Wolf Tooth ReMote Sustain Cable Conversion for RockShox Reverb Droppers - Review

Sep 7, 2017
by Richard Cunningham  
Wolf Tooth ReMote Sustain


Wolf Tooth Components has developed an alternative to RockShox’s hydraulic-actuated remote control that converts Reverb Stealth droppers (both type A and B models) to cable actuation. Named the ReMote Sustain, the kit includes one of Wolf Tooth’s three existing aftermarket remote levers, two compatible with SRAM Matchmaker or Shimano iSpec direct mounts, and their low-profile clamp-on design, which is what we ordered for this review. The cable, housing, and ends are top drawer components from Jagwire, and the heart of the ReMote system is an intelligently simple, two-piece device that mechanically depresses the same button at the base of the Reverb post that the RockShox hydraulic system operates – sans the messy oil. The ReMote Sustain is said to require 15 minutes and the simplest of tools to install (I can vouch for that) and its maker claims that the remote lever action is lighter and much more responsive. MSRP is $89.99 USD for the kit, with your choice of direct-mount or bar-clamp remote lever.


ReMote Sustain Details:

• Leak-proof, robust, low-maintenance mechanical actuation system
• Easy cable detachment for service or shipping
• A 40mm (1 5/8”) reduction of in-frame height (compared to Connectamajig-equipped Reverbs)
• Straightforward 15-minute installation
• Reverb Stealth generation A2 and B1 compatibility
• Included Jagwire polished stainless steel cable and housing
• Wolf Tooth's low-profile, high-traction lever
• Easily-installed “UpFront” cable fixing
• A large-diameter 21mm ball-bearing pivot
• Breakaway axle pivot saves remote in case of a crash
• Integrated brake lever mounting for Shimano I-Spec and SRAM Matchmaker X
MSRP: $89.99 USD (lever, module, cable, housing, and hardware)
• Contact: Wolf Tooth Components
Wolf Tooth ReMote Sustain
The Wolf Tooth conversion allowed me to insert the Reverb post deeper into this Ibis frame, so I could use a longer-stroke,150mm model.

Wolf Tooth’s remote lever is about the same size and shape as the latest thumb paddle from RockShox, but without the size and complexity of its hydraulic mechanism. If you have one of those, there’s little reason to entertain the switch to the ReMote Sustain system. If you are still using the old push button, however, Wolf Tooth’s thumb paddle alone is worth the conversion. The action is more intuitive because it mirrors that of the shift lever. It modulates precisely, so it’s easier to select a mid-point saddle height, and the feel is lighter.

Wolf Tooth ReMote Sustain
Wolf Tooth's ReMote lever is adaptable to many cable-operated dropper posts, including the Sustain conversion.
RockShox Reverb 1x remote
RockShox recently released its hydraulically-actuated thumb paddle for Reverb Droppers.

Wolf Tooth’s two-piece actuator replaces the hydraulic piston assembly that threads into the butt end of the Reverb post. Anyone who can remove a snap-ring, operate a shock pump, and wield wrenches should be able to remove the hydraulics and install ReMote Sustain in less than half an hour, with most of that time devoted to threading the cable housing through your frame. Tutorials are available on Wolf Tooth’s web pages.

Wolf Tooth ReMote Sustain
The aluminum Sustain module threads into the Reverb Base.
Wolf Tooth ReMote Sustain
The cable end tucks under the slot in the bridge inside the module.
Wolf Tooth ReMote Sustain
A forked Delrin rod traps the cable end inside the module. The cable is fixed, the housing actuates the post.

The ReMote Sustain takes up less space than the stock actuator – 40mm less if your Reverb uses a Connectamajig OEM quick-release fitting. Many frames have limited insertion, which means many riders can’t slide their posts low enough into their seat tubes to achieve their correct saddle heights with longer-stroke dropper posts. That 40mm of extra insertion can be the difference between either settling for a 120mm or moving up to a 150mm-stroke post.

Wolf Tooth ReMote Sustain
The two elements of the Sustain module are trapped by the cable housing. Once the free end of the cable is fixed to the ReMote lever the forked actuator piston remains locked in place. Yanking on the housing won't actuate the Reverb.

Trail Report

My first run in with a cable-remote conversion for Reverb Stealth hydraulics was the DeHy system, which has been running beautifully for over a year. Wolf Tooth’s ReMote Sustain conversion is slightly easier to install, because the fixed cable-end goes into the fitting that threads into the post, while the adjustable, free-end of the cable is fixed at the remote lever. (DeHy and the Fox Transfer post are the opposite.) Wolf Tooth’s configuration allows you to make all of the housing and cable-length adjustments at the handlebar, where those tasks are far easier to see and execute.

Wolf Tooth ReMote Sustain
The free end of the cable is anchored behind the thumb paddle.
Wolf Tooth ReMote Sustain
A look at the ReMote's sealed bearing and plastic breakaway axle.

The ReMote lever is beautifully manufactured, with a large ball bearing pivot and a textured thumb paddle that plays well with gloved hands. The clamp-type lever I installed takes up little real estate on the bar, so it can be set on either side of the brake lever perch to place the paddle in the most convenient location. I chose the inside of the perch, where it duplicates the position of the right-side shift paddle.

There is no return spring in the Wolf Tooth system, so you’ll need to dial out all of the cable play to keep the ReMote lever feeling crisp. It operates fine with a small amount of slack in the cable, but that can make the lever feel imprecise. Once tuned to perfection, however, the Wolf Tooth remote remains responsive and intuitive, and you’ll probably never need to twist the barrel adjuster again.

Wolf Tooth ReMote Sustain
Wolf Tooth's Shimano iSpec direct-mount lever...
Wolf Tooth ReMote Sustain
...And the SRAM Matchmaker X direct-mount option.


Ergonomics are very good. Not quite as good as the DeHy lever it replaced, which has a smoother feeling action, assisted by a return spring. I think that the raised friction elements on the Wolf Tooth paddle would be a bit much for bare thumbs, but I wear gloves most of the time, which mate perfectly with the textured surface. Considering how many racers use friction tape on their shift and dropper paddles, I think most riders will prefer the ReMote thumb paddle as-delivered


Pinkbike's Take:

bigquotesWolf Tooth's ReMote Sustain is the second cable-conversion I have used on the RockShox Reverb dropper post and I am sold on the concept. The feedback I get through the cable is better and I like being able to raise or lower the post precisely where I want it when I need an in-between saddle height. Reverb owners who can spare the steep entry fee will be stoked to join the cable-actuated club.RC



134 Comments

  • + 82
 As a bike mechanic, I dont get it whats with all that hate for SRAMs hydraulic actuator? You bleed it and it works like a charm first go for the whole season! Cables on the other hand.. They give me headaches! Ensuring proper tension on the cable, dust and mud make them sluggish over time, they loose tension...
  • + 7
 I agree. Had a reverb from 2012 to 2016. One bleed upon setup and 4 years of no problems. Switch to a cable and have had 3 issues already. Maybe its bc I have a KS...
  • + 21
 I'm surprised. My biggest issues with the hydraulic button on the reverb was how slowly it would move in colder weather. My reverb was useless in 40-50 degree weather. That's Fahrenheit. It's so easy to remove the post with a cable. Maintaining tension is also a breeze when you have the tension adjustment right by the handle. It seems so infrequently necessary to do anyway. As for mud and stuff, I can see the argument there. I've still never had issues with that, though. And lubricating the cable is also a breeze if it comes to that. I think the reverb should stay a hydraulic seat post simply for that fact that it is different and therefore will always have a fan-base of loyal customers who swear by hydro posts. Otherwise they'd just be another mechanical seat-post
  • + 6
 I love to work around my bikes but I'm far from a good mechanic. However, after first several rides with Reverb I had to bleed damn thing. With a little help from You Tube it was a slow but easy process.
My bike and me had a little bit of quality time, I learned something new and Reverb is working flawlessly ever sInce.
Cable actuated remote (for me) would be an answer to the problem that don't actually exist.
  • + 10
 I have owned 3 reverbs over the years, every single one started f*cking out within 3 months of use. Each one I removed, flushed old oil, bled it fit back to the bike. Another couple months, exactly the same problem. Having to replace a 5£ cable every few months rather than a full on bleed will definitely appeal to more folks. I've had my cable dropper on for 5months now, absolutely no issue. The time of the reverb is over, move that shit on Sram!

Wolftooth components are incredible though, good work on finding this reverb solution!
  • + 4
 Agreed, two Reverbs running since 2014, one bleed, no problems at all. And honestly, I find the old actuator quite good to handle, if you install it below the bar. (Had some KindShocks before, worked also flawless)
  • - 2
 cable tension? who gives a shtt about cable tension.
  • + 5
 @cliffdog: You didn't bleed it properly or the problem was something else not in the remote line. The actuation line is the least of the Reverbs' problems but if anything is wrong people think they need to bleed the remote. I had number of problems with four Reverbs (sag etc.) through 4-5 years but never with the remote. Once it's bled properly you don't need to touch it your Reverb will die before you have to bleed it again.
I picked up a SRAM 1x remote to replace the crappy original push button and it works like a charm I don't see myself messing with and replacing cables especially as this Wolftooth remote costs the same as the 1x SRAM.
  • + 4
 We can always count on sram to solve problems that don't actually exist.. Why the hell go for a messy, fragile and maintenance intensive system when you can use a simple cable just like anyone else? I'm on my third Reverb now and all of them have started acting up within months, the current one needs to be bled at least every month to stay smooth.
  • + 3
 My only issue with my sram remote is that my thumb slides off it when I'm really sweaty. Might have to switch to full finger gloves or try some grip tape. But, I do like the low maintenance (so far).
  • + 4
 It's just a weird and unnecessary actuation method. Adds complexity and cost, for marginal benefit, if any at all. I've heard more complaints for the hydraulic actuation than I've ever heard for cables.
  • + 13
 Is anyone that's going to say "works flawlessly" going to mention anything about cold weather? Heck, even chili weather? Mild winter weather will freeze up a reverb. Anyone going to talk about that??
  • + 3
 Yep...totally agree. Ran a Reverb for 2 years with no issues...and I never once serviced it. The remote started leaking on year 3, bought a new remote, bled it, worked flawlessly once again. I've tried other cable actuated posts and have had nothing but problems. And from my experience, cable replacement and setting the correct tension is much more of a pain than bleeding the Reverb remote.
  • + 2
 i prefer cable over reverb because i can work on cables easily at home. i dont like bleeding hydraulics myself
  • + 3
 My problem with the reverb is that stupid push button remote. I can't afford 200 to upgrade to the under the bar lever so I'm stuck with a lever my hands can't actuate while riding and still have full grip of the bars. It screwed me in a race. Specialized command post lever was way easier so going from that to the reverb was a bit disappointing. Longer stroke is nice. But not worth it if I can't actually get it to drop in a panic situation.
  • + 4
 I've got 2 Reverbs and have had 3 or 4 mechanical remote droppers. The Reverb remotes have been a lot more work and worst yet they have failed me on several rides. Cable remotes haven't been an issue and I am only changing the cable/housing once a year in the PNWet.
  • + 5
 I agree with you, i've never had a bleed issue on 4 reverbs now (we have a lot of bikes). I guess having a background in moto mechanics helps, I suspect a lot of the general public hasn't bled motorcycle brakes every weekend before racing (sofornot2die).

There are tricks to bleeding a hydraulic system properly, most people just have no clue.
  • + 2
 I've had issues in the cold with the reverb
  • + 2
 @JacksonTM: Push button remote does suck, but the Reverb 1x emote is $85, not $200, and a much better solution I think than replacing it with something that requires more maintenance and doesn't feel as good.
  • + 0
 You don't have much elevation change during your rides, do you?
  • + 3
 @captainspaulding: A simple cable requiring more maintenance than that hydraulic contraption sram use...? I've used a cheap KS post for a while after reverb number 2 shat the bed and even under the worst conditions I had zero issues with the cable getting a lot of friction or anything like that.

Must admit that a fresh reverb is smooth as butter but it only takes a few muddy rides for it to start feeling grittier.
  • + 0
 @fr3er1d3r: about the cold, I rode plenty of times in cold weather (including a bunch of elevation change @skelldify ) . My reverb did slow a few times but never froze. I don't miss the remote though. I never liked the positioning of it on the old models.
  • + 0
 @nekislav : Agreed. Cable on my Race Face Turbine has already snapped twice at the trigger mid-ride. Really considering a new Reverb.
  • + 1
 I've had 3 different Reverbs with no issues over the years. I run a bike service business from my garage and have serviced a few reverbs that weren't working correctly and every time, it was because the internal seal head wasn't tight enough which is an easy fix. Not that this should happen. With that being said, I've come across issues with pretty much all dropper brands.
  • + 1
 I should clarify that by elevation change I meant between low and high points for where the bike is located. I live at 6,000 feet, but regularly ride above 10,000 feet in the summer. My Reverb did not work well due to the pressure changes.
  • + 1
 Makes sense. I live at 4800 and biked at 9700. Must have been lucky.
  • + 2
 @fr3er1d3r: mmmmm chili weather! yummy
  • + 1
 @bonkywonky: I'd normally agree, but it's pretty easy bleeding it with the reverb 1x, if you ever have to bleed it(that's kinda my point, mine never needed a bleed first 2 years, in the same time I would be changing a cable atleast once in a cable actuated dropper). That being said I've had issues with a KS post(2017 eten) with only 2-3 rides on it and my Reverb made it 2 years before it needed to be rebuilt(I thought it needed a bleed, turned out it needed a rebuild and some updated SRAM bits which they supplied w/a rebuild kit for free). It's still kind of a crap-shoot it seems with droppers..
  • + 1
 Has anyone else had a crash where they busted the hydraulic line off the remote? It happened to me halfway through a MTB roadtrip and I was left with a non-functional dropper for three days. It was a simple OTB, but the way the remote sits on top makes the remote hose barb very vulnerable, and it snapped off the threaded portion, no way to fix without a replacement part, which none of the local bike shops had in stock. I never minded the hydraulic remote until then, but I also learned to travel with a spare hose barb. If I had the wolf tooth remote I would travel with a spare plastic breakaway doodad.
  • + 0
 To everyone who have issues with reverb in cold - for all my reverbs I use mineral oil for brakes. It speeds up the post and the lever. Just flush out reverb oil and reassamble with mineral oil. Same goes for lever. Sram probably wont be happy about it but it works a treat on mine for years without a hassle!
  • + 1
 @fr3er1d3r: same problem... Im going for the cable.
  • + 26
 Theres a reason NO OTHER manufacturer makes a hydraulic cable dropper post. Its not cuz its harder to do and better, its a maintenance liability. Take a hint from this product SRAM. -sincerely Bike mechanic and ex-reverb owner
  • + 28
 I frickin love Wolf Tooth. Their stuff is legit. Why wouldn't Rockshox have done this in the first place? When my Reverb needs servicing this will be on my bench waiting!
  • + 3
 Pulling the housing instead of the cable is a losing way to go. KS used to do it and switched. The housing catches too easily on stuff inside the frame.
  • + 2
 but the hydraulic actuator isn't the problem with reverbs- they're easy enough to bleed and lightweight. it's that the air and oil in the actual locking mechanism easily passes seals and goes all squishy-if it's cold, if you lift the saddle when down, if you look at it wrong a couple times. ain't matter how well your cable actuator is working when that happens
  • + 9
 The wolf tooth remote is hands down my favorite. I wonder though how many people will do this conversion over the new paddle remote that SRAM has now? It's actually laughable that people have been putting up with that joke of a lever for this long..
  • + 5
 I just got the new 1x remote and I'll say that while it's a million times better than the old button it's huge and still a PITA to bleed. I might go for this when I'm due for maintenance.
  • + 5
 Well, This is still 30 bucks cheaper than the new remote from SRAM
  • + 3
 @DrPete: I watched the SRAM video and it took me total 5 minutes to bleed the 1x remote. Working like a charm since...
  • + 2
 @bosnianrider: still more of a mess than a cable.
  • + 1
 @DrPete: All I can say for me it's not... I have other reasons why I dislike the Reverb - the sag that it develops very quickly - but never had a single problem with the remote.
  • + 1
 @bosnianrider: yeah, I get that it's a preference thing. For droppers I just find the cable easier to deal with, and I don't love the squishy feel. It's definitely better with the new remote but I don't love it. Definitely not a performance or reliability issue for me.
  • + 7
 Ok. The little button is a bit 'liitle'. But seriously, how do people have such issues with reverbs?! Do you bleed them badly or what? Comments above about bleeding two or three times a year. They are fit and forget. I had one for nearly 5 years fettle free until it got a top sag and it had a really hard life. The other two have been fine as well.
Bit of soft side velcro on the button makes a big difference.
  • + 8
 You must have had the best reverb ever produced, because mine was getting sag three or four times a year and had to be bled every two months. I know at least 15 other people that had a Reverb some time on their bike and only ONE of them had good things to say about it. Play, sag and bleed issues in all but one. That makes 1 in 16 good Reverbs and that's a shitty product in my book
  • + 4
 the only thing wrong with a reverbs is the owner in most cases.
  • + 5
 Talk to the shops and the mechanics, it's them who see the worst of it. Dozens of posts going back on warranty, some just stopped selling them altogether because it just wasn't worth the hassle. I can't speak from personal experience because that was enough to put me off, but I can't fault my cable actuated Giant, and it's been fitted for over 18 months.
  • + 2
 I totally agree. 3rd year on reverb. Sent back for the air-drop problem, but still.. stealth routing always awkward to get the length from new, but it's as easy as just cutting it at the lever and then taking the time to bleed it and it was done, absolutely flawless. I believe some people love to hate. My GF has a KS post, been working fine, but getting tired now and you have to make sure that the cable is secured millimeter perfect otherwise it either drops on its own or doesn't drop at all. She doesn't want a Reverb, simple because it's RockShox not Fox..... you can see how people start to form allegences. -.-
  • + 3
 I think that SRAM pushes out some unbelievable engineering, but it's just too complicated or SSLT. I've got a set of Elixir 7s on my hardtail that I ridden to death and 5 years on still haven't needed bleeding. Many sets of pads and a few rotors and still running quiet and smooth.....
  • + 2
 @shoshy: Reverb sag, play etc. has nothing to do with bleeding the remote. If you bleed the remote properly you don't have to touch it until your Reverb dies. Reverb can still be a shitty product but for me with four Reverbs in five years I never had a single issue with the remote they are just fit, bleed properly and forget. But sag on the other hand...
  • + 2
 @b45her: No the button remote is pure and utter shit, Sram must have some engineers who were taken off the nipple too soon and have a button fixation, levers work period
  • + 0
 it depends on the reverb
i had one for 3 years that was never serviced or had any problems , maybe because it was one ith the cable external routed instead of the stealth
once i changed to a stealth, every 3/4 months i would send it to warranty because it was sagging out of nowhere , only stooped when they changed the seals and some more things from the new ones that came up last year

and not even talking about the fact that when 5º or less it stops to work properly
  • + 1
 @b45her: not at our shop, we have plenty that will just start sagging. The fact that sram will just tell us to send them in warranty means they are used to seeing it and have accepted the fact their posts have issues. Pretty much all dropper do but with some cable options if your post dies on a ride you can still ride out without having your knees in your chest.
  • + 1
 @gkeele: We have sold loads if revebs and fitted loads, we only see problems when they have been fitted poorly or "My mates a mechanic and he serviced it for me " problems lol
  • + 1
 @KiwiXC: They skimp at the wrong places. There are lots of issues with the reverb but the oil not liking temperatures under 10 *C (TEN!!) is just taking the piss. Why don't my shimano brakes (and admittably, RS forks) miss a beat when the reverb completely stops working and needs to be bled in order to revive (pun very much intended) it?
  • + 9
 The only reason I stick with the Reverb is the hydro lever. I hate pushing dirty cables. It's way less maintenance.
  • + 2
 Well, my Reverbs hydro levers don't like to actuate the post below freezing unless they have a perfect bleed, so I end up bleeding them a couple of times during the winter. And a couple of times the rest of the year. I wouldn't call them less maintenance.
  • + 0
 @jasdo: Freezing? Man, there is oil.
  • + 5
 @Pauiko: Reverb hydro levers straight up don't work in the cold. Learned this one the hard way.
  • + 6
 Have had three Reverbs on three different bikes. Never had a single issue with any, with exception of simple bleed to cure slowdown maybe once a year. My first Reverb was untouched and still like new after three years use. I don't get the issue's with them personally.
  • + 1
 Same here, had to pump some new air into the oldest reverb. That said, the old remote is far from ergonomic. The new remotes are so damn expensive tho...
  • + 0
 just be happy that you had luck with yours. accept that others have issues. I have one reverb that is fine, the other 2 are not.
  • + 1
 I was exactly the same as you. Had reverb for three years with zero problems. Then the one I got in 2015 started sagging.I got it serviced with new seals and everything else for €100. Came back, worked for a while then the dropper started getting slow again after maybe 2 weeks. I bled it multiple times. No difference. Sent it back again, shop said they can bleed it again but the air is getting past the actuator seals and there isn't much they can do aside from replace the actuator for a lot of money again and then pray that works for a long time. They say actuators can cause problems within weeks on brand new reverb posts.

They are a balls of a system when they go wrong which cause untold hardship, frustration and money. For the price they are, they should not be disposable just because they begin to develop problems.

I was lucky for three years, you have been too. Don't assume that's the way it will always stay. Their poor design and quality control will come back to bite you in the arse.
  • + 8
 Buying a Wolf Tooth remote was the best thing I could have done for my Thomson dropper.
  • + 5
 It's the best thing for any dropper. Love mine for my Transfer.
  • + 2
 Getting one for my Giant made the post just like a bought one!
  • + 3
 was the best thing for the Fox Transfer. except that perhaps I should have opted for the longer version.
  • + 9
 Poor SRAM always needs their hydraulic products fixed...
  • + 5
 I see no problems with the newest 1x lever from sram. To me this conversion kit just adds hassle and another thing to go wrong.
  • + 4
 Actually, it completely takes away the one thing that goes wrong with reverbs. That's the entire point.
  • + 3
 This is still way simpler than the 1x remote.
  • + 5
 @churchburner: the reverb lever hydraulic system is basic, just like a brake. When Reverbs go it is typically one of the seals in the internals which this lever doesn't change.
  • + 1
 @churchburner: the 1? thing that goes wrong with reverbs?
  • + 2
 @churchburner: For me sag is the biggest problem with revebs and this remote does absolutely nothing about that. Never had a single problem with remotes once they were bled properly. Same with sram 1x remote, it took 10-15 minutes to install with bleeding.
  • + 1
 The new 1x remotes are heavy as. They are as heavy as a brake lever. A little metal paddle and cable is a lighter system at the bare minimum.
  • + 1
 @JacksonTM: Have you actually held it? It's def. lighter than a brake lever, I dunno where you get that. It's on par with my wolftooth remote on my other bike. Factor in there is no metal cable running thru the housing and I'd be surprised if this conversion is any lighter. The action is also much smoother on the hydraulic vs cable, I really don't see much reason to choose the wolftooth remote over the reverb 1x remote.
  • + 1
 @captainspaulding: I have held one, I've installed 2 on 2018 Santa Cruz bikes for the floor. It's much heavier than the old remote. And I think it would be heavier as a system than a cable and lever system, however, I agree it is a better solution for a reverb post. I'm of the opinion that a cable system through and through is better. The specialized command post, apart from only offering 125mm of travel Is my personal favorite right now. But the fox transfer is up there having not ridden one yet. Converting to a half and half system seems a bit silly though I agree.
  • + 2
 So the housing actuates the post, and not the cable? Does anyone else see an issue with this with tight frame routing or grommets preventing the housing from sliding through the frame? I remember the first generation of LEV Integras had that and they were all changed because no one could get any of them to work properly.
  • + 1
 Agreed, those LEV integras were garbage because of this housing moves system.
  • + 2
 I've said it before, I've made a few pound fixing all manner of issues with Reverbs - too many to count. My problem with the hydraulic button is this:

1. A relatively minor crash resulting in a spin of the bars can snap the tiny 2mm diameter barb that screws into the hose. That said, I fitted the new Reverb lever to a customer's bike last week and noticed this weakness should be reduced, as the hose is better supported by a large nut that extends out past the barb.

2. The button/actuation rod is hollow and snaps too easily. Also, the plastic collar/bush that the button/actuation rod goes into / through, is too brittle and snaps. Its circa £35 for the button and plastic collar and about 1 hour to repair. So circa £70 repair - IF the useless UK importer, Fishers has stock! The type that sits above the bar commonly snap when clumsy riders turn their bikes upside down resting the bike's weight on the button. When placed below the bar, sometimes a knee strike or crash snaps the rod.

A cable operated system is simply more robust than the relatively fragile standard reverb lever.
  • + 2
 "fixed cable-end goes into the fitting that threads into the post, while the adjustable, free-end of the cable is fixed at the remote lever. (DeHy and the Fox Transfer post are the opposite.)"

Isn't this exactly how the Transfer works? Fixed head at the post, clamps at the lever?

www.pinkbike.com/news/fox-transfer-dropper-seat-post-review-2016.html
  • + 1
 The lever itself I think works both ways, but yes, the fox dropper makes it work that way that's kinda funny they got that wrong.
  • + 4
 Cable actuated dropper to arrive to replace the Reverb altogether. Meanwhile, I feel the air raise up in it, inside my shed I wait and bleed.
  • + 1
 Nice. Early days, but got me thinking what has been the most upvoted comment you've ever made has been, any ideas? or most down voted
  • + 3
 How's the seal at the cable entry on the lever.....
That open design Looks like it could let in a lot of moisture/muck in shitty conditions
  • + 2
 Just slip a cable condom on in front of the housing boss! Yeah, you'll get some debris in there but by the time it's bad enough to warrant maintenance the cable will have frayed to the point of replacement (see top photo).
  • + 1
 I don't really have any reliability problems with me Reverb.. I've burped a nice big bubble out, but aside from that, it's been problem free for over a year. That being said,. I think the "button" is terrible, and would like one of the shifter-style remotes.
  • + 1
 A lot of people on here aren't crashing enough: I snapped the hose connector twice in 2 months, once racing, once in a bike park: you can't do a trail-fix with no hydraulic hose.
eBayed the reverb and got the Fox version simply because it has a cable not a costly liability hose.
  • + 1
 I'm all for solutions to the reverb remote and having to bleed it all the time, however that top picture shows why this design is not a good idea if you don't want to change cables all the time. You can see the cable fraying and getting ready to break because it's clamped at the lever. This was the reason I didn't like my Thompson dropper. Why not clamp it at the post? The force is much too high for it to be clamped at the lever.
  • + 1
 I'm on 3rd reverb. First was a warranty; second has performed without any issues and without any maintenance for c.18 months; third (warranty replacement for first) is trouble and on the verge of going back to SRAM. I ordered one of the new reverb 1x remotes last week, if I hadn't done so I would likely have gone for the Wolf Tooth ReMote Sustain. I use a Wolf Tooth ReMote on a Thomson dropper, ergonomics are far superior to the stock Thomson lever.
  • + 1
 "Wolf Tooth’s ReMote Sustain conversion is slightly easier to install, because the fixed cable-end goes into the fitting that threads into the post, while the adjustable, free-end of the cable is fixed at the remote lever. (DeHy and the Fox Transfer post are the opposite.)"

About the comment that the Fox Transfer is the opposite, I don't think this is true. I have 2 of them, and the fixed cable end goes to the post, and the free-end is fixed at the remote lever... Unless I'm missing something, this operates the exact same as the Transfer.
  • + 1
 I’ve used both the new 1X remote and the Wolf Tooth for a couple months each, and if you’re upgrading the remote on your Reverb the Wolf Tooth wins hands down. It’s like 1/5 the size, lever action feels better, and the cable makes for easier maintenance.
  • + 1
 I like the idea of this as I have a reverb on one bike and a lev on another with a southpaw lever. I find myself dropping the lev more throughout rides and I think it's because of the more ergonomic position. Whenever I'm back on the bike with the reverb it takes me a moment to remember the remote is above the bar, the under bar position just feels more natural.
  • + 3
 Lots of people run the reverb button under the bar - you just have to buy the option that mounts on the 'wrong' side...
  • + 4
 This looks like the simplicity of a Fox Transfer remote on a Reverb Stealth. Pretty badass.
  • + 1
 I had the opportunity to prototype this on my bike, and with over 300 miles on the ReMote system, I've had zero issues...I wish I could say the same for the hydraulic-actuated levers I've used. This actually got me back on a Reverb, which I vowed to never use again after leaving me on the mountain with a stuck up or down seatpost on several occassions. Thank you Lindarets and Wolf Tooth for answering the call for a solution to a legitimate problem. No more slow action on cold days (at least not above the belt), or constant bleeds. I fully understand that SRAM fixed some of this with their new lever, but it looks like you have another brake on your bars. I prefer the simple alternative of a cable-actuated remote. Thanks!
  • + 3
 Best upgrade to a Reverb is to sell said Reverb and get a post that actually works.
  • + 0
 "Many frames have limited insertion, which means many riders can’t slide their posts low enough into their seat tubes to achieve their correct saddle heights with longer-stroke dropper posts. That 40mm of extra insertion can be the difference between either settling for a 120mm or moving up to a 150mm-stroke post."

We could all use an extra 40mm of insertion for our longer stroke posts.
  • + 2
 This looks compelling. I live in Bellingham WA and the Reverb was all sorts of trouble last winter in the consistent 25-40 degree weather...
  • + 0
 I would really like to try this... my previous reverb was leaking and I had it rebuilt $180 and as soon as it was installed it started leaking again. My new one so far hasn't had any problems, but I think this would be a similar and easier to maintain design overall.
  • + 0
 there is more com-plaints over reverbs why? because they have sold 1000,s more than any other brand and still are
so naturally having thousands more than the competition will mean theres more reverbs go faulty

there still the best dropper on the market
all the people worrying about bleeding it you only need to bleed the lever it takes 30 seconds .
the hydraulic push button is hardly a chore and a new b1 version can be bough in the uk for £180.00 GBP
no brainer

the above wingers are the same folk who 2 years ago were saying why spend £300.00 on dropping your sadlel when a quick release does the job
sadly for out 0f 10 decent folk there's always one idiot
  • + 3
 Why did SRAM even make a hydraulic seatpost to begin with? Anyone know the story?
  • + 4
 One advantage of RockShox's hydraulic actuator is that you can cram it against unseen internals inside the seat tube and it will still function just fine. Cable types need space to move. Also, hydraulics, by nature, are sealed against the elements.
  • + 0
 @RichardCunningham: unseen seattube internals?
I guess it seems like a lot of cost and hassle for something that's not really an issue. I've never heard of anyone getting a gritty dropper or anything.
  • + 0
 I assumed it was a weight savings but RC's answer makes more sense. I would have been interested in the weight difference between the stock setup and the cable. I am guessing the cable is not much more.
  • + 1
 @RichardCunningham: that's not actually true plenty of reverbs have stopped working when "buddy" borrows your bike and lowers the seat without care.
  • + 3
 Wolftooth answers emails FAST. Their products rock too.
  • + 1
 I thought the whole point of the reverb was there was no cables to deal with? I have 3 reverbs, zero problems. If you want a cable actuated dropper don't buy a reverb?
  • + 2
 My reverb sucked giant weiner. I was on a command post for years and now a bikeyoke revive.
  • + 1
 Don't forget the BikeYoke De-Hy! They were first.
Perfect product and I think it makes the overall length even shorter than the WT.
(or a BikeYoke seat post from start...)
  • + 0
 All Wolf Tooth need to do now is build a remote for the Magura Vyron. The stock remote (even with the tacky aftermarket plastic cap) is a complete fail.
  • + 0
 Cable conversion kit for the Vyron? That would be rad! Big Grin
  • + 1
 Reading the comments here makes me feel like I'm really not missing anything by not having a dropper post.
  • + 1
 rode with reverb for 5 years now, never had issues. Wife has cable dropper and its a pos.
  • + 1
 Looks awesome. Even though it shouldn't even need to exist. Might have to pony up.
  • + 1
 Just purchased the kit fitted feels so smooth best upgrade ever for my reverb very please
  • - 1
 My DeHy conversion is so much better than the hydraulic system it replaced. easier to use, less action needed and better ergonomics. not liking the look of that open remote through.
  • + 1
 2 reverb failures in the middle of nowhere, re-bleeing cycles to regular. Switch to Wolf tooth cable ? SOLD !!!!
  • + 3
 Sweet plastic ferroules
  • + 1
 I see that Wolf Tooth lever will also work for the Gravity Dropper seat post. Interesting.
  • + 1
 KS LEV internal, 4 years, have not touched a thing after installation, works great.
  • + 1
 Wanna ride in cold winter weather with a reverb? Good luck with that.
  • + 1
 Bought a WT remote for my KS LEV, instant performance upgrade!
  • + 1
 Looks awesome! I might just get one for my 9point8 post
  • + 1
 ive still got my crank brothers joplin 4
  • + 1
 Fox transfer post, yes please. NO extra parts needed.
  • + 1
 Bikeyoke was first with theyr dehy-kit,,,,,,
  • + 2
 Wolf tooth one-ups all.
  • + 1
 Wolf tooth does it again.
  • + 1
 These are great but they're out to lunch with pricing
  • + 0
 Made in the USA to boot! Can't get much better than that.
  • + 1
 You lost me at Reverb
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