FINISHED: Yeti Cycles - Ask Us Anything

Jul 22, 2014 at 17:00
Jul 22, 2014
by Mike Kazimer  
 
You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login

Yeti Ask Us Anything

For this edition of Ask Us Anything the focus will be on Yeti Cycles' recently launched Switch Infinity suspension platform. This new design has certainly garnered its fair share of speculation since it was launched last week, and we've gathered some of the key players in its development to answer any questions you may have. Are you wondering where the SB66 replacement is? Curious about what Jared Graves will be riding at the next EWS? Want to talk about mud? Fire away in the comments section below on Wednesday, July 23rd.



Yeti's out of the box thinkers came up with the Switch Infinity
system found on the SB5c.


How ‘Ask Us Anything' Works:

Starting at 9:00 AM PDT on July 23rd you can type your questions into the comment box following this article and the Yeti Cycles crew will take their best shot at it. Sometimes, your answer will pop up in a few seconds; others may take a while, as the guys will be busy responding to the flood of questions. Everyone who posts a question, large or small, will be taken seriously. To make the process as efficient as possible, try to follow these simple guidelines:


Keep your questions relative. While this is an 'Ask Us Anything' session, the concentration is on the Switch Infinity suspension design. Questions related to that topic are encouraged, but still feel free to ask whatever pressing queries you may have.

• Stay focused. Try to keep your questions on one topic if possible. You can always ask about another item later.

• Try to keep your questions to about 100 words.

Ask Us Anything is a service to PB readers who are seeking helpful information, not a forum to broadcast opinions or grievances. If you do have a negative issue that you want to ask about, no worries, just keep your complaints relevant and in the context of a question so that it can be addressed in a productive manner.

Use propping to acknowledge good - or not so good - questions. Bump them up or down to where they belong.




Mark your calendars - the conversation starts at 9am Pacific Time on Wednesday, July 23rd.

Other time zones:

• 12 Noon EDT
• 5:00 PM BST
• 6:00 PM CEST
• 2:00 AM AEST


Yeti team

Chris Conroy, Yeti Cycles president and co-owner; Steve Hoogendoorn, vice president, Peter Zawistowski, design engineer Joey Schusler, marketing; Jared Graves, team rider; Richie Rude, team rider.


www.yeticycles.com
Must Read This Week






566 Comments

  • + 63
 With so much history in the sport will we ever see Yeti enter the DH scene again ? apart from the history you guys have just come out with the Switch Infinity Suspension Design with looks fantastic and a possible game changer do you this is invention working on a DH bike ?
  • + 9
 thisthisthis!!!!???
  • + 36
 CONROY - We love DH racing and have been doing it longer than any other team. Will we race WC DH again? It’s really a function of two things: riders we have on our team and funding. When we first started racing enduro, we split between WC DH and Enduro. It was relatively easy because the races were in Europe and the US and didn’t have a lot of conflict with WC DH races. This year, when the EWS became a truly international event, we had to choose. We simply didn’t have the resources to run two teams. We chose EWS because Jared had great success and we were developing the Switch Infinity in the trail bike / enduro category.

We’ve tested Switch Infinity on a DH bike and it works great. Our big questions internally is what constitutes a DH bike these days? Can an extremely capable long-travel enduro bike accomplish the same speed as a full-blown DH bike? Jared had great success at World Champs last year on the SB-66c. The course was well-suited for that bike, but it also brings up some relevant questions about what DH design will be moving forward.

So, are we working on bikes that could be raced on the DH circuit? Yes. We can’t commit to a date for production because we are still testing several iterations.
  • - 16
flag RLoganSx (Jul 23, 2014 at 9:16) (Below Threshold)
 Simply put..I don't like where this is going. Not particularly Yeti Cycles but the comment of " Our big questions internally is what constitutes a DH bike these days? Can an extremely capable long-travel enduro bike accomplish the same speed as a full-blown DH bike?" This is sad in my opinion. I wish bikes were simple again and everything had its place. Where DH bikes are DH bikes and Trail/Enduro race bikes were just that. None of this cross category segment stuff. The truth is full blown DH bikes are starting to become irrelevant in some areas and that sucks. My friends Norco Range kills it on some areas and really struggles in others. Can an Enduro Race bike really be a one bike quiver? Even if it can i don't think i want it to be. I like the exclusiveness of riding a DH bike. Will Yeti give up on DH until the money starts coming back?
  • + 46
 The pure DH bike will always have its place, dont worry about that. The fact that some shorter travel bikes can be raced on some DH races isnt sad at all, its just because all mountain/trail/enduro bikes have evolved to the point where they are just much more capable than they were in the past, suspension has improved and geometry has become closer to DH bikes. Theres a lot to consider when choosing what bike to ride, just because a bike soaks up bumps better and makes for a smoother ride (a DH bike) doesnt mean that its always faster. The shorter travel bikes will maintain speed better in a lot of terrain. If you have the bike skills to control the shorter travel bike in nasty stuff than they can be faster, and thats what weve been seeing with some World Cup races in recent times. When I raced the SB66 at World champs last year, it was a big gamble, I raced it more because it was what I had been riding all season and I was comfortable on it, more than because I thought it would be faster. I felt it was the bike that would work best for me at the time.
  • + 8
 @RLoganSx I'm willing to bet a lot of people would disagree with you on that one. Not everyone can afford to own separate bikes for each discipline. Obviously if you want to excel in a discipline than you use the equipment designed solely for that discipline, and in saying that full blown DH bikes will never become obsolete, but more often than not that would mean giving up or losing focus on other disciplines. For someone like me, if I'm going to spend upwards of $5000 on a bike, I don't want it to do only one thing exceptionally well. That's because I'm not going to have another few thousand lying around to spend on another single purpose bike. Companies like Yeti are providing bikes that really do do everything very well, for a bit more money than a single discipline focused bike, which for the average customer is a more sensible investment of their money.
  • + 2
 Agreed. Plus the terrain will likely never be the same on each trail. I have a sb66c and feel it is plenty comfortable compared to my Transition dirtbag down a hill. And of course it pedals up the hill 10x easier. The trails we ride around here are never just down or up hill. Makes sense to me to have something that can do it all.
  • - 12
flag RLoganSx (Jul 23, 2014 at 9:51) (Below Threshold)
 @ JaredGraves- I understand the potential for an all mountain rig and the capabilities of it. As you very well know the Enduro segment has a lot of potential and obviously has its place. I feel so much of the "Enduro push" is based around marketing and the demographics of the people getting into mountain biking. "Enduro" seems friendlier more approachable for people starting out so that's where companies are going to put there money. DH has a reputation for being brutal in all aspects and it seems its just losing ground. I love DH and race here in Utah and ride almost every day I own one bike a 2012 Demo custom build and I love it. It does cause problems with the social life haha. The GF and I dont ride together often. However she sees what it does for me and supports me. I have broken my femur, collerbones, all sorts of stuff and still ride DH. So somebody like nick-c94 reads something like this and does his reasearch and realizes Enduro bikes are capable. Because of that i have a feeling most individuals wont try riding DH and and the segment will lose ground in the long run.
  • - 2
 Guys... It is the SAME patent as the 303 rail. Not new.
  • + 3
 I want to add-on here, and this may be a question for Joey:

Obviously, the capabilities of the "enduro" or 6" in bike in the past couple of years has been growing tremendously, which is awesome. I think enduro racing has done a lot for making the trail bike or maybe mountain bike that must people ride better. The "1 bike quiver" is a marketing dream, but is it really possible or is it just the game everyone is trying to play?
  • - 1
 That transition dirtbag is outdated bruh
  • + 27
 @RLoganSx Times they are a changin, love or hate enduro, but its as simple as that. It's not marketing and companies trying to ram something down your neck. These new bikes these days that climb and descent extremely well simply makes getting out and enjoying riding far easier for people getting into the sport. After 15 years of racing DH and training that goes with it, for me, and the guys I ride with at home, organizing shuttles and all that becomes a real pain in the backside. Its easier if you live by a mountain with a chairlift, but that isnt a possibility for most people. Now that bikes can do it all, and for 99% of people who dont have money to burn and can only own one bike, a DH bike doesnt make much sense. If DH is your passion, then sweet, DH bikes will always be around, but for the majority of people, just getting out for a ride is what they are looking for, and thats why modern trail bikes are taking over the market these days.
  • + 12
 JOEY - The capabilities of the 5/6 inch enduro bike these days are absolutely insane. It's an amazing time to be involved with the mountain biking world, mainly because of where the technology is at on trail bikes. DH bikes and full on weight weenie XC rigs will always have advantages in their given disciplines that a one bike quiver will never be able to fully match. That being said, the one bike quiver is becoming more and more capable. With the SB5c you can hit the gnarliest rock gardens and biggest jumps at the lift assisted bike park, or you can go for an all day alpine single track epic. The bike is fully in it's element in both situations. For me, a bike that can do it all is the most fun/worthwhile bike at the end of the day, and it's certainly not just a marketing dream. Its a reality. 3 years ago if you told me I wouldn't own a DH bike in 2015 I would have told you crazy. Now I will just own an SB5c and be perfectly content.
  • + 5
 @ JaredGraves I totally understand and think your spot on. With that being said, yeticycles (Joey) last comment states exactly what I'm saying. Though he does state DH bikes will always have there place. "3 years ago if you told me I wouldn't own a DH bike in 2015 I would have told you crazy. Now I will just own an SB5c and be perfectly content".

Anyway I appreciate the feedback and thanks for listening to my ill fated rant.
  • + 3
 Jared and Joey - Great response. Totally agree with your thoughts here and its great to see Yeti is focused on making great bikes that are so capable. Exciting times for sure.

One other thing, starting to see on a lot of "enduro" bikes a 65 degree headtube angle. Personally, I feel like this too slack, especially for the type riding that Jared describes above, which is what most people do. I love to think I am rally steep gnar at high speeds all the time, but realistically there are just not enough trails where that is happening all the time. We all spend a far amount of time on flatter sections where a 65 degree angle is just not the most fun. Are you finding this trend to be slack for the majority of riding that most of us do, or are you seeing with new tech you can get away with it
  • + 5
 So in this comment thread the evolution of enduro bikes has been mentioned a whole lot, people are saying that enduro bikes have progressed so much that they can now be ridden down DH tracks. My question is why not try to evolve DH bikes so that they can ride down even gnarlier tracks?

On another note the switch infinity system looks awesome and i would love to try it out! Good on ya for pushing the envelope yeti!
  • + 4
 @dhx42. Thats why the 5c has a 67 head angle, makes it a bit more of a do it all bike, the bikes with head angles in the 65 range are more aimed specifically at aggressive riding and racing. They tend to have a bit more bias towards descending
  • + 5
 I'm sorry but I have a hard time believing that the sb5c, a 127mm travel rig, will be "fully in its element" in the gnarliest rock gardens and the biggest jumps on lift accessed mountains. Let's get REAL here, it is better than similar bikes in the past, but it is not designed for 40 ft doubles and massive step downs...
  • + 2
 So where in all of this does the trail choice come in to play? The latest trend seems to be building bike parks. This places an interesting question, even if you have a chairlift do you really need a full DH bike? We have already seen the last episode of "this is peaty" where he describes fort william as "the most groomed its ever been" and hajfelt as "dull and easy". This also seems to be removing the need for full DH bikes and makes trail bikes seem like they are more capable
  • + 4
 Well thats the whole other problem. The downhill tracks are just getting easier and easier which makes these "more capable" trail/enduro bikes the choice over downhill bikes. For all we know the bikes may not really be getting all that much better the tracks may just be getting easier.

We should just phase out the dh world cup and take all the funding and give Is to the fest series Big Grin . No question if you need I downhill bike for that.
  • + 52
 Hi guys, in the recession I got hit hard, I lost my home, my car, my holiday villa in Florence. Soon after the wife and with her followed the kids. To keep out of jail I had to sell all my watches, my jewelry, my clothes, all of my suites. To cut a long and painful story short it finally got down to my bike my beautiful wonderful Yeti. I love it so much I just couldnt do it. So if your passing through South Wales and you happen to see a bum sitting on the street drinking meths hugging a mint Yeti 575, say hello........And my question to you guys you ask?.......

Can I get a job?

sent using a library computer
  • + 3
 That is why you should always live like you make half as much as you do.
  • + 18
 CONROY -- Dang dude! Tough times. I'm glad you got out with your bike. And, I've ridden in SW, and the trails are epic. As for a job, we are a tiny company (27 total employees) and rarely have openings. When we do, we get a lot of interest. Best bet is to send us a resume (no HR department here, so send to marketing@yeticycles.com) and we'll check it out.
  • + 7
 wow! 27 employees?? how do you manage to run such a legendary company with so few employees? I mean having to design, manufacture, sales taxes and other stuff must be quite a load on you all
  • + 5
 Thanks for the reply man, appreciate your time. Expect my resume in the post real soonSmile
  • + 7
 You guys should really hire zer0c00l44.
  • + 1
 Alot of the companies have a small amount of employees. Ive heard from a x rocky rider now shop owner that rocky has approx 25 employees. I think thats a pretty accurate number. Im thinking since most of the companies went to asia the employees that were needed was cut drastically. I think alot of the bikes are assembled in asia and sent straight to the shops from there. Think of the savings!!!!!! It is pretty amazing how a company like yeti can only have 27 employees!!
  • + 32
 Jared/Richie,

For the EWS and the courses you have experienced paired with your strategies, would you consider the 5" of the SB5C enough travel or is a 6" bike (Whether it's the SB66 or a new version of the switch infinity) a requirement in order to be competitive to win races?

Lastly, Jared with how long you have been at Yeti and your success, is there anything specific about the company that keeps you riding for them year after year compared to moving to another brand?
  • + 18
 Both Richie and myself were honestly blown away with how capable the 5c is on terrain that should be beyond its capabilities. So the 5c could definitely be on the cards for certain EWS races. depends on the terrain. I have had some good offers from other companies over the years, but I dont want to compromise on equipment, if you want to win you need to be on the best stuff, and our bikes and components are always top notch. Ive always felt at home at Yeti and our equipment is the best
  • + 6
 Richie- From my recent experiences on the enduro world series, i would choose more of an aggresive bike for most of the stages. The SB66c did a remarkable job taking whatever terrain it got thrown at it. For sure there were some stages where a aggressive 6in travel bike would reign supreme like the steeper, more highspeed stages like Valloire or the DH stages in Chile. On the other hand we had many flatter physical stages that the SB5c would be perfect for. So it comes down to what you are more comfortable on to suite your preferences. For me I would choose this "SB6c" that everyone is talking about. but thats purely because i like a bit more bike coming from the DH side of things. But people go just as fast on smaller travel 29ers as some do on slack 6in travel 650bs. I think the Sb5c is a very capable bike and trust it to ride any of the stages we have had already.
  • + 28
 Is there going to be an SB66 replacement in the 150-170mm travel range?
  • + 11
 Seriously! Yeti came out with the SB66 and it dominated the market. It was the perfect bike for me: Long toptube, raked out head tube angle (I have the 170mm lyric on it). With two different wheelsets, it was my everything bike. Please fill us in with what Yeti plans on doing for a SB66 replacement or if they aren't planning on anything at the moment!!...I need to know before I make a mistake and buy a 2015 Trek Slash in carbon.
  • + 35
 CONROY - Yes. We will have a bike in this range with Switch Infinity technology and Jared has been critical in the development of the new rig. Might even see it in Winter Park this weekend. He's still conflicted -- SB5c or the new, yet to be released longer travel bike? WP is not super technical. Stay tuned.
  • + 9
 Please Jared ride the new yet to be released bike!!!
  • + 43
 Ill be riding/testing a longer travel/slacker proto this weekend, and im sure some photos will find their way onto the net.
  • + 3
 Can't wait to see the new rig!!!
  • + 26
 Bigger calves--Rude? Or Graves?
  • + 4
 rude...trust me
  • + 2
 most definitely Rude Trust me I've seen him in person They're the size of my Thighs...
  • + 158
 I eat steaks, Richie eats cows whole
  • + 3
 @jaredgraves that made me laugh like hell...luckily I'm early, so no one is in the office yet Wink
  • + 3
 Scrolled down to see this answer first. I was not disappointed.
  • + 20
 Your newer suspension designs always look to me like they'll be really difficult to clean and service, and that they'd have some expensive wear issues (given so many proprietary parts), while other companies lean to make their parts easier to service (take SantaCruz's VPP, which has grease ports and a lifetime bearing warranty)… Is there a chance that they're as troublesome as they seem? (I know people will say, "as long as you maintain it right," but I think it's safe to say that not everyone maintains their bike ideally, especially when it's not made particularly easy)
  • + 1
 I'd like to hear this one answered as well. Yeti seems a bit different from other smaller manufacturers in going with more complex suspension designs versus simpler ones, which is strange because I think Yeti buyers tend to be more advanced riders with better bike maintenance skills. I'd think the average Yeti rider would be the type to service their bike themselves, and would prefer a simpler; more reliable bike over an overly complex alternative.
  • + 14
 JOEY - One of the main goals with the new Switch Infinity system was to reduce the amount of required maintenance, while still creating the desired suspension qualities. We feel we have made huge leaps and bounds in with durability and maintenance compared to the previous rail systems and the original Switch system. Over the 3.5 years of testing, we have had nothing but good luck with the durability of the Switch Infinity mechanism, even when testing with zero maintenance. I’m not known to be a good mechanic or be easy on my equipment, and I have had no issues with the Switch Infinity system with essentially no maintenance, even after countless hours of thrashing it. The system may look like a hassle, but I can assure you its quite simple maintenance wise.

If you check out the San Juans video we shot last fall (www.pinkbike.com/news/proven-here-sb5-carbon-amp-the-san-jaun-mountains.html) you will notice there was a lot of grit/grime/mud/snow. I did absolutely zero maintenance on the Switch Infinity mechanism during the trip, or after the trip for that matter, and it's still running perfectly.
  • + 15
 STRETCH - Upon first seeing the design, durability is a common and valid concern and we knew it would take some convincing in the beginning. We made our first alloy test mules using this design over three and a half years ago. The Infinity link was initially cobbled together at Yeti using shafts and bushings from a FOX dropper post, hand cut seals, and a CNC’d housing. We purposely did not maintain these Infinity links whatsoever and did everything ‘wrong’ we could think of to mimic possible real-life consumers. No greasing(they have no grease ports), some were never cleaned once, others were power-washed consistently. We are still riding these mules today and the Infinity links are still smooth as butter.

Early into the development we contacted FOX to see if they would be willing to develop the production version of the Infinity link. FOX who we have been partners with for many years specializes in mechanisms that move in a similar manner (shocks, forks). The Infinity link is even simpler in that we are not trying to seal gas and fluid in, we only need to prevent contaminants from entering. FOX also have an incredible testing facility that we could utilize. We went through many iterations of shaft/body designs, mounting interfaces, bushing/seal types etc. These iterations were both ride and lab tested significantly. Cyclic, ultimate, fatigue, mud-slurry etc.

The Infinity link is also very easy to maintain as it only occasionally needs to be greased via the grease ports. We generally are concerned that people will grease the mechanism too often than not enough. We are very confident in the durability of the system.
  • + 1
 Hey YetiCycles - So with the new Switch Infinity, can you just hose down that mechanism and be done with it as far as clean up? Could you let it sit in grit and grime if you get home late and forget? I think I read somewhere that recommended greasing every 40 hours of riding. what if you did it less frequently?

In terms of affordability, I think CONRAD mentioned above that the SI technology may eventually make its way to lower price points. Like non-carbon version? or is that even possible? I love my circa 2008 575, but am curious to try the SB5 or something with the new Switch Infinity to feel how differently it rides (especially on a 27.5). I can climb well on the 575, but I reckon SB5 is more efficient. would it feel less plush than the 575?
  • + 8
 HOOG - A hose is all you need. If there is no hose to be found, nothing is great also. Honestly - I have cleaned my Switch Infinity proto maybe 2 times over 3.5 years. I never greased it. Too much grease is bad - attracts dust. 40 hours is just a rule of thumb. It is hard to say what will be needed in environments other than where we have been testing.

It is definitely possible to make an alloy version. We are not currently headed this direction as Conroy mentions up top.

The SB5C will ride/feel much different than the 575. Will it feel as plush as the 575? The suspension feels bottomless and well supported. I am not sure how else to put it in words....I think you will need to hit up a Demo.
  • + 2
 Thanks HOOG!!
  • + 2
 "i think you need to hit up a demo"...erm. you might want to re-word that slightly....
  • + 20
 Prob got asked this a lot. Do you think you will make a "freeride" style bike? Something like the sb66 but with a bit more travel,slacker head angle, shorter top tube. I think that would be awesome.
  • + 2
 I'm just commenting so I get a notification if Yeti replies, I'm curious as well but if they can't sell off their sb66 it will be hard to sell a freeride bike considering the size of that market. Freeride isn't dead but the bikes are getting there, I'd like a freeride bike to just have fun with but having a dh bike and 26" am bike means I'm not rushing to buy one anytime soon.
  • + 1
 who said they cant sell off the 66?
  • + 3
 Yeti did, they discontinued it because nobody was buying it.
  • + 2
 Or possibly a new downhill bike would love to see yeti starting up a DH team again !!
  • + 6
 @finnrambo
Freeride bikes make sense for an insanely small part of the mountain community. Who really needs the freedom a single crown gives for throwing down tricks, but also needs 7" of travel for huge hits? They weigh 38lbs, have 1" less travel and are a little more compact, just buy a DH bike. We all know you're not going to pedal that thing 1200' to the top any way. There is about 14 awesome "Enduro" bikes that will do the job better and weigh at least 5 lbs less, ie SB66. What they should make is a better build for the more rough terrain/jump oriented people. SB66 with single ring, vivid air, pike/36 fork, strong wheels, 50 mm stem, and 780 bars. Save price of the X1, we can pedal a 11-36 with a 32t.
  • + 3
 Agree here. The SB66 I have does not work well for a freeride bike. BB height is way too high, H/A not slack enough, and frankly, the bike isn't beefy enough. Quite a few swingarms have been warranteed. They are also phasing out the DJ Graves helped design, so we're not left with much on the DH/FR/DS/4X side of Yeti.
  • + 5
 CONROY - Could happen. We’re not fans of short TT’s, but like bikes with long travel and slacker head angles.
  • + 4
 i have my sb66 built with a 180mm 36, DHX RC4, zee drivetrain and brakes and chromag cock pit. it weighs in at about 35 pounds but i can still easily take it on an all mountain ride even though i built it for riding park
  • + 1
 @gtimkiv
Yesss that's what I meant but That's probably a better way of sayin it!
  • + 18
 Where do you see the future of Yeti and other high end manufactures? Is it going to be a constant battle or the highest tech bikes at increasing prices? Or do you see a middle ground opening up for high performance bikes that forego some advancements for a lower cost?

Companies like Porsche have high performance, but relatively lower cost options (Boxter/ Cayman). Do you see this also happening in the bike market?
  • + 5
 I don't understand the premise of slashnasty's question (aren't there already carbon bikes w/ low to mid level suspension and drivetrain builds? Aren't there already Al alloy framed bikes, sometimes even w/ 'simpler' suspension systems, to cater exactly to the crowd looking for a top-tier brand but at a lower price point?), but he's got enough props to indicate he's struck a nerve. Access is good for the sport. And so here's a follow-up to his question, for Yeti:

I read recently in Bicycle Retailer that mountain bike and children's bike sales were down in 2013 compared to other segments (e.g. hybrid and road). Does Yeti, a dedicated MTB brand, feel it needs only to out-compete the other brands for a big enough piece of the MTB pie, however small the pie may be in any year, or is there some plan to grow the sport? Is it economical to adopt some new and perhaps expensive approach to getting people on bikes, or is that not the bike company's role? Not just the odd grant, but banging out pump tracks in urban areas. Not just the odd NICA sponsorship, but founding teams or partnering with dozens of community groups? I reallly want a place to ride, and so I volunteer at my local trails. Not everyone can do that. But you are some of the very few in the world who may have a profit motive to build trails. Is it going to happen? Thanks.
  • + 3
 I'm sure there are many Pinkbikers with this same question, but what is the news on a SB-66 replacement with Switch Infinity link? It has to be coming as the geo numbers of the new SB5c are extremely close to that of the current SB-66 and is actually longer! Can we expect to see an even longer and slacker bike with more travel?

Note: Really big fan of your bikes and planning on getting a new bike this December. Strongly considering a Yeti enduro bike...
  • + 1
 @Slahnasty Are you asking for something like the Kona Precept 200?
  • + 1
 @FlowMasterO Pretty much, I was trying to ask if/ when there is going to be more competition for mid level bikes. I think the Kona Precept / process series are good examples of high performance bikes coming in at a relatively lower price point.
  • + 5
 CONROY - Our focus is creating the best riding bikes available. In the case of our Switch Infinity suspension, it is relatively expensive to make, but it is a big step forward in suspension design. In your Porsche analogy, it’s our 911. Can that technology make its way down into lower price points? Sure, it just takes time to find the right way to implement it in lower price points.

We still have our modified single pivot bikes in our line (575) and will offer these in the future. The performance is solid and the price is lower.
  • + 0
 If you're worried about how much you spent on your last bike/planning to spend on a new rig...... just eat ramen noodles for 6 months
  • + 1
 What I got out of that response was that I should enjoy my SB66a because I'll never be able to afford another top line Yeti. It was a huge expenditure for me to buy that bike, and I just can't justify the premium for a carbon frame. What I got out of that post was Yeti has their top suspension on the carbon bikes. If you can't afford that, go with the simple 575. Disappointing.
  • + 0
 @oldmanjoe What I got out of your response to Yeti was that you don't care about new technology unless its on your bike and that the performance benefits don't mean anything to you. They said that it will take time to make it less expensive as does everything. Read!!!
  • + 1
 I've been following this release rather closely, and the way they construct the SI is very complicated, and can't be done in AL. Hence the carbon only for the SI platform. It may get less expensive, but it will always be carbon, so add $880 - $1000 over an aluminum bike (That was the difference between the SB66 and the SB66-C) So unless they have another design to pull out you're going to have to shell out for a carbon bike if you want SI. Or go with the basic single pivot of a 575.

As an owner of a SB, there is no way I'll be going back to a 575, and I'm pretty sure I could find a DW-link bike in AL for about half of what Yeti will be charging for their SI in carbon.

Suspension response is much more important than light weight to me. I'd rather ride a well engineered heavy bike than a light bike that I can't control through the rocks.

I wish I could get an SI in AL. But Yeti has been very careful to not say that this will be an option in the future.
  • + 1
 You made it sound like in your first response that you didn't understand why they couldn't make an SB5C in aluminum. I agree with you on the weight aspect.
  • + 16
 Please spec the SB6c with a Float X or equivalent air shock with a reservoir. Sucks having to spend an extra $700 on a new shock... RP23 are great but damping is gone half way down the trail except in the cold of winter. I'm sure the racers have the same feedback for enduro.

If something goes seriously wrong with switch infinity, will it be sent to Yeti or Fox for service/replacement?
  • + 10
 HOOG - We completely agree that a 6” version of the Switch Infinity should be spec’d with a FOX Float X.

If something does go wrong with the Switch Infinity mechanism it will be handled by Yeti. It is a very simple system and is comprised of bushings, seals, stanchions, body, bearings. If your Switch Infinity mechanism needs to be serviced, we will be able to quickly turn this around at our factory. We feel that there should be very few issues with the Switch Infinity. We have ridden the system for over 3.5 years with the same bushings and seals. No maintenance and no wear so far.
  • + 19
 When do we get to see Richie back on a DH rig?
  • + 1
 Related: Are you enjoying the EWS as much/less than racing DH WC? Do you still use a DH bike for training?
  • + 7
 CONROY - Ultimately, Richie will decide what discipline he races. In our mind, it was critical in his development as a racer to continue to ride and train with Jared. He's very young and his training this year will be applicable to DH in the future. That said, he's had some great results in Enduro. Several top 5's and once he starts stringing those together, he'll be a force.
  • + 14
 ITs been hard to park the DH bike for the year... but i havent had too many regrets in doing so. Racing enduro is something new and exciting for me to give a crack at this year and ive been loving it!! Being in the position to ride and learn from Jared has always been one of those dreams ive had as a kid and obviously a great thing for me as a young racer. At this point im not to worried about returning to DH next year. With a couple of top 5 stage finishes this year it makes me want to chase the discipline for a lil longer. considering i feel like i can improve off those finishes.
Originally i wanted to mix in a few DH races this year to keep my skillz and enjoyment up. things didnt go as planned and we stuck with solely EWS rounds. I do think doing DH helps with enduro as it makes you "go for it" in many technical sections, gives you high speed training and technical skills on the bike.
I still do love to race Dh and wouldnt mind doing either. At the moment I like the enduro format better, considering we get alot more time riding and not so much sitting around like we do in DH. Also, I get to experience much more terrain around the world as we race up to 6 stages and not just one track. I see pros and cons of each, but enjoy where iam at in enduro
  • + 4
 Thanks for the response! The CT crew has got your back, good luck and keep killing it!
  • + 14
 When you guys have to fill an engineering position, how do you see the difference between an ME and MET degree? I'm currently on track for an ME (BS) degree and am curious of how MET is seen in the cycling industry as compared to ME. I'm sure ME is more desired, but how does it differ opportunity-wise to get land sweet gig at a place such as Yeti?
  • + 3
 Great question. Im an met and wondering the same thing.
  • + 9
 HOOG - When we are looking to add new employees, what degree they have is pretty low on the list. We consider work experience, references, creativity and persistence. Of course education is important, but you can take the most highly educated person in the world and they may not be able to design the simplest of parts for a bike company. Sometimes big brains can get in the way - except in Stretch’s (Peter Zawistowski) case. Back to the question/answer - We would not care whether an engineering applicant had an ME or MET degree.
  • + 1
 Good to know! Thanks for the reply!
  • + 1
 Small companies don't care about education, they care about a proven track record. Someone with a good degree but no experience has a long way to go and its mostly large corporations that want that, they can afford to provide years of employment and training before the employee is of any use.
  • + 15
 Do y'all wear turquoise underwear?
  • + 4
 HOOG - Of Course - more impervious to bacon.......strips.....
  • + 11
 The initial reviews of Switch Infinity are all superlative. On his facebook page, Jared calls it a "game changer." I don't compete, I'm not a pro who tunes 7 different shock parameters to get the ultimate feel. I can barely set my rebound right. Would I notice "ultimate" suspension performance from Switch Infinity compared to other suspension designs such as dw-link, vpp, maestro?
  • + 12
 HOOG - Hey Drootang - quick answer.... YES.
Jared could ride a three legged donkey and still finish top 20. Does technology help him? Of course. When you look at an hour + long EWS and the top 3 guys are within a few seconds, equipment matters.
I feel that guys like us are the ones that benefit the most from technology. I get to ride a lot of designs and can honestly say that I am way faster on the SB5C. When the SB66 came out we were all faster at the factory. Now with the SB5C, we are faster yet again. Jared and Richie will be 1-2% faster - and that is a huge deal. That is a game-changer at that level. Guys like us will be 10-20% faster. Also a game-changer. This is one of the great reasons that we race. If we can make Jared and Richie faster, we know we have a product that works.
  • + 12
 Big fan. Ridden many Yeti's over the years (currently SB66). Two quick ones: why the press fit bb in the new bike (everyone I know has one that creaks) and will we see a 6" version before the end of the year?
  • + 3
 Agree I'd like an answer to this one, I just bought a Yeti ARC because it has a 73mm bb....
I thought I read somewhere Yeti saying that press fit bb creak?
  • - 2
 Have you tried loctite? That stuff goes a long way towards preventing creaks... Also having an alloy shelled pressfit bb instead of a plastic one (if you're not on alloy already) should help as well, I always get creaking from plastic ones after a while.
  • + 4
 HOOG - Thanks for being a Fan and riding the SB66 - an in-house favorite. The press fit allows us some freedom from the design and strength aspect. The larger shell creates a bigger area for the downtube to join. This gives us greater stiffness at an important part of the frame. On all of our kits we run the Praxis BB conversion. The left and right cups actually thread into each other. This removes any creak and they have not loosened up on any of our test/demo bikes. The press fit on carbon frames also removes an aluminum insert that needs to be bonded or co-molded during manufacturing. Carbon and aluminum have drastically different properties that can create hairline surface cracks. Both road frames and mountain frames are plagued by cracking at the bb alloy/carbon interfaces. Sometimes these cracks are just in the paint and sometimes the bonds actually fail over time. Removing this alloy piece allows for a more robust manufacturing process.
Loctite is also a solution for press fit application. You will need to make sure that both surfaces are very clean and free of all oil/grease.
6" Switch Infinity - follow the EWS this weekend and you may get a glimpse of something in that range. The Switch Infinity works well at all travels and we have a lot in development. We can't make any promises on timing; as we strive to have designs fully baked before release.
  • + 8
 I want to know yeti's thoughts on direct sales companies (canyon, yt, etc)? Do you think that their success will bring prices down or force other manufacturers to just sell direct? And what do you think this will mean for bike shops?

Jared afte first hand experience of the muddy side of uk ridding at the Scottish EWS this year, how do you think the switch would fair in those conditions week after week?
  • + 5
 The switch Infinity will handle UK mud just fine. I know people have a lot of concerns with this, but it been tested extensively and is extremely durable. Nothing is maintenance free, but if your riding in mud every day, then 2 minutes (a wash and some fresh grease squeezed in via the grease ports) every week or 2 should do it.
  • + 6
 CONROY - Only time will tell on the direct model. We are happy with our current distribution and feel bike shops are critical to our long term success.
  • + 10
 @Schusler: What's more important in life, race results or your foosball accolades?
  • + 5
 JOEY - It's a hard balance to support both. While race results are important and quite satisfying, so is whooping up on the foosball table at work or out with friends.
  • + 1
 Is factory joey accepting applications for the 2015 season?
  • + 1
 @ Tstep3

JOEY - You know it!
  • + 7
 What sort of maintanence will the switch infinity require? How mechanically, as far you you can share, does it work; should it be thought of as a "floating" (or almost vpp-esque) version of the old circular eccentric link via the simulated rail system and what is the advantage? Why not just fully enclose that bitch with a light cover plate?
  • + 7
 for the same reason you wouldn't lock your smoking hot wife inside all day, you want to show her off.
  • + 4
 From someone not affiliated with Yeti at all:

You can't "Fully" enclose it anyway, the pivot needs to move up and down, so you would need a slot in the cover in any case. My guess is that by having it exposed it 1. looks nice and 2. allows you to see when it needs cleaning and servicing.

Considering the little links are essentially fork stanchions and the moving parts are very similar to fork lowers I imagine they'll require a similar level of work, except they have grease ports so there is no need to drop the "lowers" to replace oil. So a quick wipe and a squirt of grease would keep them running for a while I'd imagine.
  • + 3
 STRETCH- Regarding maintenance, unlike a fork/shock we are not trying to seal in gas/oil, but only keep major debris out. This makes the maintenance quick and straight forward. It is a simple as a shot of grease and a quick wipe-down. This does not need to be done frequently:

www.ridefox.com/help.php?m=bike&id=465

We tested many mules, some had the Infinity link completely covered and some were left opened. We found overtime that a cover would inevitably let dirt in and it would remain trapped. There is so much leverage on the infinity link (~7mm of motion for 5in of travel) that any mud/dirt in the way is simply scraped away by the seals...It likes being in the open.
  • + 5
 HOOG - Hey shaft - Tman and Flam pretty much nailed the answer on enclosing the mechanism.
During the early years of testing we did cover the mechanism with a sewn jacket. It was needed to keep looky-loo's at bay. When we removed the jacket it was packed full of dirt and rocks. A good test, but not ideal for production. Suspension forks were using boots back in the day. Eventually it was realized that an open seal did a better job.

Mechanically the Switch Infinity allows us to do things with the suspension kinematics that cannot be accomplished on frames controlled by links. We are able to achieve our desired anti-squat, wheel path, and suspension leverage ratio targets without compromising any of them. Our lower pivot is allowed to translate linearly and not in an arc. All non-single pivot bikes have virtual pivot points. This just means that the wheel path does not follow an arc with a constant radius (with the center of the arc not moving location).
  • + 4
 STRETCH- Longest answer ever, breaking up into two posts:

I think of the design as a “dual-link” with a special case for the lower link and a way to improve the original Switch design by incorporating our 303 technology and blending the two together.

With the original Switch linkage, the lower “link” is of special length in that it is extremely short ( 15mm), so short that an eccentric is the best way to package it. With this system we are able to tune the suspension in a very unique way that cannot be achieved with “traditional” length links. The ride attributes of the SB bikes are proof of this. But there is limit to what we can do with this design. There is an inherent instability of using a very short link. It is naturally difficult to make the link rotate the direction you want it to move, especially with real world tolerances compared to theoretical models on the computer. Push the design a bit too far and all of a sudden the eccentric is rotating the opposite way it was intended to move (hyper-extension).

Moving onto Switch Infinity, the lower “link” is of special length in that it is the mechanical equivalent to an infinitely long link. Any link that rotates creates a path that has curvature. As that link length is increased the curvature of the path decreases until the link length goes to infinity. At this point there is no curvature and the path is linear (translation rather than rotation). Although the SI’s motion is similar to the original Switch, kinematically it is very different. This is because the two are in a way the exact opposite. One has an extremely short lower link, the other an extremely long. What this does is allows us to even further finely tune the suspension characteristics. The virtual infinitely long link provides stability to the system that allows us to approach the exact curves/characteristics we want.
  • + 7
 STRETCH- continued:

The switching motion in particular allows us to achieve these characteristics. In general the upwards motion creates the pedaling platform while the downwards enables the suspension to work efficiently at the end of the travel. Sort of an automatic climbing “on-off” switch. You want the climb switch on early in the travel, and off when further in the travel. We can very specifically tune the system to control how strong the pedaling platform is, when it occurs, and how quickly it drops off(downwards motion). We can do this to a whole new level with Infinity vs OG Switch.

On top of the added “tunability”, the linear motion adds another attribute, efficiency. With the eccentric, the mechanical switch can experience some counter-forces in the right situation. If the suspension is at its switching point and there is a hard rear wheel impact, the system will firm up. The eccentric is switching (trying to move from going rearward to going forward) and the impact is ripping it rearward. It kind of has to be the perfect storm. With the Switch Infinity there is no switch from rearward to forward. It is just the up and down and the mechanism is extremely smooth. Most riders never noticed this but we knew it could be improved. The smooth linear translation of the main pivot as opposed to that of an extremely short link and its tight path (high curvature) is immediately apparent in the ride characteristics of Switch Infinity bikes. This is what we borrowed from the 303 technology; great small bump sensitivity and square-edge compliance…something that is obviously noticeable on 303 DH bikes.
  • + 2
 I will say it, as my own bike trainer and mechanic I want this bike!!!! I love yeti but I'm having troubles in the switch maintenance but still love my sb66, thanks for get abike with less maintenance !!! now time to save money for a year or 2 months (depends if you sale a 26 version hehehe)
  • + 1
 Wow! Thanks guys, didn't get a chance to see the answer until now. That was a great explanation.
  • + 3
 That is interesting as fuck. I'm about to go stare at pictures of the switch and SI linkages for like an hour now. Thanks, Stretch.
  • + 6
 It seems the new bike has an intended rising-falling-rising (regressive-progressive-regressive) leverage rate. I understand the intent when using progressive air shocks but all other forms of two wheeled suspension (especially motor sport) try to use a linear-progressive rate (in varying degrees) to enable fast, predictable, suspension tuning for different terrain and conditions.

What can you say to convince me that complex suspension designs are worth bothering with when, for example, Trek and Devinci use a single pivot that seems to work very well.

Oh and love the company, the racing heritage etc. Graves rules etc Smile
  • + 3
 STRETCH - The leverage ratio on the SB5c is actually linear and slightly progressive. Meaning the curve is a straight line with a negative slope (higher in the beginning, lower at the end). This offers the tuning advantages you mentioned, and in addition combines with the linkage design to help provide small bump compliance, mid-stroke support, bottom out control, and a general consistent feel.

Yes, there is typically a trade off between complexity and performance. There are many good single pivots out there that work and ride great. They can be made very light, relatively inexpensively and they also have a certain feel to them that just makes them fun. However, we are always searching for a way to make our bikes ride better, this is our passion. We make bikes that we want to ride and that will make our racers faster and in the end this is what we sell. Moving away from a single pivot opens the door to a whole new set of solutions/improvements and in our opinion the SI design allows us to even further optimize to a new level. The difference in the way our SI bikes ride was immediately apparent even coming from riding the original SB series, bikes that blew me away the first time I rode one. This performance in our minds is well worth jumping up in complexity from a single pivot, but to each their own.
  • + 7
 Jared and Joey, How many bikes do you own? Where is your all time favorite place to ride? Growing up in Driggs Idaho, where do the trails off teton pass rank? Top speed on dirt?
  • + 4
 JOEY -
I own 7 or 8 bikes. I have a an Yeti ARCc, a Yeti SB66c, a Yeti SB5c, DJ, BMX bike, and few cruiser/townie bikes. I have a few of my old DH frames hanging about to, my favorite was the 303WC with the 25th anniversary team edition paint.

My favorite place to ride that I have been to depends on what were talking about.
Just for the quality of trail and flow, it would be hard not to say Whistler / Vancouver Island trails.
In terms of high alpine single track shredding I would say it would have to be the bike packing trip I took in January around the Huayhuash range high up in the Peruvian Andes.

The trails of Teton pass are incredible. Some of the best I have ever ridden, with out a doubt. The Lithium trail probably ranked in my top 5 favorite trails of all time.
  • + 3
 I have a pretty good collection from the past 11 years, I try always keep a couple of my favorite bikes from each season, so the collection is growing year by year. I always enjoy my riding at home in Toowoomba most, because we have some really unique dirt at home, and nothing beats going home and sleeping in your own bed between big ride days.
  • + 6
 Chris, I had a really great experience visiting the HQ about a month and a half ago from Los Angeles. Meeting, conversing and going on a few lunch rides on Apex with your crew really did cement my views of the passion you guys put forth into your products. It was also great to see someone like yourself come out and to initiate conversations with visitors such as myself, you don't see many head honchos doing that these days. As for the SB66c, I just finished the BC Bike Race on it and can't say enough about the fun, dependability and overall promise of the bike. I am a Yeti fan for life, can't wait to swing my leg over an SB5c. Keep up the great work, really.
  • + 4
 CONROY - Charles, it was great to have you stop by. As a company, we're as good as our customers, dealers and people that work here. We always feel honored when people take time out of their day to stop by and check out Yeti and maybe get out on a ride. Congrats on the BC Bike race and thanks for the support.
  • + 6
 Not entirely removed from the switch infinity topic, where have the Yeti DJ and 4X gone, will there be a return of these bikes? I race 4X as well as other disciplines and would love to see the return of short travel racers, perhaps with a switch link...
Also a carbon DJ would be insane!
  • + 1
 Agree!!! Sure, it's a niche market, but one many of us love.
  • + 2
 CONROY - We are focused on Switch Infinity right now, but once we get the most popular categories in-line, we might explore those categories again.
  • + 15
 CONROY - We still have a few 4x's left. Auction anyone?
  • + 9
 Or auction off a few of those custom 4" links you made for Jared's Sea Otter bike. I would pay a pretty penny to convert my 66c into a play bike when I move to the new 6" infinity bike. Would make a fun bike to go in between my DJ and the new trail bike.
  • + 5
 Hi Joey, can you tell us about your marketing approach for Yeti? What kind of content is the favorite of Yeti's market? Plus, what is your approach to capturing the attention of new riders at the top of the marketing funnel? Thanks for a great time at Yeti Tribe Gathering 2014.
  • + 4
 JOEY -

Sure.
Yeti's marketing approach is fairly unique.
We do all of our creative in house (for the most part) which is very unique/rare for a company of our size. This allows us to scheme up some pretty big photo/video projects while keeping the budget far below what a production house would cost. At the forefront of our marketing is the Proven Here campaign, which in case you haven't see it essentially shows each bike being pushed to its limits in a specific location.
It's a very exciting campaign to be a part of, and is definitely very rewarding. On top of this we try to stay on top of providing a visually stunning, and informative social media presence. On our Instagram page we try to only post professional level photos, and this has definitely helped us grow our following and have a quality feed.
Both of these are ways we try to capture new riders in the marketing funnel for sure. We try to provide media content and social media that are appealing for all bike riders, not just Yeti freaks.
I think our market/followers have grown to expect and appreciate high quality, well produced marketing content from Yeti. The Proven Here campaign would fall right in line with this.
  • + 1
 Big ups Joey, thanks
  • + 3
 You used to have wallpapers available to download, my laptop's begging for some Yeti shots to use, any chance of bringing it back?
  • + 5
 Gentlemen-

Interested in your thoughts on the tradeoffs between top tube length and stem length. A few brands are pushing the front centers of their bikes way out, and coupling that with a very short stem. This line of thought different from the long stem, short TT days of old. Where do you see Yeti fitting in? How do you determine the right balance? Is a long, long front center/reach and a tiny stem simply fashion, or is there merit to that approach?
  • + 3
 CONROY - It's a balancing act. For us, the most important thing is rider position and how the bike responds seated and standing (when descending). Our bikes are designed to feel centered when you are descending -- it allows the bike to respond better to the terrain and puts you in a more natural position. Many people get on our bikes and say they just feel right. That's very much a function of a longer top tube and slacker head angle. But, you're right, it's possible to go too long. We feel like we strike the right balance. How do we determine this? Ride a bunch of iterations and then decide. Our staff typically rides 50mm stems.
  • + 1
 Thanks!
  • + 8
 What made Yeti choose Fox over Rockshox in the development of the Infinity and as a choice for suspension components?
  • + 8
 CONROY -- FOX has been a long-time partner and produces the best suspension in the industry. When we approached them with this project, they were fantastic. They gave us tons of engineering resources and have been instrumental to the success of the product. We're a small company and FOX knew the volumes would be relatively small. They didn't do it for the money -- I can promise that... They did it because they believed in what we were doing and because we know and trust each other to make the best product.
  • + 2
 Richie- I cant offer you an exact answer as i was not involved in the decision haha! But we have had a long relationship with Fox and honor they support and dedication they put into their products. Also, they are a company manly based in Offroad truck racing etc.. So in turn we can get a product that has incorporated technology from that side of their expertise; giving us a durable well tested infinity design!
  • + 4
 The new SB-5 has 17.4" chainstays. With so many 27.5" wheeled bikes aiming for shorter chainstays and longer reach these days, were the long-ish chainstays a decision due to handling traits from testing? Or more of proper clearances with the new Switch Infinity suspension design and larger wheel?
  • + 1
 STRETCH - This seems to be a common question. The CS length is not a function(limitation) of the new SI. We could go shorter if we wanted to (and may on other SI bikes to come). It becomes a balance with the frame geometry, particularly the ST position and angle. The shorter the stays, the bigger the wheel, and the more travel the more forward and slack the ST gets in order to clear the tire at full compression. This can put the rider in a position that is not ideal, especially across sizes. It is our opinion that on some models it is worth the compromise, and on others it is not.
  • + 1
 JOEY - Having Switch Infinity and the 27.5" wheel size incorporated in the overall design scheme create very minimal restrictions for what we can do with chain stay length. We chose 17.4" chain stays because we feel it rides best that way and makes for a very balanced bike. The longer reach/top tube is classic Yeti and we have always sided that way.
  • + 3
 I wouldn't complain of a steeper ST. It's even what kept me off buying an sb66c (which i wanted to mount with a Fox 36). Well that and the price of the frame in Switzerland... By chance the importer (and the prices) changed. Looking forward to this sb6c I tell you!
  • + 4
 How long will you keep supporting the SB66? Right now I am having a hard time getting stop bumpers from you and and am currently running a 1/4" vacuum hose cap. Do you have a different solution if they are no longer available?
  • + 5
 CONROY - We support our bikes for a long time... In fact, you need Lawwill parts? We probably have them. We have stop bumpers in stock.
  • + 4
 1 - Is it heart wrenching to have a bike like the SB-66 and then have shops tell you they don't want it because the industry is marketing 650B to customers? Will you continue to sell the 66 in non NA markets?

2 - Is the new design a result of the legal with SC? I assume so...

3 - Cover up your junk would you? We don't need to see your kashima shafts already...
  • + 4
 HOOG - Hi Rodeo - 1 - It is heart wrenching. We are not sure yet if it will continue outside NA. We will know by Eurobike. 2 - No it isn't. The Switch Infinity is the evolution of the the original switch. We are able to do things with the SI that we couldn't before. Once you ride it, you will agree. 3 - It is more durable uncovered. A cover will just hold in dust, dirt, and other debrisc. Just like the old fork boots. They went the way of the dodo bird.
  • + 4
 To me it seems the SB5C infinity general idea (layout) is similar to that of the 303WC with the vertical rail.
I always loved that idea but whats the advantage of changing form Standard linear bearings like used on CNC machines to custom components?
Are the components in the infinity linear bearing the same like on other FOX products hence will they be available over time?

Thanks Guys, looking forward to the longer travel versions Smile
  • + 1
 HOOG - The rail mechanisms on the 303WC were both heavy and expensive. The new SI is both lighter and more affordable to produce. We tested a similar system on the 303WC in the early days. The travel of the pivot was just too much and we were not able to get the packaging right. The bushings are inline product and will be for years. The material is the same that they use on their forks and posts.
  • + 5
 Hey Guys - big fans of your bikes! Great work on the SB 5c, too. What is the best reason I can give my wife as to why I need the new SB 5C? I've got a SB66c now. Creativity points are rewarded.
  • + 7
 tell her because you want one, best reason ever.
  • + 24
 CONROY - I have a friend that always gets his bikes in exactly the same color (turquoise) and keeps them in mint condition. He gets a new bike every year, but his wife thinks he's had the same bike forever. Not saying I recommend this, but you gotta give the guy points for creativity...
  • + 4
 Good thing my wife isn't on PinkBike... otherwise my plans would be foiled.

@Jaredgraves - if you sign it, I bet she would see it as an investment. Can I sign you up for that?
  • + 2
 I just make sure my wife's bike is always fresh and carbon.. she had 2 carbon frames before I ever had one! This way she always believes I'm as much or more concerned with her having a top end bike, although she doesn't understand or care of the final spec as long as it's carbon and covered in shiny bits. Added benefit.. she will never blame the bike or the gear for being slower, etc, knowing our bikes are nearly equal.. So and I'm sure the Yeti guys should love this... Buy HER a new SB5c now and then get yourself one, or the forthcoming 6" version in a month or so.
  • + 4
 Yeti are seen as innovators in the MTB industry. What do you predict as the next game changers in, say, 3-5 years time?

And Jared, any chance of a video version of your outstanding EWS diary notes?

Ta.
  • + 15
 Not sure about the video thing, thats really not up to me at all. We started doing the rider diaries because the net is pretty flooded with video these days, its something a bit different and you can talk about things in a bit more detail
  • + 10
 JOEY - Our next video project will feature Jared. It's been a good while since we have worked with him on the video side of things, so this project will be an exciting change of pace.
  • + 1
 Mfro- If they told you they'd have to kill you! prototypes are secret..
  • + 4
 HOOG - Yo Mfro - It is difficult to say where the industry is going. Who 3 years ago would have thought 27.5 would be where it is. Obviously we are really pumped on the Switch Infinity and have some good ideas in the pipeline. We feel it will evolve many times over the next decade. E-bikes... more computer control.... fully rigid steel fixies.... who knows. The only thing I am pretty sure of is that a new wheel size will not be a game changer in the next 3-5 years.
  • + 3
 After some vague comments came from Yeti about moving on to a new suspension platform after the switch, I jokingly came to the conclusion that you were going to release a carbon 27.B ~155mm horst link bike, tuned aggressively to a single chainring to combat bob with chain tension. The shock would be placed in a similar place as the SB line of bikes to try keep in line with your existing offerings.

As this already exists in the Lapierre Spicy, and I was completely wrong (without surprise, mind), I'd love for you to humour me and rubbish my idea completely, tell me why the new platform is better, share your opinion on the spicy if you're given one a go, and most importantly, share your views on what actually makes a good climber. I'm curious to know where you consider the balance to be now, in the context of an "enduro" bike with switch infinity, between something very active regardless of rider input and something that fights bob while sacrificing activity.

And if someone likes the SB66 but needs a new bike, should they be sitting around twiddling their thumbs at the moment, waiting for your word?
  • + 4
 Needs a new bike?

Get another SB66...
  • + 1
 STRETCH - Hey AgrAde, check out my reply to ZeGermans for some insight into the design and its benefits. One of the cool things about SI is that the bike climbs so well, but it does not do this at the expense of small bump / square edge compliance.

Oh, and keep your eyes open at the upcoming EWS races.
  • + 3
 How does the new suspension design performance on the SB5c differ from conventional pivot suspension designs? To the best of my understanding, there are tradeoffs in suspension performance, i.e. if you want an active rear end (very little chain tension/growth) for small bump compliance, you dont get hardtail like pedalling performance unless you lock out/firm the shock. I'm interested in Yeti's design and my originial question because most suspension designs are claimed to manage leverage ratio and chain tension to provide that particular company's performance criteria, and they mostly work as claimed (give or take a few outlandish claims). As a result, its very hard to find a truely poor rear suspension design, and there is a huge range to cover the different suspension performance criteria these days (firm pedal platform, active pedal platform, progressive stroke, linear stroke, final ramp up etc to name a few), so why should consumers invest in Yeti's particular suspension design relative to the competition?
  • + 2
 STRETCH - Hey ZeGermans, check out my reply above to shafthouseshred. Also note the leverage ratio comment to jclnv below. They key is in both of these discussions. Cheers
  • + 3
 HOOG -
Guten Tag - You are correct that there are very few poor performing suspension systems out in the market. Even the systems with poor kinematics are helped out with the new generation of shocks. Every brand has there own target for performance and geometry.

Geometry - we make long, low, and slack bikes.

Suspension - our goal it to have:
efficient active pedaling
great small bump sensitivity
uninhibited suspension performance deep in the travel - ability to handle large square edge impacts
linear leverage ratio plot (makes for easier shock tuning)

We feel we have been able to deliver on these with our new SI technology.

If your ideal bike is in-line with our criteria, then you are now considered a pre-qualified investor. Welcome to The Tribe.
  • + 6
 Will there be a new 650b version of the sb66? And will it have switch infinity?
  • + 3
 Joey - There will most certainly be more offerings of Switch Infinity in yet to be released bikes. 650B is what most consumers would prefer in a 6 inch bike. And we no longer have the SB66. I would say its safe to assume that something is coming down the pipeline soon.
  • + 2
 Thanks yeti for all your hard work in the bike industry. I am looking forward to my 5th Yeti I have owned coming soon.

Question:

1.Looking for geometry angles for SB5C with a 150mm fork on it. Your website in the FAQ section says to see the chart for this info but only 140mm info is available.

2. You have eluded to very clearly that another bike is on the way and Jared will be on it this weekend. What is a realistic time frame for this to be available for the masses? Has this design been ridden/tested as much as the SB5C or are you still working out the kinks?

Thank you for your time. This approach in my opinion is so much more effective than keeping all your cards so close to you and having everyone wonder what is going on with you guys.
  • + 1
 CONROY - 5th Yeti...right on.

Answers:

1. Depends on the fork length. I have a 150mm Talas on my bike and it adds about .5 degree.
2. No timeline on release. When our testing is complete, we'll release the bike. The testing is going really well so far and it utilizes the same Switch Infinity mechanism, so the mechanism has undergone all the same testing as the SB5c.

I understand what you are saying. We have to hold our cards close because development is a tenuous thing. If we commit to a timeline and then delay to improve performance, we frustrate our customers and dealers. In the end, our process makes sure the bikes are fully baked when they come out.
  • + 1
 Thanks for input. I like that you let us know a new bike is on the way soon. Can't wait for the 6 inch bike. Hopefully it is not in the too distant future.

Do you feel your bike with a 150mm fork is balanced? Or is that bike better suited for a 140 as all the reviews have tried it with?
  • + 1
 STRETCH- It works great with both a 150 and a 140...just a matter of preference. We spec it with a 140 since it is likely a better match for most riders. That being said several of us ride it with a 150.
  • + 2
 Why no frame only option upon launch? When will they be available? Was hoping to get build an SB95C soon as i heard about it being available but was disappointed that only pre-built options available Frown

Jared/Joey, will we be seeing you riding the SB5C in round 5 of the EWS in Colorado this coming week? Would be good to see how it performs at the highest level.

Cheers Yeti! Gimme a frame already! Smile
  • + 2
 By the way, been yr loyal fan from Manila,Philippines since 2007 with my 575. And first and only to ride the SB66C up until 2 months ago. Was hoping to get first dibs on an SB5C frame as well. Can exceptions be made? Pleeeeeeease? Smile
  • + 11
 Richie is racing the 5c this weekend, im riding something else Wink
  • + 2
 JOEY - Richie and myself will be racing on the SB5c this weekend. After having ridden this bike more than any other bike over the past year, I'm excited the cat is finally out of the bag so I can race on it. It's been killing me having this bike but having to keep hush hush about it! As for Jared and his race bike this weekend... Only time will tell.
  • + 2
 I'm loving the sb5 and want one, but my only concern is mud filling the whole box section of where the infinity is. Has it ever filled up on your testing? Imagine thick clay like clumpy mud we get around here. Also have you considered a guard of some sort which would deflect stones, mud etc from hitting the carbon seat tube/ infinity box section from the back wheel? The direct mount looks a nice little place to attach something sleek for winter riding.
  • + 1
 CONROY - Never filled up with mud, but it has undergone the mud slurry test at FOX (over 1 million cycles in a mud slurry bath). The seals we use are from the FOX off road division and have been tested extensively. And, remember, the mechanism only moves 4mm up band 3mm down. Small movement, but it has a profound effect on the suspension. We've tested with a sealed system and it just trapped all the crap in the system (think fork boots from many years ago).
  • + 2
 Having read that you aren't offering an alloy version of the sb5c because of the complexity of making it without too much weight, Are you guys going to be moving away from the material for other bikes and in particular the sb66 replacement? It would be a real shame if you do as not everyone has megabucks to spend on a frame, I'd like to buy yeti if possible!
  • + 2
 CONROY -- The weight issue is hypothetical. I'm sure we could be solved if we spent some time in development. But we're a small company and have decided to focus our efforts on making carbon bikes. We only use the best carbon in our frames now, but there are different grades of carbon fiber that are less expensive. You might add a 200-300g to hit a lower price point. We feel it's a better use of resources to focus on lowering the cost of carbon frames than focus on aluminum models. We have no plans to do that in the immediate future, but have done extensive testing in this area.
  • + 3
 Any information/beta available on a 29er platform utilizing switch infinity? If so, approximately how much travel should we anticipate? Chainstay length? Thanks for doing this!
  • + 2
 HOOG - Yes Wheel Size - Large Travel - Yes Chainstays - 2 We are working on quite a few new models and they will trickle out over the next few months, years, decade. You won't be disappointed.
  • + 4
 I'm planning on upgrading my aluminum Yeti SB95 with a new carbon frame, will this Switch Infinity technology debut on next years 29er model?
  • + 2
 All we can say is that we are exploring many different options for implementing our Switch Infinity technology
  • + 2
 In the article regarding the SB5, it mentioned that you have the ability to test in multiple environments (e.g. sand, water, dust, etc.); how many cycles were run on the new link platform?

BTW - Great choice for this year's TRIBE ... amazing ride for sure!
  • + 4
 CONROY - Over 1M cycles on the FOX slurry test and 500 hours of ride testing on a single switch infinity link. We have also used the same infinity link on all of our fatigue testing. It finally broke at 4M cycles. This year's tribe was our best riding ever... Tough to beat D-town.
  • + 6
 Do you guys own any yeti coolers?
  • + 3
 JOEY - Yup. We have a few of them in our demo truck and they do a darn good job at keeping the post ride beers cold for everyone!
  • + 1
 What about yeti t shirts available to the general public? I would totally pimp your brand if I could!
  • + 1
 @pm148 For sure! We actually have a complete apparel line sponging from t shirts to jerseys to shorts to gear bags... Check out shop.yeticycles.com to see the whole lineup.
  • + 1
 Awesome thanks guys!
  • + 2
 Joey: Do you ever see yourself chasing points for DH overalls again in the next couple years? And if you could travel anywhere in the world to ride trails where and who would you take? What suspension platform do you feel is timeless?
  • + 2
 JOEY - I think my days of DH racing are pretty much done with, so I don't see myself chasing DH overalls any time soon. I still enjoy riding DH, but my focus as far as racing goes has really shifted over to enduro 100%. The type of skills required for enduro plays to my strengths more so than DH.
If I could travel anywhere, it would probably be somewhere totally wild. I really want to do some bike touring in Asia/Himalayas, and I would probably take my most adventurous Yeti riding friends with me.
I'm not sure any suspension platform is totally timeless. While there might be solid designs out there already, its cool to be a part of a company that is on the forefront of trying new stuff and making innovated products.
  • + 2
 First of all, I appreciate the time you guys have taken to answer all of our questions. I am a huge fan of the company and it's riders. My question is has Yeti implemented new process controls to address some of the frame failures that have occurred with the SB66c in the manufacturing of the SB5c? I want so badly to buy a carbon SB66 because the bike rides sooo well, but cannot bring myself to do it since I have seen quite a few SB66c with cracked chain stays. The intent of my question is to receive and renew my confidence in the durability of the carbon frames.
  • + 1
 Well having recently bought a '14 SB66c, and sitting naked at 210lbs, also riding in the most rockiest trails in the southwest. The CS don't seem to be having any trouble. They're stiff and still mint.
  • + 2
 Will you be coming out with an SB75 that has a rear carbon triangle like you did with the SB66 and 96?

Another quesiton I have is, who puts the switch link together, Yeti or the bike shop? Because I bought a brand new SB75 5 months ago and it very quickly developed a noticeable *clunk* in the beginning of its travel. I finally tore it apart myself and found out that 1. the large bearing is toast and 2. most parts were undertorqued, which is most likely what caused the bearing to wear out. My bike shop claims that they should'nt be held responsible for this and so now I have to shell out for a new set of bearings at the very least.
  • + 1
 CONROY - We put the frames together at Yeti. Have your LBS contact Matt Fisher at Yeti.
  • + 2
 The past few years have seen the death of the 180mm travel climbable bike. While I love my 303 RDH at the resorts and my Reign X (could just as well be an SB66) for all-around riding, I'd really like something that can fill both needs. While all the new park bikes are cool, not everyone has a lift to ride their local rowdy terrain. Could you please consider a ~180mm bike that can swap between a 200mm DH fork and a ~170mm AM fork, with a seat angle/seat tube length that's useful for climbing? Something with low/long/slack geo though instead of the old FR short/tall.
  • + 2
 I appreciate that you have comp package bikes (~$3000) because it allowed me to join the tribe - a lot of us out there don't have $8000 to spend on a ride. I am glad to know that even though my components aren't the best of the best, my frame is, and I plan to upgrade pieces and parts over time.
Now that I own my SB95 comp, I'm wondering what you recommend as higher priority upgrades. Wheel set? Dropper? Suspension? Something else? Where will I feel the most impact?
  • + 2
 CONROY - Thanks for being part of the tribe. Depends on the type of riding you do. My list: dropper and then wheel set. Wait till the other stuff wears out or get bashed on a rock to replace.
  • + 4
 Hi guys!!! Loving the look of the newly released bike...I'm a 5'3 female so am right on the cut off between XS and S...what size would you recommend I go with?
  • + 2
 We would recommend the XS if you are at 5'3. One of the employee's wives is 5'3 and the XS is perfect for her. Hope that helps!
  • + 1
 Thanks so much for getting back to me!
  • + 2
 With the new SI suspension design, I've already heard rumours of a replacement for the SB66C, which will be a new All Mountain Bike for the EWS (SB6C?). Is Yeti looking at using the suspension design in other mountain biking disciplines? For example a new downhill bike or a new dual suspension cross country bike?
  • + 1
 JOEY - Yes, we are exploring the Switch Infinity in many different forms. If you read the first post in this discussion you will see Conroy talking about the DH bike Switch Infinity implementation.
  • + 1
 I'm a a mech eng. student who's about to graduate and would like to work for a bike company someday. I would like to know if you guys control axle rotation (same as rear triangle rotation for the switch family of bikes) as a means to control chain growth during the rearward path phase of suspension travel. If you do,are there any consequences to traction and ride comfort that restricts how much axle rotation you can design per vertical displacement into a particular suspension?
  • + 1
 HOOG - Wheelpath is one of the key components of suspension kinematics. Where the axle goes from one instance to the next will help define instant center, anti-squat,... and others. As designers, the tools we have to control this are links. Lengths and locations will determine the wheelpath. The SI mechanism allows us to control our wheelpath differently. We are able to get the exact wheelpath, anti-squat, and leverage ratios that we need.
  • + 1
 Thanks for answering my question. Please allow me to be a bit of a pain as I don't think my question has been answered and I have found no article on the subject. Say for a given vertical displacement y, you design in some anti-squat which moves the wheel back by a value x. Now we have chain growth assuming all other things stay the same. However, if at the end of the displacement, the axle is rotated a certain angle, it would end up rotating the rear cogs a certain degree and thereby releasing more chain---thereby in a sense canceling some or all of the chain growth depending on how it is designed. This is almost like ABP for pedaling rather than brakes. Is this something you guys employ in the bike industry?
  • + 1
 So - I think that you are talking about rotating the COGS - correct? That would be very difficult to control, since they are clocked by the wheel and not any parts of the frame. Is that what you are referring to. You solution to eliminate chain growth makes sense but I am not sure how you would execute it.
  • + 1
 You got my question. Thanks for answering. Hope to see you in the industry if I get lucky after school
  • + 1
 Wow that would be a complex system! ABP is easier to manage do to its single pivot nature. Also under pedaling as long as your drive train is rotating faster than the rotation required by the axle to eliminate tension across the top of chain such a system wouldn't be necessary, it would only work under braking to stop the wheel from being tugged as chain growth occurred.

Also a big "HIGH FIVE" to the yeti boys!! I work for the Yeti importer in the deep dark cold recesses of New Zealand. Keep up the good work!
  • + 4
 NERD ALERT!

Peter! What 3d Modeling software do you use for design and FMEA purposes and why?
  • + 1
 SolidWorks I would guess...
  • + 2
 STRETCH- SW for parametric modeling and FEA, Alias and a couple others for surfacing.
  • + 1
 Per the SB5c, can you offer some insight into how well the bike climbs? Someone somewhere in the pile of words that have been penned on it recently suggested its capabilities on sustained technical climbs.

My only comparison for this is a '01 GT i-Drive that liked to come close to trials riding on climbs while have a very heavy bent towards jumping and descending.
  • + 2
 CONROY - In short, it has a firm pedaling platform but is still sensitive to small bumps. When you're hammering uphill, it's putting your power into forward momentum. If you encounter a bump, it still sucks it up. Sounds like marketing BS, but check out the reviews... it's unique.
  • + 1
 as a top manufacturer in the field, im sure you guys are stacked with knowledgeable and hard working employees, in your opinion, what is the best school or program i could go to for bicycle design/engineering. ive been looking at UBI in oregon but i am already a mechanic and would be happy spending the rest of my life working on and creating bicycles.
  • + 3
 CONROY - Go to a good engineering school, work your ass off, get real life experience in a bike shop, ride a ton and keep an open mind.
  • + 2
 thanks for the quick response.
  • + 1
 I have a question regarding the Yeti "Tribe Effect"... I've only had my SB66 for a couple of months now but have noticed a huge sense of community among other Yeti owners... This the tribe something you guys intentionally marketed toward? Or do you think its a testament to the type of people that purchase your product? 10 years ago.. did you think the tribe would be as prominent as it is now?
  • + 1
 CONROY - Thanks for riding an SB66. The Yeti tribe is a fun group. In fact, we just returned from Durango where we hosted the 13th annual Tribe Gathering. There were over 300 Yeti owners and we rode some epic rides (Hermosa Creek and Molas Pass / Cascade Creek). I think people gravitate towards Yeti because they like the product and then find out there's a crazy group of freaks that like to hang out, drink beer and talk bikes. The Tribe has grown for sure. In fact, we have Tribe Gatherings all over the world now that are organized by distributors or fans.
  • + 1
 Hi my name is Shane haines. i have a big question. since your have pulled out of dh raceing and focusing on enduro. are you still going to build the 303 or it s now xc enduro bikes. i like the new line up of bike enduro bikes and the 27.5 s . but i still am a freerider at heart. and big fan of the 303 .
  • + 1
 Hey Jared! as an all around rider i admire your abilities and riding style. I'm quickly entering the enduro world and i was wondering what tips and training advice you have for the challenge considering im going into enduro blindly.
  • + 1
 This is more centered around the business side of things, but also the new switch system.

What does it take for someone who is an operations management and marketing major, and has absolutely fallen in love with marketing, to secure a position in an in-house marketing team in the bike industry/outdoor industry in general? I'm graduating from CU this Spring, and would love to work with people like myself.

With the new switch system, are you planning on releasing a range of switch infinity bikes? I know it was just released, but it seems almost every other manufacturer has their signature suspension design, and build an entire range of bikes around it, like you were doing with the SB series. Should we expect a 5 inch and 6 inch bikes, as well as a long travel 29er, built around this platform? Right now, if someone is choosing Yeti, they need to choose travel, wheelsize, and pick from multiple suspension platforms(single pivot, SB, and now switch infinity).

I hope you keep doing great things in Golden!
  • + 1
 CONROY - Quick answers, our time is almost up.

Marketing job -- start at the bottom of a company and work your way up. Hard work and persistence is often more important that what you majored in.

More SI bikes? Yes, we'll offer it in other travels / wheel sizes.

Thanks.
  • + 1
 I don't know if anyone has asked this already. But how often do you need to service the new Switch Infinity platform?
Is it something you can do yourself or is it like most of the other Fox products you have to send to a Fox authorised workshop?
  • + 2
 To Yeti: In the lobby at Yeti HQ, you guys have beautiful polished frame holders on the wall with Yeti laser cut into them. Can I buy one? Need it for my Sea Otter winning 2009 Yeti DJ frame.
  • + 1
 CONROY - Sorry, that was a limited run...
  • + 1
 With all the innovative bikes out there (and this looks really cool and innovative!), what are the chances of demo-ing a bike? I'm not asking for you to send me a bike, but I'd love the ability to test out a bike, to find out what bike I really want to spend $6000+ on. I think reading reviews is great, but personally, I can't base buying a new bike on an article. Is there a demo tour coming around Vancouver, BC by chance?
  • + 1
 HOOG -
We are sending one demo (more to follow) up to our sales rep in BC - Charles Russell - you can contact him on the following email.
Charles Russell chaz.russell@gmail.com>. He should be able to point you in the right direction.
  • + 1
 Fantastic! Thanks!!
  • + 1
 Is the switch technology available to other bike manufacturers to use in their designs?
Also, is switch applicable to DH bikes with 8" of travel and if so, is Junior World DH Champ Richie Rude reluctantly racing Enduro when he would rather be racing World Cup DH?
  • + 4
 CONROY - We own the intellectual property related the Switch Infinity, so they couldn't use unless they licensed it from us. As mentioned above, we've tested longer travel bikes and they work very well. As for Richie, he's a grown-ass man (a massive man, at that) and can make whatever decision he wants about racing. When I saw him in France at the Valliore race, he was excited about Enduro and having fun.
  • - 3
 Basically saying if you want to race DH, the door is there and don't let it hit ya in the ass on the way out?
  • + 3
 CONROY - That's not the way we work. If he wanted to race DH, we would've helped him in any way we could.
  • - 1
 Thanks for the answer Conroy. Sorry for the cheeky DH question. I've always been a fan of Yeti, Graves, and Rude. They're at the top of their craft and hats off to Yeti for supporting their efforts, be it DH or Enduro, BMX, or whatever. Keep pushing the envelope, it;s good for the sport.
  • + 1
 So I understand the reasoning for the pressfit BB and all the benifits. But why couldn't you stick with a regular BB setup? I noticed it was explained about the aluminum inserts creeking with the carbon causing cracks/spacing. It's not like downtubes are snapping on trail or enduro/AM bikes at the moment or matter of fact at all. I'd rather skip the super duper downtube to have a regular threaded bb in there.

But you guys do make one of the best bikes out there. My first real mtb was '07 575, my wife bought one too at the same time we loved them! But Finally I got my SB66c, had to save my pennies, but now I'm wanting the Graves secret weapon aka the mythical SB6c. Just hope it has regular BB shell hahahaha wink...wink...

Spam: '14 mint SB66c for sale hahaha
  • + 1
 Yeti group -Lunch rides-
Do you guys get yelled at from hikers / jeffco rangers when you train down enchanted? Would Jeffco Parks and rec ever listen to a company like yours in helping build better trails (Stop with the water bars)? You seem to be a huge influence in CO with Races, Towns, etc...?
Jeffco doesn't seem to want to work with bikers, COMBA. Might listen to a bike company based out of Golden, in Jefferson Cty.
  • + 1
 CONROY - We occasionally encounter a grumpy hiker, but I've never had an issue with JeffCo Rangers. JCOS has been great to work with. In fact, when they needed some volunteer work to get Apex open again, they asked several local groups to help out. Yeti sent a bunch of folks out and we helped get the trail open. I agree that JCOS was difficult to work with several years ago. You might even remember me openly sparing at public meetings. But since Tom Hoby has come on board he has been instrumental in reaching out to the mountain bike community. Governments move slowly, but I am very encouraged by the changes afoot. Should be great for the local MTB community.
  • + 1
 I love the way this bike looks and I'm sure the suspension works well. If I hadn't just bought a SC Bronson I would look seriously at this bike...when it grows to 6".

Apologies if this has already been covered but I think most people here would take issues with:
-the choice of tires (a 2.2 width tire on a bike like this??). Good call on the 2.4 ardent but an XC tire on the rear? This surprises me given that you are in the front range just minutes from Dakota Ridge.
-740mm bars and a 70mm stem? With a long top-tube philosophy I think you guys have some explaining to do here. Perhaps Thomson and Easton where liquidating their overstock?

Thanks for doing this forum...
  • + 2
 CONROY - Were you listening in at our staff meeting last week? Answers below:
- The Ikon is super fast rolling and predictable when turning. It breaks loose, for sure, but it's predictable. It doesn't brake as well on super loose terrain. I replaced mine with a Maxxis High Roller II and like it a bit better. Tires are a very personal choice...
- Agree. No stock liquidation... Our staff runs 50mm stems and wider bars. Our dealers have told us they prefer slightly longer stems (70mm) -- this gives them the flexibility to switch out if a customer prefers shorter (70mm stems are easier to sell). As for the wide bars -- 740mm is still pretty wide for a 5" bike. Our 6" bike will satisfy your spec concerns.
  • + 1
 Why are you running the 2014 Fox Float 34 on the SB5c? That fork has been pretty well considered to be lack luster compared to the Pike and the 36. Most avid riders have been swapping them out. So why not have Fox make you a 140 or 150 36 for the SB5c? FYI I love my SB95c and I'm putting a 150 Pike on it today Smile
  • + 1
 You can bump a 36 down to 150 pretty easily. We have tested this on the SB5c and it's great. In our mind the 34 is top of its class and preforms great. A perfect fork for the SB5c
  • + 1
 Hi, I've got 3 questions.

1. Why no one is distributing Yeti cycles in Hungary?

2. Which is your best bike for the money for hard enduro riding?

3. Is there going to be an aluminium enduro bike with the Switch infinity design?

Thanks.

One more: When will the new 303 come out? Is it going to be carbon?
  • + 3
 CONROY - 1. Are you guys Hungary for Yeti in your country. Sorry, it was too easy... Not sure why we don't distribute there, but I'll check into it. 2. Currently, SB66c. 3. No aluminum bike planned.
  • + 2
 good joke, good joke Wink

Is there going to be a new 303 carbon?
  • + 1
 Yeti seems focused on designing a Goldilocks suspension that's the perfect compromise between climbing and descending without having to rely on climb/descend on the shock. (Love that about my SB66. ) Do you see electronic suspension controls like Lapierre's changing suspension design to the point where the suspension can be optimized 100% for the descent, while relying on electronics to make it climb like a HT?
  • + 1
 HOOG - Yo Lounger - Thanks for the props on the SB66. We love that bike also. Electronic suspension is cool. I have a bit of controls in my background and really like the application. It is good to see companies out there dipping into it. It will get there, but it all depends on how much companies invest. Just think of the electronics in vehicles these days. The progression in that industry will just help ours. As far as climbing like a HT.... we don't think that is ideal - especially on technical trails. There will need to be additional control logic on the climb side. Also more feed-forward control....optics.
  • + 1
 When it comes to weighing my pro's and con's - Would I be better off jumping/riding downhill with an SB95 or climbing with an SB66/75?

Ideally I grab your new SB5C, but my goal has been to stay under 5k.

I ride mostly xc trails, but I love to get nasty on some downhill or jumps. Right now I am "making it work" on a 4" full suspension xc rig.
  • + 1
 HOOG -
Ramey says - "SB5C"
  • + 1
 Do you not think the mountain biking industry is at its pinnacle when you ask 9000USD for a bike. R&D is important as is being a innovative bike company but it seems the end user is getting lumbered heavily with the price of riding production prototypes.
  • + 2
 bikes in the 1980s were just as expensive... one of the first Specialized Epics (titanium & carbon hardtail) was over 8k$
  • + 3
 HOOG -
We don't consider our SB5C a production prototype. We have been guilty (as all) in the past, but we have really tested and developed this system to nausea.

As ka-brap mentions, the high end has always been expensive. There are definitely more high-end bikes available today, but that is because the market demands it. Trust me - we are not getting rich here. It would have been much more lucrative for us to not work on and develop the new Switch Infinity. But there were real performance benefits that warranted it. If we continue to push technology at the high-end the middle and low end should benefit, as in all industries. Even $15,000 cars have power steering today.
  • + 2
 Thanks for the reply HOOG. The question really put you on the spot. The trickle down effect answer was a winner. Good luck with the SB5C and all the team involved.
  • + 1
 peter,
I'm curious as to how you got into your position, I am in college and would love to one day be an engineer for a bike company. I'm about to be in my second year in engineering at Texas Tech University. I'm getting my major in mechanical engineering, but is there any tips you have in what i need to pursue in order to get a job in designing mtb's?
thanks,
major
  • + 2
 STRETCH- Hi McGreatness, awesome to hear. Check out my reply to kiponga above. I would stress internships and experience with CAD packages (not just one). Good luck.
  • + 1
 How much better is switch infinity over switch? I have an sb66c that I am absolutely in love with. Once you release that Sb6c I would maybe consider upgrading (if I got a big enough bonus at work) - but otherwise I see no reason to upgrade unless you can help quantify the increased "awesomeness" ... thanks
  • + 1
 I really want to hear from Jared on this one.. don't just tell me its better... tell me how its better .. in what terrain ... what conditions ... and i really probably won't upgrade soon anyway (since I just got the 66c)... so don't fill this up with marketing bs... give me your true opinion
  • + 2
 It does everything just a little better than the 66c. Pedals a bit nicer, slightly better small bump sensitivity, and ramps up a bit harder to handle big hit better, then its also lighter and stiffer. the 5c isnt a 66 replacement, its not made for the same type of riding, more of a ASR-5 replacement, so it has some more aggressive geometry to be in line with modern day riding/trails.
  • + 1
 Hi guys,
will there be a bike that features the switch infinity thingy and offers more than 127mm of rear travel, next year?
I really really like the principle/idea of that system and would like to give it a go in the not too distant future.
Cheers,
Alex
  • + 2
 it would seem crazy not to produce a longer travel version
  • + 1
 Yeah, I guess so. But when?! I need to plan ahead Wink
  • + 2
 The Yeti videos found on YouTube and Vimeo are great. What kind of camera equipment and video editing software do Joey and Craig enjoy using to create great MTB Cinematography? Keep up the great work and I love my SB66C!
  • + 1
 JOEY - Thanks! Glad that you like the videos. For camera equipment it depends, but for the larger videos we use a RED Epic, Freefly systems Movi, Canon Lenses, ABC Crane, and Canon DSLR's. Both Craig and I really enjoy putting these pieces together and it's such an amazing opportunity to do it for a Brand like Yeti. Cheers!
  • + 1
 Peter,

From my understanding the eccentric switch link and the infinity switch act on different principles. With the eccentric switch it seems like leverage ratios were achieved by the effective shortening and lengthening of the chain-stay. The new system however...? You mention that the linkage is effectively 'infinitely' long, but I am having a tough time understanding why. Any way you can explain in easy-to understand terminology?

Also, while I understand the case for external cable routing, it seems to me that many customers will want otherwise. Any plans down the line to do internal routing? Even my SB66 A has internal routing for the rear mech cable... why go completely external on the 5C? I do, however, love the little port for running a stealth dropper!

Thanks for working hard to design to best bikes available. I truly admire the consideration and attention to detail that you put into every frame. Keep up the good work!
  • + 2
 STRETCH- Hi SB66, thanks for the praise, it is much appreciated. Check out my nerd response to shafthouseshred for a more detailed reply. When I say that the linkage is effectively infinitely long I am referring to the Switch Infinity Link itself. This mechanism allows the main pivot to translate linearly (slide up and down) rather than rotate. To accomplish the same motion (translation) with a link, it would have to be infinitely long. Hope that helps. This is what allows us to do some cool things with the suspension.

Internal and external routing seems to always be a big debate, at least in the past. People love it because it looks super clean, but it is more work to install. It seems that people are gradually moving in a direction where they are willing to do this extra work for the clean look. I am all for it. As this becomes more accepted we will start incorporating it into our designs.
  • + 1
 Both the old Switch and the new SI operate on similar principles - as Yeti has mentioned. There's a 'Switch' on both platforms - that switch can be thought of as the shortening/lengthening of the effective chain stay length. There's more going on, but at heart, the main pivot moves back in the initial part of the travel to lengthen the effective chain stay and then switches at a pre-determined point in its travel.

As far as an infinitely long link - it's just another way of saying that the path is linear. The larger the radius of a circle, the more linear its path will be. A circle with an infinitely long radius is just a line. They're just modeling/describing the linear part of the suspension platform as an infinitely long link.It's worth noting Yeti's discussion of the switch mechanism as well - you do get instabilities with a pivot and don't with a linear slide.
  • + 1
 Thanks for the reply(s). This definitely helps in my understanding. Thanks!
  • + 1
 When developing the Switch Infinity system, how important a role do the pro riders play in development and feedback? Few of us can push bikes to the limit like Rude and Graves, so what kind of changes were made based on rider feedback (perhaps changes that maybe couldn't be accounted for in initial design)?
  • + 5
 CONROY - Pro riders are key to our development and are essential in our feedback loop. Our typical development loop:

1- Our product devo team works with our WC riders to define needs. We make test mules.
2 - We have several pros that work on staff and ride the bikes before Jared and Richie get on them. If we do our job correctly and have listened to our pro rider's feedback, the bikes should be 95% correct.
3 - We have Jared and Richie crush them on the trails.
4 - Make changes (if necessary).
5 - Test on machines.
6 - Make changes (if necessary).
7 - Primetime.

Jared and Richie experience different things. Jared is more keyed into suspension and geometry and how they interact. Richie is the destroyer. He is a big guy and ride super aggressively. He is the ultimate strength tester.
  • + 1
 Jared and Richie, what EWS race/location has so far impressed you the most. In the future, do you see using different bikes depending on the location? I can see a few different YETI's working on these various terrains. I for one would love to see different bikes in the different stages.
  • + 1
 As the name suggests i've been a big for years- amazing how fast you guys crank out prototypes.
I am curious though, is there a reason yeti has generally stayed with long chain stays and slightly higher bb heights? and when then the complete opposite mentality for the DJ?
  • + 1
 I am a heavy rider 320 and I can't get suspensions to go hard enough. I called Fox currently on Trek they said mm you are riding wrong bike you need 2:1 ratio and mine apparently is 3:1 well can your bike setup handle someone my weight . Working on going down to 265 but thetas good weight for me.
  • + 6
 HOOG - Foes makes frames with low leverage ratios. Give that a go. Once you get to your fighting weight, more options will open up.
  • + 1
 For Peter Zawistowski,
I am curious as to how you landed a job engineering with Yeti cycles. Do you have any tips on how to get into the industry as an engineer. Personally I am studying engineering in school and have gotten a lot of internship positions at non-bike related companies but within the bike industry it seems that no matter the company you need prior experience working with a different cycling company. If you ran into these road blocks how did you over come them?

Thanks!
  • + 1
 STRETCH- Hey there kiponga. In short I think I got lucky, but I like to think that at least hard work contributed somehow. I grew up in Colorado only about 15-20min from Yeti and worked at the bike shop at REI in high school. Here I met someone who raced a lot and ended up being Yeti's demo guy back in the early 2000's. As I started my ME degree I had an in to work at Yeti prepping/assembling/shipping etc. whenever I had breaks from school. This eventually led to my current position. I also did a couple internships outside of the bicycle industry and I think this was really helpful to broaden my experience. I'd say the more experience you have in engineering and the more experience with different CAD packages the better...just keep at it.
  • + 1
 Hello,
Given the market is focused on enduro, and many riders waiting for the replacement of the popular sb66, why did you released a 5' trail bike?
Are you planning to produce another batch of sb66 until the replacement is released?
One favour please : sb5 looks very like many bike on the market, for the new sb6c can you please keep the look of the sb66 andmost important (personnal preference) avoid the split of the top tube near the seat post?
Thanks ! Keep it up doing amazing bikes
  • + 2
 CONROY - When we started to develop the SB5c (two years ago), we felt the SB66 would be relevant through 2014. The market told us we were full of shit and dealers / distributors were hesitant to stock it. We were already well down the road with the SB5c when this played out so it came out first.

We'll have a 6" version in the future, so no need to make another batch of SB66's.

As for design, you'll really like our next bike...
  • + 5
 Are you guys interested in hiring a mechanical engineer? Smile
  • + 1
 HOOG - Not at the moment. Send your resume in and we will keep it on file.
  • + 4
 Favorite trail side beer?

Keep up the great work and keep pushing the envelope!
  • + 3
 Ska Brewery - Modis Hoperandi or PBR, depends on how hot it is and how long we are riding...
  • + 3
 STRETCH - For a ride, a good old Coors Original
  • + 2
 The Banquet Beer FTW!
  • + 1
 HOOG - Gotta go with Campfire bourbon. Been off the beer on account of the Gluten. Horrible decision.
  • + 1
 It seems to be a reocuring theme in the questions. But is their a longer travel Switch Infinity frame in the pipeline e.g 150mm -160mm travel as im sure this is the bike that most people with one bike for all really would want?
Love the look of the new frame by the way.
  • + 3
 Lets just say Jared isnt riding the SB5c this weekend at the EWS in colorado..
  • + 4
 but im not riding a 66c either Wink
  • + 3
 This is going to be a loooongg two days....
  • + 2
 How extensive is the patent on this design, do you think any other brands may copy it in either way I.E. the utilization of a switch link pivot or small rails to alter the suspension curve, wheel path etc?
  • + 1
 CONROY - We feel it's pretty solid, but sometimes patent defense is a game of attrition and the guy with the most money ultimately wins. The industry is generally pretty reasonable about not stepping on each other's designs and IP.
  • + 0
 Hello guys! You are working on new bikes with Switch Infinity suspension design, and that is great! But is it really better than Switch Suspension Technology design? What are the differences between these 2 sistems? Thanks, and congrats to Jared for being such a great rider.
  • + 1
 HOOG - Hi Cebolla, There really is a significant difference. Please see above under STRETCH's explanation.
  • + 0
 Santa Cruz has released a new version of the Bronson, by simplifying the manufacturing process they have been able to make it cheaper, however slightly heavier. Is this something Yeti will be looking at doing with the SB range? Simplifying the construction of the carbon frames to make a more affordable version?
  • + 1
 Where did you read this?
  • + 1
 CONROY - No immediate plans, but we have tested different layups and materials that would bring down the cost and increase the weight.
  • + 1
 My friend flew out to CO from Boston this week to race in the EWS and broke his SB-95c frame this morning. Any chance you could help him sort things out in time for the weekend?
  • + 1
 Sorry to hear that! Matt Fisher, our warranty guy will do his best to help you out. His email is warranty@yeticycles.com
  • + 3
 What's a rough timeframe for seeing a more budget-friendly build kit, or even better a frameset option, on the SB5?
  • + 1
 HOOG - Additional kits and frame sets will be available around Oct - Nov time.
  • + 2
 Is there a possibility that Yeti would produce any kids bikes in the future? I know my little guy would love to have a yeti like dad!
  • + 2
 HOOG -
I actually am lucky enough to have Yeti's for my 2 kids. XXS ASR's - One with 24" wheels and one with 26". They definitely improved their biking. Cost at retail would be insane.... so sorry chances are not good. If you can just get disc brakes on your kids bike, that makes a world of difference.
  • + 1
 no question. just a comment. you make great bikes. I've owned an SB66A and a 303wc and both have been phenomenal bikes. keep up the great work. also thanks to Matt who has been super helpful with service support info
  • + 1
 HOOG - Thanks for the props. Matt is a great guy ... and rider.
  • + 4
 Will you ever relaese a carbon 303 wc like the one the team was using.
  • + 1
 No sorry
  • + 1
 Joey - Will we see one exactly like the team was riding in carbon? probably not. That goes without saying we are testing many different iterations of the Switch Infinity link, including longer travel DH style bikes, so that one is definitely not off the table, just not sure when something will come to fruition.
  • + 1
 What kind of criteria do you guys look for when hiring at Yeti? I'm currently a high school senior and I would love to eventually work for a big bike company. I'm mostly interested in R&D and product design.
Thanks
  • + 1
 HOOG -
We look for hard working, creative people (that don't want to make a lot of money). Work hard and put the time in and you will get there.
  • + 2
 Hey guys! The Yeti Gathering was a blast this year and the Molas to Cascade ride was EPIC!

If you had to choose, Where would you put the gathering next year?
  • + 2
 HOOG - I am pushing for Steamboat.
  • + 1
 Does Stretch get to design his own custom frames? He's a tall dude! And when are we gonna see Chris, Hoog, and Stretch out on the course throwing down? I know you guys can all ride hard!
  • + 2
 CONROY - Coincidentally, our XL frames always fit Peter perfectly (he's 6'4", all in the neck). I might hit an Enduro or two next year. My kids are kicking my ass now, so I look forward to racing against grey haired guys again.
  • + 2
 Great, now I have one more guy that crushes me in races.
  • + 3
 I heard a rumour that Yeti is rehiring Missy Giove and she'll be riding switch. Is this true?
  • + 1
 CONROY - Missy is a Yeti legend, but I haven't talked to her in years.
  • + 2
 I ride a SB66a and my calf's sometime nick the rear triangle whilst pedaling... Does this mean my calf's are bigger than Jared's?
  • + 1
 Hey yeti! I am going into senior year of high school and I want to major in mechanical engineering so I can work for a bike company, hopefully for you guy! I was wondering if you have any ti
  • + 1
 Any tips on getting hired. What are you looking for beyond a degree that will stand out? And how likely is it that out of school I will get a job as an engineer at yeti, or any company for that matter? Thanks!
  • + 1
 STRETCH - I mentioned this above as well, but besides the education part play around with as many CAD packages you can. Practice modeling different things using different methods.
  • + 1
 At just shy of 73 degrees, the seat tube angle on the SB5c is quite slack. The trend seems to be going steeper, with many brands approaching 75 degrees. Why has Yeti stuck with slack seat tube angles?
  • + 1
 HOOG - It's all a numbers game in GEO. If you steepen the ST your front center will shrink. If you keep the same front center, your wheel base will grow. We always try to minimize wheelbase, but we can't compromise on everything else. That said - we may get slightly steeper in the future.
  • + 1
 That's because you take a lot into account the sitting position for the efficiency of the bike. This would make sens on a 5" bike but on a 6" bike say enduro racing oriented, which won't handle technical climbs in sitting positions and most likely won't feature a fork with adjustable height then a steep seat angle makes good sense I think. It doesn't change the reach (which matters for riding down the hill). Plus if it's too steep for some, they can just mount a seatpost with offset. Whereas if it's too flat (like on SB66 with old fox 36, angle below 71°) it's very uncomfortable, plus the bike tends to "backflip" on steep uphills and you can't mount a post with forward offset. Well actually you can but it will look stupid!
  • + 0
 Can you please hire me next Spring? I will be graduating next spring with a degree in Mechanical Engineering from Penn State University. I also would accept an internship.
Thanks Bros
Reason to hire me
- I Bike
- I brew my own beer
  • + 1
 HOOG - We appreciate your desire to work at Yeti. I have to admit.... it is pretty awesome. We are not hiring at the moment, but send a resume and we will keep it on file. Enjoy that last semester.
  • + 1
 I am 16, and looking to start competing at top level downhill in the next 3 years. could you give me any tips on how to train and get the most out of my riding and training to get to the highest of levels? thanks
Joey
  • + 1
 HOOG -
Hey Joey - great to hear you and that you are committed to DH. I have not raced much in my life, but have spent plenty of time around guys on the team... Jared, Richie, Rowney, Gwin, Leov, Blinky.... These guys are, or have been (Rowney) world class racers. Being 16 - your training would be drastically different than that of a racer in their 20's. But their is one consistency that I can attach to each one of these racers - no matter what their age or point in their career - commitment. All of the racers I listed take racing very seriously. It is a science. From training to strength training to eating to rest to off-season. Everything is calculated. Ideally you need to find a coach that can help you with at least the sport specific strength training and diet portion. The older you get, the more you will learn your body and understand when food, training, and rest are needed. If you have the resources, try to find a coach/trainer to help.
  • + 1
 I noticed on your site that there is a 12-13 Switch and a 14 switch under SB-66 parts. What are the differences between the two and is there a possibility of retrofitting the updated switch?
  • + 1
 The reason there is a difference is because: the 12 and 13 SB66 both have an Aluminum rear triangle, the 14 SB66 has a Carbon Fiber rear triangle. Because of this the kit is slightly different.
  • + 1
 HOOG - Drew nailed it. The Switch Infinity will not work on Switch frames that use the eccentric.
  • + 2
 My only question is how long will the SB75 be available? I had to sell mine but it's hands-down the best trail bike I've ever ridden. Love it.
  • + 1
 HOOG - Not sure how long it will stick around. It is a relatively new model and there is a lot of demand. Sorry to hear you had to sell it...
  • + 1
 Will you guys continue to have a single-pivot bike like the 575 in your lineup, or will every full suspension bike you make soon be replaced by a bike that uses some variation of your switch system?
  • + 1
 The top end bikes will all have Switch Infinity, but we will still have several offerings that are non-Switch. For example, the 575 will stay in the lineup and bridge the gap as a more affordable option.
  • + 1
 Hey I am looking at your bikes What would be a good enduro bike that you would recommend and what price is it from your line up?
  • + 3
 HOOG -
Why are you "TREKSFINEST"?
  • + 1
 Will you guys use this suspension design on a big travel bike (DH or freeride) also will you be getting back into the downhill racing scene
  • + 1
 HOOG - Hi TB - See posts above for your details. I think it has all been covered. Thanks for the questions.
  • + 3
 Blonde, Brunette, Black or Red?
  • + 2
 HOOG - Yes
  • + 1
 will you guys be doing anything more with the sb66 im sad it left the market because there is no way im leaving 26inch wheels
  • + 1
 JOEY - Honestly I felt the same way about leaving 26inch wheels. I love more than anything how they feel while turning and jumping. That being said I honestly find a negligible difference in the 27.5 wheels, especially with how aggressive the geo is on the Yeti line up.
  • + 1
 what Joey said, given a ride or 2 to get used to the bike, you can ride 27.5 wheels exactly the same way as 26
  • + 2
 By what it sounds like, the SB66 was a great selling bike. I love mine, so why discontinue it?
  • + 6
 Very low sales, as 26" bikes are out of fashion. Frown I love my SB-66 as well, but I'm not too worried about the demise of the 26" wheel, fun brilliant bikes wil continue to be made! Looking forward to the release of Yeti's SB6
  • + 2
 CONROY - We would've produced that bike till the end of time, but the market for 26" bikes evaporated. The market has spoken... That said, there are plenty of SB66's kicking around our offices.
  • + 1
 Will you keep a front deraillier for the long travel switch infinity bike? And is there some kind of mud guard on the S.I to keep weight down from mud clogging?
  • + 1
 HOOG - We have been slow to move to the 1X specific frames. One of the main reasons has been the availability of Shimano 1X kits. Shimano is a strong suppporter of our team and also a very close partner in development. Once we are comfortable with their commitment to the 1X standard, we will feel confident in creating a 1X specific frame. Regarding the mud... We have ridden the SB5C in many muddy conditions. The shapes of the tubes in that area seem to not allow the mud to stack up, as we have not found an accumulation problem. Not to say this couldn't be an issue, but we have yet to see it.
  • + 1
 Thanks Hoog, please keep a font mech mounting because I like them. Much more efficient climbing. Thanks for your reply Smile
  • + 1
 Hi guys! Is going to a 150mm fork on the sb95 going to affect the cockpit feel and handling a great deal? Obviously will slacken the head angle slightly.
Cheers
Matt
  • + 1
 STRETCH- I ride mine with a 34-150...great combo
  • + 1
 How long do you plan to manufacture the eccentric style switch technology ? I own a sb66 which i can't believe how amazingly well it rides . it truly is a Super Bike!
  • + 1
 How are you going to stop the new switch from wearing to quickly as it seems to be in an area that will collect mud debris etc?
  • + 6
 I might as well get in early for an answer to this one. Here is the link to the Yeti Infinity Link User Guide, which is located on the FOX website. This user guide shows how easily and how often you should maintain the link. I hope this eases some peoples concerns about the maintenance on this Technology.
www.ridefox.com/help.php?m=bike&id=465
  • + 5
 So at worst every 25 hours it requires a clean, a pump of fluid and another clean? If only my g/f was as easy to please Wink
  • + 11
 She is, trust me lol
  • + 1
 So that would be every 3-4 days then?
  • + 1
 If you ride your bike for 6-8 hours a day then yes. Which really isn't that much to ask for 1-2 mins of Maintainance.
  • - 1
 Dear Yeti, I have admired and longed for the SB66 since its release, but I realise I will never afford one. My question to you guys is this; please may I just have one? A medium. Doesn't have to be anything fancy and carbon, just alu, and in lime if there's one laying about. Many thanks, James
  • + 1
 Does Yeti plan to address the tire rubbing problem on the SB66 aluminum or should I just keep buying stickers and praying I don't take to hard a hit?
  • + 1
 HOOG - Sorry to hear you have some rub issues. Have you discussed with your LBS. There is a chance that you may have a rear triangle that is out of spec - assuming you are not running too large of a tire. We have to design around a certain tire size and that spec is provided in FAQ's on our website under that model.
  • + 1
 I run a maxxis crossmark 2.2 which should be well within specs on a bike with this much travel. The rear triangle is the same as it was from the factory and my shock is not damaged.
  • + 1
 HOOG - Yes - that is within spec. Check with your LBS and they will follow up with our warranty guy (Matt).
  • + 0
 I'm a tall rider. I liked the 120mm dropper posts... but I'm now in love with the 150mm dropper posts. They are perfect. Except they aren't available in 30.9 diameters. Why not make the switch to 31.6 for us tall dudes?
  • + 2
 Were committed to our 30.9 size as we are trying to keep it consistent across all of our bike line. Email the seat post companies and get em to make a 30.9 150mm dropper
  • + 2
 STRETCH - KS makes a 150mm 30.9mm dropper:

kssuspension.com
  • + 2
 Actually, pretty much every good manufacturer of droppers has a 150mm option in 30.9.
  • + 1
 Anyway to purchase the new carbon rear triangle for the SB95? Im on the full aluminum frame now and it seems like a worthy upgrade!
  • + 1
 This may be an option in the future but we're not currently offering this upgrade at the moment.
  • + 3
 What will the price be for the new sb6 frame?
  • + 1
 HOOG - Not decided yet - we need to get further in development.
  • + 2
 Does the Switch Infinity use IGUS bushings? Appears to be. If so, G300, J, P, or ??
  • + 3
 STRETCH- No, they are not IGUS bushings…They are Saint Gobain Norglide bushings that are aluminum backed and Ekonol coated. These bushings are commonly used in FOX suspension and in other bicycle applications.
  • + 1
 Great - thnx for the response!
  • + 1
 I'm guessing that most of the Yeti staff members each have garages/living rooms full of bikes, but what wheel size do you guys/gals ride most often?
  • + 2
 HOOG - Many in the shop still rock the SB66, but those same people also have a 95. Hard sayin. We are as confused as the rest of you....
  • + 1
 Do you plan to offer the SB-5 in comp. level? (i.e. full alu. frame and budget oriented specs).
Thanks for thinking of those who simply can't afford the top shelf.
  • + 2
 HOOG -
Yo Lost - That currently is not in the plans. We have limited resources at Yeti and can only develop/source so quickly. We understand that not all can afford the top shelf. We still hope to have Yeti models at that lower range - they just may not be with the newest technology.
  • + 1
 Many thanks!
  • + 1
 What are the benefits of the 575 over a bike like sb series or SB5C? And why do you continue to run it in your lineup when you offer the comp builds on your other models?
  • + 1
 Aside from price.
  • + 2
 HOOG - The 575 was the original trailbike and has evolved over the years to stay current in geometry and suspension tune. It is a well proven platform and a favorite of many. The ride of the 575 is completely different than the switch bikes. You really need to ride both platforms to decide which one you like.
  • + 3
 When can we expect a longer travel Switch Infinity frame akin to the SB66?
  • + 2
 Yes! We should be seeing one this weekend in fact!
  • + 1
 What have you done to address some of the fragility of the previous carbon frames? Are the new ones more durable, specifically with impacts?
  • + 3
 HOOG - We have changed our carbon molding process. We have incorporated eps internal mandrels. This improves layup consistency and compaction. The new ones are more durable for sure.
  • + 2
 my goal is to become a factory mechanic one day on the UCI circuit, any tips on what i can do?
  • + 1
 HOOG - Work at a shop, go to all the races, and give your time away. It will pay off.
  • + 3
 Will we ever see a yeti BMX race bike again? Pretty please?
  • + 1
 it's such a cool part of their history. i really wish they would. whaddya say Jared? still got bmx fans of yours out here!
  • + 2
 Yeah the BMX project was cool, but its done for now, no plans for any more BMX frames at the moment. Sorry guys
  • + 1
 oh well...thnx for the reply, jared.
  • + 1
 HOOG -
@Jman311 - Glad to hear that you love your SB. We feel the same about them. The Switch Infinity is the next generation of the current (2014) design. I am sure that you will be further impressed with this new generation. As far as production on the eccentric style... we will continue with the models that make sense in our line and have market demand.
  • + 3
 Joey Schusler, where and when is the next trip like Huayhuash?
  • + 1
 JOEY - Oh don't worry, we area always planning the next big adventure! I'm hopping this winter once things slow down a bit we can pull off another big project like our Huayhuash trip. He certainly had nothing but positive feedback from what we produced there.
  • + 1
 Jared why are you using 170mm cranks instead of 175mm since 175 has more leverage ? Also how has your stages power meter helped you? And how much was your max wattage!
  • + 6
 Richie- I use 170mm cranks aswell. part of it is becuase longer cranks are easy to catch on rocks, roots etc.. Iam sure Jared can offer up more of an explanation... but i feel they are more comfortable when riding "enduro" type trails. We battle in the over 2000watt club #coolkids
  • + 5
 if you want to get technical. its all fairly trivial differences, 175 has more leverage from a dead stop, but on flat ground and once up to speed 170 will spin slightly nicer, you are pedalling on top of your gear, more than you are heavily accelerating in enduro. And 170 has a bit more ground clearance. The stages meters are awesome for training, you can measure your efforts, ride consitantly for more quality in training, and for hard and short efforts it gives a number you want to beat when you are in the last stages of preparing for a big race, it makes you dig a bit harder in training. You can also guage your form and training, and if its headed in the right direction. for races that involve climbing to the top of stages, you can use it to stick to a power range that is consistant and you can actually recover up the climbs to the next stage. If you ride to power on the climbs you can get to the top as efficiently as possible and save energy. Max wattage is pretty irrelevant for me these days, more like 10 second, 1 minute and 5 minute power. Its dropped a fair bit from the 4X/BMX days, but its still around 2100
  • + 2
 Richie Rude!!! YOUR MY HERO!!
  • + 1
 HOOG - Mine too.
  • + 1
 About how much does a professional rider for your company (Yeti) get paid a year?
  • + 3
 We pay them in whisky and burritos.
  • + 5
 afterall, thats all you need to survive! Whiskey, burritos and free Yetis to ride, what more could you want?
  • + 1
 Will we see some different color schemes in the near future? Love the turquoise/yellow and turquoise/white frames Smile
  • + 1
 CONROY - yes, we'll release other colors in the future. can't promise we'll make your color combo.
  • + 1
 I still can´t belive it !!!!

www.ridefox.com/help.php?m=bike&id=465

Need this thing in 26 and 6" jajajaa
  • + 2
 Will you ever make a production full suspension 4x/dual slalom bike?
  • + 1
 HOOG - I wouldn't say never, but it might really be the right word to say. Sorry.
  • + 1
 Is there any chance you could integrate this system into different types of riding? Such as downhill or slopestyle?
  • + 2
 HOOG - Yes - One of the cool things about this system is that it can span the entire range of travels. Super computer Stretcheronimo has built a 4 mile long algorithm that pumps out suspension harpoints based on desired inputs - geo, anti-squat, wheel path.
  • + 1
 When training for an ews race in the offseason. What kind of miles/schedule do you guys base off?
  • + 1
 More a statement but i was meegggaa stoked when richie rude followed me on insta g
  • + 1
 HOOG - Crush
  • + 1
 Will you be offering a frame only option for the SB5c and the new (SB6c) when its realeased? Thanks Scott
  • + 1
 yes, we'll offer a frame only option in the future. october/nov on sb5c frame,
  • + 2
 What are each of your favorite places to ride?
  • + 2
 CONROY - We get to ride all over the world, so it's tough to say. I'm just stoked whenever I get to ride. We had our 13th Annual Yeti Tribe Gathering in Durango last weekend. Both of the rides -- Hermosa Creek and Molas Pass / Cascade Creek / Graysill are solidly in the top 5. The riding around Yeti is great -- super fast, technical, and looooose. It keeps you on your game... Other favorites -- Scottish Highlands (Torridon), South Wales (around dirt mag offices), Moab, Sun Valley and surrounding area, and, of course Whistler (though, sadly haven't been there much). Honestly, though, the list could go on and on...
  • + 1
 HOOG - The last place I rode.... As Conroy says above - riding in CO is so good. There are very few that I wouldn't do again and again. Molas Pass this weekend was amazing. Last month we did a 2 hour ride outside Barcelona that was awesome. They are all different and great for their own reasons.
  • + 1
 How well does the new Switch Infinity climb? As good as XC bike or still something like a bigger bike?
  • + 1
 Its pretty amazing, its light enough and pedals well enough that you could even race some XC on it. On smooth basic climbs it will never be as fast as a Hardtail, biut its not far from it, and it certainly is a whole lot faster and more fun on the descents!
  • + 1
 Richie- My first few test rides i immediately felt how smooth the bike climbed. we were told to ride the with the rear shock complete open (on descend mode).. there wasnt a time where i thought i needed to switch it to climb as the bike didnt bob or feel to soft going up climbs. the new technology tracks very well up climbs and feels nothing like a big bike. definitely a XC bike feel up climbs with the suppleness to keep traction
  • + 2
 hOW big will my smile be
A : big
B: Huge
Or C sooper boner
  • + 2
 STRETCH - C
  • + 1
 JOEY - D all of the above.
  • + 7
 theres trouble if you have a sooper boner anywhere near your smile, unless you're into that sort of thing?
  • + 1
 HOOG - A/C +B
  • + 1
 I see the recommended fork travel is 140-150mm. Would the bike still handle acceptably with a 130mm fork?
  • + 2
 How many bikes did yeti sell last year?
  • + 1
 HOOG - Tens of hundreds.
  • + 1
 Do you plan to build a 29" enduro bike for jared for PMB 2015 ?? (or even a big production ? Smile )
  • + 1
 hi it is shane again i am a bike mechanic. are you new suspension design easy to service . as for bearingis and bushings.
  • + 1
 Yes! Super easy to maintain and service. You can get away with little to no maintenance on the Switch Infinity unit.
  • + 0
 Interesting. I'm looking to revive an ASR7 and had some questions regarding which shock would be a worthy yet affordable upgrade over a DHX Air 5.0 on it.
  • + 1
 I've got an ASR-7. Any coil shock would be an upgrade over the DHX Air. I'm running a RC4 and love it.
  • + 1
 HOOG - Yes - a coil over shock would be a good upgrade.
  • + 0
 Any plans on bringing this system to other bikes? Like a DH bike for example? Also, is this going to be completely exclusive to Yeti for a while?
  • + 1
 HOOG - See above strings for other bikes. Alot in the pipe. This system is exclusive to us. We have US, EU, and Chinese patents on the system with additional outstanding applications. If it shows up on another brand, it would be a licensing deal.
  • + 1
 how do you guys view the long term sustainability of longer travel (130-150+) 29 trail bikes?
  • + 1
 Dudes, what are the steps to be a yeti dealer outside USA? I'm in Mexico and want to sale yeti bikes Big Grin
  • + 1
 HOOG -
Hi Ed - contact John Pentecost - he is our International Sales Guy. jpentecost@yeticycles.com
  • + 1
 Thanks, I will send an email to talk about it.
  • + 0
 I've been thinking about selling my bike to get a new, and hopefully better one. So my question to you is, should i buy a Yeti? If yes, why? Smile
  • + 2
 HOOG -
Hi Chistopher - We at Yeti feel like we have the best bikes available.... period. I am sure (and hope) other brands feel and say the same thing. In this industry we are all committed to what we do and what we stand for. I can sit here and type about all the reasons why you should buy a Yeti and why we feel it is the best bike, but the truth is - you need to go ride one and feel for yourself. I hope that you have this available to you. If not... will you be in Colorado any time soon?
  • + 1
 I might be coming in october actually, not a 100% sure tho. Smile
  • + 1
 Jared - What is your typical fork travel you prefer for enduro races? 150 or 160? what about for every day riding?
  • + 2
 160 for enduro, cant really put a number on travek for every day riding, I like to mix up the bikes I ride. Always enjoyed getting out for some DH runs on a hardtail with no more than 80mm up front.
  • + 1
 When is the SB76 coming out and will carbon version be released immediately?
  • + 1
 Would you ever come for a ride with me and a couple of the other toowoomba local kids gravesy? Youre a champ!
  • + 6
 im always out and about on the trails when im at home, dont be afraid to say hi if you see me!
  • + 2
 Will we be seeing aluminum versions of the switch infinity.
  • + 1
 do we need to do a seasonal rebuild to the extra bit , cuz if so that would suck alot, and are they keeping the sb66?
  • + 2
 The new system offers minimal maintenance. basically all you need is a grease gun and some soap!!
www.ridefox.com/help.php?m=bike&id=465
  • + 1
 You Need a sales rep in México? I can work in my free time for bikes haha!!!
  • + 1
 Dear Jared.

What the f*ck do you eat?

ep1.pinkbike.org/p5pb10695674/p5pb10695674.jpg
  • + 5
 the competition. very high in protein.
  • + 3
 Lots of Burritos! No McDonalds
  • + 1
 is there a more affordable sb5 in the works maybe an al frame and carbon triangle?
  • + 1
 HOOG - We have committed to Carbon for the short term. There will be some additional kits offered near the end of the year.
  • + 2
 ah, and jared: being a rad dude, why no moustache?
  • + 2
 HOOG - Creepy
  • + 5
 haha, sorry, not into the Moustache, my facial hair looks like pubes when it gets long
  • + 1
 Why don't you produce your best frame anymore? www.pinkbike.com/photo/11141549
  • + 1
 HOOG - We do - just not in that paint job.
  • + 1
 Link me please.
  • + 1
 So I guess the whole "starting on Wed. the 23rd 9am pacific time" thing isn't self explanatory.....
  • + 2
 Do you guys have any industrial designers on staff, or just engineers?
  • + 2
 HOOG - We just have engineers on staff. We have a company that we outsource most of our surfacing to. We give them hard points, necessary clearance, overall design intent, and design detail for technical areas. The Surfacing software industry is changing quickly. Staying current and having the most appropriate is a difficult task.
  • + 2
 Downhill bikes - what does Yeti have in the pipe?
  • + 1
 HOOG - See some of the strings above. We have a few SI protos in DH's travels.
  • + 1
 Is Yeti going to move the entire line-up to carbon, and stop producing alloy frames?
  • + 2
 Are we gonna see any 303 carbon ?
  • + 2
 not with the current 303WC frame with the Rail, sorry
  • + 1
 Besides your backyard (apex) what's your favorite Colorado trail, front range or otherwise?
  • + 1
 HOOG - There are tons... I live right by Bergen Peak. I love that ride first thing in the morning (no one on the trail). The decent is one of the best in the front range.
  • + 1
 I'm an engineering student and i'm looking for a traineeship in R&D, possibly in a bike company, any chance in yours?
  • + 1
 HOOG - We do need a warehouse employee.
  • + 0
 Is there anything new in store in the dh world from yeti? And also... Are you guys hiring?!?
  • + 0
 Wow sorry you already answered my question about the dh.
  • + 1
 Is there already an infinity link successor in testing/proto?
  • + 2
 HOOG - We do actually mix some R with our D. Gen 2 is in proto stage, but who knows how far it will go or how long it will take. Gen 1 took 3.5 years.....
  • + 1
 Jared do you ever seen a Yeti ? Wink
  • + 3
 HOOG - I have seen him riding one.
  • + 1
 How strict is the bacon and beer regimen at Yeti HQ?
  • + 5
 Im not sure about Bacon, but Beer and Whiskey are 2 things taken very seriously at Yeti
  • + 1
 Macallan or Lagavullin?
  • + 2
 HOOG - Oh yeah .... depends on the night there. If I am starting clean and want to run straight thru - Lagavullin. Finishing an afternoon of random drinks - Macallan. Sitting on my desk right now. Livet and Balvenie
  • + 1
 Trade my yeti sb66a for a sb66c ?
  • + 1
 HOOG - That sounds like a sweet trade.
  • + 1
 What is yeti more focused on. DH or enduro?
  • + 1
 At the moment our race program is focused more on enduro. That being said, our team has a very very long history and lineage of DH racing. We are definitely exploring various options for the future.
  • + 1
 Peter,

You are from Poland?
How did you manage to get this jobWink ?

Thanks
  • + 1
 STRETCH - Not me, but someone in my family once was!
  • + 1
 Are you focused on DH or enduro more these days?
  • + 1
 At the moment our race program is focused more on enduro. That being said, our team has a very very long history and lineage of DH racing. We are definitely exploring various options for the future.
  • + 1
 do you still do the DJ frame?
  • + 1
 HOOG - Sorry - no we don't.
  • + 1
 Why did you drop the 4x and the DJ from the production lineup?
  • + 1
 When will the sb6 be avialable for sale ? And what price will it be?
  • + 1
 Will you have to Service the Switch Infinity system?
  • + 0
 What benefits does the sliding Switch Infinity design have over the previous rotating switch design?
  • + 1
 Dave,

The biggest benefit difference between my SB66 and the new Switch Inifinity is maintenance. It takes a while to break down my rear end on the SB66 and pull out all of the bearings to service the switch link. Luckily it adds enough time in there to enjoy some delicious Colorado brew.

From reading up on the Switch Inifity and of course Fox's/Yeti's website, all you need is a $10 dollar needle grease gun, clean rag and 1 beer. No bearing pullers, no sockets/wrentches, no loss of patience*, no mallet, no wooden dowels, etc. No wonder Yeti is worried that people will over grease it. It will be extremely tempting for most to over grease it considering how easy it is. The maintenance on the SB5c looks ridiculously simple and amazing. Good job YETI!

-Drew-
  • + 1
 I wouldn't say that the biggest difference is maintenance... there is a lot more going on here. Not the same system at all!
  • + 1
 How can I register my yeti bikes?
  • + 1
 What said Taylor Super T about yeti asx?
  • + 1
 Thx jared and richie for your insights.
  • + 1
 whats the difference between a Yeti and a Sasquatch?
  • + 4
 HOOG - About 43 inches and 2200 miles.
  • + 1
 would it be a good enduro bike?
  • + 2
 JOEY - Definitely. We will be running the SB5C at the Enduro World Series in Winterpark this weekend!
  • + 1
 If I come to your factory can I see
a real life yeti? Razz
  • + 2
 Only if the man Keith Darner or Big Joe are around Smile They've been known to dress up for special occasions.
  • + 2
 2: a^n + b^n = z^n
  • + 8
 1 horse 3 1/2 chickens
  • + 1
 Any plans of introducing a youth line of frames/bikes?
  • + 1
 HOOG -
I have 2 kids and I am really (actually they are) fortunate that I work in the industry. They are outfitted on bikes that would cost $4-$5K at retail. It seems like the kids bike market drops off around $500. I know we could get somewhere around - $3K retail, but the sales really wouldn't be there. Sorry.
  • + 1
 Jared & Richie, what's your favorite state to ride in?
  • + 1
 Colorado, no question
  • + 1
 Carbon DH bike anytime soon?
  • + 1
 CONROY - Not in the immediate future, but could happen. We've tested the SI on aluminum test mules and really like the results.
  • - 1
 Can you just explain to us how the Switch Infinity suspension design works?
  • + 2
 HOOG - Check out Stretch's comments under Shafthouseshred
  • + 1
 thanks guys
  • + 0
 Why did you abandon the lawwill suspension design?
  • + 1
 In addition to that question, what is the biggest suspension design regret or the poorest performing idea/system whether it came to production or not?
  • + 3
 Hoog
@sandwich - The lawwill design is a great design. We just felt that the benefits the 303 design had to offer (great square edge bump absorption and pedaling) made a better DH bike.
@rattpoison - The original ASR7 had a single sided chainstay - we (I) chased it for months - bigger bearings - carbon fiber. On paper is seemed like a good idea. Plenty of crank and tire clearance....but the brake and chain forces created this wonky inch worm phenomena. Quite impressive, if that is what we were after. I don't like to think of it as a regret, just a very expensive education... I think we have a quarter million dollar proto hanging around here somewhere.
  • + 1
 I would do some bad things for one of those single chainstay ASR7s just to hang on the wall.. I rode the crap out of a team colored 7 (how many ASR7s have been flipped?) and still think it was my favorite Yeti of the 4 I have had.
  • - 1
 Will you pls do a limited run graves Bmx frame and arcX again? For me? Much thanks!
  • + 2
 I have a Graves BMX frame… So sweet!
  • + 1
 Put me down for one too!
  • + 2
 I am scared to build it… too cool!
  • + 1
 I wanted one but my buddy taytay didn't think to order me one when they were still in stock. Lame
  • + 1
 I've been tryin to hunt a frame down for years!
  • + 1
 If so, PLEASE do a 24" version for us 'older' guys!
  • + 3
 CONROY - If he races in the Olympics again, we'll make a BMX bike.
  • + 1
 would be very cool to see jared, buchanan and willoughby again in the olympics. serious aussie speed.
  • - 1
 what's your training for dh? and what it takes to become successful in the sport
  • + 1
 Where's Nate Hills?
  • + 2
 HOOG - Did you check your ... Training
  • + 1
 Nope, not in there.. loll!!! He's one bad mofo, cheers to you guys for supporting him!
  • - 1
 Yeti, i still don't get it.... fill me in?
  • + 0
 Bring back the ARC-X.
  • - 1
 what travel is the sbc5
  • + 1
 127mm/5in of rear travel
  • + 0
 What do you recommend for enduro
  • + 3
 A unicycle?
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2017. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.187236
Mobile Version of Website