Wolf Tooth Launches New GeoShift Performance Angle Headset

Dec 8, 2020
by Wolf Tooth Components  
Wolf Tooth GeoShift Angle Headset


PRESS RELEASE: Wolf Tooth Components

The New GeoShift Performance Angle Headset from Wolf Tooth allows riders to alter the geometry of their bike by changing the head tube angle by 1º. These are sold as an upper/lower pair, with ZS44/EC44, ZS44/EC49, and ZS44/ZS56 pairings and options for 90-115mm or 115-140mm head tubes. This new headset was designed, engineered, and machined in Wolf Tooth’s Minnesota machine shop.

Two positions are marked on the GeoShift Performance Angle Headset: +1º and -1º. Position the angle headset with -1º facing forward and slack will be added to the geometry, which creates more stable steering for fast descents. Conversely, switching the orientation of the headset will add 1º to the head tube angle and make for a steeper geometry and more responsive steering. Both angle options are indicated on the headset along with dashes that need to be aligned with the centerline of the bike. Full installation instructions can be found on the product webpage.

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Wolf Tooth GeoShift Angle Headset installed on Ibis Ripley

This new angle headset has a design that sets the bearings at an angle that matches the angle of the steerer tube. This design reduces the friction found in angle headsets that have the bearings that sit flat. The angled bearing positioning also limits the creaking found in angle headsets that have a spherical design.

The GeoShift Performance Angle Headset is part of Wolf Tooth’s Performance Headset product line that was first launched in 2018. These are lightweight, strong, durable headsets made with aircraft-grade 6061 aluminum and have a triple-sealed system to protect the bearings from the elements. Performance Headsets use black oxide bearings made by Enduro. These bearings are engineered to use the largest possible ball size and are filled with high-pressure waterproof lubricant. A pair of dual-lip seals ride in micro-grooves to further protect the bearings from water and debris.

Find GeoShift Performance Angle Headsets available now on WolfToothComponents.com for $104.95 and wherever Wolf Tooth is sold.

Wolf Tooth GeoShift Angle Headset
Wolf Tooth GeoShift 1º Angle Headset

About Wolf Tooth: Wolf Tooth is a Minnesota-based bicycle accessories and components company built on the foundation of innovative engineering, precision design, and local manufacturing. Founded in 2013, Wolf Tooth began with chainrings and has since expanded to headsets, tools, soft goods, axles, seat collars, grips, and other accessories. In 2016, Wolf Tooth launched Otso Cycles with the purpose of building versatile, performance-first bicycles.

For more information click here.


MENTIONS: @WolfToothComponents



145 Comments

  • 68 0
 My works angleset has been perfect.
  • 22 0
 As have mine, at half the price.
  • 20 1
 Works headsets are great, make great chain rings also. Great customer support too.
  • 16 0
 Only problem with Works is that once you try one you want to add them to all your bikes! I've bought 5 of them.
  • 9 0
 Same. Their -2 deg has been flawless on my 134.
  • 4 0
 @jnroyal: I’ve got 4 Works angle sets in service at this time. Work perfectly. But I’ll be happy to try the Wolf next time.
  • 2 0
 Nice to not have to get it shipped from the UK
  • 3 2
 @HaggeredShins: Works headset is $5 more at Fantaik Bike and only $9 less shipped directly from UK.
  • 4 0
 Love my Works angleset. No issues at all.
  • 1 0
 @jimsmart: $25-30 less shipped isn’t it?
  • 1 0
 @jimsmart: I have a handful of receipts that say otherwise. What you pay today is still less, even with conversion back up.
  • 2 0
 This seems like a really tidy bit of kit but, as others have said, the works components anglesets are utterly reliable and great value. Have 3 bikes with them.
  • 2 0
 @iduckett: just put one in my 2015 153, damn its good
  • 1 0
 @potatomasher: Totally re-upped my bikes game in combo with a longer travel fork. It "modernized" the geo without compromise, if you don't count the unchanged seat tube angle and accept the traits of a reduced HTA (which comes on a new bike anyway...).
  • 41 0
 Interesting this is not far above the Mach6 announcement
  • 2 0
 Dang, LOL, I thought the same thing!
  • 1 0
 coldplay-speed of sound
  • 8 0
 Okay i cant resist. Why doesn’t pivot offer a low setting on their bikes that is actually freaking low? Instead everyone runs it in the low setting as stock.
  • 1 0
 Would actually help with the lack of BB drop as well
  • 1 0
 @Dangerhill: "Why doesn't Pivot" how about "Why doesn't everyone". Just about all companies have this problem. You hit the nail on the head.
  • 5 2
 @Dangerhill: because Pivot is an XC company that has been forced down the path of long travel bikes to stay in business. They are pushing the steeper is better geometry mantra.

Take a look at Turner bikes to see what happens when companies don't stay in front of trends.
  • 4 1
 @salespunk: Ahh yes the tired everyone rides where I do so all bike should follow this formula.
  • 3 2
 @salespunk: LOL you think that their Mach 6, Phoenix, and Firebird are keeping the business afloat. LOLOLOL. They are both RIPPING bikes but if you think that long travel bikes prop up sales you're so far off the mark.
  • 4 1
 @Dangerhill: It is more a folklore and myth than a real need. I ride my FB29 in High and is way better in nearly every aspect. The bike is truly alive all the time. I have done about 320000 vertical metres in two years, trashed one frame and a rim, I jump it, race it, teach with it... Whenever I switch for a couple of weeks, just for the sake of it, to low setting, I always revert. Incomparable agility, pop, clearance and maneuverability. I have also tested the new Enduro... same story.. it is a stupid, train-like sled in low or a freaking fun and versatile bike in high. But I still prefer my FB 29... Way more versatile and equally fast. But I admit that I hate and avoid wide, smooth, flowy, highway-like trails. You will find me on gnarly, steep, slipery and scary stuff.
I guess this wolftooth would come handy to slacken the old switchblade a bit though.
  • 2 1
 @NorCalNomad: Mach6 yes, Phoenix no, Firebird no
  • 1 0
 @Pocair: I have a Stumpjumper Evo (last years less adjustable model) that is extremely low and slack.

Replacing the 27.5 wheels with 29'ers has lifted the BB from 326 to 338mm (estimate) and it's brilliant. The extra hight has made the ride more dynamic, seemingly without loosing any perceivable stability.
Perhaps the higher BB allows it to "tip" into corners with less effort? Not sure, but I do know that I can now pedal on terrain that isn't billiard table smooth.
  • 31 1
 slacker, longer, blah blah blah.

I'm gonna change the game and start running 1° of lateral angle to the right on my steerer Big Grin
  • 11 0
 Genius man!! Do you find it easier to corner in one direction than the other? Well, solve the issue with laterally adjustable headsets.
  • 7 1
 @DrPerceptron: Now you can be worse at cornering on both sides! Great solution, cuz now you have a built in gear issue to blame for your riding!
  • 6 0
 The perfect complement for a Lefty fork.
  • 3 0
 @DrPerceptron: we can just offset the wheels the other direction to balance things out
  • 1 0
 This could be useful for DIY frame builders who end up with a twisted frame from welding distortion but who don't have the equipment for straightening their frame.
  • 4 0
 Sounds like a great option for anyone who isn't an ambi-turner
  • 1 0
 You are on to something. Maybe use this on XC world cup courses that are clockwise or counterclockwise this could be a game changer. Race cars on round/oval tracks already do it.
  • 5 0
 @PJSANAB: no, perfect combo with that new intend fork
  • 9 0
 I wonder how drastic the the effect of headtube length is on these style of anglesets. Works Components sizes theirs in 10mm headtube length increments, now Wolftooth is making theirs in 25mm increments. Not saying that either is right or wrong, I'm just curious if someone more knowledgeable can chime in if the slight differences in headset bearing alignment inherent from +- 12.5mm from ideal headtube length are any more significant than those resulting from headset machining tolerances or headtube manufacturing tolerances.
  • 13 0
 I'd err on the Works side of things, considering it's their only product. Plus the trig seems a lot friendlier to the narrower range of headtube length.
  • 1 2
 Creak fest.
  • 6 1
 Superstar Components also makes them in 10mm increments. More than doubling the interval seems sketchy. I'm no engineer but it seems to me that in the worst case the bearings would be misaligned for a couple of millimeters, ask Hambini what's his opinion on that Big Grin .
Not to mention the price, almost double, not seeing the worth in the WT offer.
  • 2 0
 The trigonometry works out to a maximum error of 0.218mm in the bearing alignment from ideal to the extreme end of the sizing. I don't know what frame tolerances and headset tolerances are in the headtube, but I would guess that manufacturing leads to larger deviations then the 25mm sizing.
  • 18 10
 From what I understand, the Works design doesn't angle the bearings, while the Wolf Tooth and Superstar ones do. Maybe that's why there's more tolerance for headtube length? I've got both a Works and this GeoShift headset in the garage so I'll take some time to compare them shortly.
  • 1 0
 FWIW, I recently installed my old Works -2 on a friend's Honzo with a 25mm difference in headtube length without issue. Maybe not recommended, but seemingly fine.
  • 15 0
 @brianpark: sure they do angle them, just look at the lower cup from the side.
  • 10 0
 @brianpark: Works angles them perfectly. I've got a -2 on a Turner 5.spot and the tilt is obvious to the eye and runs perfectly smooth and creak-free.
  • 3 0
 @Mondbiker: you could be right, I'll try to take some comparison photos.
  • 4 3
 @brianpark -- correct. From what I've seen. Works will offset one or both bearings but doesn't angle them. If they do, I haven't seen it. The WTC ones angle and offset the bearings so there is extremely little bearing misalignment across the range of head tube lengths.
  • 11 0
 @brianpark @bacon53 How on earth would it work if Works didnt angle the bearings?

I have had a few, regardless of if only one cup is offset, the bearings are still angled - how would they align otherwise?

They all do it the same way, as its the only way of doing it.
  • 2 0
 While I can't speak for Works, I did ask them about moving one of their headsets to a bike with a longer HT and they said it really didn't matter and there was loads of tolerance IRL.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: Does the Cane Creek one angle as well? I am looking at an angle set for my bike
  • 2 0
 @jmhills: it's more of a concentric sphere interface, as opposed to a fixed position. That's why they creak like nothing else!
  • 1 0
 @ddspaz: So which is the best angle set on the market that is not ridiculous money?
  • 1 0
 @jmhills: I'd go with the Works, your caveat makes for a pretty impossible combo.
  • 1 0
 @jmhills: well depending on the angle you want and side of headset you could go with works, WT or Superstar - WT is the most expensive but arguably will have better bearings, 1.0 degree and 3 different sizes only though. Superstar cheapest, 2.0 degree only and maybe most basic. Works middle pricing, 3 angles and pretty much every available size. Take your pick.
  • 3 0
 @jmhills: gimbals make self-aligment of the cartridges for the offset cup installed.. but 6/10 times it is installed, will creak.
  • 1 0
 @ddspaz: Well, I was considering the Cane Creek set so that is my pricing window. I am looking for between a half and full degree of adjustability.
  • 3 0
 @jmhills: if you want adjustability you’re stuck with the Cane Creek as that’s the only one that comes with multiple sets of cups for their gimbal and bearings to drop into. All the other ones are a dedicated headset for a given angle and head tube length.

VP made a side-of-the-trail adjustable one almost a decade ago (@mikelevy previewed it at the 2011 Taipei Cycle Show) but it’s long discontinued.
  • 1 0
 @melanthius: Well, I hate creaking noises so I suppose the CC one is out the window. The WT 1 degree does not seem that bad, price wise. I will look at that one. I have to measure the headtube to see which will work best.
  • 10 0
 Slackeriser headsets are one of my favourite bike components.
So many almost-good bikes can be rectified.
Got a -2° slackeriser in a Vitus Mythique to give a contemporary 65° HA.
Plus it steepens the slightly-too-slack SA
  • 2 0
 I agree. My first gen Bronson is a much better all around bike with a 66 hta than it was at 67.
  • 3 15
flag honda50r (Dec 8, 2020 at 12:09) (Below Threshold)
 @MarcusBrody: You really think you can tell 1 degree difference?
  • 9 0
 @honda50r: 100%. I had a -1deg angleset on my Kona Process, taking the HTA from 66 to 65. Very noticeable difference. The front end wandered a little more on the climbs, and I got more stability on the descents.
  • 1 0
 To be honest, if I'd had the choice of -1° or -2° when I bought it, I would have been too timid to get the full -2° and it wouldn't have been enough
  • 3 0
 @honda50r: I did the same to my gen1 Bronson and it did make a difference. You could really tell in the steeps.

Ran the Works, btw. Can't say enough good things about that headset!
  • 3 0
 @honda50r: Definitely. I ran it for a year or two at 67 before switching, so I was pretty used to what it was like before. The change made it noticeably more confident in steeper terrain where there was a bit of chunk. I decided to make the move after starting to go to the bike park a bit more.

I've moved to somewhere that's steep and rocky. There are times now when I wish it was another degree slacker, but from others' experiences it seems like that throws off the balance of the bike a bit. I'll keep it at 66 and get a new bike in a year or two that will be likely in the 64.5- 65 range.
  • 2 0
 @geephlow: I have the Works too in my Bronson. Hasn't made a squeak since I had it installed a couple of years ago. Great product.
  • 2 0
 Yup. A -2° angleset on a V1 bronson or 650B heckler will nearly as good geometry wise as any current production models. To think people were upgrading from a V1 bronson to a V2 bronson is laughable.
  • 11 1
 It doesn't change the head tube angle, it changes the steerer tube angle. And no, I don't want to come to your party because I'll just cast a gloomy pall over it.
  • 9 0
 Is Effective Head Tube Angle a thing?
  • 10 1
 If you wanted to make the steering more responsive wouldn't you start by swapping out that 200mm stem?
  • 4 0
 That stem and stack of headset spacers makes the bike in the graphic look right at home in 2008.
  • 2 0
 Lol. Yeah, right. Surprising that someone at WT really is rocking that relic stem.
  • 1 0
 I hear your jest, but slackening a head angle technically makes steering Less responsive.
  • 2 0
 @mildsauce91: yes, but the press release says you can use it to steepen the head angle and make it more responsive
  • 8 0
 Will this fit on a 2021 Grim Donut?
  • 11 0
 Only to make it steeper.
  • 5 0
 Interesting looking at the infographic. Not only does it slacken the head tube angle, but it lowers the stack height, lowers BB, and steepens the seat tube angle.
  • 6 0
 Not if you add 20mm to your fork length...
  • 2 0
 And seems to lengthen the wheelbase.
  • 19 0
 @Dustfarter: any time you slacken the HTA you're going to grow your wheelbase.
  • 2 0
 @brianpark: What is the benefit in an angleset over offset bushings?
  • 3 0
 @unrooted: now you're doing two things that shorten your reach
  • 1 0
 @mildsauce91: is reach more important than HA?
  • 2 1
 @adrennan: my understanding is that you lengthen the wheelbase, drop the bb and slacken the head angle using both methods, but the offset bushings achieve the same outcomes without changing the angle at which the fork steerer sits within the frame's headtube, meaning the stress of those hits is displaced differently. Other than that, not much.
there's a nice animation here www.offsetbushings.com
  • 5 0
 @adrennan: With an angleset you actually increase your STA instead of slackening it (w/ offset bushings). An angleset also adds some wheelbase. Both have slacker HTA and lower BB, but I’d prefer the angleset if it was going to be left like that for a long period of time.
  • 2 0
 @unrooted: No, just something to be aware of, you may not want to shorten your reach too much. I have a hardtail (Surly Krampus) That I'd love to slacken a bit but the reach is already on the short side, so it's on my mind
  • 1 0
 @iduckett: @coney good answers. thanks for the input.
  • 1 0
 @adrennan: No prob. I looked into this a bit further and the offset bushing may or may not change the wheelbase. It depends on the axle path/suspension curve.
  • 1 0
 @iduckett: The question is, which method lower the BB less? I don't like too low of BB because I'm allergic to pedal strikes.
  • 1 0
 @tacklingdummy: Well? If you don't want to lower it at all, but still rake out your forks, you can use a lower headset cup spacer or an EC lower cup to keep the same front end height/stack. Otherwise you can go to bikegeo.muha.cc to plug in your bike and play with the HTA, and how that affects the BB height. I don't think there's a shock bushing option though, that would require a more in depth kinematics program to see the geo changes.
  • 1 0
 @iduckett: Cool website to crunch the numbers. Yeah, I'm aware of taller lower cup solution. I was going get a taller lower headset cup to raise BB and stack height, but not easy to find one unless replacing entire headset. Even then, there are not many headsets with higher stack lower cups.
  • 5 1
 This things looks to work with ZS44/ZS56 while Works doesn't have a ZS44/ZS56 from what I can see. That may be a win in my opinion, as adding an external cup with the Works components headset might look quite funky.
  • 2 0
 I got a EC44/ZS56 from Works Components. To me it doesn't look funky, however it does add to stack height, which makes it hard to fit used forks with chopped steerers to the already long headtube of Banshee Bikes...
  • 1 0
 I’ve got a works 1.5 and the external cup is pretty much flush with the steerer tube on my meta. Doesn’t look funky once you’re used to an external cup.
  • 1 0
 @Muckal: Funny, it actually reduced the stack height on my Kona. The stock FSA spacer is massive on top! Taller than an EC44 cup.
  • 3 0
 Geeking out a little, it appears this headset shifts the center of the bottom cup forward while Works shifts the center of the upper cup back to change the angle. FWIW, that will limit the reduction in reach that one sees with Works. How much that matters is up for debate.
  • 6 0
 Only +/-1? Works and Superstar go up to +/-2
  • 2 0
 1 degree is very much worth it and anyone saying you can't tell the difference hasnt experienced it (including me till I tried it). An offset headset is a very good value way of updating your bike
Several yrs ago I did 1.5 degs plus an extra 10mm travel on my v1 bronson and the change from 67 stock to @ 65 is glaringly and v enjoyably obvious. I have used Works headsets on several bikes and all without any probs years later
  • 4 2
 Works vs Wolf Tooth:
Adding little stack to the bottom compensate the loss of stack from slackening the head angle, keeping the bikes total stack almost the same. It's the correct way to do it. Works did it the opposite.
WT keeps the top bearing in the center, which does not shorten the reach, works moves it backwards and unnecessarily shortens the reach.
WT is probably fully sealed, comparing the the Works which is known not to be sealed well and eat more bearings than average.

Works $90 shipped to US/CA
Wolf Tooth $114 shipped to US/CA

I would say extra $24 are totally worth it for all the above benefits.
  • 2 0
 Not sure you have looked hard enough at this:

- The WT top bearing is not in the centre, it is offset, clearly seen in the images, it is just by a smaller amount and even then it will be something like 1mm vs 2mm for the Works 1.0 setup - that’s right, you save a whopping 1mm reach at the bearing.
- The WT lower cup doesn’t have a larger stack, it’s internal just like the Works one (in 44/56 option) so there is no compensation for stack.
  • 1 0
 Is your name Zachary Lott by the way? Apologies if not.
  • 1 0
 On the flipside, with the Works you have the option of going with a longer travel fork, to compensate for the lower front end.
  • 2 0
 @iduckett: How so? both the WT and Works one in ZS56 type use the same zero stack lower cups, they literally look to be within a millimetre or so of each other’s.
  • 2 0
 @justanotherusername: Yes, right, the ZS56 are the same. I saw the EC cup in the picture and took Zach's comment to mean their whole lineup has an EC cup. My point about the longer travel fork still stands, though you can do it for either brand.
  • 2 0
 @justanotherusername: The WT is def sneakier though. As Zach2 mentioned Works EC cup isn't centered at the top which sticks out in pictures. WT not so much. And you get the slight reach benefit. Could be a benefit for pros hiding an angleset...
  • 2 0
 @iduckett: 1mm or something like that at the bearing isn’t much of a reach benefit.
  • 4 0
 Does the -1 spec take into account the lowering of the headtube which makes most -1 anglesets less than a -1 degree change?
  • 1 0
 I believe the angle between the frame and fork is changed by 1 degree. The makers of headset cannot assume too much about the frame geometry, since bikes come in many shapes and sizes.
  • 1 0
 I'm curious, because I have installed a few works angle headsets...

Does anyone make a good tool to install anglesets? Perhaps something that could key into the bearing recess to drive them in straight?

Or how do other people do these?

I have always made a cardboard wedge and used the park tool press...but there has to be a better way...
  • 5 0
 I struggled tried to install mine the "correct" way with a bearing press. Finally tried the rubber mallet method instead and it worked like a charm.
  • 4 0
 One of the few cases where you’re worse off using the “correct” tool. Headset press will usually skew the cup when you’re trying to get it started since the top of the cup isn’t perpendicular to the head tube by design. I usually start them with a wood block and mallet, then maybe switch to the press once it’s for sure going in square. Still might mark the cup if you don’t use cardboard or something though.

It would be cool if manufacturers of angle headsets sold matching drifts for installation, but they would probably cost as much as the headset. Actually, if you had two sets of the same angle cups you could use one as a drift if you flipped it and spun it around to cancel out the angle...
  • 1 0
 @huntingbears: It amazes me those drifts dont exist for sale...you know WC techs have made some for their own use...keyed into the bearing seat and appropriately angled at the top to make the press drive them straight without shifting around or fudging the headtube or cups.

Come on Marshy, make them for us!

I have basically done exactly what you described, I use the cardboard wedges to stop from marking them at the final stages. But as a professional mechanic, I feel like a garage BMX brat using a wood block or mallet...it just isn't right...also, I have found they often spin a few arbitrary degrees (even when they are started 1/4 inch or so straight) and they need knocked out until luck finds them clocked straight in the frame - super annoying, and cant be good on frames.

Thanks for your comment.
  • 1 0
 Anybody happen to try this with the Yeti sb5.5? I know they used a custom external cup to slacken Richie Rude's race bike a few years back to achieve a similar effect. I really think my sb5.5 would rip with a slacker head angle but I'm worried about altering the geometry too much.
  • 1 0
 Can vouch for both Works and Superstar's slacksets being good quality and durable.
Picked up another -2deg Superstar one for £35 in their recent sale.
Twice the slackening for half the price.
  • 3 1
 What makes this any different from Works Components? I don't see them on Pinkbike despite being $40 cheaper...
  • 7 0
 I’d also like to know, I have 2 degree works headsets on 2 of my bikes, zero issues after several years.
  • 2 0
 Pinkbike did feature them back in 2014 (?) when Works components first made an angle set. This isn't excactly new and revolutionary technology...

Edit: actually seems like they've been around since 2011.
  • 3 1
 This place the additional external stack to the bottom side of the head tube. This will increase the axle to crown height in addition to slacking out the head angle. The Works places the external stack height on top of the head tube leaving your axle to crown unchanged. Either get the job done, but the Works achieves this without the added change to the fork.
  • 3 0
 @Focotrailrider: It´s the same with works and the same headtube dimensions, 56mm is ZS for both. Big difference is that works offers them in 1, 1.5 or 2 degrees and for pretty much every headtube standard out there.
  • 1 2
 See my reply above. A few differences, and it's not $40, unless you plan on flying to the UK and picking it up there.
  • 3 0
 @WolfToothComponents the link to the website is broken (wwww.)
  • 3 0
 Good to see an American version.
  • 2 0
 "made to fit the largest possible ball size" wish they'd made some underwear to match their headset.
  • 1 2
 They did, from 6061 aluminum. Wasn't a great product.
  • 1 0
 @Zach2: But where they light and stiff ?
  • 1 0
 whats different between this and what scott did for years with the gambler cups? (aside from more options than just 1.5 headtube/1.125 steerers)
  • 1 0
 I have a -2 Works on my Kona Wozo which has been flawless. With that being said, I did order the Wolftooth for my “race” bike.
  • 3 1
 Superstar had those for years, at cheaper prices as well.
  • 2 0
 Who uses stems that long?
  • 2 0
 Works components has all these guys beat still by leaps and bounds.
  • 1 0
 Will it work on a 2016 Specialized Stumpjumper?
  • 2 0
 Time to read up on what headset size/standard you are currently running.
  • 1 0
 No but it will fit a 2017 Ridley LS
  • 1 0
 Does Superstar ship their stuffs to USA?
  • 1 0
 While they release rad product, photo with 90mm stem looks just so 2020
  • 1 0
 Has anyone used an angleset on 2019+ Canyon Strive?
  • 1 0
 I reckon Jack Moir probably has.
  • 1 0
 What is with the 100mm stem?
  • 1 0
 First world solution to a first world problem...
  • 1 1
 What is the increase on axle to crown distance?
  • 2 0
 Axle to crown is a measurement of the fork? It should only change if you change the travel of your fork or install a different fork. If you’re asking about stack height, then it depends on what headset you had before. The wolf tooth headset shouldn’t be much different.
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