Wolf Tooth Launches New '8-Bit Pack Pliers' Multi Tool

Nov 18, 2020
by Brian Park  


Wolf Tooth's new 8-bit Pack Pliers are a clever approach to multi-tools. Eight attachment bits sit inside the handle of master link pliers and are held in place with magnets. Those bits fit into an 8mm swivelling hex head that has a 4mm opening for the bits.


Wolf Tooth 8-Bit Pack Pliers
Wolf Tooth 8-Bit Pack Pliers


Details
• Master-link pliers feature a swiveling 8mm hex bit on the end, with a 4mm opening to accept a variety of bits that are stored in the handle
• Includes a spoke wrench, valve core tool, flat head #3.5 and Phillips #2 screwdriver bits, 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8mm hex bits, and T10, T25 Torx bits
• Also installs and removes master links, clears tire sealant clogs from valve stem, and tightens the valve stem lock nut
• Made of 7075-T6 aluminum handles, CrV tool steel swivel head, S2 tool steel bits
• Magnets keep all bits in place
• Ball detent swivel head designed to access hard-to-reach places
• Handle provides extra torque
• Pliers compatible with 9, 10, 11, and 12-speed master links and chains (not compatible with Campagnolo 12-speed chains)
• Master Link storage is compatible with SRAM PowerLock Link, Shimano Quick-Link, KMC Missing Link and other similar master links (not compatible with Connex Links by Wipperman)
• Available with coloured accents: black, silver, red, purple, orange, blue, gold, green, and gunmetal
• Weight: 68g (verified)
• Size: 146mm x 20mm x 9mm
• Master links are not included
• Made in the USA
• Price: $69.95
wolftoothcomponents.com


Wolf Tooth 8-Bit Pack Pliers
Wolf Tooth 8-Bit Pack Pliers


I've been using these pliers for a little while, and I like them more than I thought I would. There are some obvious downsides: it's a miracle I haven't lost any of the bits yet, and it's annoying that it's almost a complete repair solution but is missing a chain tool. But I've come to really appreciate the extra torque versus typical micro multi tools. Especially when taking some stubborn pedals off because someone who will remain nameless did them up to three ugga duggas. The tool feels sturdy, almost a little heavy, but it's in line or lighter than other multi-tools with similar functionality.

I'm not sure it's enough to convert me away from on-bike tool storage, but this could be a good option to throw in your bag on a big ride or a bikepacking trip.


190 Comments

  • 99 8
 Third day in a row that there’s a new multitool on PB without a chain tool...
  • 34 8
 I haven’t used a chain tool on the trail in quite some time, are other people still breaking their chains after switching to 1x??? I still won’t go for a ride without a chain tool though...
  • 53 5
 no chain breaker is deal breaker
  • 15 1
 Agreed, I mentioned in the article that this is annoying. On the other hand, with something like this you're already carrying a bag, so one school of thought would be happy to get to choose the micro chain tool that you like best. I do like a CT-5, but it'd be nice to find something that could save some weight and use the 8-Bit to drive it.
  • 15 0
 @unrooted: Haven't used a chain tool for myself on the trail either since I started using master links. I have, however, used a chain tool on the trail several times on fellow riders bikes. I always have a chain tool in the pack...
  • 6 0
 Three Days Graced.
  • 13 5
 I tried once to use the chain tool of a multitool and it was impossible 'cause too small to apply enough force to break the chain... Good on me I tried this shit at home. So better carrying a proper chain tool than expecting your minitool save your ride!
  • 11 17
flag warmerdamj (Nov 18, 2020 at 13:34) (Below Threshold)
 So... when do we start arguing over multi tool size?

Because to me if 8 bits is enough for you then you must be some sort of moron.

Do you even wrench brah?
  • 38 3
 Seriously... what is the point of having master-link pliers but no chain tool?
  • 36 0
 @thegoodflow: dude you can customize the color of the bolt that holds these pliers together. When you're stuck on the side of the trail nothing else will matter.
  • 15 30
flag shredddr (Nov 18, 2020 at 13:38) (Below Threshold)
 I'm curious why you'd need a chain tool on a ride now, assuming you have a spare link handy. If you break your chain, you just swap in the spare link. It's not like you can reuse most of the pins these days anyway is it? Maybe I'm missing something?
  • 2 3
 @Clem-mk: toughen up butter cup
  • 55 0
 @shredddr: you’ll likely need something to break the chain so you have two narrow links on each end with no pins still stuck in them
  • 10 37
flag wallheater (Nov 18, 2020 at 13:46) (Below Threshold)
 In 30 years I don't think I've ever had to use a chain tool for a trail side repair. Just ease off when you change gear and give your chain an easy life.
  • 16 0
 @shredddr: You ever twist a link and you will know why you need a chain tool.
  • 1 0
 @shredddr : what jwellford said. And yes, In a pinch, you can still use a chain tool to reinsert a pin to get you home if you don't have a quick link (or you break it a second time, which is increasingly likely after the chain endures whatever trauma that caused the first break). The key is to not press the pin all the way out of the second outer plate so that you can press it back through from the backside. Of course, this link is now compromised and should be replaced with a master-link later, but it'll get you home.

And another situation, which I surprisingly encountered recently with an fresh eagle xx1 chain, was a stiff link, presumably from some botched shift that went unnoticed... quick links and pliers alone are not going to help you fix that.
  • 2 0
 @unrooted: First 15 minutes on slickrock had two buddies break a chain (12spd the actual outer link broke O.O, 10sp a plate bent out). I'm not sure if I was the only one with a chain tool, but damn glad that I did.
  • 5 0
 @shredddr: You're assuming you broke the chain at the quick link. And that the chain bits before and after are still usable.In our shop, on a road bike no less, I've had the chain twisted so bad from the trauma of hanger explosion that a section of nearly 10 links was visibly warped and unusable. So on the trail that might be hopeless, but if you have to remove damaged links first to get the quick link on or you break other than the quick link a chain tool will be a useful option. I carry a piece of cable to function as a quick link breaker but I have yet to shred my fingers needing to do that.

Your mileage may vary, obviously, based on some people never needing or having one in X number of decades of riding.
  • 4 1
 @unrooted: more likely to break chain with 1x thinner chain spending lots of time at relatively sharp angle \
  • 13 6
 If you snap your chain, then its already broken...

Why break it again? That just seems like a temper tantrum
  • 12 0
 I went down a rabbit hole and think the KMC mini chain tool would be worth checking out as a companion to something like the 8-Bit. Only weighs 25g, and probably less since you don't have to bring the hex key part. www.youtube.com/watch?v=-YC9g9ZXjQk
  • 12 0
 @pikabika: Yeah, although that one is a bunch heavier than the KMC one. Dangerholm would be horrified at the extra 25g.
  • 4 0
 @brianpark: The music in that video made me feel like I was feeding starving children or something.
  • 4 0
 Use the granite tools bar end one
  • 2 0
 Only a couple of months ago, my freehub seized. That is a game ender. Had no chain tool so had to use rocks to smash my chain off so I could scoot (the downs) back home.
The chain tool on my ancient heavy but alas not oft carried trusty Topeak multi tool has set the length on every new chain I have bought for the last 5-6 years since my proper one broke. Works first time every time.
  • 4 2
 I agree, it's pretty dumb.. it has masterlink pliers, but no chain tool.
  • 3 0
 @unrooted: if people aren't breaking chains as they used to, why do we need a multi-tool with master-link pliers?
  • 9 0
 @brianpark:
Can we have a poll please. "When was the last time you used a chain tool out on the trail?"

Or even expand it to what tools have you used out on the trail.
  • 15 0
 @shredddr: Have you ever actually broken a chain on a ride? You'll need a chaintool before you will be able to use your spare master-link. Just saying.
  • 5 0
 @shredddr: snap a derailleur hanger and need to go single speed
  • 3 1
 @unrooted: I’ve been riding 3 days a week for 6 years. Never broke a chain and would have no idea what to do with a chain breaker if I had one. Maybe I don’t put down enough power!
  • 4 25
flag thegoodflow (Nov 18, 2020 at 14:45) (Below Threshold)
 @AdamKos: wow, you've been riding bikes for six whole years?!
  • 3 0
 @hamncheez: I'm glad I'm not the only one that thinks this. Also, I use a Crankbrothers M19 as my "shop" chain tool in college and it worked fine. Ergo I own three of them and they live in a small top tube bag on each bike.
  • 2 0
 A hybrid of this and the Lazyne Multi Chain Plier will get all of the money.
ride.lezyne.com/products/multi-chain-pliers
  • 2 0
 @ilovedust: That is savage and awesome! Was the chain a complete right off afterwards?
  • 6 4
 @thegoodflow: yeah. 24,000 miles should give me a good idea if I need to carry a chain breaker or not. Do you require a larger sample?
  • 3 0
 @ratedgg13: I've said this elsewhere, but if something is a "lever" why not curve the ends and make it a tire lever too.
  • 1 0
 @thegoodflow: You might need a chain whip to remove the cassette to access the free hub and lube the paws maybe.
  • 1 1
 @shredddr: defnitely; like having two narrow ends to use the link on and removing the twisted mess of kinked chain because someone thought that running an 120 gram bash guard was a: bad idea/ too heavy/ not needed because I have NW/ XSyncII what ever flavour of chain retaining teeth.
  • 3 1
 It does have a chain tool - it's a Chain LINK tool... Smile
  • 3 0
 @jwellford: +1, they probably never had a chain break on them, or they only had the master-link itself breaking, otherwise they would have figured it out (the hard way).
  • 1 0
 I don’t use one either for a long time!! Maybe “modern” chains are better, stronger and don’t snap so much?
Hope I m not jinxing myself for the next ride...
  • 1 1
 Who carries tools while "Enduro-ing"?
  • 1 0
 @Clem-mk: Not sure why the downvotes. I completely agree most multi-tool breakers aren’t robust enough to get the job done. If ur a backpack guy like me, then bring ur stuff. If ur full enduro, then put ur fancy 1-Up in the steerer tube and strap a breaker on the frame or in the Swat.
  • 1 10
flag thegoodflow (Nov 18, 2020 at 17:02) (Below Threshold)
 @AdamKos: wow, sik stats bro. I hope you enjoy your inevitable walk out of the woods.
  • 2 12
flag thegoodflow (Nov 18, 2020 at 17:07) (Below Threshold)
 @likeittacky: by that logic, better bring your headset press too, just in case.

You might think you're clever, but my hubs don't need a chainwhip to access any "paws".... or pawls either.
  • 5 0
 While a lot of these new tools look super cool, they all seem to do a crappier job than the Crank Brothers M17. I got mine over a decade ago for under $20 and still going strong, $29 MSRP now. The M17 is probably the one thing anyone is using from Crank Brothers after that long, but it’s just a bomber tool. And if you have a shoe lace, you have a master link tool. These $60 tools are awesome if you have money to burn, or you can just get something tried and true for half the price.
  • 1 0
 @unrooted: yes, people are still breaking chains with 1X groups. I still use my chain breaker on the trail a few times a year, the last time was on a trail which would have involved at least 5km hike-a-bike before being able to roll down the last big hill, then another km push to the trailhead.
  • 1 0
 @ilovedust: Just make like a fixie rider and pedal the whole way?

You did in fact have some other non-destructive options, such as taking the wheel off then unbolting the derailleur jockey wheels, allowing the chain to be moved out of the way of the cassette. Pull it off the chainring and you can tape it out of the way (chainstay or seatstay, whichever you prefer).
  • 1 0
 @unrooted: yes, we are breaking chains with 1x
  • 3 1
 @thegoodflow: Yep, I misspelled pawls Pal, WOOF ! lol
  • 1 0
 @warmerdamj: Color customization for sure Drool and "A pop of color for your dropper" from PNW recently.
Next up HGTV ...
  • 1 0
 They were all designed by Aaron Gwin.
  • 4 0
 @AdamKos: nah you’ve just been lucky. Get yourself one and practice at home with clean dry hands. It will pay off when the inevitable happens deep in the woods.
  • 1 0
 @warmerdamj: I could and do get by with just two quite often. Syntace in axle tool with 4mm and 5mm.
  • 1 0
 @DC1988: great idea!
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: Similar to the KMC Z-Chain, if you have to ask what a ZJ is, you can't afford it.
  • 2 0
 @ratedgg13: saw this and bought it immediately. ????????
  • 3 0
 @brianpark: Not if you have SWAT frame storage my friend. I put my tools in my bike! Right F’ing in it! Peasants carrying their tools in packs....
  • 3 0
 @Clem-mk: I literally have been breaking chains for years exclusively with a Crank Brothers multi-tool. This one: www.crankbrothers.com/products/m19
  • 1 0
 @JJBend591:

Yep, easily the best tool on the market. I've had mine for 5 years now. No reason to ever change it.
  • 2 2
 Do you barbarians not use a missing link instead of a linking pin?
  • 2 0
 @unrooted: Couple weeks back I broke my 6 month old hollow link chain as I entered a bike park. Never the less, I stayed and sessioned with a chain. Some people were like, what no chain, couldnt of been bothered as I had no need to pedal. but yes, a compact tool needs a chain breaker.
  • 2 0
 @Mac1987: I actually went back to Shimano chains after years on KMC, just so that I could use a linking pin again. Back when I was running 9sp I could easily open and close a masterlink by hand and they were all reusable. A few years ago I moved on to 10sp and I now run 11sp chains but on both 10sp and 11sp chains these masterlinks are quite hard to open and settle/close by hand. Plus they all claim to be not reusable. Not sure why that was introduced but well, apparently chain manufacturers think it is being compromised. To then also need such pliers along on the ride seems silly to me. I needed the chain breaker anyway so instead of a spare masterlink I just take some linking pins and I always take a short piece of chain with me anyway (part of which you trim off when you install a new chain). So when the chain breaks, I just install a new piece in between using these pins. That said, I haven't actually had to do that on the trail yet, but I'm happy with how quickly I can install a fresh chain at home now instead of the wrestle with the 10sp or 11sp masterlink.
  • 1 0
 @unrooted: E-bikers do all the time apparently.
  • 1 0
 @unrooted: I seem to snap a chain every few years. But yeah, they aren't used very often.
  • 1 0
 @Clem-mk: crank bros M18 works great.
  • 2 0
 @brianpark: KMC's mini chain tool might just fit this need. Its tiny and pretty sure a 5mm drives the pin.
  • 3 0
 @AdamKos: that’s a nice start. Still, you walk most of the 9 miles back to the trail head with your chain in your pocket, I bet you put a chain breaker on your bike for the rest of your life. Hahaha!!
Needing a chain breaker is a rare need, but when you need it, you REALLY need it.
  • 2 0
 I have probably repaired a chain 7 times in the past 2 years, maybe more chains than that (just my bike, not including others). Those were all Eagle. THe worst was the XX1 chain that I broke 4 times before I had to throw it away. I don't know how many miles were on it but it was pretty damn low and I am guessing defective.

Luckily my bike has an integrated chain tool (E29), because I use it.
  • 2 1
 @JSTootell: I guess it pays in more than ways than one to buy $25 chains.
  • 2 0
 @unrooted: It was the only one the LBS had on the shelf and I decided to see if it had that long life like the XO1/XX1 cassette. I go towards mid tier chains now.
  • 2 5
 Finger crossed I never had a broken chain on trail.
The question is how much stuff you want to carry all the Time for using it every once in a decade? Seems like wearing ski boots all year because you’re planning on hitting the slopes around Christmas.
Personally I prefer to ride without tools and other stuff/junk and walk home a few miles once a year or so... even with cleats not a big deal... a run is still a workout.
I always wonder what folks are bringing on rides when I see groups of guys heading out and everyone is wearing 30l backpack stuffed to the point of zippers almost popping?
  • 3 0
 @michibretz: There are multitools that have chainbreakers included, that are cheaper/lighter/smaller than this one. Why spend more for something worse?
  • 3 1
 @DC1988: @DC1988: I have never used the chain tool on my years old Crank Bros Multi 19... Never. I took a trip to Moab 3 weeks ago, first time there. 4th day we rode the WE. Finishing Porcupine Rim section I somehow twisted and broke my chain.. Used the tool for the first time. Ironically I also have the Wolf Tooth Master Link Pliers. Took just a few minutes thanks to the right tools.
  • 7 0
 @michibretz: Whatever a few miles is. Depending on start time, fitness and regular life factors, I've done almost 50km rides where if you have a non-repairable mechanical, you are sufficiently far away from a parking lot where someone may or may not be by nightfall. And any night in mountains proper unprepared can be a life-testing experience. If you don't carry some tools chances are you're not carrying an extra jacket, extra water or extra food. Or bearspray. Or shelter.

I over-carry for sure. But I don't think it's extreme for where I ride (when I get to ride). Urban park in town? I slim it down. Big ride in the big mountains? I minimize risks I don't feel like dealing with and increase my chances of helping myself and/or others. I don't think a chain tool is the make or break thing in that regard, especially if it means an overnight with some bears.
  • 2 0
 @iammarkstewart: Definately, I carry my pack when I know its far from the car and a long day on the bike, Everything I need is in the bag, but shorter rides and park sessions, I dont worry. I probably need to add a pump and chainlink and multi tool to the bike.
  • 3 0
 Ive had to fix two snapped chains out on the trail in the last month. (friends bikes) Needed a chain tool both times to break off the female ends to add the quick link. If I didnt have the chain tool Their rides would have been done and mine along with them.
  • 2 0
 @Eric27: there’s a female end to bike chains???
  • 3 0
 @unrooted: Yes, and a male end too. Male end inserts into female end and a pin is pushed through. And nine months later you have a baby chain.
  • 3 1
 @Eric27: I’ve never heard anyone refer to inside and outside chain links as male or female, but it does explain why the outside link is the one that always breaks. . .
  • 2 0
 @brianpark: I've never been so inspired to break a chain after watching that video.
  • 1 2
 @AdamKos: More likely you replace your chain when it's supposed to be replaced. I've never broken a chain that was not excessively worn out
  • 2 0
 Pointless without a chain tool for me. I haven't used one in years but sods law you will need one at some point.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: Andrew Major over on NSMB.com came up with a pretty clever solution and added a one up chain breaker onto his wolftooth pliers.

www.instagram.com/p/CHtjxHwn4a3/?igshid=1v075iklavzzu

Ya gotta admit he thinks outside the box.
  • 1 2
 @iammarkstewart:
I am in Marin county. Thats where I ride the most. So are the guys I see riding out on the trails with the massive backpacks that keep me guessing what they might be filled with.
So far we established chain breaker...

Anyway, No, at home I don’t cary jackets, bear sprays, tools, pumps, tubes... really anything but water. Loops out here a around 10 miles and the worst thing that can happen is you run across a cougar and the am not talking kitty cat I am talking wealthy older lady... also just roll out the next best fire road and call an über...

Anyway, yes if I am doing a massive shuttle ride in the sierras for example I bring some stuff, but honestly never more than what could fit in my shorts pocket.

You say 50k rides... so in the worst case 25k back... thats 5 Hours of brisk hiking, no need to spend a night... yeah it would suck but so does Carrying a super heavy backpack with the major difference that if something breaks it only happens once in a while but you carry the heavy bag all the time...

Only issue i had in the last few years was a completely busted rim... nothing fiting a backpack could have helped me. I jogged out 8 miles of prime Utah downhill with my bike on my back and I didn’t even have the slowest time of the day on Strava. Yeah I needed new cleats after that one and yeah it sucked but looking back it’s a good story
  • 2 0
 @michibretz: Firstly, your "brisk jog" is your business. I can only speak to my fitness, my riding area and my risk aversion. Secondly, my bag isn't "super heavy", but likely heavier than most others and heavier than I could get by with. I have a comfort level that includes the fullest, biggest water bladder, first aid, a few tools/tube/pump, extra snacks, extra jacket, bear spray and anything else specific to that day's itinerary (friend's bikes, route, whatever). It not only may help me but it may help someone else.

You do you in Marin and enjoy it however you do.
  • 1 0
 Topeak Ratchet Rocket 11 is the best tool ive owned, i scratched topeak off and put a lezyn sticker on so it was cooler
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: You wouldn't save weight but you could pair the 8-bit plier with wolftooth encase chain breaker and have tire plug on top of of everything else.
  • 52 1
 Shoulda called em Multi-Pliers
  • 23 0
 Someone give this man a plush marketing gig stat!
  • 2 0
 Brain short-circuited.
  • 2 1
 Gerber knives already claimed that one
  • 2 0
 Wouldn’t that imply that there’s multiple pairs of pliers?

And I got the joke after I typed that sentence out. I’m leaving it.
  • 19 0
 I've only needed a chain breaker a few times, but when I needed it, I REALLY needed it. No deal.
  • 2 16
flag shredddr (Nov 18, 2020 at 13:42) (Below Threshold)
 recently? can I ask the circumstances? would a spare link have done you justice instead?
  • 1 0
 @shredddr: First 15 minutes on slickrock last month had two buddies break a chain (12spd the actual outer link broke O.O, 10sp a plate bent out). I'm not sure if I was the only one with a chain tool, but damn glad that I did. After teaching mtb for a few summers and done at least one walk out I'd almost never go on a ride without one.
  • 8 0
 @shredddr: You still need a chain breaker even with spare links. Think about it. When you snap a chain, you still have to remove the pin on the broken link that is still intact. You can gnaw on it with your teeth, or you can just carry a chain breaker. Me thinks you haven't ever had to fix a broken chain on trail.
  • 2 0
 @shredddr: I've used a chain tool when I've blown up a derailleur 10 miles from the car, when I've broken a chain 6 miles from the car and when my buddy had a stick dismember his derailleur. I really hate pushing my bike so I'd rather carry a multitool that has a chain tool and weighs an oz or two more.

Just carrying a spare link doesn't do shit when the busted link is still partially attached to the chain which is how it usually goes.
  • 4 0
 @shredddr: what others have said. Often when you break a link, just the outer plate snaps off, and you've still gotta push the pin out, which is nigh impossible without a chain tool.
  • 2 0
 @shredddr: dude... You have to be able to push the other pin out somehow to be able to use a quick link.
  • 1 0
 @shredddr: I guess you dont ride hard enough or cant push the pedals hard enough.
Try to insert your master link when the chain is broken on the wrong side. Twisted chains are also common.
My last broken chain was 6 days ago. Whiteout the EDC I would be stranded. Before that the chain was snapped and twisted 12 days ago, same story without the EDC chain breaker I would have ben stranded.
  • 4 0
 I use a 2 foot piece of spectra line for a link breaker ( easier on the hands and pretty much the same weigh as wire). I agree no chain breaker is a deal breaker. Went years without an incident, saved the group 2 rides this year with the breaker. Twisted link from bad shift and a derailler hanger break twisting a few links. I liked the one with the little compartment for storing the spare quick link but until I lose my 20year one or it gets rusted beyond use hard to justify upgradign to this.

Now if we could get the bike/parts companies to cut down on all the different head types and sizes we could get rid of a bunch of tools....
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: How are you doing this with spectra line? Would love to see a video link? Yes, I do know what Spectra line is, just never heard of this method, seems cool though.
  • 1 0
 @JDFF: Watch video for breaking a quicklink with a shoelace or shifting cable.

www.bing.com/videos/search?q=how+to+break+a+quickl+ink+with+a+shoelace&docid=608032533353202408&mid=055F72BDBE1B6D583D66055F72BDBE1B6D583D66&view=detail&FORM=VIRE

The spectra is slick, tough and easier on the hands then wire.
  • 1 0
 @pink505: thanks for the link. Makes sense. I have always just used my hands with a little twisting, but admit it can be PIA. (My experience has been with KMC and Sram links only).
  • 8 1
 Chain breakers on multitools suck. I carry a separate, lightweight chain breaker so I can use a better multi tool.
  • 4 0
 Ditto, independent chain breaker is best.
  • 2 0
 They do suck. But I ride minimalist (no pack) so I rely on a small multitool when I ride. Better than nothing.
  • 3 0
 I have a 20yr old Topeak Alien ii multi-tool with some of the unneeded spanners removed and replaced with washers. It has a great chain breaker which works with 12 speed. There seems to be a lot of effort put into inventing things that cost more and do less.
  • 4 0
 Whats the weird lookin screw/pole thing in the other side? Why oh why didn't they make it detachable and shape the ends for tire lever use?
  • 4 0
 that's what I sayin???!!! Actually not fully sure what you said just had to say that.
  • 5 0
 It's a textured rod used to clear clogged valve stems
  • 4 0
 Looks more like a file than a screw.... I'm guessing that's the part that "clears tire sealant clogs from valve stem"... obviously far more important than a chain tool.
  • 1 1
 @provin1327: you're telling me the screw pole is a textured rod?! well why didn't you say so!
  • 2 0
 I carry a large paper clip, the version that is rough as opposed to smooth. Pull valve core, bend clip out like you would to reset a device, plunge away. Do this before using a CO2 or you have a high risk of it not seating the bead.
  • 1 0
 Seems like this product is designed for people who already carry the other stuff separately. In this case, you'd likely want something to remove and reinstall the valve core. Never realized people have issues with clogged valve stems out on the trail. I personally use the Pepi valve to inflate tire and a regular tube to complete the (ghetto) ProCore system. When I saw the Peaty valve with the grooved butt end I thought it was actually more clever than the Pepi one. But yeah, poke this tool into that valve and you'd puncture the tube! Then again, I've never had issues with a clogged valve stem out on the trail (except for the original two way ProCore valve). But I can imagine those who inject sealant through the stem and use CO2 to inflate their tires are probably calling for clogged stems Wink .
  • 2 0
 I have the predecessor Wolftooth tool. A beautiful piece of industrial art indeed. But the quick link pliers don’t work for me. I have to resort to my larger, clunkier Park Tools pliers for that. Almost certainly it’s user error on my part but just a heads up.
  • 1 0
 It’s you... Hah, sorry. At home though I still use full size pliers for sure. The design is fabulous, especially the master link storage in the handle.
  • 4 0
 Pretty cool tool, but I wish these companies would anodize or paint the bits bright colors. If you have ever dropped a bit on the trail, it is near impossible to find.
  • 2 0
 Bits look too short to me. Is no one else having the problem with reaching hard to access bolts (like the stem bolts on a dual-crown setup)? Would be nice if someone made a compact tool, but perhaps with a 4 and 5mm that was longer.
  • 5 1
 Chingon.. algo finalmente limpio, compacto y sencillo = zero complicaciones.. kudos a @wolftooth????
  • 4 0
 Somethin' about limp
  • 4 0
 Who opts for 8 bit these days?
Call me when 10-bit version will be aired
  • 2 0
 Call me 2-Bit Willy.
  • 2 2
 What are we still putting screw driver bits on a bike tool. Where on your bike is there a philips or flat head screw. As for the pliers, if you’ve ever broken a derailleur or hanger and need to get the chain off to do a chainless run, the quick link pliers would be nice
  • 12 0
 derailleur limit screws
  • 1 1
 @dsut4392: how old is your derailleur????
  • 2 0
 @unrooted: Not everyone rides the latest, fanciest groupset.
  • 2 0
 @MaplePanda: I'm still waiting for Shimano to release an XT level 10spd wide range cassette. They've got it in Deore flavourful already...
  • 1 0
 @m1dg3t: I’d be stoked on a wide range 8 or 9 speed in xt quality...and xt prices.
  • 1 0
 @unrooted: How old is the derailleur on which bike? You're not one of those weirdos with only one bike are you?
To answer your question, the derailleurs on my road bike are 10 years old (10sp Ultegra SL), on my commuter about 7 years (replacing the original ones which would have been 30 next year), and on my FS MTB 3 months (XO1 Eagle). TBH I haven't had to adjust the eagle derailleur since building the bike up so I don't remember what the head on the limit screw is. Of the other 5 bikes in the family belongning to my kids and wife, the running gear varies from 3 year old X9 to 10 year old Dura Ace, but all of the derailleurs would have Philips head screws.
  • 2 0
 @dsut4392: only my Mtn bike has a derailleur, y dirt jumper and BMX don’t need em...no need for road bikes, I have a car.
  • 1 0
 @unrooted: I feel that. Could use 1 on my frankenbike as it's 9spd. I'm a huge fan of XTs price/performance. Best bang for $ IMHO
  • 1 0
 @m1dg3t: I feel like they’d want to keep their best tech on the UBER FANCIEST NEW DRIVETRAIN. It’d likely be super popular though!
  • 2 0
 @MaplePanda: They already have a Deore version. Just make a couple/few more of the gears alu, put some gears on an aluminum spider, and slap XT on the lockring/box. I'd be rocking the Deore already if the cassette alone didn't weight a pound. There would be no uber tech involved. Just take a 10spd XT cassette and make it 11 - 42, not hard Shimano. I won't run any other cassettes.
  • 2 1
 The real question I have is the tool long enough to adjust your brakes on the trail? Many of the multi tools I have seen are way to short to be useful for adjusting the brakes.
  • 1 0
 I’d rather be able to fix a broken chain than have a huge lever to adjust brakes with my dainty hands.
  • 1 0
 I follow the kitchen sink theory. "Bring it... I might need it". Funny thing is that the only thing I usually grab out of my backpack is my cell phone or a beer. I do have the Wolf Tooth master link tool with me.
  • 1 0
 I like it. I carry a small Park chain tool anyway, so not having one integrated doesn't bother me. I wish there were some bit options - like a T25/T30 instead of the T25/T10 as I could use a T30 but have no need for a T10.
  • 6 3
 Has anyone ever need to remove their quick link while on the trail????
  • 10 2
 Yes. When you rip your derailleur to shreds.
  • 1 0
 you gotta use a spare cable and wrap that baby around the quick link and pull the ends of the cable. itll work but gloves are necessary
  • 3 2
 @Ardenjacoby: instead, you could also use a chain tool to accomplish that... as well as actually being able to fix a broken chain.
  • 3 0
 @Kobeefton88: Shoelaces work pretty good too. Or just removing the jockey wheels.
  • 3 0
 no.. No I have never actually removed a quicklink on the trail. I have however used a "real" chaintool.
  • 2 1
 This is a leave at the car/keep in a backpack tool.
  • 2 0
 Remember when a quick link could be separated by hand? Simply pinch link while pushing the two ends towards each other and WahLa removed!
  • 2 0
 Love the form factor. Love the weight even more. Too bad about the lack of chain tool.
  • 2 0
 I feel like they could’ve very easily put a little lip on one of the arms to make it function as a tire lever
  • 4 1
 They did that on the old pliers, its better than nothing i guess,but it will brutalize your rim.
  • 1 0
 Lost two of the original pliers already chucked full of links. Not only sleek but small & slick and easy for me to lose apparently.
  • 2 0
 It looks cool! The body is 7075 so it's tough. Make the body/handle 30mm longer and mill in a slot for a chain breaker.
  • 3 0
 A few cutouts for use as spoke wrenches would be nice.
  • 3 0
 Wolf tooth..... can you build this/incorporate it into a bottle holder?
  • 5 7
 Most chains break because they are worn out. On average I might pull my multi tool out once every 6 months. And that is due to crashing and having to readjust my handle bars and levers. If you clean, lubricate and inspect your drive train on a regular basis you will find that you wont have chain failures as often. Most chains are good for around 300 miles if taken care of. So I have had the same multi tool for the last 15 years with a chain tool.
  • 10 0
 I definitely get more than 300 miles out of a chain, and regularly check them with a stretch gauge.
  • 1 0
 @bigtim: depends on the chain. XO lasts significantly longer than GX chains for instance, because the rollers are plated and don't wear as fast.
  • 1 0
 Chain worn, plus general lack of bike maintenance leading to bad shifts and twisted chains. Sure, if you maintain your bike well you're less likely to break your own chain, but can you control for your buddies being ham-fisted, lazy, or tight with their maintenance spending?
  • 3 0
 My last gx eagle chain lasted well over a thousand miles,clean and well lubed with a lube that attracts the least amount of grime
  • 2 0
 I am questioning how well you take care of your drivetrain if your chain only lasts 300 miles.
  • 1 0
 There is no way I am going to replace my chain 24 times a year, 300 is barely broken in unless you are riding in wet sand every day.
  • 1 0
 funny that also your wife doesn't know with how much force you use to fasten pedals .-)
  • 1 0
 Maybe they should have called it the 1 byte tool. Then all us compsci nerds would have bought one
  • 1 0
 How's about I send my older model (pliers, tire lever, extra link), CNC that bad boy hollow, and insert those bonus bits?
  • 1 0
 Make it into a storage tool like oneup and add a chain breaker and you'll have my money
  • 1 0
 Look up their enCase system
  • 2 1
 Just ride the bike parks. Then you don’t have to worry about this nonsense
  • 2 0
 Neat !
  • 1 0
 Neature.
  • 2 1
 I love this idea with a chain breaker and all the fixings
  • 1 0
 Like good ol' country cookin.
  • 2 0
 Buyin' it.
  • 1 0
 great looking product. I just may buy one...
  • 1 0
 but where does it fit in my bike?
  • 1 0
 Did AvE do the hand modeling for this?
  • 1 0
 Another stupid expensive multi tool to lose on the trail lol
  • 1 0
 Fix-it mfg tool + OG WT pliers is the way to go
  • 2 0
 no chain break - no deal
  • 1 0
 One more reason why I love DH ... I don't need a chain ...
  • 1 4
 Imagine what our bikes would be like if all the energy that has gone into improving upon the perfectly adequate multitool had gone into actual frames and components.
  • 11 0
 You upset that wolftooth doesn't build frames?
  • 2 0
 @RonSauce: They do sell frames.
  • 1 1
 Imagine what our cars would be like if all the energy that has gone into improving upon the perfectly adequate bike had gone into actual automotive design.
  • 2 1
 @GSPChilliwack: I know, its almost as if wolftooth is an established company that has already put sufficient energy into frame and components. Too bad they waste so much brainpower on developing multiple options for tools.
  • 1 2
 Of course not. Love their products. But the time and energy that goes into designing and discussing tools of which we already have perfectly good versions and that we should be using infrequently if our bikes are well maintained continues to baffle me.
  • 2 0
 @muscogeemasher: so you want that time and energy focused on frames instead, which they do.

Not everyone wants the same things from a tool, if you try to build a true all in one tool it ends up being bulky brick. Why do you think topeak successfully makes like 100 different multitools? It isnt affecting you, as someone who doesn't care, when they make tools for people that do care.
  • 2 0
 @RonSauce: Always learn something from the comments and today I learned that there are some people that are really passionate about multitools. Didn't criticize anyone, just expressed my bafflement, which is kind of what the comment section is for.

Headed out to take my something-or-other blackburn multitool to Pisgah for a few days, where, unless I decide to make my levers more horizontal or need to adjust them after a crash, it will live in my hip pack and have zero impact on my experience.

Peace.
  • 2 0
 @muscogeemasher: yeah, thats one way to look at it. It isnt that its "passion" but there are some of us a full time mechanics off the bike who spend plenty of time wrenching and won't compromise with tools. Im also the guy who repairs 1-2 bikes per ride and rarely mine. On top of that, over engineered, stashable tools are SUPER trendy right now. Love it or hate it, companies will make money off of it.

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