next product.
  • 2 0
 @JDFF: All good, man. I don't doubt you. I'm 185 pounds, and I've never broken a frame yet, going back to my freestyle/bmx days. I ride a good bit in fairly rough stuff. But my bikes last. Maybe I'm just lucky. Maybe I'm just too smooth. Or maybe I'm not rad enough. Kind of makes me wonder what I'm doing wrong.
  • 4 1
 @TheR: Also to address your "I don't have a solution" paragraph. In my experiences hardtail frames tend to outlast FS bikes. Especially a well built steel or ti hardtail. Less materials, no moving parts, etc... And a modern hardtail will still be relevant at 5 years old. I know they arent for everyone, but just food for thought. I have a hardtail in my quiver to offset wear and tear on FS carbon bike and I am certain that I break way less stuff when riding the hardtail due to it requiring more finesse. There are several reasons I am an advocate for modern hardtails, and reducing environmental impacts is one of them. Next step is figuring out a way for me to not go through so many tires!
  • 2 1
 @JDFF: Well said sir Smile , I feel exactly the same way about my franken build ht... Yea, it may have 10 year ole' geo, but that's nothing, i'm having a ball!

I'm in the process of rebuilding/restoring a bunch of 29+ year old steel bikes (bmx/mtb/road), i can tell you for a fact, no way you can do that with plastic frames... Riddle me this batman... Can you hit a carbon frame with an angle grinder?
Big Grin
  • 1 2
 $15 for a lever? is there a weightweenie advantage?
  • 1 0
 @JDFF: If that's a good solution for you, I say go for it. But as you said, it's not for everyone. It's good to recognize that. As for steel, the manufacturing process is filthy (but getting better), but if it's offset by not needing to replace a frame as often, maybe it's worth the trade-off.
  • 4 0
 @the-joe: Aluminum cans can be and are often "recycled". Meaning you can make more cans from the cans and this is done. Plastic bottles are "downcycled" for the most part. Meaning they largely do not become more plastic bottles. I've read about efforts to change this, but the truth is most plastic is landfill or burned, but that's a whole other topic. The misconception is that when you recycle a plastic bottle it goes on to be another bottle, and that the bottle in your hand is made of recycled plastic. Hardly ever true.
  • 12 1
 I thought "downcycling" was riding a XC bike with slack geometry. No, wait. That's something else.
  • 1 0
 @the-joe I suppose the point I was making is lots things people think are being recycled are in fact turned into different products. It's better than putting them in a landfill, but yes the goal should be to produce fewer things that cant be truly recycled.
  • 2 1
 @thewho07: Are you under the mistaken impression that aluminum is *better* for the environment?
  • 4 4
 @NotSorry: ....climate change isn't natural.... #anthropocene
  • 3 5
 @cactuspunch: The Earth's climate changing is natural. Our affect on it is not. Or it is if you look at it from a distant third party view. If the earth was overrun with Termites and Cows they would alter the climate with excess methane. That would be considered natural.
  • 1 0
 @LeDuke: It is
  • 5 1
 @NotSorry: Earth's climate changes naturally over 10,000 year orbital cycles. The rapid change of the last 100 years is entirely due to human activity.
  • 1 0
 @chriskneeland: I agree with you. 10,000 years is a blink in the lifespan of Earth. Life on earth perseveres, whether or not it is human life is up to us. Climate change is not the most eminent threat to human life on Earth though. Should we make changes that slow or reverse climate change? Yep.
  • 2 2
 @chriskneeland: "Entirely"?
  • 3 1
 @bbeak: Pretty hard not to see the correlation

climate.nasa.gov/evidence
  • 4 0
 @DARKSTAR63: PBS Frontline released an interesting documentary about recycling and the plastics/petro-chemical industry this past spring, worth a watch www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/plastic-wars
  • 3 3
 @chriskneeland: As has been said quite often, "Correlation is not causation." Perhaps it would be better said that at least some of the rapid increase in temperature is probably caused by human activity. It is possible that most of it is due to human activity. "Entirely" is a bit definitive.
  • 1 0
 @Ajorda: I thought I read that aluminum beer/soda cans are the only actually "recycled" aluminum product. And that every other "recycled" item is actually down cycled. (thought this was true of paper and plastic too, that "nothing" was actually creating more "recycled" products, the paper is never the quality of the original and contain new paper in the mix, etc.)

Still better than throwing it away!!
  • 1 0
 @LeDuke: I'm under the impression that plastic is killing fish. Carbon is plastic. Aluminium is not. What's worse for the planet? Simples.
  • 1 1
 @thewho07: Well, first and foremost, do you understand how carbon fiber is made? And do you understand how aluminum is mined, shipped, smelted, and then how the vast majority of something machined off during the production of a frame like a Pole Machine is literally not recoverable because it oxidizes?
  • 1 0
 @thewho07: Not really that simple. I can't speak to the manufacturing of aluminum, but I can assure you, steel production kills fish as well.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: I can’t guarantee every alloy and steel frame is being recycled. They’re collecting dishwashers and fridges from scrap yards and refuge sites around the world and shipping them to China to be melted down for manufacturing there’s no way they’re letting high quality mountain bike frames go to waste. Seriously what’s the point in carbon.
  • 1 1
 @thenotoriousmic: But are you recycling your aluminum frames? Are you personally seeing to it they go into recycling? Are you taking your frame directly to the recycler? Or are you just throwing it in the dump?
  • 3 2
 @TheR: truth bombs.
Folks that love telling the world what *everybody should* make and buy really grind my gears. So much more nuance in the world than these types seem to grasp, but you know they've watched a video from some Finnish bike company, so they're experts.

You can't just buy the solution to big issues.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: I personally am but in the uk even if it got taken to the dump it would be sorted there and put aside for recycling. I can’t see why most countries wouldn’t do the same as there’s real profit in scrap metals.
  • 3 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Maybe you’re right. If it’s as easy as tossing your frame in the recycling bin, maybe a lot more dudes are doing it than I think. I still have a feeling that it’s more difficult than that. I don’t know. I still own two of the three aluminum bikes I’ve ever owned, and if I had to wager, I’d say the vast majority of us are doing the same thing — just keeping old bikes and frames in the garage. I suppose that’s better than the landfill, for now anyway.

Unrelated thought, not directed at anyone in particular: carbon as an element is much more plentiful than aluminum, or the iron ore used to make steel. Where does that come into play in the ecology of using up the earth’s finite resources
  • 1 0
 @JDFF: i would disagree, i broke 3 hard tails cromo, 1 bmx and 1 fs from alu, i would say depends on manufacturer, and absolutely irrelevant to type of riding
  • 2 0
 @TheR: Aluminium is recycled to a much much higher degree than carbon fiber.
And even if it wasn't it would still be better than carbon fiber, as you would have to be less intelligent than a gold fish to believe that aluminium manufacturing and recycling has a worse impact on the environment than dumping plastics in the ocean.
The most effective thing you can do, is to stop consuming so damn much, and that goes for every single person on this planet.
The problem is that there are way too many people on this planet, and everyone want to live a comfy life with single use everything.
  • 2 0
 @Losvar: Probably one point we agree on.
As a clever bloke once told me...
Want to reduce your impact? Reduce the 'quality of life' you're used to.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: if you took your broken frame to a scrap yard in the UK they’ll definitely give you money for it. Scrap prices obviously so I won’t be a lot so their is value there, it’s unlikely to be left in the dump . Before covid all scrap metal was being shipped to China, they’re buying everything they can get. I refit houses so I’m constantly selling old appliances, wire cables, viper pipes etc to scrap metal merchants.
  • 2 0
 @thenotoriousmic: I’m sure scrapyards in the US do that, too. My point is, few bicycle owners are going to go through the effort if it’s not as simple as tossing it in a bin. Some of you have said, “oh yeah, certainly people recycle frames,” but only one of you have said they have taken the actual steps to do it. It’s all a hypothetical that none of us is really doing. Oh sure, I acknowledge it’s possible, but by and large, most of us are not recycling our aluminum frames. We’re just not. Stop it.

@Losvar: Let’s all stop pretending we know anything about the aluminum mining and refinement process, or the carbon manufacturing process to say one way or another which affects the environment more. I don’t know which is worse, and unless you work in either industry, you don’t either.
  • 2 0
 Regardless of materials, it seems that we all need be more concious of how often we are replacing bikes and components. I truly believe that most industry folks want to do the right thing, however profits depend on consumers continually buying new things. So we enter a revolving door of bike industry consumption. As consumers we should pick quality products wisely and make sure that when we do buy new bikes, its because we truly need it, not because of 0.5 degree HTA update, new color scheme, etc... Buy real analog pedal bikes and run them into the ground before replacing.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: Well unless you’re hording old broken bike parts in your garage for some unknown reason or fly tipping in the wilderness it’s probably going to end up being shipped to China to be melted down to be made into something else.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Keep on believin'.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: buying a used bike is the most eco-friendly option
  • 1 0
 @TheR: What kind of absolute hellhole do you live in?
Sounds like you just pile all the garbage in your yard...
And why do you believe everyone else to be so lazy, are you projecting your own faults?
  • 1 0
 @Losvar: You have a nice day...
  • 31 1
 ENVE has left the chat.
  • 21 1
 Enve probably supplied all the recycled broken rims. That's the market they need to "break" into
  • 23 8
 This is a great idea, but £15 a lever from waste that they would normally have to pay to get rid of?! Ouch!
  • 12 2
 worth the £15 just to wind up the carbon hating brigade... Wink
  • 20 0
 @wreaman Cheap and wasteful, we have enough of that in this world. I would be happy to pay a bit more for this.
  • 4 2
 thats good business i want some.maybe enve is cheaper, they got more waste
  • 2 1
 no doubt. Why is 'saving the planet' always more expensive than just buying new plastic?
  • 2 0
 @preach: Maybe re-proccessing waste materials is more cost intensive than using virgin material? Just a thought.
  • 1 0
 @dirtyburger: just seems like dumpster diving for dollars to me
  • 1 0
 @dirtyburger: It usually is more expensive to recycle plastics, than just making new.
The vast majority of plastic never gets recycled, it's estimated that more than 90% never gets recycled.
Plastic is killing all higher forms of life at a steady rate now, this is a much bigger problem than global warming, much bigger.
We and most animals can adapt to rising temepratures and sea levels, we can't adapt to filling our bodies with poison.
  • 14 0
 you're the second person I know that browses on duckduckgo.
  • 5 0
 @aug7hallak: i am a 3rd.
  • 7 0
 Yeah I read 1984... Google also sucks.
  • 17 2
 @NotSorry thanks for that. Yeah, a little over a decade ago, we stopped putting any plastics in our dishwasher & wash stuff like hard Camelbak bottles or plastic kitchen tools or storage containers in the sink because when they are heated up, they dump plastics out of them and into the foods you eat or drink out of and can show up in a childs urine immediately.

Then we read the stuff Patagonia was doing to try to reduce the amount of plastics that wash out of their garments and dump into the water out of the washing machines and realized it's everywhere all day and we're just overdosing on it in every single manner.

We've tried to avoid plastics in our food stuffs and buy metal everything, even dodging teflon pans now and moving back to cast iron. But holy cow, in our clothes, our tools, our everything....plastic is just smothering us. Can't imagine a family or household that doesn't try.

Also, my grandmother died of mutliple myeloma bone cancer...a cancer that can be traced back to heavy plastics exposure. She worked in a plastics factory for Baxter Healthcare making medical supplies from bags to clips, etc...and only for a decade. But she was one of the first in our area to have Rubbermaid & a microwave and heated that crap up on the daily, so plastics got her one way or the other.

It's justified to be afraid of all this carbon and plastic on every level.
  • 9 0
 @blowmyfuse: Seeing comments on pinkbike from intelligent people who can see farther than how their bike rides is always refreshing. That shit is killing us on sooo many levels, from the natural oils they are made of through plastic food containers to bikes, clothes, and f*cking BOTTLED WATER that eventually end up in landfill/oceans and practically never break down. One could say metal mines are like raping the planet, but then what is plastic like? ????
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: Absolutely man. My mother in law also worked in a plastics factory, concerned for her.

It's everywhere. Car tires for example release microplastics every time they're used. There's a few cars and trucks on the road... We are truly drowning in it.
  • 2 0
 @ski-n-bike-da-east: Lost count, but at least I've been using duckduck for over a decade or so. Why use Google/Bing/Yahoo?
  • 2 0
 Ya I’ve heard Tires can make up 50’/, of a car’s emissions.@NotSorry:
  • 1 0
 @vinay: I use Brave and Qwant
  • 1 0
 @aug7hallak: 5th person here.
And i watched animal farm...
  • 2 0
 @aug7hallak: 6th person. DDG for search in Firefox browser.
Some people just doesn't understand why I, as a software engineer and tech nerd, don't have an Alexa, Portal, Google home, Ring doorbell, or any of the other "smart" things in monitoring my home

PBS Frontline released an interesting documentary on "recycling" and the relationship with the plastics/petro-chem industry this past spring, worth a watch: www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/plastic-wars
  • 1 0
 @chacou: I've got a Pinebook Pro coming my way so fair control over what my computer will be doing and what not. As someone who hates wasting stuff, I got pretty annoyed over how laptop computers could break and not be repaired. I'm no computer expert by any means but it seems like I should be able to keep that one going for a while (and be able to get hold of spares and advice when something does break).
  • 1 0
 @aug7hallak: Brace web browser’s is where it’s at
  • 1 0
 Doublepost Frown
  • 4 0
 @blowmyfuse: After 15 years of using plastic water bottles, just this year I switched to stainless steel. Hopefully not too late......
  • 12 0
 The dude on the right keeps repeating that the rims are "100% recyclable" despite the guy on the left clarifying that you can't recycle the material from an old rim into a new rim. The fibers get chopped up in the recycling process, so this material can be downcycled but not 100% recycled. Aluminum alloys, on the other hand, are 100% recyclable because the material from an old rim can be recycled into a new rim.
  • 4 0
 Incinerate the plastics then we can inhale then recycle the stuff so we can filter the air for future generations.
  • 2 0
 @curendero: Plus we get more sunny and warm days to ride.
  • 13 2
 lol now a carbon fiber tire lever that costs as much as a fish n chips is apparently too expensive for the pinkbike comment section.. get a job kids.
  • 2 1
 Yeah I’m not spending $15 on fish n chips or a carbon lever. Probably something to do with cooking at home and using metal levers I bought around 1990 or so. #cheap
  • 1 0
 @DHhack: I didn’t know you had fish and chips in America. Is it the same as over here?
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: we do. No it’s not the same. Same as every other American bastardized copy of anything food related ever.
  • 11 0
 Could this process eventually lead to recycled (downcycled) carbon shift levers, dropper post levers, bottle cages or other little things like that?
  • 3 0
 Man this is a great idea. The possibilities are endless. Dropper levers are grossly overpriced, they could easily design a complete dropper lever to be made out of this stuff and turn a healthy profit on us suckers! There are already carbon reinforced plastic levers on the market aren't there?
  • 2 0
 @NotSorry: the little plastic bits on chain retention devices also?
  • 1 0
 @NotSorry: if a tire lever is $15 a dropper lever is going to be like $300
  • 11 0
 What can you make out of this?
...I can make a hat or a brooch or a pterodactyl...
  • 1 0
 Point me to this video. I must see it.
  • 8 0
 Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit sniffing glue...
  • 1 0
 Is this from the movie Airplane?
  • 1 0
 Wasn't that a Little Caesar's 'pizza pizza' commercial?
  • 2 0
 Bad news, the fog is getting thicker. And Leon's getting laaarger.
  • 6 0
 Step 1: Make a YETI version, paint it turq
Step 2: Charge $29.99
Step 3:???
Step 4: Profit!
  • 3 0
 Step 2: Or three for $100 cause dentists don't math.
  • 6 0
 Re-cycling and up-cycling. The way forward for most earthlings.
  • 3 1
 I have never thrown a carbon rim away. All of my cracked rims have been professionally repaired and have never failed on the same spot again. Even without the need of unlacing, exception being the XMC1200 which cracked at 3 adjacent spoke holes, not at the sidewall. That being said, there has definitely been some carbon removed with each repair. So finding a way to reuse it is a smart move.
  • 3 0
 A normal carbon rim can be repaired, but you can pretty much forget to repair a revel rim that uses a thermoplastic resin.
  • 1 1
 @SleepingAwake: with a lifetime warranty on Revel rims why would you even consider repairing it? Break a rim, get a new one, and get some tire levers produced in the process
  • 2 3
 @mattdawg: do you understand how lifetime warranties work?
  • 1 0
 @SleepingAwake: dont thermoplastic composites open up more potential to recycling vs thermoset? In terms of maintaining fiber length?
  • 1 0
 @beast-from-the-east: recycling yes, but repairing is not feasible with traditional methods.
  • 1 0
 Awesome. I'd be willing to bet that failed structural carbon fibre composite parts and frames are more viable for cost effective repair than either steel, aluminium or titanium alloys. Of course there's a limit, failure mode, extent, blah blah
  • 3 1
 Revel, Im really digging what you are doing with this new material. WE NEED TO SEE TESTING on the RW30 rims vs many other leading rims. TESTING TO FAILURE. We need a "project farm/you tube type of test" Promises of "whatever percent more impact resistant" mean nothing until we see proof!
  • 6 0
 Reveal = CSS Composites = Christensen Arms/ACT Aerospace
  • 2 0
 Damn, a quick search and yup, checks out. Common people, common location in Gunnison, UT
  • 1 0
 I have the same Decathlon tire lever set (green one you can stuck like a lego)for 10 years,best thing you can find there. If you can fit a DH tire without snapping the tire lever in the middle of the trail,it is good.
I have 3 of those for very cheap,the best tire lever I ever try by far.
Even some LBS use them daily.
  • 3 0
 Woot! We DEFINITELY need more sustainability in the mtb industry! This is a great start! Also, programs to help the underprivileged get into riding!
  • 3 0
 Guys in picture both have their protective eye wear, one is even hiding behind the partition.
  • 2 0
 The guy behind the panel looks like he is waiting for the lever to break and poke the user in the eye. Or possibly, he just farted and is waiting for the effects to be discovered.
  • 2 0
 @bbeak: Just ask if anyone can smell popcorn.
  • 2 0
 I'm sure that every purchase of a new revel bike will come with a pair of carbon tyre levers now. Nice freebie :-)
  • 3 3
 Nice to see this from Revel. While other NA carbon rim manufacturers are just throwing waste into the local landfill and lying about it, Revel is actually trying a better solution.
  • 7 9
 Oh, I thought the point was to recycle the wheels to make more wheels and them make them cheaper to the final consumer....not bike levers! I can use a spoon to do that. What a gourmetization of something that doesn't need to be. Enough with the rant. Hope it works, and they can upgrade the process to be used on actual wheels.
  • 6 5
 Anyone ever have a carbon fiber splinter? They are the worst. This isn't a great idea.
  • 10 0
 This is shredded carbon fiber. I think it is more similar to normal fiber reinforced plastic then a laminate product, I would not expect splinters.
  • 4 0
 It's not a bum lever shoehorn like Tushcore's...
  • 4 0
 Some of us haven't been as fortunate to experience that kind of luxury. Alloy splinters will have to suffice.
  • 4 0
 fun fact, carbon fiber is invisible on x-ray, just so you know in case you gotta to the hospital because of one
  • 1 0
 In the penultimate picture - looking at the wheel. For a second I thought it was Jeff Goldblum peering over the toolboard!!
  • 1 0
 I imagine they should have a large supply of recycled rims if you know what I mean...
  • 2 2
 Problem here is dentist don’t remove their own tires. I’ll stick with $1 ones.
  • 2 0
 I want these!
  • 1 1
 Yes I desperately need carbon splinters in my hands while prying on the trail side...
  • 2 1
 I just came to see how ridiculous the pricing is
  • 1 0
 Love it. I'm buying some now!!!
  • 1 2
 I would never use carbon if i did not have to it is toxic like asbestos. One fibre turning into dust is all it takes to hurt you as the powder is far worse for you.
  • 1 1
 Summary of this comment section: If you aren't killing trees with every pedal stroke, you're not biking correctly.
  • 1 0
 A second chance for carbon to break again????
  • 1 0
 I spy a Blues Graveler in the shop.
  • 1 0
 Update: ENVE produce carbon rims from recycled tire levers.
  • 4 4
 Finally a tire lever for dentists
  • 3 4
 Really? So, being as two are usually required, they expect me to spend $30.00 USD (plus shipping??) to do a job that two Park TL-4.2 Levers will do for under $4.00 USD, and can be purchased from a box sitting on the counter of almost every LBS ?
Well, spend if you want to, but I'm not drinking the Koolaid on this deal............
  • 4 0
 @GT-CORRADO: those levers wear out quick
  • 4 0
 @GT-CORRADO: and park tool levers suck. Pedros are the way to go with plastic levers. I’ve only broken one of those (on a wtb rim).

Buuuttt, now that I have WR1 rims, I barely ever need levers.
  • 5 0
 @mungbean: I have had some Pedro's levers (plastic) for at least 10 years. They have mounted some of the tightest tires without fault (road tubeless). They are pink (easier to see, less likely to be stolen).

+100 for Pedros
  • 1 0
 @GT-CORRADO: topeak shuttlelever 1.2 ;10€ metalcore platic outer, best ewa
  • 1 0
 @Paddock22: some bontys do the job fine.
  • 1 1
 @GT-CORRADO: Your obviously not a mechanic...
  • 1 0
 @mungbean: Yeah I haven't used a tire lever in ages, even on wire beads. I guess if I used inserts or something I'd need them.
  • 1 0
 This will pair up nicely with my $40 tubes.
  • 2 0
 @Paddock22 @mungbean: another vote for pink pedros!
  • 1 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: Tire lever from Decathlon are very good. they have the perfect size and fit. I have the same set from 10 years ago or more,have change a lot of tires,never broken one. Very easy to work with even in a bike shop.
  • 1 2
 Need to destroy more carbon rims and need to have more punctures. Sold.

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