Welsh Made Components From Unite - Bike Place 2019

Jul 1, 2019
by James Smurthwaite  
Photos: Ed Spratt

Unite are a new component company based in Wales and formed by a team of yacht engineers who had access to a fleet of CNC machines and all the right programmes to build some really smart looking components. Previously they sold a small range of stem caps, chainrings and chain guides but they're now really kicking into gear with a set of pedals and a stem, which were unveiled at the Bike Place show.

The Instinct Pedal

The Instinct pedal is machined from 6082 aluminium with an oversized, concave 113x102mm body. The axle is also made in house, this time from EN16T alloy steel with a black nickel coating to prevent corrosion. Unite are claiming this will make it more durable than the axle you may get from other popular pedal manufacturers.

From billet to completion, the Instinct pedal as a work in progress.

The pedal runs on 4 Igus bushings and 2 cartridge bearings and has 20 pins per pedal. The whole thing comes together for a claimed weight of 219 grams per side and a price of £99.99 for a pair.


The Renegade Stem

Unite are also offering this stem that has been designed with carbon bars in mind. Instead of the faceplate and stem body being machined separately, they all come from the same piece of aluminium here. Unite claim that this ensures a more even force distribution and that they can work to tolerances than other brands. This is especially useful for carbon bars to prevent a pressure point that can lead to a snapped bar and a very bad day.

The plate and stem body part-way through being machined from one piece of aluminium.

As for the details, this is a zero rise stem available in 35mm or 42.5mm lengths and for 31.8 or 35mm bars. The 35mm stem has a weight of around 130 grams. The stem will cost £84.99.




Unite also have a set of 800mm bars coming but these will not be made in Wales, keep an eye out for more details on them soon.

More info.


69 Comments

  • + 41
 Cool Hope stem and Burgtec pedals Wink
  • + 3
 That's what I was thinking !
  • + 11
 Stem looks better I think. A lot less material and more slim.
  • - 6
flag nanaMEX (Jul 1, 2019 at 23:30) (Below Threshold)
 There is little russian manufacturer BOY components

They gives better premises:
for example short stems 35mm lenght 0mm & 20mm rise for 45£

NW chainrings 25 ... 35 £

And so on

And all of components cnc-machined and done of D16T aluminium (russian material, better than 6061),
tested on hard traks (including DH WC track in Slovenia and IXS Europe dh cup), RES (russian enduro series),
and dirt/slopestyle lines
with top russian crazy riders ))

You can find them in instagram @boycomponents

))
  • + 6
 @nanaMEX: russia metal better than america metal
  • - 1
 @Civicowner: Thanks a lot!
But i don't know exactly all sort ofaluminium alloys in US and RU,
but D16T alloy using in aircrafting, space-industry and more in Russia

It's light weight and strong

One of our test riders has hard-hit his chainring on rail then jump over railroad

No any aftermaths for chainring ))

We also have B95T alloy... It understructable, you can grind concrete with it ))
But we now not using it - it's more expensive and harder in processing
It's reserved for future line-up ))
  • + 2
 took the words right out of my mouth
  • + 1
 @Civicowner: As a former owner of a 1970 FIAT 124 Spider, I can tell you that at least back then, not true!!
  • + 2
 @endlessblockades: not sure if I’m missing something here, but FIAT is Italian...
  • + 2
 @irck: Yes, but FIAT sold some of their obsolete designs (one becoming the infamous Lada, for example) to Russia around that time and the cash-strapped Russians paid in steel that turned out to be very rust-prone . Many FIATs, Alfa Romeos, and Lancia of the era rusted into oblivion. Not all had the bad steel, and some still survive.
  • + 2
 @endlessblockades: Haha ok. Good to know.
  • + 1
 @endlessblockades: Haha , my dad had one of those, converted it to rhd and imported it from california in the 90s. Shame it had the cali spec bs. Its still getting around.
  • + 1
 @nanaMEX: was being sarcastic
  • + 17
 Haven't we long ago surpassed peak bar, stem and pedal offerings? How do these companies make any money? Way too many bar, stem and pedal choices.
  • + 46
 But these have more llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch
  • + 7
 Pedals are one of those, many fail to stand out, but some do and end up very popular in some areas. These look like a great option for me, I have size 16 (17us) feet so the bigger the better, and I'm rather hefty so stronger axles sound tempting. Combined with local ish manufacturing (about an hour away) and the 4 bushes and 2 bearings per side should be pretty durable.
  • + 3
 Funny enough i had the exact same thoughts.
"Who's really interested in yet another cnc'd pedal offering?"
Then i thought:
"Nice, since riding clipped i don't need to worry about pedals anymore and they cost a fraction of the price!"
That put a smile on my face for realizing there's now a lot of parts on my bike i'm genuenly happy and content with, unlike only a few years ago when most available stuff was still crap.
What a time to be alive!
  • + 8
 You can get a second hand CNC mill for less than the cost of a Santa Cruz Nomad in this country. There will never be too many options for bars, stems and pedals, never!
  • + 4
 @Loki87: I'm a bit jealous of you clipped in folks. The same xt or time pedals you bought 15 years ago are still perfect and somehow spin beautifully. And you can't fit two fingers through holes on the soles of your 5.10s.
  • + 2
 With companies making pedals with bushings, there does not seem to be too many pedal options, at least not good ones. Say no to bushings in pedals.
  • + 0
 As a member of BOY components team
- i can say:

While you are little- you have no money, just pleasure
  • + 8
 Great work. Nice to see more UK made options.
First place I'll be going for a guide+bash as well.
  • + 4
 Bang tidy init butt?
  • + 1
 stuff looks good. Im not in the market for those pedals but i will admit that the stem looks very nice. There is a problem tho. That price (And i think in Euro's) is like a 100 bucks at least (I dont know if that includes the VAT.) Thats a lot of money for a stem.
  • + 1
 Hopefully they'll be able to make their products available within a reasonable timeframe. I ordered a Unite bashguard from Stif only to find out it wasn't going to be available for near on 2 months. I cancelled the order and bought a OneUp instead (also a company whose inventory regularly runs dry). I'm happy to support a UK company, but they've got to make products readily available or consumers will pass them by for someone who can.
  • + 2
 I think in order to excite the market now you would need to half the price of both products.

They look to be made / designed with care and thought though, will make nice niche finishing kit.
  • + 1
 I love the raw billet pics and seeing things created out of metals. I wish them and anyone else making reasonably priced , crafted metal things the best of luck. I, however am not going back to metal pedals. Composites are just too inexpensive, reliable, and tough for the money.
  • + 1
 A few of boys I know are rocking some of their components and seem to love them! - I actually follow them on insta .....defo going to look at what they got
  • + 2
 Nice Smile 42.5 mm stem length instead of a length that every other manufacturer makes ...
  • + 3
 Exactly!
I thought that when I saw the new spank range. They have like 33,38,43mm that kind of stuff.
I can’t believe it’s taken so long for anyone to think of it!
  • + 3
 Those pedals look sick :O
  • + 1
 I'm just always surprised to see machined or molded pedals designed around the limitations that come with extrusion. Why would you do that? If you're going to mold or machine, why wouldn't you go all out and go with a double concave platform, maybe closed sides for more stiffness etc. And if you don't need that and this is indeed the best shape, why not start with an extruded part and go from there just like what the likes of VP and Wellgo have done for so long (for themselves and others)? Aluminium extrusion isn't particularly expensive and you don't need to go for extreme quantities to justify the expense of the mold (unlike plastic extrusion). My daughter also has some plastic pedals from Superstar components (made by a contractor, not in house) and it was striking how much the design sticks to the standard extruded shape. Same goes for those here from Unite.
  • + 1
 @vinay: Because they already have the CNCs, and the yachts to export stuff if it goes well? I'm no armchair engineer, but this design looks optimally strong and light, given the available production techniques. I still wouldn't put them up against OneUp, Kona, or Spank's forged-machined offerings.
  • + 1
 @ceecee: As an expert armchair engineer extruded (and then machined) pedals are perfectly fine products. Casting, forging and machining give you more freedom to design the optimal shape and I'd say forging would probably get you the strongest pedal (though I never realized Spank actually forges their pedals, pretty cool) but these advantages are only relevant if you use them. If you don't, I don't see how a fully cnc'd pedal (from a solid billet) would be any better than an extruded and then machined pedal. The advantage of the latter is just that aluminium extrusion is relatively cheap and there is much less material to remove afterwards (hence less machine time and less tool wear). To get an idea of how this works, you may like to visit the website of Superstar components. There is a video on there how they produce their pedals, starting from a supplied aluminium extrusion. If you look at the line up of for instance Wellgo, you can also see how several of their pedals use the same extrusion profile. I wouldn't be surprised if the Eason Cully pedals are theirs too.
  • + 1
 @vinay: spank pedals are awesome. There are so many other pedals I like the look of and want to try, but there’s no point because my spark oedals are still going strong after years of use. It would be a waste of money to change them
  • + 1
 @jaame: they are horrible. The bearing is badly sealed and gets destroyed when it gets wet for the first time. I had to super glue the bearing to the axle twice on my Spikes to loosen the bearing and get it rotating again.

Then there's the outboard bushing. The last time I changed it it took two or three months to develop noticeable play.

Spikes were the reason I am not buying pedals with bushings ever again. Bearings only. I'm currently on one up aluminiums.
  • + 1
 @Primoz: thank you for telling me all the things wrong with my pedals, that have never happened to my pedals.
I love the internet for that. I’m always finding out stuff I didn’t know, in this case how my pedals are shit. If I didn’t read your post I wouldn’t even know how shit they are! I would have gone on thinking they were great. Thanks for opening my eyes, yo!
  • + 1
 @Primoz: yup same here. I was 1 month with bad play, 3 months to get 5mm of lateral play, i kept adding washers to minimize the play. But once it got to nearly 10mm i put them in the bin. Utter garbage
  • + 1
 I guess I’m not riding hard enough!
I’ve had two pairs, the first we’re still sweet when I sold the bike they were on. The second pair are still sweet after three years of 50:50 use with mallets.
  • + 1
 I cant unsee the big dent in the purple ano pedal. Hope that wasn't the good side.
  • + 2
 Bloody hell, they are only 25 miles up the road.
  • + 0
 I am always inspired by the "British machinist in their garage" culture. I wish we could have some of that here in the states.
  • + 7
 Chromag, Paul components, Box... North America has plenty of them
  • + 22
 You will find far more "American machinist in their garage" in this country.
  • + 1
 @sam264: chromag is made in tiwan
  • + 2
 @freeridejerk888: It's spelled Formosa
  • + 5
 @freeridejerk888: Not true. They do have some products that are made in Canada
  • + 2
 @freeridejerk888: It looks like the BZA and Ranger stems are made in Canada. HiFi stems made in Taiwan. I'm not sure from their website about their pedals, but based on price alone I'm hoping that the CNC'd pedals are made in Canada.
  • + 3
 @Tinga Be the change you want to see.
  • + 1
 Really I was told it al was except for the tomahawk frame @JaredHarzan:
  • + 1
 @freeridejerk888: I'm just going off of their website. They have a number of frames made in Canada, most of which have similar counterparts that are made in Taiwan that are cheaper. Web pages for their stems explicitly state made in Canada or made in Taiwan.

chromagbikes.com/collections/made-in-canada/frames+current

chromagbikes.com/collections/stems/products/stems-ranger-v2

They've been updating their website a lot lately. They also released a new flat pedal that I hadn't heard about until checking the website just now.
  • + 3
 @freeridejerk888: Their cnc'd parts are made by North Shore Billet in the same industrial estate in Whistler.
  • + 1
 They looks soooooo sick. Got really excited about thoose haha@JaredHarzan:
  • + 6
 "The 'garage'? Hey fellas, the 'garage'! Well ooh la-de-da Mr French man!"

"Well what do you call it?"

"A car hole."
  • + 2
 @skerby: And the garages in the USA are far bigger than here in the UK!
  • + 2
 Any idea when the pedals might be on sale|?
  • + 2
 Fantastic!
  • + 2
 fuck ya'll!!!
  • + 3
 all of ya'll??
  • + 2
 Snap into a SlimJim
  • + 1
 Stem looks great! Very clean.
  • + 1
 The Swiss like it when it`s clean, don`t you? Smile
  • + 1
 Why 6082 aluminium?
  • + 1
 leftovers? hah
  • + 1
 Its essentially the UK version of 6061.
  • + 0
 Looks like any other stems and pedals I've seen
  • + 3
 Might look it, but, as they say, the devils in the details. En16t axles along with 4 bushes and 2 bearings per side should mean they'll outlast most other pedals that aren't an inch thick.
  • + 1
 To an untrained eye , yes they do !

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