Xprezo Adhoc - Review

Jul 21, 2014
by Mike Levy  




You'd be excused for thinking that any high-end mountain bike worth its salt has to feature a generous amount carbon fiber and employ some sort of multi-link suspension design. After all, the large majority of the machines I review on this very website tick off both of those boxes, don't they? Xprezo, a company hand building frames out of Bromont, Quebec, thinks differently, and their 150mm travel Adhoc that's reviewed below is a perfect example of how they approach things. The Adhoc is built out of aluminum, and in a world where most companies seem to be aiming to create swoopy looking bikes out of carbon, the Adhoc sticks out like a cat at a dog show. Its bright pink paint certainly plays a part in that, but Xprezo offers dizzying amount of color options and combinations that allow consumers to customize to their heart's content. Want a blue front end, green aluminum plates, and a yellow rear end? It's all included in the price. And how much money does this hand built beauty cost? An Adhoc frame/shock/headset package retails for $2,600 USD, while the complete bike shown here would go for $5,975 USD. However, because all of Xprezo's prices are in Canadian dollars, it does depend on how the exchange rate looks at the time of purchase. No one ever said that being different would be inexpensive. The company also offers an interesting 'New Life Service' package that sees them repaint your frame and replace all of the hardware and bearings for $500 USD.


Adhoc Details

• Intended use: AM/enduro
• Wheel size: 650B
• Rear wheel travel: 150mm
• Frame materials: aluminum
• Single pivot, linkage activated
• Tapered head tube
• Pressfit 92 bottom bracket
• ISCG 05 chain guide tabs
• 12 x 142mm or 135 QR dropouts
• MSRP: $2,600 USD (frame/shock/headset), $5,975 USD (as tested)







Frame Details

The Adhoc's aluminum front triangle features a tapered head tube that's home to a gorgeous badge proudly touting the frame's handmade origins, and two simple entry points on the down tube make for some clean internal cable routing. Keep in mind that there are no internal cable guides, though, a fact that could make cable changes tricky if you don't know a few mechanic's tricks. The bike's top tube drops down dramatically for both stand over clearance and to make for a cleaner forward shock mount to the gusset that connects the top and down tubes together, while a gusset on the underside of the down tube likely ups the front triangle's strength. There's a set of ISCG 05 chain guide tabs around the bottom bracket shell, and Xprezo went with a Pressfit 92 setup.

Xprezo Adhoc Photo by Amy McDermid
Xprezo Adhoc Photo by Amy McDermid
  Look past the pink color of our test bike and you'll see a number of interesting design points, including a set of aluminum uprights that mate the two triangles together.

Things get even more interesting when you move to the back of the bike, where Xprezo decided to mate the steel rear triangle to a set of aluminum upright plates that connect it to the front end. The two aluminum sections are home to the main pivot, and are tied together to the rear end at the linkage and by large steel bolts just behind the seat tube. Why use two different materials? ''While others will stick with popular materials, we believe that today's technology allows builders to use steel and aluminum's specific advantages to create a final product that's much greater overall,'' says Xprezo. Replaceable dropouts let you mount either a 12 x 142mm or 135 QR rear wheel

Xprezo Adhoc Photo by Amy McDermid
  While the Adhoc is a single pivot, 150mm travel bike, Xprezo has employed a small linkage and both steel and aluminum components in the design.


The Adhoc's Suspension Explained

The majority of Xprezo's full-suspension bikes employ a simple single pivot layout with the shock connected directly to the swingarm, but the 150mm travel Adhoc is different in that the shock is compressed by a compact linkage that pivots off of the seat tube. The bike's axle path is still determined by the main pivot's location that sits a few inches up and forward of the bottom bracket, and the linkage allows Xprezo to have more control over the suspension's performance throughout its travel. Basically, this lets the FOX Float CTD shock feel more supple and responsive in the early part of its stroke while still providing enough ramp-up deeper into the travel to prevent a hard bottom out, and it's why so many bikes depend on a linkage of some sort to modify suspension action to the designer's liking. Xprezo has certainly created a cleaner looking package than most, though, as the linkage is nearly hidden from sight and tucked up so close to the front of the seat tube that you'd have hard time sliding an empty energy bar wrapper between them. There are sealed bearings all around, as one would expect, and the combination of aluminum plates and steel rear end gives the bike a unique appearance. The two different materials are bolted together at the linkage and just behind the seat tube, and a set of pinch bolts at the main pivot help to keep everything together. There's no getting around the fact that, for a single pivot bike with a small linkage, it isn't exactly the simplest design out there, but that shouldn't matter so long as it all stays together on the trail.








Climbing

To be honest, I didn't really expect the pink machine to climb with much vigor, and I anticipated getting to the top of the mountain aboard the Xprezo as being more of "I'll get there when I get there" kind of thing. I know, I'm supposed to go into these tests with a clear mind and no preconceived notions of a bike's personality, and I will often avoid looking over a set of geometry numbers until after the first few rides so as not to skew my opinion, but the Adhoc pretty much performed as I assumed it would. Surprise, surprise, the single pivot, aluminum and steel framed Xprezo doesn't climb nearly as well as the majority of carbon wonder bikes with the same amount of travel, although frame material really has nothing to do with that - it's all in the suspension, and the bike definitely benefits from reaching down for the little FOX shock's CTD lever. Leave it wide open in 'Descend' mode and, while you'll have traction for days, you also might take days to get to the top of your local mountain. It's simply a very active bike that doesn't reward those big out of the saddle efforts unless you hit the shock's cheater switch, but doing exactly that transforms it into something that can motor up a gravel road as fast as any bike with similar amounts of travel. Am I saying that the FOX shock's CTD switch has to be used as a crutch? Yeah, pretty much. The same can be said of many other bikes, of course, but Adhoc does lean on it more than others. Don't want to take a hand off the 'bar? You're far better off staying in the saddle and spinning circles if you're going to leave the shock in either Descend or Trail modes, and that method should keep most riders who prefer 150mm travel bikes happy enough so long as they've never spent much time on a truly efficient mid-travel bike.

Despite all that bellyaching above, it's not all bad news when faced with a long, boring climb, because our large sized Adhoc is about as comfy as it gets when talking about rider position. The roomy front end works well with the bike's stubby Chromag stem, and sitting on the matching Chromag saddle is like getting a taint massage while you're riding. Well, maybe not that good but it's a damn comfortable seat. The agreeable riding position made all day adventures only a matter of legs and fitness rather than putting strain on my bad back and shoulders, a fact that anyone with a ninety year old man's body like mine will really appreciate. Don't know what I'm talking about? Give it a few years.

Xprezo Adhoc Photo by Amy McDermid
  Planning ahead for tight corners and tricky uphills will help, but you might need to book them a ways out in your day planner to make it happen.


It doesn't get easier when you take the Adhoc off of the gravel road and onto any sort of technical singletrack, and while a skilled pilot is going to get any bike up most things, it really felt like the bike's footprint was about three feet longer than others in the same class. That's obviously an exaggeration, but I found myself consciously having to place the bike's rear wheel where I needed it to be, which is in contrast to a good technical climbing machine of similar travel that doesn't ask you to do much beyond turn the pedals over and point it in roughly the right direction. No, the Xprezo doesn't let you relax when it gets tight and twisty, even relative to other 150mm bikes, but staying seated and in a slightly lower gear than you might otherwise seemed to be the key to motoring through sections of trail that might trouble those in hiking boots. Momentum is your friend and keeping it is the goal. My test bike came with an adjustable travel Pike RC3T - RockShox refers to it as Dual Position Air - that I ended up taking advantage of far more often than I have on other bikes. Dropping the fork down by 30mm is key to your success on the Adhoc, as is running the shock in 'Climb' mode for any extended pitch, and making those two changes while on the move will have it responding better when you need maximum effort to get both wheels up and over a mess of roots or steep wall.
bigquotesThe Adhoc and a tandem bike have a lot in common when you're on the subject of climbing tight trails, although that task might be easier aboard the tandem...

I know that there is a large group of riders out there who place a bike's climbing abilities roughly above who won Big Brother 13 and below what Kayne wore to the Grammys on their list of important things to take note of, and there's certainly nothing wrong with that sort of thinking. Yes, we all know that climbing makes you fit, but so does eating green stuff and stretching but no one likes to do that stuff either. Nodding your head? Then move on and read about what the Adhoc is like when things get fun.



Downhill / Technical Riding

Are you familiar with the movie Rain Man? Dustin Hoffman's character in the movie, Raymond Babbitt, is an autistic savant who, long story short, struggles with a lot of everyday tasks yet excels at a few others. Well, I often found myself referring to the pink Adhoc as my own Rain Man due to how it frustrated me in a lot of everyday situations yet managed to make other 150mm travel machines look a bit silly when it came time to get rowdy on the downhills. That, and calling it Raymond Babbitt seems odd, doesn't it? The Adhoc is, without a doubt in my mind, the most stable and confidence inspiring 150mm bike that I've ever pointed down a hill, which is the sort of temperament that leads one to do things that they might otherwise not be inclined to consider on other, less rousing bikes. Do keep in mind that it's a good 50mm in the back and three or four degree up front away from being a downhill bike, but I wasn't thinking about those limitations when I was on it, with my thoughts usually focusing one two points: "Holy shit, I'm still alive," and wondering how Xprezo was able to get so much performance out of the itty bitty FOX Float CTD shock that it comes spec'd with. There is so much suppleness and control at the back of the Adhoc that, assuming I could navigate down the trail while blindfolded, I might have guessed that the bike was running a high-end coil-over rather than a shock we commonly see on pure cross-country bikes. I'm not going to pretend to know how Xprezo has managed it, although it's obviously got something to do with that tiny linkage and a perfectly matched shock tune, but the back of the bike tracks the ground in a way that will make even the most unwitting of riders take note. The traction that comes from that is mightily impressive, and it really does allow you to not only take more chances, but also get away with it in a way that you will realize has more to do with the bike than luck or riding skill. Lets not gloss over the Pike RC3T fork, either, because it's the entire package that makes it such a potent machine on the downs and the fork is a big part of that.

Xprezo Adhoc Photo by Amy McDermid
  The bike corners with conviction, although it also asks the same of its pilot.


While the Adhoc's rear end is impressive, it's the bike's handling that really allows it to excel on rough downhills. No, it's not a lively machine that will have you thinking out of the box, and it needs a more assertive rider to get the most out of it, but those who feel comfortable riding at 9/10ths will be able to throw the Adhoc around as it should be. And that's the key to getting the most out of the pink bike: being able to wring its neck a little, especially around the corners, will have it slicing through singletrack like an electric knife through a still warm turd. All the traction out back helps, of course, but its angles and attitude make you feel like you can just keep leaning it into the bends until it stops biting... except it doesn't want to stop biting. Much like your crazy ex, the Adhoc just doesn't want to let go, and while it stops short of keying your car if you piss it off, the bike feels as if it's willing to do just about anything you ask of it. This is multiplied tenfold on steep terrain that makes you rub your ass on the back tire, although how the bike's rear suspension firms up noticeably when on the brakes does somewhat negates this.
bigquotesThis travel bracket is literally jammed full of bikes to pick from that can literally be ridden everywhere. Want to go to the bike park? No problem. All day man-ride with monster climbs? Sure thing. However, you might say that most 150mm bikes are decent at everything but awesome at nothing. But the Adhoc truly is awesome at something: hauling ass down scary trails.


Things become a little more difficult as the trail tightens up, and its those stalling speed, wheel-pivot type of corners where you might find the Adhoc to be a bit of a handful. My advice? You're best off letting it roll when you can rather than depending on circus tricks to get you around switchbacks, but you're always going to lose ground in these type of situations relative to more nimble machines. You might not care one bit once you get back on faster, rougher ground, though. I certainly didn't.

Xprezo Adhoc Photo by Amy McDermid
  This bike can probably out-descend the top downhill bikes of not that long ago, and its rear suspension is absolutely best in class when on rough ground.


Going into orbit aboard the Adhoc is a strangely calm event, much more so than on most bikes of similar travel. Maybe it's because you know that the bike's suspension is so good that you feel like you could literally land on your buddy who's ahead of you and still roll away, or possibly because of the inherent stability off of lips that it seems to have. Either way, the bike doesn't have a lot of built-in pop but it does give you the confidence to roll into any takeoff like you own it, with little care for what the landing looks like. Those who come up for excuses as to why they didn't hit a certain jump or drop won't be able to blame the bike if they're on the Ahoc, which could be a good or bad thing depending on how you look at it.


Technical Report

• I did take note of what I thought was a lot of flex coming from the back of the bike, but it turned out to be a number of important bolts that managed to back themselves out slightly. Not a huge deal - I tightened them and they weren't repeat offenders - but it does highlight the fact that a bike doesn't need a load of pivots to require maintenance, only a load of bolts.

• The Adhoc's Chromag cockpit felt spot-on - I wouldn't change a thing if it was my personal bike. The saddle is softer than I usually prefer but it seemed to work hour after hour, while the short stem and wide handlebar simply make a load of sense for how one needs to ride the Adhoc. Installing a longer stem or skinnier bar on this bike would be akin to putting spinner rims on your 911. Just don't.

• The Pike RC3T's Dual Position Air feature lets you drop the fork by about 30mm by turning a dial atop the left fork leg, and while I'm nearly always of the opinion that one should get used to how a bike handles and go from there, it really is an indispensable trick when it comes to the Adhoc. I'll happily backtrack from past statements and admit that, without the fork's DPA dial, I likely would have been walking much more than I did during my time on the bike.

Xprezo Adhoc Photo by Amy McDermid
  An 11 speed drivetrain and Chromag cockpit doesn't give me much to complain about except those pesky pulley wheels.


• There's not much to dislike about SRAM's 11 speed drivetrain but we'll keep grumbling about the derailleur's pulley wheels that feature the same narrow/wide X-Type tooth shaping as the group's chain ring. The problem? They pick up massive quantities of mud and grime, much more so than a standard pulley wheel, and the upper one can sometimes come out of time with the chain so that the narrow/wide profile doesn't match up to the chain's inner and outer plates. It doesn't happen all the time, though, just enough to be annoying.

• I wasn't the biggest Highroller II fan before I threw a leg over the Adhoc but my time on the bike has me re-thinking my opinion on them. They don't roll quickly, which surely doesn't help the Xprezo in the climbing department, but holy hell do they grip. No flats for our tubeless conversion, either.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThe very large majority of 150mm travel bikes on the market seem to strike some sort of polite middle ground that, much like a Toyota Corolla, allows them to be pretty decent at most things. That's boring. Do you want your bike to make you feel like you're driving bang on the speed limit to the corner store to pick up pack of smokes for your wife, or do you want a machine that lets you feel like you're driving some sort of foolish sports car at irresponsible speeds? Sideways. With your stripper girlfriend in the passenger seat. Sign me up for the latter, thank you very much. Beige colored Corollas and strippers aside, the Adhoc isn't going to be everyone's cup of tea - it's simply too focused on the downs for me to recommend it to most riders as a 'do everything' kind of bike - but those who are looking for a 150mm rig with the soul of a downhill bike might just find their ideal partner in crime with the unique looking Xprezo. Major kudos to Xprezo for being brave enough to not build a beige colored Corolla of a bike, even if it would sell much better than what they have created.- Mike Levy


www.xprezo.ca


209 Comments

  • 109 3
 Cool pink bike, Pinkbike!
  • 14 15
 yeah! digging the color on this one! never seen a pink bike as pretty as this one! Kinda in love with nicolai bikes because of their attention to detail but somehow, this beaut is pulling me away. Are they available in asia tho
  • 31 13
 This is the first bike I've seen that looks good and shit at the same time. I can't decide if I love it or hate it!
  • 10 5
 I would so ride a Pink Bike.
  • 9 2
 KILLER PAINT JOB MAN!
  • 7 19
flag drivereight (Jul 21, 2014 at 11:34) (Below Threshold)
 For $2600, I'll wait another 2 weeks to make another $600 and get the new SC Nomad in Pink.
  • 15 8
 Made in china or another sub standard economic country by people who can't afford a tricycle and then lets complain to the gouvernement for job loss
  • 7 2
 "They Took Our Jobs, Took Errr Jerbs, dey turk err jurbz"
  • 1 0
 And when i dropped latin last year i said it was stupid and pointless, rethinking now...
  • 53 1
 "Ad hoc is a Latin phrase meaning "for this". It generally signifies a solution designed for a specific problem or task, non-generalizable, and not intended to be able to be adapted to other purposes."
Heh, that's pretty clever, with the bike being what it is, first and foremost a downhill shredder.
  • 4 0
 Props
  • 2 0
 I learned something today
  • 38 1
 saying that it used the clever switch as a crutch was unfair. the designers took into account that they ave another option so designed the climbing aspects with the switch in mind. sounds like clever engineering as oppoosed to cheaing to me
  • 26 2
 ya! if a little switch can make my bike climb like an $8k VPP or DW-link, but then do better on the dh, then who needs all those stupid pivots?
  • 8 0
 Isn't there a ctd remote yet? Why does anyone care?
  • 8 0
 This bike sounds like a great candidate for a remote rear shock. Great descending with snappy climbing at the push of a lever on the bars.
  • 14 2
 I do love this kinda stuff, all the linkage bikes came about because shocks of the day, in essence, were shit. So the frame manufacturers had to make the bike pedal efficiently. Then finally the shock manufacturers realized that's what people wanted and designed shocks with multiple setttings, CTD, RT3, DBA CS which meant we could go back to simpler single pivot type designs that are generally more active and IMO at least more reliable (lets not get into the brake jack debate here).

Now we have that, if a bike actually uses the shock as intended there must be something wrong with the frame design ? WTF man.
  • 3 0
 jaydmf - I agree. A common criticism of more efficient pedalling suspension designs is a loss of active feel on the descents. It comes down to style, but making full use of the shock's pedalling platform can allow for really active kinematics.

I do think a handlebar remote ties it all together. I ride a Cannondale Jekyll, which is a fairly active faux-bar. It feels pretty mushy under power until flicking the Dyad lever to firm up the back, but once flicked it pedals like a (heavy, overbuilt 26er) XC bike.

If you're willing to fiddle a bit, you can get a bike that feels great both up and down. But others will prefer more of a set it and forget it approach.
  • 4 3
 mx bikes have really good suspension, better than any mtb on the market. What do they use to tune the leverage ratio and the curve? linkages.
  • 4 0
 Yes Wayne they do, but most MXs use a single pivot and drive the shock off a linkage in order to get a particular leverage ratio and curve for the purposes of getting the best tracking. Theyre not exactly trying to counter act the forces of the rider pedalling tho. The 2 share the same parts and underlying principles but have completely different tuning requirements. If linkages alone could solve both the performance and pedal bob issues we'd have reverted back to the basic shocks from yester year. Currently tho pretty much every AM/XC bike regardless of how good the linkage design supposedly is still comes with a pedal platform shock.
  • 7 0
 They make it sound like a downside, but in reality it's a giant plus. Just like how Knolly frames don't depend on suspension gimmicks to make pedaling easier. It allows them to design completely for the downhill experience, and then let the shock's features handle climbing efficiency. I much prefer this to a suspension design that has to make compromises for better pedaling efficiency.
  • 2 3
 I'm not an engineer (although I pretend I am sometimes) but I think some single pivot designs counteract pedal bob don't they? Whereas some designs aid in increasing pedal bob? Anyway its all moot, the LSC and HSC on my X Fusion Vector Air shock is back all the way off and pedal bob is not a concern. Although a little bit is good.

Anyway this: "but most MXs use a single pivot and drive the shock off a linkage in order to get a particular leverage ratio and curve for the purposes of getting the best tracking" - is exactly what is being achieved by the Adhoc's (and other's) design.
  • 10 0
 I agree that it seems strange to complain about the CTD settings being "a crutch" in a negative way. Isn't it designed to be HELPFUL crutch?

I'm getting a little tired of Pinkbike's "This bike climbs like sh*t in descent mode..." comments in their reviews. That's thats the whole point of the little blue lever!! Many of Pinkbike's recent reviews have stated similar feelings, and I really don't understand it. The whole goal it to create a shock or fork that stiffens up for climbing, eliminating the need to design crazy linkage systems to eliminate pedal bob.

My bike would pedal like shit uphill if I left it in descend mode. That setting is for DESCENDING!
  • 3 0
 Its all fine if you are only riding up then down but, on varied terrain with ups down and flats flicking the lever back and forth can take some finesse. I don't like the way the rear end behaves in corners with the platform engaged. It seams to keep the rear end depressed in hard corners then push it out hard which can be fun or not depending on the corner. Haven't tried CTD though.
  • 2 0
 A single pivot is in effect the most unrefined suspension type for pedal bob, you can move the pivot around to counteract the pedaling forces but theres disadvantages to this too. Im no engineer either so i wouldnt even try and explain the pros and cons. all you need to know is that they rely heavily on the shocks for pedaling efficiency. Wayne i think you missed my point, im actually backing this frame design up to an extent as it focuses on getting the best tracking performance from the shock and leaves coping with pedal forces down to the pedal platform tune of the shock. My main point was i dont get why, as Marseer has said, the reviews are slamming bikes because they actually use the shock modes.
  • 5 0
 Jaydmf, your're not an engineer but your absolutly right. -A spot on single pivot design, specially with these days single ring setup, is a simple way to manage super good to counteract the pedaling forces on the travel pedal range. The shock pedaling platform are working great aswell whatever the bike design. Even is you got crappy pedaling design if you got to climb long pavement or gravel swichback you lock to shock and you're good. -A foward mainpivot placement, like the adhoc, helps to get a little backward rear path, helping on sharp impact. Plus chaingrowth is limited to radius of that main pivot, so if it's nicely located, chaingrowth is under control. -Now you want the bike to track the ground and manage big impact, so working with some sort of compact tension linkage in order to do so makes sens. -Plus, that traction help you out on rough loose hard climp because your sensible suspension will stick on the ground under negativet and positives obstacles... -Put a nice downhill geometry with in mind a climbing geometry design around a drop fork and steep seat tube angle and you got the best moutain bike swiss knife ! -Maintenance free ! Bing Bang Boom !
  • 3 0
 #JoeAllard Approval
  • 1 1
 "You've never heard of the Adoc ?... It's the ship that made the Kessel Run in less than 1:55 parsecs."
  • 1 0
 @choppertank3e

"Its all fine if you are only riding up then down but, on varied terrain with ups down and flats flicking the lever back and forth can take some finesse"

I think here is where suspension matters even more. It actually helps with climbing (traction). This is why it's not uncommon to see recommendations to stay away from climbing/lockout modes on technical climbs.

The only purpose of the climbing/lockout switch is to make it more efficient on longer climbs where you know the trail doesn't require a lot of traction.
  • 2 0
 I have the X Fusion Vector air, which doesn't have a switch for climbing and descending. I never understood why those switches were needed if A) the shocks damping works well, and B) the design of the frame works well. I guess the X Fusion shock is just that good that it doesn't need a switch.
  • 2 1
 @marseer - There's a difference between a 150mm bike that pedals relatively well when the shock is left open but obviously better when it's firmed up, and a 150mm bike that pedals like it has 200mm of travel. Designing a bike to depend on the CTD lever is fine, but Xprezo really, really leans towards that. One of my main goals when writing a review is to keep my thoughts relative to other bikes in the same class, and I've been on quite a few different 150mm bikes over the years - probably over twenty - and the Adhoc is by far the poorest pedalling of them all. That's what I was trying to get across. A 150mm travel bike that comes with a dropper post and a drivetrain with a wide range is meant to go everywhere, but there are more well-round bikes than the Xprezo. It's too bad that your bike would "pedal like shit" if you left it in Descend more because there are plenty that don't.
  • 3 0
 Mike, maybe why I don't get your take on the poor pedaling of the Adhoc just comes down to shock choice? I've been around long enough and ridden enough bikes to know if a bike doesn't pedal or climb well. If my Adhoc didn't, I would shit kick it to the curb toute suite. My only issue is that my gearing is too high for some of the monster kamloops hills. Other than that it doesn't pedal any worse than other bikes and is far better than a Horst link bike. But it also remains very supple on small bumps. I would love to try the Fox shock to see if there really is a difference.
  • 28 3
 Can Mike Levy sign the next review as: "Words by: Mike Levy & his taint", since we seem to get his taint's opinion in every review as well? Thank god it liked this one, there isn't enough mental bleach to get the "freshly opened can of tuna" image out of my head. Awesome bike as well.
  • 26 1
 This review sounds like it was written by Jeremy Clarkson. I can pretty much hear the author shouting "powerrrrrrr" while drifting turns.
  • 1 0
 YESSSSSSS!!!! So glad i wasnt the only one thinking it...
  • 21 2
 Steel is the future.
  • 4 1
 Ti is the future of the future!
  • 2 0
 yes, alsoWink
  • 3 0
 And the past... funny that. No matter how great carbon bikes get, steel is still real.
  • 1 0
 "Carbotanium" look it up. You will $#*€ bricks...
  • 1 0
 Was looking at reynolds steel recently. They do make awesome alloy much stronger than 4340 and stuff alike!
  • 1 0
 I've had snowboards with four different types of alloy in them why not a bike with, Reynolds, 6061, 7005, Magnesium, Scandium, 3.5al 2v Ti 6al 3.5v Ti, carbon, carbon nanotubes and ballistic carbon. JJ btw
  • 14 4
 Mine: www.pinkbike.com/photo/11151122

I disagree with the 'bad' climbing traits that Mike experienced. I find the riding position so comfy and the angles so spot on that climbing is very easy. My only problem is that my gearing is too high. I also disagree with how Mike thought it wasn't nimble. I find for a long bike with big wheels its quite maneuverable.

I agree with the descending qualities though. Holy crap, the Adhoc shines at speed! Like no other.

And the bike is light too. The one pictured is 28.5lbs, mine is 30.5, built on the heavier side for enduro racing. Steel is indeed real.

factionsk8.blogspot.ca/2014/06/bike-test-xprezo-adhoc.html
  • 15 3
 Wayne, you have to remember that this is your personal bike and likely 1 of only a few bikes you've ridden in the last few years. The test crew here rides dozens of bikes and can tell when one is a rocket up or a corolla that is loaded down trying to get over the Coquihalla. The Adhoc is a DH bike that gets to the top ok.
  • 6 1
 hey I'm so out of shape that if I can climb it anyone can! Wink
  • 2 0
 but yea its such a good enduro style bike though. such a pleasure when things get rowdy
  • 6 1
 And what is your personal bike Brule ?
  • 4 0
 Bonowanabe! Brule has bought an Adhoc aswell ! Meaning that if a guy like Brule ,who have access to bunch of bike, take the decision to buy that Adhoc , that bike is a winner no doubt! I'm sure he has plenty other bike though Smile Enjoy your Adhoc !
  • 6 0
 The Adhoc is for sure one impressive bike but I've never heard about this bike being not performing on climbs and tight technical stuff. The Large sized Adhoc has a long top-tube and same about the wheel base. I'm 6'1" and I would prefer the medium size....I know that Mike is not really tall so maybe that didn't help.

Anyways, great review Pinkbike and nice to see that you bought the bike after the test Tyler! Happy trails! Cheers!
  • 10 0
 FYI The Front Triangle is Aluminum, it's the first sentence in Frame Details. And the total bike build like in the review weights around 28,5 pounds.
  • 3 0
 Thanks! I've been looking for the weight. Stoked to try this rig out when I can pry it out of Tyler's cold hands
  • 2 1
 I'll be up in Squamish/Whistler for 11 days during CWX and you can take the Adhoc then man.
  • 3 0
 Yay!! And you can baby sit while I do that! You can take care of a 3 week old, right? Seriously looking forward to it!
  • 9 1
 I own a Xprezo Super -D 26 " And I've owned everything

Personally I find the driving more rearward biased if you want to see the real difference. Someting that take time to "discover ". All other bikes are too bland and non complying laterally which makes for no existing " Micro Side travel ". Travel you want in a shitty situation. Steel Its like having extra ultra stiff 3 mm coil in the back. If your smart or " senile enough " and are an "ultra pilot " you will use it for : " preload drifting " or a side pumping bailout. This thing is to be used like skis : because it carves like skis. Give it an extra power pop at the apex of a turn and you have a synthetic berm.
  • 6 0
 This comment is a perfect example of how tho bike should be driven. All of you have to be aware that this bike is #JoeAllard approved, which is more awesomeness any of us would ever require.
  • 3 1
 That is one sexy KOM
  • 6 0
 Haha ! Hell yeah
Riding xprezo bikes like you skiing ! I think ,actually I'm pretty sure the designer is thinking about that fun fact that makes a bike track the ground , carve or slash turns every corner ! Basically allow you the choice of control you need. Desole de defoncer la fete a PA Smile
  • 12 0
 I feel Mike's writing got funnier lately. Keep on styling it!
  • 13 4
 Good looking bike. Great concept. Locally made. Steel is still the sexiest material for bikes. Not something insecure brandwashed drones would buy. All good.
  • 7 0
 I reluctantly went for a long demo ride with this bike and it blew me away. On the contrary to the test rider, I tought it climbed very well but I agree the fork has to be dropped down to do so. Finally a bike that's snappy and playful after trying a bunch of systems that eats everything in its path, including the fun factor. Not the sexiest to my opinion, but the most fun I've ridden !
  • 8 0
 The front triangle isn't made of steel, but aluminium ! All Xprezo bikes are made this way. It's quite obvious when you lookat the welds...
  • 1 1
 ...Looks kind of mucousy....
  • 5 0
 the front end is alu im pretty sure. I used to have a Blfa Belair and I always thought there was a special zing to the steel rear end, I reckon thats part of the feel that makes it so rad on the downhill. Awesome bike and cool review, I like these a lot.
  • 3 0
 so do I, I had a Balfa BB7 it was awesome with its weird chain line and steel rear, plus if you were unfortunate enough to snap the rear it was an easy fix!!. I love the handmade frames like this, Orange and BTR etc they just make you feel like your riding something special and that having fun is all that matters - not the finish line (to me anyway)
  • 4 0
 I am pretty sure the main welder from Balfa is the guy working at Xprezo.
  • 1 0
 Its a bit like my k9ine,( Tam from BTR was half of k9! ) steel and alu combo. Steel feels sooooo lively compared to alu! I'm half torn between a BTR Pinner and one of these......
  • 1 0
 haha no way! Im on a k9 now! great minds think alike eh? And yes Balfa and Xprezo have a lot in common, hence the reference
  • 1 0
 Dude I see you're in Perth...
Do you know gibbo (Dave)? He rides one too!
  • 1 0
 hahah yeah i do, I have seen him at a couple of tracks around theplace. Man did I get a shock the first time I saw him hahaha! Nice guy as well
  • 3 1
 He's actually one of my best friends in the world! You gotta love pb! Luis also designed the k9 in the house Dave lived in when he was in the UK! If you see him about, say hi from me, he'll have a hell of a shock! Get some pics of yours on pb!
  • 4 1
 I love the skinny tube look of the steel rear stays.
  • 5 0
 The comments I get from pretty much everyone that have demoed my Adhoc is "snappy". Power to the pedals isn't lost in the suspension and the bike gets up and boogies. I personally find it to be a great climber. Especially seated with it's steep seat tube. Don't believe? Don't take my word for it, I'd be happy to set up a demo for anyone in Western Canada who is serious and in the market for a $5K+ AM/Enduro rig. This bike rips in every way!!
  • 4 0
 Can't agree more. After demoing the Adhoc on Fromme mid April with @JeepThing08, I was placing an order in the next day. It is not at all the fastest climber but it will climb everything you put in front of it as long as you just keep pedalling at at steady speed. I'm always amazed at how easy it will get over steep up hill tech section compare to my XC/Trail bike. Yes, you need more power, but if you keep pedalling it will get you up that tech uphill without having to do gymnastic on your bike to keep traction. Using the dual position PIKE on the way up and the CDT is the key to success. On the way down... well I can't agree more with @MikeLevy It is a confidence booster, faster is the better, it corners like a trail running dog and the "Holy shit, I'm still alive," is sooo true. In conclusion. It is such a fun bike :-)
  • 10 6
 Carbon may well allow you to make a slightly lighter bike. But it certainly won't last as long as a steel frame. Not only can't it take a fair amount of punishment, but if it ewre to fail, any good framebuilder can get it back to scratch for a reasonable cost. With a good bit of design, steel bikes aren't far off in weight terms anyway....
  • 2 1
 A crack just above the BB shell (common on older road bikes that have been ridden day after day for years) is terminal, unless you want to replace the BB shell, downtube, seat tube, and both chainstays.

It's certainly possible, but not exactly affordable compared to the cost of a new frame.
  • 4 0
 Exactly, "common on older road frames that have been ridden day after days for years". Everything fails eventually, but steel will be there the longest.
  • 4 1
 if your going carbon you shoud be going to it because its stiff not because its light
  • 1 0
 The way this bike is made is my favourite: steel swingarm and aluminium front. The aluminium front save weight and can be really stiff, for chirurgical precision in corners, and the swing arm is flexy but not too much for grip, comfort, and is strong.
  • 4 0
 Mike Levy: I'm curious about your impressions of this bikes' stability and descending capabilities. The geo is pretty standard for a bike with this travel, so do you think your praise is due more to the suspension design or could the steel rear triangle be offering some beneficial ride qualities. My non-fully is a steel single speed and rides pretty damn smooth.
  • 2 0
 suspension design and steel make for a sweet ride!!
  • 1 0
 ...or because there wasn't enough air in the shock? Seriously, "climbs better with the fork lowered...comfy climbing [with a 76* sta] "relies on the CTD switch" "super stable descending with poor low speed handling" Sounds like we're describing any modern 6" bike with a progressive linkage and excessive sag. I don't doubt the review, but i'm suspicious of the set up.
  • 4 0
 I'm glad to see Hugo (former co-kahuna of Balfa along w Jamie, who later helmed Appalache) carry the torch with Xprezo.

Balfa's designs were ahead of their time, so I'm not surprised that Xprezo continues to build bikes that rage to the beat of a different drummer.
  • 4 0
 It's a sick bike! I've ridden it all over BC, East coast, even in the dey trails of Peru. Soft, smooth, burmy to gnarly gnar rocky rooty stuff. Even bike park and drops. It's a war machine. I love it! I was used to ride Kona AM bikes and Spec, and this is so far the best bike I've owned. Locally made by hand, it also gives it a little something extra special. Try it!
  • 8 0
 Steel is Real
  • 9 0
 Steel is indeed very real...

www.pinkbike.com/photo/10520089
  • 2 0
 Dude that frame you made is a thing of beauty ! I would add ugly points to it by riding it
  • 3 0
 Awesome read, very entertaining, you are getting good at this Mike. And to the bike if it really rides as you describe it then it is awesome because, at least to me, there is something much worse than a decent Corolla-like bike coming from a mainstream company. A Corollish bike coming from a small niche company. The latter is a modern hipster, a truly sad thing to watch.
  • 8 3
 Is it made by child labor in a country with no human rights destroying our economy and way of life ?
  • 10 0
 Nope! Hand made by a Canadian frame builder.
  • 4 0
 www.xprezo.ca/en
"Our products are designed, assembled and welded in our factory in Quebec"
  • 8 2
 That's what I'm talkin' about!
My next bike won't spend any time being shipped overseas.
Send the bike building jobs to the US or other places where the wages are relatively decent.
By relatively decent, I mean more than the $3.71/hr current minimum wage in Taiwan.
Compare that to a modestly estimated salary of one of the CEOs of the big three bike companies--12 million/year
You will find that the CEO makes $6250/hr (40 hr work week)
Even if you make $50/hr as an engineer for example, you're still getting f*cked

Corporatism is dominating the global socio-economic-political sphere, and we must acknowledge the consequences of supporting neo-liberal corporations who de-humanize 3rd world workers in order to maximize profits. No joke.

So don't be mad at Pinkbike for reviewing bikes you can't afford--be mad at the multinational corporations who exploit and oppress the "free" peoples of the world, including yourselves.

I ride a Trek, but my next frame will be handmade in the USA or Canada by the little guys. Probably a Jedi, Wilson, Uprising, or M9.

Thanks for reading!
  • 3 0
 I love your statement Loamydog .... Buyers decide the way of our living conditions. Be responsible ! A bike that cost 6000$ technically cost you 3000 $ If you put in context the medium term micro economic return, social infrastuctures from taxes and local biking/trail development
  • 2 0
 Hey loamy dog great statement, One thing the wilson jedi and evil are all made oversea ... Sorry Thanks
  • 2 0
 Well now sh*t! Exactly my point. Here I was thinking the Canfield brothers shipped direct. At least that's what I learned about them through their website. I didn't know they lived overseas. And I don't speak French, but DeVincis website told me "fabriquée au Canada"...which to me sound like fabricated in Canada. Anyways, I was duped too, thanks for setting that straight. I'm glad you didn't mention the M9 though, cause those "are" made close to my home. There is hope indeed. Good stuff.
  • 2 0
 Carbon fiber is made in developing countries because of lower environmental and health issue requirements. I had an M9 and an Uzzi prior to my xprezo for the same reasons mentioned above. The steel makes for a better all around ride compared to my Uzzi even in DH situations with a lot less travel and weight
  • 3 1
 I couldn't help but notice the traduction of ''hand made'' on the X symbol located on the steerer tube...''fait main''.
Critical words are missing..I would put ''fait à la main''.. I know it is longer but otherwise it means they are making some hands, wich is weird.
Anyway, I would like to give that beast a try!
  • 1 0
 you are right indeed.
  • 5 0
 shock position and orientation deserves "bike porn" attribute
  • 2 0
 Steel? Alu? Maybe it's welded carbon - that's a joke by the way - nobody seems to know. I wonder how many of these they sell/will sell/have sold?
  • 2 0
 I mean, doesn't it say the "aluminum front triangle" under the passage entitled Frame Details?
  • 2 0
 You joke, but Diamondback used to sell a "welded carbon" frame. It was carbon tubes connected with welded steel. Supposedly the lightness of carbon and the forgiveness of steel.
  • 3 0
 More fun facts, DB made those to compete with the existing Trek CF/Al frames, which used CF tubes epoxied into aluminum lugs. DB thought they could cut weight by putting a smaller piece of cromoly on the end of a CF tube and welding those steel ends together. Then Trek made the OCLVs and all that stuff became obsolete.

IIRC Raleigh and Scott even tried the adhesive thing with aluminum tubes early on, using a mix of swaging, adhesive bonding, and brazing to put aluminum tubes into steel lugs. Not sure if they didn't trust Al welds for bikes yet or just thought Al had too harsh of a ride. Saw one of the Raleigh Technium fames in person a couple years ago, it was pretty cool. Disclaimer: I wasn't really around for that era (too young), but I did a bunch of reading after I saw that funky Raleigh frame.
  • 3 1
 Giant and Miyata also did bonded frames. Trek also bonded their aluminium frames together until the late 90s when they finally abandoned using lugged construction. Gary Fisher (pre-trek ownership) did all sorts of bolted or bonded or welded together frame mixes... The CR-7 for example used a welded Aluminum front triangle bolted to a welded together rear steel stays. To go with that was a press-fit cartridge bearing bottom bracket, and a 1 1/4" sized headset.
  • 1 0
 the more things change, the more they stay the same...

a lot of carbon frames are "tube to tube" which is the same thing as a lugged frame pretty much... mitered tubes glued together and then wrapped up in more carbon like a big lug...

monocoque carbon frames are still bonded... by epoxy between the laminated layers... ha
  • 5 1
 Good review, I feel like mine climbs really well tho?
  • 1 0
 pics!
  • 2 0
 Mine climbs great too (although I don't)
  • 6 0
 What climbs well for you (and I) may not climb well compared to many others in its class. You have to realize that testers will ride more bikes in a year than many in a life time and can tell when a bike is on it or off the back a bit. This pink rig likes to go down and does that really, really well.
  • 1 0
 agree.
  • 2 0
 It's an ENDURO race bike, so it's made to go down. But to compare it to a tandem , it's a bit harsh. Mine is set with 40% sag and it climb like a goat and it's very nimble. This bike is awesome.
  • 3 0
 Does the author consider the enduro 29 a 150mm bike? How would last years 'bike of the year' compare on the descents?
  • 1 1
 Surprised to hear that a single pivot rear is best-in-class. I really don't know sh*t but about suspension design (still learning), but it looks like they used ideas from Full Floater and Maestro designs on that link Curious to see what another shock instead of that fugly piece of metal would be like. I mean, really, why are bikes limited to one shock? Seems like two would be the badgers nadgers with enough creativity and money.
  • 4 1
 its goes to show that the lowly single pivot can be the best design and that just because a bike has a multi-linkage doesn't mean its good.
  • 1 0
 Two things are important in suspension design: suspension ratio and axle path of the rear axle. All the others things come from these two.
When you know the axle path you want, you may be able to archieve it with a single pivot, depending on the pivot placement. The linkage sets the ratio you want. So a single pivot layout can be a good one. Look at commençal, kona, scott,... these aren't bad bikes, and they are single pivots.
  • 2 0
 It's an ENDURO race bike, so it's made to go down. But to compare it to a tandem , it's a bit harsh. Mine is set with 40% sag and it climb like a goat and it's very nimble. This bike is awesome.
  • 1 0
 I saw an Ad hoc with the exact paint scheme at Belmont Bike Park on Jul 6. Quite a looker. No doubt it shredded the DH trails there.

In my world, an Adhoc with the E:I system would be the perfect bike no?
  • 6 3
 Thats the prettiest bike if ever there was one!
  • 4 3
 If it climbs like shit why not just get a bigger bike that climbs equally shit but has the stones for park duty? New GT Sanction looks promising.
  • 3 0
 The Sanction is coming up soon, but is in a whole other class of bikes with a lot more travel. It'll come down to where you live and what you ride most often.
  • 5 0
 It actually doesn't "climb like shit", it's just not the bike you race to the top. This bike is all about getting up there in a reasonable amount of time (which is still miles faster than walking up a freeride or DH bike) and slaying the downhills like a bike with way more travel. Honestly, it's faster on most DH tracks here in Bromont than a full blown DH rig, you just can't ride it at race pace on the really rough stuff.
  • 2 0
 What, if any, is the advantage of positing the rear shock "upside down" (at least to me) like that?
  • 1 0
 positioning*
  • 5 0
 We put the shock "Upside down" for two several reasons: 1) To have an easier access to the CTD remote (like said in the review, our AM bikes are really designed to use the remote, both on the pike and on the CTD Shocks), 2) To clear the waterbottle area.

If you want to build the bike with a Float X or a Monarch Plus, there you put the shock in the "right" position.
  • 3 0
 26in version and I will write you a check right now.
  • 9 0
 Looks like y0bailey just bought a bike. :-)
  • 2 0
 Now to figure out the color! Thanks for the link!

Also, I am immediately between a M and a L (5'11). What do folks in my height range tend to prefer?
  • 1 0
 I am also 5'11 and have been riding a M Super-D for the last couple seasons, I feel it fits great. For long XC rides I sometimes put on a 60mm stem, but most of the time it's a 50mm stem. Also helps that for the XC rides I also swap a Revelation back on it and a 150mm Fox 36 for rowdy times.
  • 1 0
 @y0bailey: I'm 5' 10.75" and I have a Large Adhoc. I tried the medium and I still decided to go with the Large after talking to the guys at Xprezo. I have no regret at all.
  • 1 0
 I'm 5'8, rode a Super-D Medium and fit me perfectly. I think if you like to go fast on the downhill, the large will be better.
  • 3 0
 wow, that rain man reference was all time.
  • 3 0
 Oh, and yes, it's sooo sexy!!!!:-)
  • 2 0
 I totally agree.
  • 3 0
 Can't help it .... just love pink bikes!! Wink really though. Sexy bike
  • 2 0
 A Cesna pilot reviewing an F-18 would probably put some focus on gas economy
  • 3 1
 they are brave enough to come out with only 650b option.
  • 2 1
 Correct, pity he did not have it 26 "Wink
  • 7 0
 The 26" just has an other name (Super D)
  • 4 1
 Such a sexy bike!
  • 3 0
 cool bike
  • 3 1
 Mike Levy for president! best reviewer in the industry...
  • 1 0
 Cool color and design. TT geo is comparatively on the long side to similar style frames.
  • 5 3
 Pinkbike on a Pinkbike
  • 2 11
flag DURTWURX (Jul 21, 2014 at 5:51) (Below Threshold)
 No 26" option? DURT WURX will provide "for the rider" of 26" wheels! Check pb profile or fb
  • 3 0
 It's called the Super D. Different wheels, different name.
  • 1 0
 wonder if they'd do a fluoro UV pink one.
  • 1 0
 I live close to the factory :p
  • 1 3
 wow tons of below comments... looks like lots of people didnt liked this ugly bike! tons of colors doesnt change the fact that the frame lines are ugly as hell. it bobs and evem brakejack...
  • 1 0
 Faster is beautiful to the eye of the beholder
  • 2 2
 The cockpit is cool.....
  • 1 0
 怎么看怎么觉得丑
  • 3 5
 It looks flimsy to me.
  • 5 0
 Columbus Zona steel, Superior strength to weight ratio.
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