Opinion: What Would You Pay to Keep Air Inside Your Tires?

Nov 27, 2019
by Richard Cunningham  

Carson had an incredible run but ended abruptly when his tire bead blew off.
TECH
What Would You Pay to Keep
Air Inside Your Tires?


WORDS: R. Cunningham
Carson Storch poses with the anaconda that took him out of this year's Red Bull Rampage competition.


Bikes and riding styles have changed dramatically in the recent decade. Tires? Not so much. Look no further than the Maxxis Minion DHF and DHR II for proof of that. Minions have remained relatively unchanged since many riders were riding plastic tricycles. Today, improved geometry and enduro-ready suspension have bestowed super powers upon average trail riders, who now can straight-line chunder, survive jumps and maintain speeds that were once unimaginable. Tire technology, however, has fallen behind. This article explores the cost and weight penalties that modern riders shoulder in order to keep air inside their tires and their rims in one piece. It also suggests that there may be a better solution.


Flats on stage seven cost many riders precious time.
Frustration party: EWS racers fixing flats and damaged wheels between stages. Speeds and intensity made possible by the endurofication of the trail bike quickly eclipsed present tire technology.

What If?

Foam tire inserts, two-ply downhill tire casings, inner tubes that look like alien reproductive organs, and shock-absorbing rim liners all offer some level of additional protection and performance - which begs the question: What if you gave tire makers a performance improvement budget that included the equivalent weight and price increases of all those extras, could one of them produce the next super tire?

bigquotesLightweight bullet-proof vests, slice-proof Kevlar gloves and chainsaw-proof pants are common items. A puncture-proof tire seems like small potatoes by contrast.

Shouldn't be too much of a task. Lightweight bullet-proof vests, slice-proof Kevlar gloves and chainsaw-proof pants are common items. A puncture proof tire seems like small potatoes by contrast. Cush Core inserts weigh 250 grams each. That's a lot of material to work with for a designer who was actually serious about ending pinch flats and protecting rims. Then there's the extra padding to cover the costs of those improvements. Inserts cost around $75 USD each, and the up-charge from a trail bike tire to the DH version is another 20 bucks. You can see where I'm going with this.

Stage 7 was carnage with big crashes broken frames and punctures. When all was said and done three of the mornings top five riders were out of contention.
It might be better if flat tires stayed on their rims.


Apparently, Tire Brands Don't Think There's a Problem

Could tires be significantly improved? Two years ago, I initiated conversations with the major tire makers about the possibility of any new technologies, materials or construction techniques that could solve fundamental shortcomings that mountain bike riders have accepted as necessary evils. Sidewall slashes, pinch-flat shearing, bead separations, burping, bent rim flanges, and the litany of minor punctures that so often derail a ride or race. The answer then was a short-list of excuses. along with the assurance that tires are way better now than they were then. I'll paraphrase a few of them for you:
bigquotesWe have the technology to make a slash proof, puncture proof carcass, but it would be so expensive that nobody would buy it.

Ready
In Support of Tire Makers...

I've visited a few tire factories and can tell you that the steps required to make a good bicycle tire are many. The process is a mixture of steampunk and rocket science. Some of the machines are automated. Others are iron monstrosities from another era.

Experience is the gold standard in a rubber factory, where chemists in white lab coats share equal status with sage factory workers in dirty overalls. "No pictures, please." Secrecy is the code, because the key ingredient of a perfect tire could be anything from a modified chain of molecules, to finely ground walnut shells, or an eight-degree angle in the casing fabric.

Continental Tire factory

Welcome to heavy industry. Aromatic and hot, when the assembly line is in is full swing, wads of hot sticky stuff pop and bubble between massive rollers in the mixer; rubber and fabric are being sliced, squeezed and mated together; ribbons of tread roll overhead on pulleys towards the fabrication drums, where workers join the beads, casings and tread rubber in to a circle; then somehow, those featureless flat rolls emerge from pressurized, steaming-hot vulcanizing molds as finished tires, bristling with knobs, with all the hot patches neatly in place.

The presses at work.

I marvel that this process can produce such tight tolerances - tires that weight within ten grams of each other and bead diameters that must be held to a millimeter. It's clear that today's tires represent an accumulation of knowledge eked from 150 years of incremental evolution.

Images from Matt Wragg's Continental factory story.
bigquotesIt's purely a weight game. We begin with the standard single or dual-ply casing. The rest is how much rubber and protection layers you are willing to use to armor the casing and under-tread.

bigquotesWe have the world's best racers, as well as fifty chemists on our staff testing tires and giving us feedback. If there was a better way to make one, we'd know it by now.

Things are about to get rowdy here in Northstar
Cornering skills, speed and amplitude have increased by a magnitude in less than one decade.


Why Mess With Success?

At least for now, all three of the above statements ring true. If every tire maker (actual manufacturers, like Kenda, Maxxis, Schwalbe, Conti, Vittoria & Hutchinson) shares the same construction methods and materials, if the most popular tread patterns mirror the Minion's DNA, if they're winning races, and if riders and OEM customers are buying them up as delivered, then who's going to jump at the opportunity and risk seven figures to re-invent the mountain bike tire? Given that the sport's most influential riders grew up on a diet of Minion clones, there's also a good chance that, regardless of merit, any challenge to the status quo would be summarily dismissed. So, why bother?


Three Good Reasons to Redesign Tires

1 - Keeping air inside the tire: Tubeless has been the only significant leap in tire technology since the birth of the mountain bike. To make tubeless work, however, the tire casing must be air-tight, abrasion resistant and tear proof. Strange then, that only a handful of DH-rated dual-ply tires could earn better than a C plus in any of those categories. We expect punctures, slashed casings and abrasion tears. The tube and CO2 device taped to our frames broadcast our complacency.

Punctures in the tread area are uncommon, but lighter, faster-rolling single-ply tires are prone to fatal sidewall injuries. Adding a 250-gram insert can ward off pinch flat shearing, but can't guard against rips and abrasion damage. The popular fix is to take the 300-gram weight penalty and use dual-ply (DH) tires. Four layers of rubber and nylon side-wall fabric are better than two. The downside isn't just extra weight, it's the unwanted stiffness. Conventional dual-ply construction results in six layers of fabric under the tread, which creates a harsh ride and increases the tire's rolling resistance.

The Fix: Red Bull TV offers proof enough that adding more layers of nylon and rubber has not produced tires that can hold up to today's riders. Let's ditch all the layers and the fancy breaker strips completely, then resolve the durability and puncture
Vittoria tire designs two ply and single ply
The classic dual-ply DH tire casing (left) provides four layers of desirable side-wall protection, but results in six layers of unnecessary weight and stiffness under the tread. Replacing the nylon casing fabric of the single-ply tire (right) with a super-tough hybrid material could be the better solution. Vittoria images
issue with a truly slash and puncture proof casing material - good enough to carry a one year guarantee. Some hybrid of Kevlar and nylon comes to mind, but there are a handful of super-fiber options to choose from. I anticipate that such a fabric would be heavier and less supple than the existing nylon material, but the sum game would be to split the difference; gaining some extra lateral support in the casing sides, while maintaining the more flexible and faster rolling aspects of the single-ply tire in the crown area.

Cush Core in action
Cush Core inserts do not interfere with the tubeless tire's suppleness and instant response to small impacts.
Cush Core in action
Smack something big, and the insert dissipates the energy of that event across a wider section of the rim, and activates the suspension sooner. Cush Core images


2 - System integration: Grab some popcorn, because we'll be watching videos to clarify the importance of the next two improvements. Let's begin with the Cush Core effect. Arguably the most effective of the present crop of foam inserts, Adam Krefting's winged insert squeezes between the walls of the tire casing at full compression, which prevents the folds from contacting each other and causing the shearing damage we call pinch flats. Another benefit is that the insert cushions impacts that would normally damage the rim.

Cush Core's video duplicates Jo Klieber's slo-mo experiments, which suggest that suspension's action could be improved by altering the compression rate of the tire.

Cush Core's most dynamic contribution, however may be its influence on the suspension's action - an effect first identified by Syntace founder Jo Klieber, who also co-designed the Schwalbe ProCore system. Watch the Cush Core video and you'll see that, upon impact, the tire nearly compresses to the rim before the suspension begins to activate. Inserts assist the process by ramping up the tire's natural spring rate as the tire fully compresses, which kicks the suspension into gear a fraction of a second sooner, providing a more seamless transition. The penalty of all that goodness is 250 grams per wheel in a place where every gram of rotating weight can be felt. Could there be a way to integrate the benefits of an insert into the design of the tire itself?

The Fix: Changing the shape of the tire where it interfaces with the rim and incorporating a slow-memory cushion could integrate some of the benefits of closed cell foam inserts while eliminating most of their weight and complexity. The concept is not a new one. A number of mountain bike tires feature cushioned bead areas, but not to the extent I am suggesting here. Look to motocross racing tires. Their designers have incorporated a shelf-type bead cushion which could serve as a starting point to explore the concept.

tire story

Unlike Cush Core, a cushion molded into the tire's bead interface could not prevent the casing folds from direct contact. That said, the presumption that the tire maker will have used a tear-proof casing fabric would negate any pinch flat issues. The built-in cushion would buffer and disperse the energy of bottom-out and near-bottoming impacts across a larger portion of the rim, increasing its survivability, and to some degree, would also function to ramp up the compression rate of the tire to activate the suspension earlier and in a more controlled manner.


3 - Address the new school riding style: Beyond speed and amplitude, fundamental changes in geometry and riding technique have placed greater demands upon the tire's edging tread. Slack head tube angles force the rear wheel to follow the front. Add that to rider-forward cockpits and suddenly we're steering much more aggressively and loading up the front tire to the degree where riders are using the handlebars to force the rear wheel to comply.

There are plenty of hooning shredits on PB to illustrate that. The more interesting change to suggest we need a tire redesign is illustrated by this video from the Les Gets World Cup DH. Watch how Amaury Pierron races most of the course point to point. He waits to pressurize each turn until he's right at the apex, boom! and then almost skims the surface to the next corner.


The Fix: No secret. Tire designs that edge extremely well are quickly rising to prominence. Schwalbe's Magic Mary ruled supreme until competitors caught on. Maxxis' Assegai was heckled when it arrived, but nobody is laughing at it now. Take it to the next level. The unicorn that we need to progress now is a tire with crazy edging grip, but rolls fast and pedals efficiently when you stand it up. One suggestion is to ditch the six-layer crown casing for a more flexible crown tread. Another idea is to abandon the present light-bulb tire profile (which does not flex uniformly and requires a lot of reinforcement to stabilize it laterally) and try a lower profile with a more hemispherical shape.

It's not a stretch. MX front tires (front tires are always coasting, so the technology applies) are nearly hemispherical, assisted by the wider stance of their shouldered bead profiles. Back to cycling, road racing clinchers mounted to wider rims also create a near-hemispherical arc and roll significantly faster over rough pavement - and with more stability in high-pressure turns. May be worth a look.

Moments like these: Elliott Heap launches over the boulders at the Northstar EWS near Lake Tahoe, California.

How Much Will this Thing Cost?

Expensive, but not out of reach for enthusiast and elite-level riders. If such a tire debuted on PB today, it's doubtful that you'd be able to buy a pair for one or two years at any price. High development costs and lengthy timeframes are the norm for truly innovative tire concepts. Rubber is picky about the materials it will bond with, so selecting and proving a suitable super-fabric would require much laboratory time. Any type of stepped and cushioned bead would need to integrate with existing tubeless rims, or possibly require a modified rim with a locking bead. Sussing out the finer details of a high performance tire like this would be a racers-only work in progress until the patents were secured and the tire was earning podiums.

Thibaut Daprela had a scare last week when his bike got stolen here in Andorra but thankfully it was recovered.
Thibaut Daprela shows how it's done on the Andorra World Cup track. Today's tires may have pervasive issues, but they're pretty darn good.


Regardless of the cost to develop such a tire, its MSRP, weight and wear would have to reflect those of its conventional competitors. My guess is that number would hover close to $125 USD initially for the halo racing version, with more affordable models filling in later as OEMs put pressure on the manufacturer. That said, I'd still expect at least a 25-percent upcharge from existing premium tires.

The real value, beyond the promise of next-level cornering and survivability, would be additional cost and weight offsets due to the fact that you would not need to purchase inserts, nor bear the burden of riding a quarter inch thick rubber donut emblazoned with a DH hot patch to ensure you'll make it to the bottom of your next gravity run. And there's also the assurance that you'd be able to ride them until the fabric was showing. Realistically, I'd estimate the weight to split the difference between a sturdy trail-rated single-ply tire and a DH-rated dual-ply model. So, the target would be a DH/enduro race-winning tire that costs $125 USD and weighs 1000 grams.


Where Do We Go From Here?

I don't pretend to be a tire designer, but like you, I ride, so I feel I have a stake in the game. I also believe that it doesn't help to complain about the status quo unless you can suggest a different option. That's what this story was about - starting a dialogue that, hopefully, will inspire meaningful improvements.

This rekindling of the tire debate was inspired while riding, where I was pondering the recent leap in trail bike performance. Trail bikes evolved from cross-country, so it took 30 years of reluctant incremental evolution to get to 150 millimeters of travel and a head angle slacker than 69 degrees. Somewhere around that point, probably inspired by rudimentary enduro racing, downhillers started riding trail bikes en-masse.

It was gravity riders who wrestled the trail bike away from the stodgy XC mindset and magnetized its development to DH. Why not kick the head angle out to 65 degrees? Why not add 100mm to the reach? Why not pedal around with a coil shock? Why not ride a 180mm fork? Why not put dropper posts on everything that has knobby tires?

For a while, everything seemed possible. An average trail bike today is mental compared to a decade ago. Even pro XC racing benefitted from the influx of brash ideas. How then, did tire design miss that boat? Perhaps downhillers couldn't imagine a better tire could possibly exist. Bottom line: we'll never know how much faster or how much more fun a break-through tire design could be until someone makes one. So, the question is: "Why not?"
Cecile Ravanel punctured on both stages one and two - word is that her rim was some damaged that she had to beat it back into shape with a rock to keep her going until she could get to the tech area.
Cecile Ravanel repairs a mid-race puncture.

What it costs to keep air in your tires:

Maxxis Minion DHF 3C Maxx Grip 27.5 x 2.5
MSRP: $90
Weight: 1160g

Maxxis Minion DHR 3C Maxx Grip 27.5 x 2.5
MSRP $90
Weight: 1190g

Cush Core Pro inserts (pair, 27.5")
MSRP: $149
Weight: 250g

Stan's NoTubes Kit (pair 27.5)
MSRP: $64
Weight: apx.150g

Total MSRP: $393 USD
Total weight: 2750g





312 Comments

  • 398 21
 I must be doing something wrong because I haven't gotten a flat in literally years.
  • 35 1
 knock on wood
  • 53 3
 About 100 rides per year, between trail riding (dually and hard tail) and DH (propper DH bike), I'm at about 1 flat per year. I don't think that's worth any additional cash on top of the cost of tires and tubeless fluid... But I'm not racing, so maybe that likely plays a factor.
  • 76 21
 last time i checked, air is free
  • 32 10
 @goflowz: it’s not the cost of the air we’re talking about, it’s the cost of keeping it in your tires. And that is not free.
  • 12 0
 Same here, I ride with decent casing (DD or DH) and haven't got a flat in years despite 3 spins/week on average over the year. I can't ride flimsy tires simply because they fold or get super bouncy once pumped up so they don't fold during cornering. Bit of tubeless sealant and done.
Actually most of my troubles come from rim tape that gets soggy over time. Some real tubeless like Mavic used to do would solve that but their double nipple thing was not great.
  • 51 9
 I have’em coming in waves. Like mushrooms. Nothing for the most of the year and then suddenly they pop up one after another.
  • 18 2
 Was thinking the same thing; can't even remember last flat I got. Running basic tubless/no inserts.
  • 3 0
 For the first four or five years I rode tubeless, I didn't flat. I thought they were magic. I know better now.
  • 4 0
 I've had one in the past three years, and the only reason it happened was because I was experimenting with low tire pressures on my new mountain bike and hit a sharp edge. It was at around 18psi so it was totally my fault, but I was also looking for an excuse to upgrade the stock EXO casing High Rollers to 3C Minions, so I didn't mind one bit
  • 4 3
 that was me until I spent the summer riding sharper rocks this summer (Silverstar BC) and my Rock Razor just couldn't cope. Got one flat right at the top and had to much down on a tire that wouldn't hold more than 10psi (thanks for nothing, Stans). I was running hefty pressures, too, but the sharper rocks at higher speeds just cut right in. SUPER annoying..
  • 5 1
 @fullfacemike funny, thinking the same. And, when I do get flats it's because of my own stupidity that is the cause. 98% of the time I don't worry about flats
  • 4 1
 you will now have a flat almost every future ride you are going on when with friends.
  • 4 0
 Damn you just jinxed yourself
  • 6 0
 It just depends on where and what you are riding. I havent gotten a puncture since getting back to the soft dirt of the north shore but this summer i ripped 3 dh casing minion dhfs riding the oldschool rocky downhill race tracks at the camp fortune bikepark in quebec (i had cushcore in too). Very similar terrain to mont sainte anne where I watch countless riders walk bikes with flat tires down the track during the practice sessions at the world cup.
  • 13 1
 You don’t ride Bootleg Canyon...
  • 2 0
 @MTBCamerongoldy: @fullfacemike Knock on ROCKS (harder)
  • 4 0
 @WAKIdesigns: is everything mushrooms now?
  • 6 18
flag downcountry (Nov 27, 2019 at 16:16) (Below Threshold)
 You are riding trails too slow, you know them too well, or they are paved. Either way, I flat DH casing tires on my trail bike 2-3 per year.
  • 6 0
 I also have pretty good luck with tires. I find that keeping the Stan’s fresh helps. Also after about a season or so, (or whatever number of miles), the reality is it’s not just the tread that’s worn down. I find the casing and sidewalks get pretty worn, especially on the back tire. Keep the rubber fresh!
  • 18 1
 Line choice > tire casing
  • 4 0
 @bubbrubb: The secret is... you got to coordinate!
www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Zrgc2aocnM
  • 1 9
flag Hundin (Nov 27, 2019 at 17:04) (Below Threshold)
 @WAKIdesigns: that is just lame
  • 5 1
 I legit jinxed myself saying that last week. Lunch ride, guy in the group slices a sidewall. I proclaim “ive never sliced a sideway, must be line choice!” No sooner than I was back on the trail and there is it, first sliced sidewall. Karma, having her way with me, also had me lose my lever and multi-tool on a prior ride so I had to walk it home. First rule of flats, never talk about the lack of flats!
  • 3 2
 I was just about to say the same thing.. Even on my road bike with tubes, I get like one a year. Im not sure what people are doing to pinch flat a tubeless tire.
  • 1 0
 I'm 3 seasons in, no flats due to the environment. Had one that was my fault. A hot summer meant the sealant dried up. Running tubes before that, about 7 flats a year. I'm waiting for the jinx, btw. Taking its sweet time...
  • 1 0
 sounds like a case of genital warts
  • 2 0
 Last time i said that it took about two hours before i was putting a inner tube in my tire again while a bear was overseeing the process from about a 150m away... strange feeling...
  • 5 0
 you def must ride like a little bitch then! Wink JK JK
  • 2 0
 @downcountry: I'd say you run your tire pressure too low
  • 7 0
 @goflowz:
This!!!

The most important and beneficial improvement for no flat tires is riding adequate pressures. If you're a muscular /fat 200 lb force of nature you simply can't get away with low pressures of line perfect skinny 140 lb racers

IIRC there was a time one or two years ago when Sam Hill was winning one race after the other and he just didn't put inserts in simply correct pressures. Meanwhile Rude, Graves and others where dropping out of contention with lots of flats despite inserts and such.

If you're riding hard just put on DH pump up like Ratboy and don't compain about suppleness and rolling resistance. It's physics and no evil deliberate conspiracy from tire makers

PS.. Only 37 but felt like a boomer, ouch
  • 5 0
 Come and ride in Africa.
  • 1 4
 @bubbrubb: the teachers!
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Almost like its time to get new rubber haha
  • 2 1
 My mate got a flat last week and we were discussing how long it had been since we had a flat - probably 18 months. And we run Exo casings because you don't need anymore where we ride in the Surrey Hills. Maybe in the summer I would go up to an Exo+ casing if I am pushing hard or use Bonty SE tyres which seem really good.

I think it very much depends on where you ride (assuming we're all riding hard). If we rode more in Wales I am sure you will get more flats as its rocky.
  • 1 0
 Depends on what (terrain) and how you ride. I got 7 flats las year due to sharp rocky sections on my local trails, mostly sidewall tears. Added Cushcore and so far (knock on wood) none. I am willing to pay $125CDN for the assurance I won't be walking out..
  • 1 0
 What is this so called "flat" thing? haven't had much trouble since years. Mixing dh casing with lighter casing where it makes sense doesn't seem to be such a big trick, isn't it?
If I ever had a flat it was purely my own stupidity (low PSI, crashing or brute force)

rolling resistance is key
  • 1 0
 Minion DHF/DHRs Exos on NewMen i30 rims being snake-bite-free for three years running 19psi front/ 20psi back at 73kgs.
Had a few punctures but the Maxalamis are in there for month now and everything ist going smooth.

I have a friend of same weight and bike who can't go without 2ply DHI casings and will still flat every second ride...

must be purely luck
  • 1 0
 I’ve cut exactly one side wall in the last five years and the tire didn’t even go flat with tubeless tech. Still could ride it out. I don’t think its the “problem” they are trying to sell in this article. That said new tire improvements would still be welcome.
  • 1 0
 I did get one a month ago (after years) when a 10 cm nail somehow punched the side of the tire with two nice large entry and exit holes. I doubt anything would have guarded against that ...

Other than that no problems since I switched to tubeless about eight years ago, ... the industry is probably right, and the article actually does not really propose a solutions to the "problem" other than saying that "it" (the solution) would be expensive ...
  • 1 0
 @duzzi: I've been de-tubed and on my local smoother trails I've had two flats in like a decade, one from glass the other from a long nail that went right through the tire. Riding rockier gravity stuff I had 4 this year - same schwalbe tires and higher pressures. Sharp rocks, they just hurt.
  • 1 1
 @JesseE: I just figured out your 4 flat problem, you said Schwalbe. Lol
Maxxis... accept no substitutions.
  • 1 0
 @bubbrubb: Yep, just bought a Christmas beer from Rogue with mushrooms in it... :-P
  • 1 2
 @hlars12: you can make a Christmas brew from Amanita Muscaria and add it to some IPA or herb wine - you won't tell the difference in taste... Dry the shrooms in the oven for 170F for 40mins, then 5-10caps into water on rolling boil and add vinegar. 30 -45 mins. Or eat 2-3 caps right after drying. In 30-45 mins you will puke, but then after 2-3h you will start feeling good. Just no beer in that case. Panther Caps work too but careful with the dosage, cut it in half from Muscarias to not end up with repetetive motion syndrome like bumping your head into a closed door 87 times until your friends can no longer laugh due to their abs cramping.
  • 1 0
 I have just under 100 ride days in this season. Mainly squamish, then Pemberton, Whistler (not bike park) and Sunshine coast.

Zero flats , no inserts , tubeless (first half of season had a tube in the rear tire).

I use sensible pressures (23psi)
  • 1 1
 I'm running 26" magic Mary's I picked up for £30 like new and I use light weight tubes. Run them at 35psi and have plenty of traction and never get punctures. I tried tubeless and hated it, messy business and a major pain to work with apart from also lugging a trough of fluid around in each tire! I hear I'm not the only one reverting to tubes too!
  • 1 0
 @landscapeben: body weight/ tire pressure? DH/evo casing?
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: 190lb DH casing 35psi front and rear
  • 1 0
 @landscapeben: yes yes and yes!
  • 1 0
 I don't always flat, but when I do it's in a race run.
  • 1 0
 @downcountry: should probably start putting in enough air cause that shouldn't happen unless you f*ck up your line and smash into something
  • 1 0
 @shredb4dead: I know, I know, I know....
  • 116 0
 there's always air inside my tires - it's the pressure i'm having problems with.
  • 7 13
flag B650wagon (Nov 27, 2019 at 14:50) (Below Threshold)
 What kind of riding are you doing?

Cross Country, Trail, All Mountain, Downcountry, Enduro, or Downhill ?

Personally I’m waiting for a good Downmountain bike to come out, these other one’s don’t suit my riding style.
  • 6 1
 Some people just cant handle it.
  • 1 1
 People on streets Ee da de da de People on streets Ee da de da de da de da
  • 78 2
 "We have the technology to make a slash proof, puncture proof carcass, but it would be so expensive that nobody would buy it."

Let the Dentists be the judge of that
  • 73 1
 I mean there are people who buy an Enve air pressure station.
  • 1 0
 How much for some Fuji 9
  • 57 14
 At $120 CND for a Maxxis DHF, I’ll bet Maxxis is in no hurry to change up their money making formula. There is no incentive for tire companies to design a more durable tire which would undoubtedly reduce their sales numbers. Remember kids, a corporations sole reason for existence is not to provide a better product or service, but to provide a larger profit for its share holders.

Crucial complaint: how in the hell is it possible for the tires on my bike to cost more than the tires on my wife’s car??? Getting RIPPED OFF!
  • 48 0
 You could put the cheaper tires from your wife's car on your bike but it'll probably ride like shit.
  • 7 14
flag Golden-G (Nov 27, 2019 at 12:18) (Below Threshold)
 @fullfacemike: they’re Yokohamas. Not ‘cheap’ quality.
  • 106 1
 @Golden-G: My bad, they'll probably run just fine on your bike then.
  • 24 2
 Research: Economy of scale.
  • 12 0
 @Golden-G: your wifes car tires cost less than 120 a pop? Is she riding on 13’s?
  • 2 2
 @Golden-G my thoughts exactly .. .. i got 2x Onza for 40e on sales so don't mind it much . . ... but their normal price is just as much as 2x Uniroyal rain-tires for my ( ex ) car. .. . ...
  • 21 10
 @Golden-G A really expensive Minion DHF DH 3C Maxxgrip is possibly the best tire out there. It lasts less than a season. A really cheap OEM Minion DHF with 60 or maybe even 70a durometer is possibly worst long knobbed tire that I have ever tried. It will last years. There’s also Kenda and Nokian whom achieved the impossible: no grip and fast wearing...
  • 2 0
 my guy, save yourself some $$ and get your tires from Jenson, $70 CAD for a DHF
  • 4 0
 @arrowheadrush: TBS is a canadian retailer, usually offering the same price. I bought 4 of them for $63CAD + tax.
  • 4 0
 Stop buying tires at retail when you gotta have them now. Buy them on Black Friday for 50% off five at a time and put them in a sealed plastic bag in the closet. I use mylar.
  • 1 9
flag Golden-G (Nov 27, 2019 at 14:02) (Below Threshold)
 @JohanG: I don’t pay retail. Most people do.
  • 9 2
 You are comparing arguably the best MTB tyres money can buy (which the pros use while racing) to some everyday tires on your car? Have a look at what the best Auto tyres cost (the ones the pros use while racing) and then consider the amount of those that get sold vs MTB tyres.. Not such an extreme difference after all.
  • 9 1
 You can get a good look at a T bone by sticking your head up a cow's ass, but I'll take the butcher's word.
  • 3 0
 Comparing high end MTB tires to cheap car tires. Price out some Goodyear MTR-K 37x12.5x17 tires for a more apples to apples comparison. Or compare to motorcycle track day tires, where you'll burn through $400 of tires in a few hours.
  • 1 0
 I pay wholesale for tires and it still stings buying new ones when a front tire only lasts ~3 months. Frown
  • 34 8
 Is it possible that we simply expect too much from our bikes? Perhaps charging down the roughest line imaginable at mach chicken on our trail bikes is just inviting disaster. All the stories of broken frames, wheels, tires, etc are evidence of this. There is such a thing as finesse in mountain biking. It means being smooth and finding the smooth line not just pointing your bike straight down the rockiest chute on the mountain. Find a smoother line or slow down a little.
  • 17 1
 Why would you even say something like that? Who even are you? Slow down? Be smooth. Outrageous simply outrageous. Wink
  • 13 0
 ^This^
Without digging too much into the pro comparisons, have you noticed that some of the pro EWS riders seem to have fewer mechanicals? Smoother may not be faster all the time, but it's hard to win if you don't finish.
Riding smoother seems to have gone out of style, but it sure saves a lot of money on broken stuff...
  • 3 0
 its those guys that see a sharp rock as something to push off of and then theres the rest of us. im 200lbs and understand if I want my tires to stay on I need to pump em up more or ride lighter on my feet.
  • 20 1
 Thank you for your journalism, Mr. Cunningham! Your ideas and insights bring positive change, and freshness to our beloved sport, maybe more than any I have ever seen. From builder to journalist, your skill set is unique and we are lucky you are of obsessed with the beast we call a mountain bike!
  • 16 0
 At the suggestion (and supply) of a friend I've fixed punctures in a sidewall that a plug would not cover by stitching it back together with upholstery thread (Tough AF but thin) followed by a small super glue to cover them. It is not a mid race fix but can save some $$$ between tire purchases. Punctures to brand new tires are a real buzz kill. This does help.
  • 8 0
 RC car tire glue is even better than super glue. Yes, RC cars, as in at the hobby shop.
  • 1 0
 @JDFF: Thanks for that tip!
@banffowen: While I tend not to tear many casings, this is what I will do to get significantly more out of my investment if/when I do.
  • 2 0
 Park glueless patches work wonders as well if you can remove all traces of sealant. I have some tires with small rips right near the bead.
  • 2 0
 I just put a park tire patch on the inside of my tubeless. takes a minute to prep the surface but id rather do that than put a freaking tube in it and have to deal with it again later. my EXO maxterra minions usually end up with 4-10 patches before the tread is beat
  • 1 0
 Easier fix is to rubber cement a car tire patch over the cut from the inside. You can even use a small piece of sidewall from a old tire.
  • 3 0
 @acali: Yeah, tried that, I found the Park patches seem to take better near the bead (they're thinner) and are faster.
  • 21 5
 ”The Fix: No secret. Tire designs that edge extremely well are quickly rising to prominence”

Richard... Minion DHF and Highroller edge extremely well in most conditions since 2002... Magic Mary edges extremely well in softer conditions, it’s long and mud tire like knobs don’t bite into the hardpack that well. Assegai is not an edging tyre, it cannot be, it has no channel between side and center knobs. It shines where edging tires don’t - intermediate lean angles, it allows for more precision, it is very responsive, while it edges just ok, it makes chosing and holding lines an easier task. Where dhf forces you to Take lots of sharper turns, So called scalloping corners, Assegai draws nice smooth arcs. No wonder it is Greg Minnaars choice.
  • 2 0
 Accurate. Was thinking the same thing.
  • 6 0
 Unpopular opinion - DHR's > DHF's in almost every situation. I was offered a free DHF and didnt take it.
  • 3 4
 @Thustlewhumber: dhr2 is a highroller that doesn’t wear out after one day on the mountain. Excellent for schralping. Brakes very well but there is no transition from center to sides. It’s a tire for those who ride straight and then turn hard. It’s perfectly fine, just depends on your technique. I must say Assegai opened my eyes. It’s suddenly easier to setup for a turn or hit whatever you want to hit. Shines on off cambers.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: agree I really like Assegai in those situations
  • 16 3
 I destroy tires. DH casings from Maxxis or any other brand for that matter. Tried Cush Core and Huck Norris. Higher pressures. Double the recommended amount of stans or orange seal (plus like 4 other sealant brands). And I’m only 145 lbs. But I live in Arizona so we have some sharp rock gardens and long straightaways on trails I hit 30-35mph on regularly. I would say I go through a half a dozen sets of tires per year (it’s AZ so we can ride year round). Using dynaplugs currently but tried all the other brands of plugs too to try and save them. But usually my holes are too big to repair even with a few shoved in there. I’m so over flats and have now looked into running the Mr Wolf Smart Mousse once they come back in stock or Tannus Armour since it’s cheaper and lighter and easier to get in the USA. Anyone have any luck with either of those systems or any others, I am very curious?
  • 8 0
 Wowsa. I lived And rode in Phoenix for a decade, and while the terrain is brutal on equipment, your experience seems excessive. South Mountain? How many miles a year are you getting in? At six sets a year, you’re either riding a ton or seems like something else ain’t right!
  • 2 2
 @BiNARYBiKE: i probably only ride around 1250-1500 miles a year. Some south mountain but not a lot. It’s some of the harder packed trails on the north side of town with tons of baby head sized sharp rock gardens just sticking out of the ground so they are a solid hit to the tires as opposed to loose stuff deflecting out of the way. I even run an ElevenSix coil shock and a smashpot coil converted fox 36 hoping that might help deflect some energy. Maybe it helps a little but not much, on my 3rd set of tires since I built this bike up in late May. I’m actually trying the Michelin Wild Enduro’s F & R with no inserts and fingers crossed so far so good after 5ish rides. I know it’s only a few days a year compared to what I do here in town but I rarely if ever have tires issues at the bike parks (Colorado or Whistler). But in those 3-6 days a year I usually get over the past 15+ seasons I probably do as much downhill in those couple trips than I do all year back home.
  • 12 1
 Dang dude, you mash on bikes. We had 3 guys at Rampage riding these without flatting, so you should be in good shape. Pheonix has been one of our fastest growing markets, so I'm sure you'll dig it.
  • 7 1
 There are probably guys in your area that are both faster than you and don't have such issues. Maybe check them out to see what they are doing differently?
  • 42 1
 I'm going to level with you. If every piece of equipment you try fails then you might rule out equipment as the driving variable here.
  • 22 0
 Jesus dude...time for a different riding style perhaps?
  • 4 0
 @Tannus: Thx man. I will definitely be giving your product a try the next go around. I have high hopes. Plus I’m over the mess of sealant all over me an my bike every time I pop a tire ????
  • 6 1
 I´m using tannus myself, it works reasonably well, I managed to pinch flat tubolito tube on my first run with it but I was running something that I would classify as xc/light trail tire, was running less than optimal pressure and hit some large rock harder than I ever had almost causing me to go OTB-on geometron g16 so you know it was a good one lol,, only very slight dent on the rim said it did it´s job. The thing is, if you use thumb method to check your pressure you are likely to get pinch flat pretty fast, the tire feels hard enough with 5psi in it, weight it with the palm of your hand though and it will compress like it should at such a pressure. So my advice would be don´t use it with lower pressures than you would with tubeless, it won´t behave in the same way anyways as it supports the casing a lot more.
  • 3 0
 Dude you know that you can go around some of those larger rocks and cacti, right?
I'm 200lb riding Mormon, Javaline, National and Hawes regularly. My worst experience has been on Maxxis EXO & EXO+ and will never run those again. Only got 1 month out of each. The thing is if you are running too high a psi you may be making things worse because now your tires cant conform to the rocks or flex to not get a sidewall tear. Oh yeah and limit trail beers to only 2 or 3.
  • 2 0
 more air maybe? 28f/30r
  • 3 1
 I've been running the Tannus Armour inserts for several months. I got so confident that I didn't even carry a spare, no levers, pump, nothing. Then I decided it was a bit of a pig and tried the TUBOLITO tubes for a big weight savings. Unfortunately I meat head smashed a sharp rock from a 4 foot drop and flatted last night. I'm going to try it one more time. But the Tannus with regular light weight tubes is AWESOME if you're ok with taking a bit of a weight hit.
  • 3 0
 @hockeyg0d9: so which plugs do you like the most?
  • 3 3
 I have run the gambit of pressures and on 3 different width rims. As high as 30f&r on 21mm Easton Haven carbons. As low as 18f and 20r on 35mm Ibis carbons but didn’t like the squirming tho. Now I’m on Reynolds 30mm Carbon wheels on my Tracer and have settled at 24f and 26r with these new Michelin’s. They seem to have the grip I want without the squirm but still no audible rim strikes. As far as plugs I like the compact setup of the dynaplug racers the best probably. I ride with a lot of fast dudes that weigh a lot more than me and some on even lighter tire setups and they still don’t have the issues I have but again even tho they are fast I’m faster Wink If I hold back a little and cruise with them I don’t have the issues, it’s when I start to sprint away from them on the downhills when disaster strikes. But I can’t let them beat me and take my KOMs ya know.
  • 5 2
 Your tire usage rate seems about right for a strong rider doing that kind of mileage. Sorry bro. Gotta pay to play!
  • 2 0
 I ride about 2000 miles of single track in a season in south west CO, not uncommon to go through/destroy 3-5 rear tires a season. The rocks and hard pack def reduce life. I rode about the same miles when living in NY and would go through about 2 rear tires a season. Trail conditions make big impact. inserted NukeProof ARD’s this season and it has helped the tire life even tho I really wanted additional rim protection.
  • 1 0
 @hockeyg0d9: Good luck with those Wild Enduros; they're incredibly prone to punctures, and they hate loose, gravely dirt. I'm not impressed at all, as they've punctured 5 times over the course of a couple months, while I had 0 flats on Double Down DHFs throughout an entire year.
  • 5 0
 Alright. Well maybe I should just stop complaining and accept it as the price of admission. My wife does say I’m a big complainer and nothing is good enough Smile I’m definitely trying the tannus armour next tho. I’m not that concerned about weight otherwise I wouldn’t be running coil front and rear.
  • 3 0
 @hockeyg0d9: If you're in the Pheonix area, Archers Bikes in Mesa has a steady supply of Armour in stock. Go check em out
  • 3 0
 @hockeyg0d9: have you tried the new Stans plugs? they look promising. I will try out the Dynaplug racers for sure.
  • 1 0
 I would keep clear from Tannus. 2 runs on real terrain and 2 pinch flats a couple hundred yards in both times.....
  • 2 2
 I've had real problem with flat tires too, but it's recently improved a fair bit. Part of if was going with carbon rims, but a bigger part was to stop thinking I can ride the line I want regardless of what's in the way like I used to. I'm light as well, and would get sometimes 3 flats a day in WBP running 30psi front and 40psi rear (I was 140lbs at the time). Mavic 823's definitely contributed to the problem. While I still run high pressure (about 27/35), I try a lot harder to avoid sharp objects and get light when I don't want to avoid them, instead of just railing heavy through a rocky turn like it's a flow trail.

One day after getting 2 flats in WBP I was complaining while I was fixing it that I flat despite 30/40psi, and for the 3rd time that day someone suggested maybe I run too much pressure. So I thought, what the hell I'll try 22/32 like a normal person. First corner I got 2 flats and won a 2 hour walk.
  • 1 0
 195 or so pounds myself. Ride lots of chunky terrain in Colorado, NM, Utah, etc. Prone to hucking into janky sections of trial. Am a mixture of creative and cheap which has led me to do things like use automotive bead seal to make tubeless setups work better for me. Not too interested in products like Cush Core as a pocket of low pressure under the tread doesn’t suit my relatively slow but engaged style of riding. Have a generally hateful relationship with rear tires and wheels. BIG fan of Tannus in the back tire. Seems like a step backward, and the weight is noticeable when you are grinding out climbs to the good stuff. In the same token, they can ‘feel’ a bit slow rolling when you are chugging up smooth trail - or heaven forbid, road. With all that said, they have worked as advertised for me. Have been able to drop a few psi with regular tubes, and still ride generally recklessly in a place like Moab. Have kept an OEM exo+ Minnion alive long enough to trim up undercut side knobs, which is something I have never done before. I am satisfied with their product. Price is low enough to try without feeling attached. Will buy again.
  • 1 0
 I have loved running tannus. Switched too it from cushcore after flatting with cushcore 3 times this season. Although imo cushcore feels better than tannus, not enough to warrant the cost for new tires. Tannus also ends up being quite heavy so if that matters get it in mind.
  • 1 0
 I used to destroy tires, but since running cush core I've only flatted twice in the last year, and both times it re-sealed on trail. What are you doing?!
  • 1 0
 I also live in Arizona and have punctured, sliced, and warped every Maxxis Exo tire that I have ridden. Will your product help with sidewalk cuts and punctures and if so, how does it do it? @Tannus:
  • 1 0
 @hockeyg0d9: I do think some of it is pressures-- you pretty much have to run lower pressure in AZ (live in Flag) with the huge differences in precip. June is moondust everywhere & pretty much until now this year.
  • 1 0
 Live in Tucson. Ride brutally rocky trails like milagrosa and agua caliente on a weekly basis, but I don't destroy tires at that rate. I run a maxxis DD casing in the back and and exo+ casing in the front, both tires with cushcore. Yes, the tires wear quickly, but to be cutting that many tires a year seems like a lot. Way too much.
  • 1 0
 @hockeyg0d9: problem might be stiff carbon rims that put more stress in your tires. Try some 30 or 35 mm Newmen aluminum rims.
  • 16 2
 The answer for me is $10 for tubes I ride a hardtail with tubes and flat 1 time a season and put another tube in. Cue the downvotes for being behind the times. But it works
  • 2 0
 When I use quality, non-weight weenie tires I can go months without seeing any evidence of sealant fixing a hole. I bet tubes would work fine for me, too.
  • 2 0
 Bruh, having been in freeride for 20 years ensured that I could give a rip about how much my bike weighs, so I run DH tubes and I never get flats. Props to tubes
  • 2 0
 @JohanG: 100% and no selant to worry about drying up and needing cleaned or replaced and if you do flat no mess either.
  • 2 0
 @preach: oops double post. I also run dh tubes and never felt my tires squirming or rolling and no tire burping. Simple and effective
  • 1 0
 Depending on what/where you are riding, Cush Core in the rear of a hardtail allows to run lower pressure and maintain sidewall support. Saves rims and smooths out the bumps too. Really depends on what type of riding you are doing though.
  • 1 0
 @JDFF: I live in colorado springs we have some mellow trails. A lot of really chunky trails and some fun dh runs on motorcycle trails. We even just got our first dh only jump trail. 99% of what I ride is natural. I tried a rental bike with cushcore. I didnt like the feel of a muted trail. I am also only 30 but was racing grade school xc at age 9 so I have been biking a long time and maybe I am just stuck in my ways. GET OFF MY LAWN. damn kids.....lol
  • 17 3
 What it really costs to keep air in your tires:
More pressure
MSRP: 0$
Weight: 0g (i know not scientifically correct)
  • 7 3
 Wrong. That’s the cost of the air. Not the cost of keeping it in your tire.
  • 6 1
 @BiNARYBiKE: But it's not "wrong". In many conditions/terrain, extra pressure greatly reduces the likelihood of flatting. It may not help in all cases, but that doesn't make him wrong.
  • 3 0
 True. But the sweet, sweet riding characteristics of lower pressures is worth the risk to me.
  • 1 0
 @mtbracken: I destroy rims long before I flat any tire. Can't go lower than 27 psi in the rear...
  • 3 0
 @jzPV: How do you destroy a rim without flatting? Nearly every time I've killed a rim, I flatted too. A lot of variables, I guess.
  • 1 0
 @mtbracken: I've never exploded a rim, it's just pretty wobbly and has multiple massive dents that complicate the tubeless setup. So to keep my rim straight, I have to be at 27 psi.
  • 10 0
 Tires are disposable, because we seek ultimate traction and soft sticky compounds dont last forever. It does not make sense to create a more expensive disposable tire. However it does make sense to pursue new technologies that may be in the form of an insert or tube, that would reduce flats. Currently Cush Core has found an excellent solution. Only thing that could be improved is to maintain performance, but reduce weight. Currently the weight penalty isnt a deal breaker for those that truly benefit from Cush Core.
  • 3 0
 This exactly. I'm all in on improvements that let me run lower pressure or reduce my flat risk, but only if they remain detached from the rolling surface that needs to be replaced occasionally.
  • 11 4
 What a crock. How hard is it to really change a flat every year or two? We don't need rip-off racer technology. Occasionally, someone gets a flat. We all heckle our friend as they fumble to fix it, take a breather, tell a few jokes, and get back to riding. This is about riding----not spending.
  • 8 2
 Elon Musk & Al Gore are developing a tyre that will never puncture whatever you throw at it. Made from a super secret blend of natural rubbers, Nepalese Alpaca hair, discarded political will & pulverised tax dollars; all infused with Solar Captured Uranium Dust (SCUDtech™️) allowing your E-bike battery to utilise Photon Infused Solar Silicon technology (PISStech™️). It will be 110% Carbon Reducing Anti Pollution construction (CRAPcon™️) which captures excess global carbon dioxide & converts it avacardos enabling you so offset smugness as you push around the trails with a full battery & fanny pack of healthy snacks.

The "Scuzzlebutt" will not be available to purchase in a range of non-sizes.
  • 6 1
 It always been and always will be a game of give and take. Cars and motorbikes are around for 4 times the history of our sport and still haven't come across nothing better than air to out inside the tires,ir discovered anything better than rubber to make them out of.
  • 5 0
 I call hogwash that they have the tech but it’s too expensive. Obviously no one in any industry has been able to figure out a legitimately better solution than rim, tire, and air. And with all the advancements made in tech these days, it says a lot to recognize that nothing beats the versatility and feel of pneumatic tires. But maybe one day someone will come up with something that weighs the same, can be adjusted for feel, and doesn’t degrade. And we’ll put that in our tires instead of air. I would pay a lot of money for that. And I rarely get flats, but to eliminate tubeless sealant, leaks, seating tires... that would be amazing.
  • 1 0
 non-pneumatic tires are realistically the next jump in solution, but you're right - they, among other solutions, either can't be adjusted for effective pressure (feel), aren't durable enough, or weigh significantly, more. It comes down to tradeoffs, and fully airless just isn't quite there yet. Or any of the other alternatives to rim, tire, and air that is.
  • 6 0
 I don't see myself spending much more on tires. I already wait for them to be on sale, and I buy the cheapest version of what I want. So far I've been pretty happy.
  • 7 0
 Im just gonna put this here...

tannusamerica.com/pages/tannus-armour
  • 5 0
 You’re hired.
  • 19 0
 You're hired.
  • 3 0
 300g + tube per wheel for 27.5. Def a downhill specific product.
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: honestly tho would you feel the difference? Its just complete piece of mind
  • 2 0
 @Bloop88: I already have complete peace of mind. I've only had one flat in five years of riding and I was able to get back riding with a tube. The new Stans tubeless fix kit looks like the end of my tube carrying as well.
  • 2 0
 @JohanG: Thats fair, i think it's still a great solution, as it also offers side wall protection. If ur riding tubeless and get a slash on the side, no fix kit or tube in some cases will work.
  • 4 0
 @Tannus: when do i start?
  • 1 0
 @Bloop88: tubeless with with a rimpact is lighter and works better because it'll seal a nail hole!
  • 1 0
 @rockchomper: I think just tubeless sealant would seal a nail hole, but i cant see Rimpact protecting the side wall of the tire still...
  • 1 0
 @Bloop88: ya no sidewall protection but DD maxxis do a fair job and if I slash a tire I generally sew it up then using a piece of cut tube and rubber cement cover the threads and BAM done! that said it aint a race run fix.
  • 10 6
 Tire makers: We have fifty chemists working on materials.
Richard Cunningham pouts out his lower lip: We simply need better materials, such an easy problem, why isn't it happening? waaaaaaa
  • 2 0
 Not a tyre expert here, but I wouldn't be surprised if most of the seemingly "simple" suggestions Richard makes here would make the current manufacturing process impossible or at least require a good deal of new tooling and machines
  • 4 0
 @Arierep: background in tire design myself - it's not so much that his suggestions are a manufacturing issue, but rather that they create a lot of other tradeoffs. Believe me this is the case of ANY tire, any intended market (car, truck, airplane, etc). Manufacturers are truly at the reasonable limits of the materials, if there was a magic solution to any of the performance characteristics of a tire without tradeoff, it would long since have been implemented. New, better materials and construction methods are still very much being researched, but like any technology these days, gains are becoming more incremental.
  • 5 0
 @klondike08: No, I think you missed the point of the article. If those scientists would just try harder and maybe sprinkle some magical pixie dust on their test fixtures they could finally solve all my problems.
  • 3 0
 Usually love RC's stuff, but I think tires have never been better. In fact, I think that's been the most notable parts improvement. I haven't flatted DH or Trail in years. And every wet weather ride over logs and slick rocks I am reminded of how, just a decade ago I'd be praying my fire xc pro's pumped up tp 40 psi didn't suddenly shoot sideways--now, I don't even think about or make any major adjustments went riding through once wet and treacherous terrain. Love the Assegai, just wish I knew how to pronounce it...without getting school boy giggles from the crew.
  • 5 0
 I'm super impressed with this article. Lots of information, well researched and written, and some interesting ideas. This is the kind of content I like on PB!
  • 3 0
 $100 per tire (as compared to my current favorite combo of XR4/XR3) and 25 or 30 grams. Wallet ready.

On a similar topic, I'd cheerfully pay $200 for a chain that never needed lube, and lasted longer, and added minimal additional drag.

Happy Turkey Day, Richard!
  • 3 0
 I feel like a Tyre company is as motivated to create a 'puncture-proof tyre' as a Pharmaceutical company is to curing illness. They don't want to cure anything, they want to manage symptoms and extract ongoing fees. That may sound jaded, but thats the world I think we have created for ourselves.
  • 3 0
 Loads of people dotn have problems with flats because we use stans and inserts. that kind of the point you Pay a lot for a "DH" tyre that could flat then we put in stans and then a insert to deal with that. So on my MX bike it's £59 for a Pirelli or Michelin MX tyre, not liquid and no insert. On my Enduro bike its £65 for a maxxis then £4 stans and £30 insert??? Why. if it was weight then i woudl like aset up where i dotn need a insert and liquid int here they all add to the weight and cost. Wheel for wheel MTB tyre cost more that MX with or without all the other crap. Just stick 100-200g of rubber & foam on the tyre and ditch all the other crap!!!
  • 6 0
 Saving my money for a coil conversion.
  • 2 0
 How about not having to put more air into tubeless tires after they sit in your garage for two weeks!!!.. I rarely puncture my tires.. My flats are either flat when I pull it out of the garage or I burp my tires in corners.
  • 2 0
 I still find it incredible that at top level with all the focus on suspension setup, bike design, computer systems feeding back infomation, amazing as it is, racers are still getting flats on race runs , full foam inserts ,no air, you can have different densitys dependending on the track, its being used in moto x , if you can invent something 100 per cent dependable for wc riders you are gonna be a very rich, man or woman
  • 2 0
 I think this is a great thought exercise and there is some room for improvement. With that said I also think tires are very very good these days. For the weight and what we ask of them they are impressive. I agree with tire manufacturers responses. More durable and you are adding weight and or expense and these are a disposable item which are already fairly pricey. Expecting a LOT more I think comes from a lack of understanding of what's going on and or misplaced expectations. For one I think many folks run tires that are too light and thin and expect them to never fail. Secondly, grippy tires wear quickly - the price will always be a concern for most. These days to be honest I usually wear a tire out before a failure occurs. I think it's fantasy to expect a tire could be conceived that never fails under any conditions -that performs in a way we find acceptable from a traction standpoint. My big gripe ? I want a a tubeless tire that doesn't require sealant and never weeps if you do put in in there.
  • 6 4
 What it costs to keep air in your tires:

Enduro bike: Maxxis DHF/ SS DH casing 70€ each. 2 tubes 7$ each. 144$...
Down Country bike: Front: Maxxis DHF Exo 3C, Maxx terra, huck norris, 50ml race sealant, rear: Maxxis Aggressor Exo+, dual, cushcore, 100ml standard sealant, Epstein didn’t kill himself
  • 2 0
 hardly any mention of procorem no mention in overview of technoligies- what the heck!?
weight of procore is about 200g per tire. cushcore is 250-290 and is less durable or protective than cushcore.
i cut, pinche puncture and burped and ruined rims frequently before procore running the same types of agressive single ply tires. with procroe only ruined one tire in 3 years and zero rims; when i take procore out i ruin more tires.
as stated the ramp up of tire pressure and volume is hugely important. you can run lower starting pressure and it doesnt hit rim before activiating suspension.

running a good tire insert allows for lighter weight tires to be used and should allow lighter more compliant rims to be used.
a single ply tire and procore weighs less than no insert with a dh casing, much much less than an hd casing and foam tire insert.
  • 4 2
 Whenever i puncture on my xc or enduro bike, i am dissapointed about my riding and not the actual tyres. Some people always puncture and they shoud stop bitching about tyres and ride smother and learn better riding style/techniqe.
  • 2 0
 It’s not flats that happen that often, it’s denting/flat spotting my rim that’s annoying. This is with running 28-30lb on maxxis minion tires. Reality is it’s usually a bad line or a rock I just didn’t see that caused the ding. Riding aggressively it just happens...
  • 2 0
 Tire reliability isn't a question of capability... it's a question of desire. No tire company actually wants to completely eliminate premature failures from punctures because those failures result in you buying more of their products. It's like the big knock on pharmaceutical companies, there's more money in treatment than there is in cures. They 'cure' the issue and charge you twice as much for a tire that wouldn't puncture and still rode great, and even lasted twice as long... but they'd be eating into the own profit margins to do it so there's no incentive. They'd rather keep 'treating' the issue by selling you new tires every time one punctures.
  • 2 0
 This past dh season I ran through 4 tires due to flats. I raced about 6 races over the summer. I was running dh casing for 2 of the flats. Then dh casing with huck Norris for the other 2. Said screw it and bought a set of Cush cores and ran them with double down casing. Didn’t have a flat the rest of the year, and I could hear the Cush core save me on several occasions with hard rock impacts. So I guess my answer is, I’m willing to spend as much as Cush core costs. It has worked magic and I’ll now be running them on my trail bike. Was always skeptical, but now I’m a believer. Lol
  • 2 0
 I bought in to the Cush Core hype train. I’m off it now. The pressure of the tight fit of the Cush Core on the rim was playing havoc with my spoke tension. The suggested drop of 5 psi ended up being fairly accurate, however, having to true wheels that were freshly built by a pro wheel builder every 3-4 dh days was just ridiculous. I still bent a rim without a noticeable ping rock strike sound.
  • 2 0
 Nice article. I run tubes on my bike, but I also run heavy duty tubes sliced open and put the normal tubes inside, the weight penalty is insignificant cause I don't get flats and it actually acts as a protector, and also I'm 6'1, 215lb and my legs are really strong, so I care less about weight, if anything more weight makes you stronger. Also I feel it balances the bike more even on jumps. I have dt swiss m1700 spline 2, schwalbe MM's and it feels so good on downhills.
  • 2 0
 The problem isn't flats for me, I ride pretty gnarly stuff on exo casing tires and haven't had a flat in several years. What I do have a problem with is burping tires, denting rims, and wearing out tires. Maybe just me, but why do we need more expensive tires and new standards that won't solve the bigger problems?
  • 2 0
 I love the idea that things are moving on, then an example with a Minion DHF, a 16 year old tyre!
Pretty sure the dual ply version has not really changed since then, yes we saw the demise of slow reezy then 3C to replace it (3C is pretty pants IMO) and an additional wee bit added to the diameter, but the DHF is still one of the best tyres out there for rolling speed and grip.

www.pinkbike.com/news/article1130.html
  • 2 0
 Tires are a pretty disposable item to be increasing the cost of them significantly. I don't puncture often, but I do wear them out pretty thoroughly in just a few weeks of riding.
Inserts and the technology surrounding them continuing to improve is the future of MTB tire performance.
I really like Tubolight inserts currently just wish they'd add some sort of elastic band to keep them from rattling/ rotating once they are aired up and compress as a result.
Certainly I like the idea of some sort of closed cell rubber tire with no pneumatics, but I don't know how you would keep it on the rim.
Also they should sell a special tool for breaking the bead and removing tires after using one of these inserts so I didn't have to weld my own up.
As far as you guys that slash tires constantly, there's a lot of riding technique that you can improve that situation with. Used to slash tires constantly when I was a slow novice, now I'm much faster in sharp terrain and rarely hurt a tire outside of just tearing off a knob.
  • 3 0
 Michelin Wild Enduro F&R £45 each
Stan's fluid £3 per tyre
Valves £10 pair
Gorilla tape £3 roll
£106.
With less weight.
  • 2 0
 Yep. What flats?
  • 2 0
 Im with you, but gorilla tape is garbage. Leaves so much shit on your rim when you replace tape.
  • 1 0
 @pargolf8: Agreed. Wish I knew that the first time someone recommended it. Others have since recommended electrical tape.
  • 1 0
 @pargolf8: Kerosene/mineral spirit remove the gorilla tape residue very easily. The electrical tape I tried was too weak and burst into the spoke holes, but this may depend on the brand.
  • 1 0
 @pargolf8: Why replace a Gorilla tape? It lasts forever.
  • 2 0
 I run heavy old school 2.7 nevegals and full dh tubes. I've only gotten 1 pinch flat in 2 years and that was because I didn't check my air pressure before riding a rocky technical trail.
  • 1 4
 Kenda makes some of the greatest MTB tyres.
  • 1 0
 I ahve pretty good luck, few flats even when I deserve it. I flatted a bunch of Bontragger tires last year, so I don't ride them anymore. Maxxis has been good for me as long as I ride 60tpi and EXO. Schwalbe has also been good, but I ride their heavier casings too.' Honestly, I don't flat that often, even when I trash a rim my tires have stayed intact and inflated. I'm good.
  • 1 0
 I do agree we should be taking hints from the moto industry (somewhat)! A bigger issue I have than tire problems would be scratched and dented stanchions! I think stanchion guards would sell very well. If the DVO emerald didn't weight so much and wasnt so flexy, id run that purely off the fork guards. Nothing ruins a ride like a scarred stanchion! just really puts you in a bad mood!
  • 5 0
 They should try first to produce Tires that run true
  • 1 0
 Hahahah good point
  • 1 0
 The first ust tires did have a weak side wall in contact with the rims ,some cuts it will produce ,but the new tubeless ready are getting very good ,I was in love with the ust thing in the first try ,it was 2004 and before that it was punctures almost every time of no reason ,for me ust is a thing for life ,I’m not a pro or even an amateur but the ust thing is just the most amazing thing and with the tire plugs for the punctures that the liquid can’t solve ,I don’t see any draw backs ,even if you break a spoke it doesn’t leak like using a ust rim tape ,the only disadvantage is burping and that will sometimes occasionally happens,but in the end come on it is unbeatable
  • 1 0
 If this is an opinion, why does the opinionator have the opinion he does? This seems less like an opinion and more like „we can make better tires but they expensive“

Im shitfaced af right now and missed my apartment door but neither does richerd comingham (not the apartment door)

I should not write this comment
  • 2 1
 A few weeks ago I had one of the best runs of my life until I burped a rear tire. I thought I'd never burp a tire since I'm about a buck fifty with gear on, but the trail had some sharp-edged rocks that I was plowing through (Nursery in Murrieta, CA) I was running something like 16psi front and 18psi rear. My traction was like velcro, but the feature I liked the best was having the tires absorb the rock hits which maintained my speed. Tires were Minion DHF/DHR 2.3, EXO and TR. I'm now back to running 20 front and 23 rear, but I'd love to go back to those lower numbers if I can do something to prevent burping out. I guess those inserts might be the ticket, but they're heavy. I wonder if the old UST system would've worked.
  • 1 0
 How is it physically possible to run less than 20 psi on exo casing tires with no inserts and not get insane punctures and tire roll
  • 3 0
 I hate it when my rubbers pop. I'll gladly pay way more to ensure my rubbers don't burst and I never have any accidents. The aftermath can be way more expensive.
  • 1 0
 it depends on the course, rocky terrain just destroys tires, no matter which you will choose, comparing to the dirt;

I do have puncture once in while, however I do puncture car tires too;
I would not say it is expected however it not something I would bother too much, modern tires + sealant does good job of keeping me on track;
  • 1 0
 So if one of these unicorn tires costs $50 bucks more than what we have now, but the rubber wears out as fast as what we have now....what’s the point of this article then? Over the long haul, cushcore makes more sense then right?
  • 1 0
 I rode whistler 45 days this year and never got one flat. I rode my dh casing tires till they were bald. Make sure you have enough rim tape so the tire fits super tight and have 3-4oz of tire milk inside. 40ish psi and you are golden
  • 1 0
 I thought Enve's M-series rims with larger radii on a wide, hookless bead was supposed to make a big difference in reducing pinch flats (and also increasing rim strength?). Did that pan out? Seems like it'd work for aluminum rims as well.
  • 1 0
 Shut up and ride! First world problems bitches....breaking stuff to try new more expensive or less expensive, blah,blah,blah. There are more expensive sports and hobbies out there but we enjoy riding mans most noble invention and within our own price point. Pay to play! Life is short!
  • 1 0
 I'm much more willing to invest more money in a durable (not so disposable) product to keep air in and protect my rims than some super tire that doesn't need much else but where I'll still dispose of that super tech (carcass and tire bead) because the knobs are worn off. So I'd rather get tire inserts than a more expensive tire that doesn't need that. I'm pretty happy with ProCore (just get rid of their funky tube, replace it with a regular tube and drill a second hole for a Pepi-type valve to inflate the outer chamber) and am looking into using Tannus with a regular tube to see how that works out. Sure for pro racers who travel the world, employ a support team etc for that 5 minute race run, spending that bit extra on a tire that would save your race run makes perfect sense. But for a recreational rider like me, saving weight is pointless. I'm out there to waste my energy, not to preserve it. If it takes a bit more weight to keep me rolling then that's fine with me.
  • 1 0
 tyres are funny things. people seem to be able to get different levels of grip from different tyres from person to person.
It depends how you treat them i guess! leaning them over and loading up side walls and side knobs, vs keeping the main tread on a suitable perpendicular surface in turns (finding little berms).
I never had an issue with Race kings, which are infamously skinny and bare. having said that, these days i push more aggressive knobs a bit harder in sloppier conditions.

i dont tend to get punctures though.

Gorilla tape tubeless and Schwalbe tyres
  • 2 0
 I typically don't get a lot of flats. Even before I went tubeless I didn't. I go fast & ride gnarly stuff too. I think at least some of the reason for it is I pick my lines like I'm riding a late 80's ridged bike.
  • 1 0
 So many factors to consider. Probably the most important is matching the tire for the ride. XC rides on smoother trails light tires with thinner sidewalls and higher PSI. More chunk thicker rubber. Boomer alert.... I stared riding in the late 80’ on rigid bikes so picking good lines comes 2nd nature. Today my bikes range from a rigid SS to trail / enduro so picking lines ( rigid SS) is super important.

Two weeks ago I damaged a sidewall on my FS XC bike riding through some shale (made it home before I noticed the slice....thanks Stans!). Really should have picked a better tire for that trail.
  • 1 0
 Riding on "correct" terrain, I flat with Dualply and 400grm tubes with Notubes inside it and over 35psi at the back (85kg)
On the other hand, on "normal" trails, I do have some flats, but have reduced significantly since I started using Procore.

Procore is great avoiding pintch flats, but on not pierce punchures... something I need to live with.... unless I start riding EBIKES, I won't be using +1500grm system on any MTB
  • 1 0
 I dunno..Lots of people talk about the Manufacturers not wanting to change things up because they profit more but all things aside lets face it...a huge number of tires "age out" before they're even worn treadwise. The sidewalls get worn inside and out, the material breaks down, and the sealant use is "wrong"...not enough or not changed often enough etc.. Would a Super Tire change that?
Delicate balance for tire makers, OE supplying is important...also people bitch that they make too many options etc. they cant stop making those and stay profitable and spend on R/D, sponsorships, ads too.
Don't get me wrong, I want this tire and all it's benefits and I will pay the higher price...Just like I did on all the high end build, full carbon bikes over the years....and not because I'm a dentist (high suicide rate) but because I love to ride.
Funny how over the years RC brings these things up and waddya know..they change.
  • 1 0
 Do any forms of motorsport have truly puncture proof tires where there would undoubtedly be an advantage to them? Air works well to absorb impacts and promote traction. You could do it but there would certainly be shortcomings as with any give and take. I guess eventually you start running out of things to write articles about..
  • 1 0
 I think most people completely missed the point of this article. It's not about how good today's tire technology is but about how it could be better. Richard, this was an incredible read. Great work! And no I haven't had a flat in years, change my sealant regularly and enjoy the ride, but..... what's wrong about making it better.
  • 1 0
 One thing that wasn´t mention but should also be adressed:
1. I prefer tubeless tires over tubes mostly for pinchflat resistance and the ability to run my preferred combo of 1,6-1,8 bars front and 1,8-2,0bars back.
2. When I start the season in austria it´s typically march to april. Then i mount my (tubeless) tire system and I run it for the rest of the year, unless...
3. I exceed the lifetime of a tire (can be adressed by putting on a new one), destroy it beyond repair (block get´s torn out, or it get´s sliced - seldom), change a spoke or, and this is mostly the case, i have the desire to change the tyre. In order to experiment with a new one, or because riding conditions (or the cruel mindgame of racing) force me to it.
4. And then I have to destroy the whole tubeless system. (valve, rimstrip, tubeless fluid) And start all over again.

I´ve done this now for years, but as I get older and more lazy and my available spare time get´s more prescious and i´d rather spend it riding not fixing i recently started to ride tubes again, and cary a spare one with me.

I would like to have a tire that checks all of the above mentioned, and then then the painfull tubeless mess when tire changing,
  • 5 0
 $1 Bob.
  • 3 0
 Evo Schwalbe or Exo maxxis casing & stand fluid .. haven't had a flat in at least 4 years
  • 10 5
 If you haven’t flatted Schwalbe Evo for more than3 rides, the Imperial College would love to invite you for the a series of experiments in hope to solve the mystery of dark energy
  • 1 3
 @WAKIdesigns: Keep quiet man, just cause you don't like Schwalbe, doesn't mean they're bad, they make the best bicycle tyres in the world. So stop doing what you're doing if you can't provide evidence, pople are trying to inform themselves, you hater. Maxxis is nothing outside of the downhill biking.
  • 3 3
 @8088yl0n: I love selected Schwalbe tires for selected conditions. Rockrazor SG is my favorite semi slick and Magic Mary is my favorite gloop tyre. Schwalbe also makes excellent ebike tires. There is no going around the fact that evo casings are not good for anything else than XC. I punctured last crap out of them.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: must be the way you ride mate
  • 1 2
 @savmeister: almost everybody rides mate. Ask whoever you want. Doesn’t work for anyone who is at least a bit fast. I could ride with Schwabes in 2010, then I learned to ride...
  • 2 0
 @WAKIdesigns: man u could not ride until 2010 -only one word "noob". Dont bother to ask since when or if i can ride -i still, or even more suck. There are pictures of a 2000 wc qualirun and my 3rd place bavarian champs run from 2009 (over 30) though.

on a more serious note evos are weak but for tamer terrain without sharp rocks they can work ok at least with inserts. they were on my 2019 bike and i rode them 4 months, i did not puncture once but dinged up my backwheel and rolled em off once.

I had em also as fronttire in the 2018 winter (with cushcore) and despite beeing out quite often i only punctured once (hitting a big sharp rock headon while sprinting and not judging the distance right, a thicker tire would have survived the fork bottomed out so it was a pretty big hit).

So for most people they are ok and they are stupidly light and fast rolling ( i know you disagree). They are just trailtires for tamer terrain, the mm sg are pretty dope in winter and they dont get hard as glass in the winter like my dhf maxxgrip.

I obviously lost track in what i wanted to say but i ll submit it anyways.
  • 2 2
 @optimumnotmaximum: In Sweden, Norway and mountains of Poland you’ll fk up evos in a pletheora of ways. First you can just cut them, then you can just puncture them beyond repair with tire plug, finally you can rip the knob off. The reason for that is very simple, they have little tubber on the casing that is why they are so damn light. Look no further than Specialized and Continental that do exact same thing with same results, except both contis and specs are additionaly easier to warp. Maxxis and Bontrager keep reasonable amount of rubber on the casing that is why they are heavy(ier) and transalpers don’t like them. Do they like anything else than Thunder Burts or Vittorias anyways?

There is no defending it. And if you say, I use them with insert, that’s like saying Carbon rims make sense since we invented inserts. Hell yeah, instead of using durable casings and rims people use shitty casings with inserts.

I don’t know how tame a trail would have to be to make it ok to run vo schwalbes on anything else than XC bike. We haven’t even started talking about how shitty are knob patterns on Rons, Nics and dampfs. Just don’t tell me they are fine on the rear, anything is fine on the rear, even Kenda
  • 1 1
 @WAKIdesigns: i will in no way advocate for the superiority of schwalbe tires. they dont even have a propper fronttire for the summer. the dirt around here has alot of clay in it, in the summer the trails feel like streets with a dustlayer, good luck with the magic mary. in general i would not ride any other schwalbe tire than the mm in the woods.In the back hd sg is pretty ok as its tough and rolls fast (sorry mate).

i remember my point now, given the speed and terain most people ride they are not as bad as your comments suggest. if you are fast on the downs or at least try to be evo is not for you. (actually my biggest issue with them is that i have to run more than 35psi to not fold them over in the summer)
  • 1 1
 @WAKIdesigns: like I said must be the WAY you ride
  • 1 1
 @savmeister: we are on a gravity oriented site not on a forum for Transalpers. Schwalbe has excellent Super Gravity casings and fantastic tire compounds but they have a lot of work to do with intermediate tires. So do Spec and Conti (although Conti has much more to do everywhere) Like add 100g rubber to them so that casing doesn't come out of sidewall after only a dozen of rides. In fact they already did add 50g meat since Addix compounds came along.
  • 2 0
 I've been wrestling with a fatbike tubeless setup for a year. It's never been good , several experts have attempted a fix. No success. I'm getting desperate
  • 2 0
 Some rims and tires just don't work as well as others. I've almost exclusively used Schwalbe tires for the last few years and they hold air well and have never come off or really burped even. They fit really tight, which also makes getting them on and off a chore, but they are dependable, generally. but the sidewalls aren't the toughest on some of the trail oriented offerings.
  • 2 0
 I ghetto tubelessed (might have invented a word there..) my Cube rear when I got it about 3 years ago, took a couple of attempts but it's stayed up since with minmal air loss. The front however just wouldnt seal so after a few failed attempts, several dozen expletives and about a litre of sealant everywhere, i cleaned it up and whacked a tube back in and that's been fine as well. I guess im a bit 50/50 about the whole thing.
  • 3 0
 @w0dge: It's an annoying task, but sometimes you have to replace the rim strip/tape, cause once that is compromised you'll lose air no matter what. Old valves can be shitty too.
  • 1 0
 Crazy!

I've has all of 3-4 flats since switching to tubeless a decade ago.

On a HT and a dual squish riding in the Koots, the coastal range, WA state...

Why would I spend anymore than I already do?
  • 2 0
 'Apparently, Tire Brands Don't Think There's a Problem' - because you need to buy a new one when the old one flats! Anyone see the problem?
  • 2 0
 Cush Core for the win! I used to get a few flats a week here riding in whistler, no more burping tires, and no more flats other then a puncture through the top of the tire.
  • 2 0
 Still getting flat in this day and age is so pathetic. Its the number one issue that needs to be addressed. Enough with all the other BS
  • 2 0
 If only they could make something as light as air that could be inserted into the tire under pressure to resist flats and rim damage
  • 1 0
 Schwalbe Magic Mary's on both the DH & Trail bike, running normal tubes with talc, around 24psi front, 27psi rear, no flats for years. Had 3 front tyres roll off the rim (DH) but I can deal with that.
  • 1 0
 It seems that the writer might not fully understand the physics of the punctures, even with kevlar nylon or other there is a physical limit to what you can do per unit of weight.
  • 1 0
 How about no air? Been using Mr. Wolf Solve Banger inserts. Granted there is air involved with the Bangers but close to none. That means we’re close to seeing some pretty good moose-style (airless) tires/inserts.
  • 1 0
 I stopped getting flats once I switched from 28mm ID carbon rims to 35mm ID aluminum rims. Not exactly apples to apples, but I agree with Zipp when they say a more flexible rim results in fewer pinch flats.
  • 1 0
 Looking at the trail and actually choosing a line instead of barreling over anything in my path does wonders for keeping air in my tires. Current tire technology meets my needs nicely.
  • 2 0
 Anyone running the Nukeproof ARD system? As good, better, or worse than cushcore?
  • 2 0
 Not as good but better than huck norris and easier to install.
  • 1 0
 I have the same question. I'd like something stouter than my current Huck Norris for the rear wheel, while avoiding the cost and mainly the weight of a Cush Core. Reviews on the ARD seem to be all over the place with some people complaining about shrinkage
  • 2 0
 I think I saw it on sale at Chain Reaction for about 50% off. $36? for both tires. Worth a go at that price.
  • 2 0
 @Ron-C: Agree with this. 6 months of use so far.
  • 2 0
 @chriskneeland your best option for a tire insert hands down is gonna be RIMPACT ! check em out $50 for both inserts with valves. and January they will be dropping a more DH specific version! Ive used the ARD and the rimpact and rimpact is WAYYYYYY better!
  • 1 0
 ARD gets bigger after few rides rattling in the tire. I don't think it will prevent any burping so losing air but maybe protect rims.
  • 1 0
 @jungjoonc: dude that happened to mine!!!! So annoying! Not a fan of the ARD but my RIMPACTS have been amazing!
  • 1 0
 I have been running ARD for a while. easy to fit and not had the rattle yet 2.5 months in. a good gateway insert!!
  • 1 0
 @rockchomper: don't want to risk spending 45€ on the ARDs just to end up having a pool noodle bouncing around in the tyre.
Thanks for the heads-up on the Rimpact, seems to be precisely what I'm after: more protective than the basic stuff while lighter and cheaper than CC.

Last weekend had to climb 800m vertical in a go before reaching the goods, and was thinking to myself that wouldn't want to have any setup much heavier than my current DD casing+ Huck Norris
  • 1 0
 As a light weight who really likes to smack his corners. All I want is a weight free solution for burping that doesn’t involve going over 30psi.
  • 1 0
 There are some rims with a big bead lock lip. I can't recall the brand.
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: TBH I’ve been having good runs with Flow mk3 rims with a few more laps of tape than necessary.
  • 2 0
 not really that bothered about the article, but my god Amaury still blows my mind with that Les Gets win..
  • 2 0
 If I pay 25% more, can I at least get side knobs that aren't removable after a few days in the park?
  • 3 0
 I just want chainsaw-poof pants...
  • 1 0
 The fix in the article looks alot like the old Arrow Racing Prime Wides. I was sorry to see them go away, they were awesome tires.
  • 1 0
 Schwalbe super gravity version Dirty Dan and Majic Mary well worth the money 0 flats and I ride gnarly east coast rocky af trails. I won't buy anything else
  • 1 0
 I am working on a lightweight beadlock that would be adaptable to any wheel. I can ride a long way slowly if the tire stays on after flatting.
  • 1 0
 A lot of credit is given to Minions here but let's not forget that Minions famous thread pattern is based on Michelin Comp 24 and 32 design
  • 1 0
 I can’t complain. No complain, the tire industry is doing banger job on the beads and ruber, but I do miss more diversity on the pattern of the profile
  • 1 0
 @RichardCunningham "Tire designs that edge extremely well are quickly rising to prominence." Does that include the Tioga you tested earlier this year? Do you still rate that?
  • 1 0
 Even inserts aren’t enough for me. I smashed a rim on some east coast tech through cush core and dh casing tires at 27 psi.
  • 1 0
 "Punctures in the tread area are uncommon..." Hello, Maxxis dhf EXO and DD would like to have a word. 4 EXO casings and one DD, all punctured in the tread in the last year.
  • 1 0
 PB : What Would You Pay to Keep Air Inside Your Tires?
Industry : Here's a plus size tire, thinner sidewalls and tire folds on corners like no other.
  • 2 0
 Have not read it all yet...but that IS NOT Sam Hill...
  • 6 0
 NO, THIS IS PATRICK!!!
  • 3 0
 About £26.
  • 2 0
 $140 for 2minions + $20 Stan's = at least a year of non stop fun
  • 1 0
 I'd say closer to six months but ya!
  • 1 0
 We need new valves.The valves we have were never designed to work with sealant.New pumps would be nice also.
  • 1 1
 I freaking love that you used Carson's photo from Rampage. No feeling in the world beats watching one of the guys stab it with a knife after it ruined a near-perfect run.
  • 2 0
 Maxxis DH casing - heavy af but so worth it.
  • 1 0
 IMO for rear tyres especially, the profile need to be reduced and the side walls reinforced... much like a moto tyre...
  • 1 0
 How much would I pay? A 1€10 baguette X 2 = 2€20. Barelli tested and approved
  • 2 0
 Man, this sport is getting more and more expensive.
  • 1 0
 Can we all take a minute to appreciate the roost!?! I'm usually not a fan, but this one is next freaking level.
  • 2 0
 I just huck to flat and don’t even give a shit
  • 1 0
 i pay the price of double down tires in terms of weight and moneyunits.... case solved
  • 2 0
 £3.50 each on "Old school Inflatable tyre insert systems"
  • 1 0
 "Cornering skills, speed and amplitude have increased by a magnitude in less than one decade."

what?
  • 1 0
 2,300 plus grams of a single thick sticky rubber compound with 360* rim lock and two air chambers please
  • 1 0
 Stupid article. If you have a problem keeping air in your tires you have other issues.
  • 1 0
 “No one would buy it” = we wouldn’t be able to sell as many tires bc they would actually last...
  • 1 0
 Hmmm. I have had zero problems with my e13 tires. I run inserts now but even before it was fine.
  • 1 0
 I'm a pretty competent tire changer, does that count for something?
  • 1 0
 Have they tried tri-ply or quad-ply? ????
  • 3 0
 schwalbe super gravity
  • 1 0
 Wasn’t this same article on here last year?
  • 2 0
 £50 a month
  • 1 2
 mountain bikers are so cheap. People will drop 10k on a Yeti and then bitch and moan when it comes time to replace the tires.
  • 2 0
 @wibblywobbly not all of us buddy! some of us are just scraping by with our nukeproofs.
  • 1 0
 I got my 2017 RM T-bolt on offer up for $650 almost 2 years ago, 1 year ago on eBay $460 for a pike rtc3, chainreaction sale dt swiss m1700 wheel set $220, offer up sram guide RSC $120(worldwidecyclery warranty the levers for free) so brand new, and just recently I got 2 magic Mary's and a nobby nic on craigslist for $60, if you look hard and have patience, and some luck, you'll find deals. I have very nice performing bike for under $3,000
  • 2 0
 @DepressinglyAscending: +1 I did the same thing for my hardtail ragley mmmbop frame new with shipping from crc $290. Fork wheels and transmission from my old bike were all free. Brand x seatpost 15 on crc stem 16 on crc shimano boost xt rear hub was 50 on jenson also got an xtr threaded bb on jenson for 30. And new rotors and pads from worldwide was 60 including labor for the rear hub swap and headset press in I am under 550 and happy.
  • 1 0
 Duro Leopard 559x68mm (26x3.0) tire weighs 1600g and is bulletproof!
  • 1 0
 Run a pair of those for winter and send it down the ski slopes!!
  • 1 0
 Anyone tried flex seal to fix tire slashes?
  • 2 1
 Full review coming tomorrow
  • 1 0
 I wonder why they made bead lock rims for off-road trucks??????
  • 1 0
 I would pay nothing...air is free!
  • 1 1
 FYI... “bullet proof” vests do not exist; especially lightweight ones.
  • 2 1
 u entirely sure, or u basing on supposition.

watched someone with a Dyneema getting shot from ten yrds, (.45) in Egypt,
and not in a test situation.

they may use the term "bullet resistant".
but either way, bruised he was, dead he wasnt.
  • 1 0
 @SmallBrownDogMTB: cool story, but I’m 100% sure of their limitations... especially when ones occupation requires the wearing thereof.
  • 2 0
 only flat on the bottom
  • 1 0
 Whatever the price of a shot of Stan's is. It's working so far.
  • 1 0
 I'm getting flats on my dirt jumper every two weeks. Help.
  • 2 0
 I run DH or thorn proof tubes(thicker), cut out the valve stem, then gut along inside of tube, wrapped that tube around another DH tube, line up stem with hole, add Orange Seal enduro sealant. Old school dh racer trick. Yeah it is a bit heavy, but it is also Heavy-Duty. The last flat was a broken drill bit. It's crazy how much this eliminated my flat probs. I'll take the weight just so I can keep on ridin'. Good luck!
  • 1 0
 one dollar, bob.
  • 1 0
 Air is free!
  • 2 1
 Whats a flat?
  • 1 1
 Who pays $90 for a minion I got a set of michelins for $80
  • 1 0
 I got 5 on it
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