Yeti's New SB100 Doesn't Fit The Mold - First Look

Apr 11, 2018
by Mike Levy  



From bringing up some of the best downhill racers the sport has ever seen, to their current focus on the Enduro World Series, Yeti has a long and storied history in gravity racing that could easily fill a book. That gravity-focused DNA has always been present throughout their range of bikes, too, with one notable exception: Yeti's cross-country machines. Their ASR Carbon could be run as a sporty trail bike, but its angles and suspension can't match the expectations of what some cross-country types are looking for these days. Those expectations include low weight, suspension that offers more than just efficiency, and angles that allow a cross-country whippet to ride much bigger than its travel might suggest. So the ASR and its flex-pivot design was retired a few years back, and now we finally have its replacement.

The SB100 is their all-new cross-country platform, and it's also their answer to Yeti President Chris Conroy's question of ''How capable can we make a 100mm travel bike?''
SB100 Details

• Intended use: cross-country / trail
• Wheel size: 29''
• Rear wheel travel: 100mm
• Fork travel: 120mm (all models)
• Revised Switch Infinity suspension
• Carbon front and rear triangles
• 2-bolt ISCG-05
• Uninterrupted seat tube
• Internal routing w/ molded-in guides
• Room for bottle inside front triangle
• Fits 2.4'' tires
• Frame weight: 5.5lb (with shock, hardware)
• MSRP: $5,999 - $9,899 USD
• Frame MSRP: $3,400 USD
www.yeticycles.com

Yeti isn't exactly known for their inexpensive bikes, and it's the same story with the SB100. You can get a Turq (lighter carbon) frame and shock for $3,400 USD, but the standard frame that's said to weigh about 300-grams more isn't available on its own. Complete bikes start with the SB100C GX Comp that goes for $5,999 USD, and it tops out six models later at $9,899 USD with the SB100T XX1 Eagle that comes with carbon wheels. You can check out the whole range on Yeti's website if you're looking for all the spec details.

Yeti also has their similarly priced, four-bike Beti range that are all assembled around the same frame but get shorter, 170mm cranks and WTB Deva women’s specific saddles. More importantly, Yeti has worked with Fox to come up with a shock tune that better suits lighter weight riders.
bigquotesHow capable can we make a 100mm travel bike? Chris Conroy - Yeti President

Yeti SB100
The SB100 doesn't have much travel, but this ain't no cross-country waif.


The gist of the SB100 is a relatively relaxed 67.8-degree head angle, a 120mm-travel fork on all models, a moderately long reach and loads of standover clearance, room for long-stroke dropper posts, 2-bolt ISCG-05 guide tabs, and a stock build that includes proper tires. The frame, which has been in development over the past two years, is said to weigh 5.5lb with its Fox shock and all the small bits in high-end Turq form; the standard carbon frame is about 300-grames more. Yup, that's heavier than some but, as Conroy explained during the bike's introduction, the SB100 is ''not your Euro sub-10kg bike.'' Yeti says that completes weigh between 24.5 and 25.5lb.

If you ask me, the most notable thing on that list is that every single SB100 will come from Yeti with a 120mm-travel Fox 34 (the new, lighter weight Step-Cast model) rather than a puny 100mm fork, a decision that might put off some traditional racer types who place grams at the top of their priority list. Yes, you can install a shorter fork on the bike, but if that sounds like you, then you're probably going to be better served by looking at any number of off-road road bikes on the market. Race courses are getting much more rough and technical but, more importantly, the people who ride cross-country are wanting more and more from their bikes. The trick, however, is to provide them with that capability without taking away too much of the sporty, race-ready vibe that makes a cross-country bike what it is.
Yeti SB100
Housing is routed internally via molded-in tubes.


Yeti SB100
The bike's 100mm of rear wheel travel is controlled by a new, compact version of Yeti's Switch Infinity system.


The SB100 kinda looks like a single pivot bike, doesn't it? But it's not. While all of Yeti's other full-suspension bikes see their Switch Infinity system located above the bottom bracket and parallel to the frame since the system's debut back in 2014, making it easy to spot, they've rotated it 90-degrees and moved it back slightly on the SB100.


Yeti SB100
The view from the back shows the Switch Infinity carrier's position, as well as the need for a bolt-on guard.


The change was done for a few reasons, but the fact that any cross-country or trail bike worth considering needs to able to carry a bottle inside the front triangle was a driving factor. I'm not going to lie, I feel a wee bit vindicated of all my bitching and moaning over the years on this subject; not just about Yeti's bikes, but every model that couldn't fit a bottle inside the frame. That said, Conroy did stress that due to suspension designs, patents, and all sorts of variables, it's often not as easy as drilling a couple of holes to mount a cage.

Still, Yeti knew that this genre of bike absolutely had to make room for fluids, hence the new location for the Switch Infinity unit, but he did go on to say that they have no plans to make similar changes to any of their current SB platforms. We'll see about that.


Yeti SB100
Yeti SB100
A nearly hidden link drives the shock (left). And yes, that is a standard-sized bottle inside the front triangle of a Yeti (right) that you're seeing.


But it's not only the location of the SB100's Switch Infinity that's new, as Yeti has come up with a fresh carrier that's both smaller and lighter. Up until now, every SB platform, from the 114mm-travel SB4.5 to the 152mm SB6, has employed the same Switch Infinity components, but that's not so with the 100mm-travel SB100. The diameter of the Kashima-coated tubes has dropped from the 15mm used on the other SB machines, to 10mm on the SB100, thereby allowing the forged carrier to also be smaller.

They've also moved the sealed bearings from the carrier to the frame, and greasing the unit is now done via zerk fittings located under the main pivot's bearing cap.


Yeti
Yeti uses the same Switch Infinity unit (left) on all of their existing bikes, but the new SB100 employs a smaller, lighter version (right) that's been rotated by 90-degrees on the front triangle.


Yeti's been quite confident about the Switch Infinity's ability to shrug off mud and grime, saying that it's excelled during million-plus cycle tests despite having all sorts of different gunk thrown at it, but there was also no way that they were going to let it sit at the back of the seat tube without some sort of protection. That explains the bolt-on guard.

We should probably touch on exactly what Switch Infinity is. For those unfamiliar with the system, it relies on two short Kashima-coated tubes to manipulate the bike's axle path. Initially, as the bike goes through its travel, the carrier moves upwards on the rails to provide a rearward axle path for pedaling efficiency. Then, as the rear wheel goes deeper into its travel, the carrier moves downwards to reduce the amount of chain tension so the design can better deal with hard impacts. Yeti has long been tight with Fox Racing Shox, and the two companies worked together to develop the Switch Infinity design.


Yeti
Yeti SB100
Because the Switch Infinity unit sits at the back of the seat tube and is in the tire's line of fire, a bolt-on shield is required.


The SB100's suspension sees an altered leverage ratio intended to make the bike more capable than a pure race rig, with it said to be more supple at the top of its 100mm and sporting a stable mid-platform. The goal, Conroy explained, was not to be locked into having to tune for either just ''pedaling efficiency or bottom out, and it gives the bike an incredible flexibility.'' There's a relatively linear anti-squat figure that should allow for a wide range of sag settings, according to Yeti, and for more sag that most short-travel bikes can get away with.
They're not wrong, either, as I've been running 32% (12mm of stroke) during my time on the SB100, a number that's common in the all-mountain world but would usually feel excessive on a cross-country bike.



Yeti
You want stand-over clearance? You got stand-over clearance.


Enough suspension talk; let's get to the rest of the bike. The carbon frame sports the same lines as the rest of Yeti's SB range, but the SB100's top tube drops down lower and the forward shock mount is on the underside of the top tube rather than being on the down tube. There's a ton of stand-over clearance, too, and the seat tube is quite short to let the little SB100 possibly (depending on rider inseam) be able to run a longer stoke dropper post than any of Yeti's other bikes.

The theme is low, and it gives the bike a very un-cross-country, BMX-ish feel when you're coasting around with the seat fully lowered.


Yeti SB100
Yeti
Housing that disappears into the front of the bike exits at the bottom of the downtube.


You're never going to be able to use a front derailleur on the SB100, and the lack of a direct-mount plate means that riders wouldn't be able to bolt on any type of chain retention if it weren't for the 2-bolt ISCG-05 tabs around the BB92 shell. I doubt many riders will, but you can use a lightweight upper-only guide if you think you need it. The routing is internal, but molded-in housing guides are out of sight inside the frame so you can just feed the new line through without it disappearing into the dark nether regions of the universe.

There's Boost hub spacing, of course, enough clearance to fit a 2.4'' rear tire out back (which is notable for this type of bike), and room for a standard-sized bottle inside the front triangle. A normal large bottle clears the shock no problem, while a massive Podium bottle from CamelBak just brushes it. A two-liter of Faygo will not fit.


Yeti SB100
Yeti says that they've spec'd the SB100 how they like to ride them, which apparently includes big rubber.


In terms of cross-country bikes, the SB100's numbers are out there. There's the 67.8-degree head angle with a 120mm fork (the same as the new Blur with a 120mm fork), while the existing SB4.5 sports a close 67.4-degree head angle with a 140mm-travel fork. The new bike's reach is also longer than the SB4.5 - 452mm versus 444mm - and the SB's seat tube angle is also a notch steeper at 74-degrees. So cross-country travel and trail bike angles.

Yeti

Yeti is another company that's been tinkering with longer, slacker bikes combined with forks that have less offset, and the SB100 is the first production model that embraces this new-school approach. Why? It's said to allow for the stability of a slack bike, but the 44mm offset (it's usually 51mm on a 29er) helps to keep the wheelbase in check and the dreaded floppy front end syndrome to a relative minimum. Yeti says that they've done their own testing with CSU's of different offsets and angle-adjusting headsets, so I wouldn't be surprised to see the same tactic applied to other models down the road.



Ride Impressions

I spent two days aboard the SB100 covering a load of desert singletrack, and while that's not anywhere near enough time to properly review a bike, Yeti's new machine has some pronounced traits that are easy to point out. The first thing you'd likely notice is how low and small the bike feels beneath you, which isn't exactly something that cross-country bikes are well-known for. With the seat out of the way, the SB100 wants to be tossed around like it's done something wrong, and it was a ton of fun anytime the trail presented a unique line or opportunity to manual or get a bit sideways.

It's very much like the new Blur in this way, although the low-slung and meaty-tired Yeti has an even more untraditional way about it.


Yeti
I was too busy riding the SB100 in the desert to get any action photos, but this guy looks like he's having fun on the opposite sort of terrain.


The other notable quality is that SB100's rear end is, as claimed, surprisingly versatile. I'll tell you right now that running 30-percent or more sag on a cross-country bike, or most any short-travel bike, often means that you end up feeling like you're sitting in a flat, dead spot in the travel. That's because you are; you don't have much left because you didn't start with much, and it can seem like you're just bashing up against a piece of wood. But my black Yeti didn't do that, even at the prescribed 32-percent number. The rest of the stroke was forgiving, and the bike pedals like a champ - I didn't want to use the cheater lever once.

That pure cross-country efficiency - the jump - is there for you, but slow-speed handling up technical steeps is very un-cross-country-like. Just don't expect razor-sharp steering in such moments, especially when you're gassed, as I'd say the SB100's climbing manners are more 'trail bike' than anything. I'm not faulting Yeti here, though, as the SB100 is essentially an incredibly sporty, nimble trail bike that, with a simple tire swap, could pull double-duty as a pro-level cross-country rig. Hell, you can even put a bottle on it, too.

That was probably a bit extensive for a 'First Ride' kind of article, but the SB100 is an interesting bike. I've got my hands on the very same rig for a few months of testing, so expect a proper review to show up down the road.
Yeti


Must Read This Week

306 Comments

  • + 129
 can we make that geo chart any smaller. for fudge sakes.
  • + 3
 On mobile there's no way to open a version with enough resolution to zoom in on. Can someone tell me the wheelbase, chainstay, and stack numbers - they aren't mentioned in the article ????
  • + 38
 It says they have steep head angles and short reach
  • + 17
 Quick numbers for the lazy:

CS: 437

STA: ~74 degrees

Reach: 432 (M) 452 (L) 472 (XL)

Stack: 612 (M) 627 (L) 647 (XL)

Wheelbase: 1151 (M) 1177 (L) 1205 (XL)
  • + 62
 Gorgeous bike, but am I reading this correctly?
--Santa Cruz Blur Frame+Shock+Hardware: 2060g; $2999
--Yeti SB100 Frame+Shock+Hardware: 2500g; $3400
  • + 39
 Nice to see Yeti have stuck fat with the press fit BB, because thats what everyone wants - face palm
  • + 15
 @Tomac72: Yup Yeti thinks they have gold and people pay.
  • + 5
 @Tomac72:

dang.

That's a full pound difference.
  • + 7
 ohh great ! welcome to the inner water bottle club !
  • - 48
flag AutumnMedia (Apr 11, 2018 at 5:55) (Below Threshold)
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: over engineered pos - they make frames that need to utilize wild designs that will not last - have fun with those creaks and snaps that all yeti frames are known for...also Mike loves to talk out of his ass - so yea avreview before a review and the tires are great first paragraph and then lastly tires need upgrading...? Someone doesn’t proof their articles
  • + 40
 @AutumnMedia: just as you didn't proof read your one paragraph.
  • + 3
 “The bike nobody wanted”
  • + 11
 @Tomac72: Probably the weight penalty for the Switch Infinity system. My last Yeti was an SB6 before Switch Infinity came out. It seems overly complicated, adds weight, and narrows the design envelope
  • + 5
 @theedon: I want one...
  • + 6
 @Tomac72: yes, pummeled by the Blur for XC riding and racing!

Sounds like this is more of a rival for the Tallboy.

No threaded BB, can’t fit a large waterbottle either! Good looking bike Yeti and I’m sure it’ll sell well but I give the edge to Santa Cruz.
  • + 8
 @hllclmbr: and a Scott Spark is 1750g and a degree slacker than the Tallboy.
  • + 5
 @0gravity: But it's so marketable.
  • + 1
 @jclnv: That said, a lot of people seem to run the bike with a 130mm fork and 29in wheels, which slackens the bike a little bit more
  • + 3
 I actually meant slacker than the Blur. Apologies, I just woke up. Overall the Intense Spyder is probably the best of the bunch unless you're paying Unno money.
  • + 1
 @CM999: sweet spot for head angles! Climbing is a huge part of my trails..
  • + 7
 @Tomac72:

Also,
intense spider sl, 2120g; $2499
Intense spider nm, 2375g; $1999
  • + 12
 @Tomac72: I mean Yeti is like the Apple of mtb world. They have a cult following and people will buy it because its Yeti, and spend more because its turquoise, not because its necessarily any better.
  • + 3
 @kcr138: This is actually a bike more in line with their sniper sl (100mm rear / 29" wheels), which is offered at the same price point as the spider but weighs 200g less than the spider
  • + 5
 @Tomac72: neither of those numbers should be correct, but yes. i think the correct equation for the yeti is frame+shock+hardware+shock+hardware
  • + 3
 Full geo and spec in a larger font can be found on the Yeti Cycles website - www.yeticycles.com/bikes/sb100/specs
  • - 4
flag Sshredder (Apr 11, 2018 at 9:28) (Below Threshold)
 @Tomac72: Guess which frame is built to last and take a beating?
  • + 31
 @yeticycles: I am sure you are working your way through some of the comments. Seems like its getting some pushback in a couple different areas. Weight and cost. Curious to see your response to "why would people get this and not the 4.5 when they weigh the same and will arguably be just as efficient on climbs given geo but the 4.5 will clearly be a better descender since its a "trail bike". Its a beautiful bike and I am sure it rides like a dream, but where does it sit in the hierarchy of bikes....its not a race bike, its not a trail bike but its got the girth and weight of a trail bike.....
Secondly, where are you coming up with 6k for a GX build, performance suspension and boat anchor wheels? There are companies out there that have full enduro bikes at 6k with X01 builds and top of line suspension. Hell, even the 4.5 is $800 cheaper for essentially the same build.
  • + 11
 Even though I've criticized the crap out of this admittedly very pretty bike, let's put it in perspective. A few days ago a ludicrously expensive steel bike (with some great geo numbers and crap leverage rate), that weighed more than a small car, and was totally out of alignment was tested.

Suddenly the aspects of this bike that I don't think are too great suddenly seem rather insignificant eh...
  • + 1
 @Creg: Why? You're not going to buy one...
  • + 1
 @jclnv: Because people are so f*cking stupid...
  • - 12
flag deadmeat25 (Apr 11, 2018 at 10:05) (Below Threshold)
 @yeticycles: Bet we don't need bigger font to see your ego..
  • + 6
 @Sshredder: Based on a long history of comparative warranty rates between the two companies, the Blur.
  • + 1
 @0gravity: yeah it's dumb
  • - 2
 @Tomac72: You are reading that correctly. They are very different bikes.
  • - 1
 @Tomac72: yes, weight and price are the only important factors. I sometimes like to consider suspension intention/design/execution, materials, construction, geometry, compatibility with your existing parts, fit and finish.
  • + 4
 @alexsin: So the Blur or Sniper
  • + 1
 @cartoon: Yea I was on a feverish rant my bad
  • + 0
 @theedon: Until it goes flying off the shelves!
  • + 5
 @jclnv: not everybody wants slacker! Just sayin.
  • + 5
 @bohns1: There's no downside!

My 170mm 65HA/76SA bike is a better technical climber than my 4lb lighter 68HA/73.5SA bike.

Seat angle is the main factor in tech climbing performance IMO.
  • - 2
 @Tomac72: literally, it comes with 3 shocks instead of one on Blur frame -)
  • + 1
 @jclnv: well my specialized enduro and yeti 5.5 were fsr worse climbers than my fuel ex 9.9
  • + 1
 @bohns1: Well Yeti's are known for slack seat angles and only the MY17 Enduro had a steeper seat angle than a Fuel. Then there's weight. Are you fit enough so that the extra weight of the other bikes isn't a factor?

I've got 45 second stepped steep climbs around here that the bigger bike with steeper seat angle won't lift front wheels on.

And anyway apart from really tight switchbacks where wheelbase is pinched there is no downside to say having a 66/67 degree head angle on an XC race bike. There's only benefits in easier recovery on descents and being more stable when you're riding over threshold and your brain isn't working.
  • + 1
 We need to buy maybe Magnifying Glass to read the Geo. Good Job Pinkbike.
  • + 2
 @jclnv: Well I work at the fire dept and ride year round fat bike in the winter.. Plus paid gym time.. I'd like to think I'm fit enough.. I don't agree with ha not being a factor.. 67 is the sweet spot for me.. 66 starts to feel a tad to raked.. Atleast for my trails... None of the enduro bikes I've pedaled feel anywhere close to a good a climber as the fuel.. That being said.. I'd like to toss a leg over the new Ripmo.
  • + 2
 @bohns1: Well I'm happy with 67 on a 130mm bike.

The Fuel EX is a great bike.
  • + 1
 >Right click image
>Open in New Tab

>Sorry Mac users
  • + 1
 @gabethebabem8: doesn't work on mobile, you just get a shitty unreadable image... In a new tab
  • + 49
 Looks nice but comparing the tyres fitted. This is their XC bike and has DHF/Aggressor combo, yet the SB5 still comes fitted with Ardents!
  • + 2
 The SB5 is in dire need of an update, I'm sure it'll get the same treatment to bring it in line with current bikes and intentions once it does.
  • + 5
 That's what the Lunch Ride is for! Best bike I've ever ridden!
  • + 36
 To me it is the sexiest Yeti so far and one of the sexiest bikes ever. Turquoise with orange Fox must look amazing. I just want to ride that thing. Keywords: long, fast, sex.
  • + 2
 Agree with that and I bet the thing is an absolute flying machine under a fit rider with some technical skills.
  • + 1
 @Racer951: Too heavy.
  • + 5
 I slightly prefer the previous design cues from Yeti with the curved top tube (SB6, SB5.5) but this looks like a mean little XC/Trail machine for those tight and twisty East Coast trails. Smile
  • + 6
 @jclnv: 24-25lbs may be 'heavy' for a full XC race bike but still pretty light in my book for a bike that is going to be super fast to ride on a lot of terrain, not to mention retaining some fun instead of being a twitch, steep head angle, long stem abomination.
  • + 3
 @Racer951: Agreed but that weight will be the new normal for 130mm 29" trail bikes moving forward.

A 150mm travel Scott Genius frame is lighter than this.
  • + 11
 @WAKIdesigns My girl would use two of those three keywords to describe being with me, and unfortunately long isn't one of them :\
  • - 1
 @jclnv: Scott Genius does not have a miniature steam engine instead of the main pivot and I am told by several people that Yetis suspension is super dope. Scott looks great but like many bikes in that category (like Fuel EX) I doubt it can be described with any more finesse than: it has handlebars and if you twist them the bicycle turns. If you press on pedals it will start riding forward. Both front and rear of thw bike go bouncy bouncy. As a plus I can add that It does it better than a bicycle from Decathlon. Minus - it is more expensive than a bike from Decathlon
  • + 1
 They are the key words but rarely go together. I do try....
  • + 1
 @yeti-monster: lubricants and frequent workouts... I came to a conclusion once that two kinds of long lasting lovers are porn actors and dudes in relationships with months of unsuccessful attempts to make a baby. When a girl you are with since over a year (or worse: many years) wants you to shag her two, three times a day on demand, for two weeks, with purely functional purpose to it, you just stop getting there...
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: That miniature steam engine u speak off cause a fair bit of warranty headache atleast with owners in my area.. Beautiful piece of kit and all I'm just not 100% sold on a potential headache... Btw the Trek fuel ex 9.8 to 9.9 are absolutely killer trail bikes... Reaktiv works pretty damn sweet.. Slap a 140 fork on and they are remedy capable but a better climber!
  • + 2
 @bohns1: except Remedys are now Slash capable but better climber and Slashes are Session capables but better climbers and Sessions are Session 29 capable but bettee wheel size
  • + 1
 @Racer951: I agree with you Joe
  • + 1
 @ledude: Thanks Gary.
  • + 1
 I agree. Bike looks bad ass. Probably rides as good as it looks.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: evolution!
  • + 1
 @bohns1: but Top Fuel is almost as capable as FuelEX and climbs better, your next bike maybe? Big Grin
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: No way.. Top fuel does not rail the downs as well.. Fuel ex strikes that balance I need.. Especially after the 140mm pike upgrade
  • + 25
 Waiting for Yeti to follow GT and throw in the towel on that suspension sasquatch.
  • + 0
 They had to get round the VPP patent somehow
  • + 11
 @CM999: Actually that patent expired.
  • + 13
 Have you owned one? My older SB66 pedals amazingly and still has great suspension when the trail points down without needing to fuss with the lockout lever.

The switch systems do their job and do it well but they add expense to the manufacturing and maintenance of the bike so they obviously are never going to allow Yeti to build a budget bike around that platform. I don't think Yeti is interested in trying to compete in that market though.
  • + 6
 @Patrick9-32: I haven't ridden a yeti, but my sc pedals like a dream, and instead of replacing expensive kashima stanchions, I just get free replacement bearings for life.
  • + 5
 "My older SB66 pedals amazingly and still has great suspension when the trail points down without needing to fuss with the lockout lever"

I can say the same for a number of bikes that don't require a marketing link.
  • + 2
 @jclnv: Mmmhhh, you should try a SI Yeti if you haven't yet. This suspension system is really above the rest IMO, and I've been riding and owning many FS bikes with different kinematics (Horst Link/FSR, VPP, single pivot, four-bar, etc.).
  • + 2
 @cool3: Yep I'm being a bit cruel.

I'm allergic to high anti-rise kinematics (brake stiffening suspension) so I could never ride a SI design or others with high anti-rise.
  • + 2
 Do we really need to limit ourselves to horst link, VPP, and single pivot? Now that all the patents have expired we can save a ton of money if we just group buy generic frames off alibaba and put our own stickers on it. On the other hand, why not try something different now and then (especially if it works really well IMO)?
  • - 1
 @jclnv: Actually, it does not stiffen the suspension. Rather, it's a bit stiffer at the beginning and sort of softer (more linear) passed 1/3 of the travel. This is probably why many people said that Yetis are made to go fast. The quicker you go, the better the suspension works. It takes some time to get accustomed to, but it grows on you.
  • + 7
 Yeti has something legit, nothing else feels so good out of the saddle and in deep techy stuff too. Ride one and then form an opinion.
  • + 1
 @cool3: Rise not squat.

The leverage rate on SI is usually pretty good. Although I think there are better ways to achieve similar values without resorting to such complexity. And you can end up with more active braking too.
  • + 3
 @jclnv: Well, I'm very satisfied with my Yeti (SB66c). Best bike I ever had. Smile
  • + 1
 @cool3: Good stuff.

You mind me asking how much you weigh?
  • + 3
 @BigLips93: Too hard. It's much easier for people to just blindly hate.
  • + 1
 @Idiotech: Or know what you're looking at kinematics wise.
  • + 1
 @jclnv: 160 lb without gear.
  • + 1
 @cool3: Well there goes my theory that guys who don't have an issue with the brake causing suspension to stiffen are only big guys...
  • + 2
 @jclnv: LOL! Not fat enough... Wink
  • + 2
 @cool3: Indeed!

Or maybe I just drag the brakes too much.
  • + 2
 @cool3: Truly! With you all the way... I lucked into a deal on an SB66 (aluminum) and it's incredible. Rode it against a couple newer models, including an SC 5010, and it was no contest.

And no, I'm not a downhill bomber - I have a trials background, ride tight 'n twisty east coast stuff and I swear my SB66 has a brain that's telepathically linked to my own.

Yeti prices make it easy for people to scream, "Overpriced hype!" but the ride speaks for itself.
  • + 3
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: "I haven't ridden a yeti", I'm just trolling... 3 years we have a SB5c and 2 years a SB5 at home and they both pedal like a dream too... without changing anything.
  • + 17
 Having had the ASRC and SB4.5 I can assure you the added weight means absolute shit when comparing 1lb frame weight with the SI. The efficiency from Switch is outstanding and the suspension platform keeps your body fresh longer as it doesn't beat the shit out of you. As a result the ASRc wasn't needed for XC duties and was sold shortly after owning the SB4.5. If you're wanting a featherweight, build the SB100 accordingly and race X/C.. When maintained properly, the switch is very reliable. Rinse after a muddy ride, grease every 40 hours, service bearings periodically and you'll be absolutely fine. I'm no master mechanic and I was able to disassemble the SI with ease. All frames and bike products are overpriced. Having said that, SI is worth the extra 400.00 compared to other suspension platforms, not to mention the outstanding resale value of Yeti. They also take damn good care of their bike shops. compare that to Intense F'n over bike shops with direct sales and also their frames horrible resale value.. Having ridden the RKT, Top Fuel, Epic, scalpel and still preferring my SB4.5 over all of them for my local XC trails, the sb100 will compete very well against other dedicated X/C bikes. The tire choice is a bit confusing compared to other models, however thats an easy fix. Luckily there isn't a lot differentiating the SB4.5 and SB100 so I don't have to add another bike to the stable Smile
  • + 5
 Too bad they don't take great care of the owners. Saw way too many post about people waiting months for rear triangles.

Why pay a premium for that kind of CS?

Not only that, but if Yeti thinks so highly of their product to charge such a premium, why are they afraid to stand by it with a lifetime warranty?
  • + 5
 @utley06 Spoken like true Yeti fanboy.

Full disclosure I am a recovered Yeti fanboy (Owned 5 Yeti's over the years). I still ride and love my SB95C but Yeti lost me with their mistruths and over-inflated sense of frame prices.
  • + 5
 @spunkmtb: After owning the Ripley, Tallboy , and 429 (all great bikes) I'm for sure a fan of the SI platform. Just a Phenomenal design. I call and annoy Jeff, Jamie, and Ben all the time at Yeti. They put up with my questions and provide superior customer service. I will admit the CS was lacking in the past with Yeti but they seem to have really beefed up their CS team, on par with Ibis now.. I've also developed a great relationship with my local bike shop Mad Duck Cycles.. I consistently go to him for all my cycling needs and he takes good care of any issues. Thats extremely hard to find but once you have that relationship its gold.
  • + 3
 Intense does have horrific resale value. But an expensive used Yeti with no warranty isn't much better. Maybe for the seller getting top dollar.
  • + 15
 It seems like there's a new category now - burlier than a full-on highpost, slammed stem XC bike, but smaller than a lightweight, aggressive, short travel trail bike either. I still think the intense sniper has the edge on the blur and this new rig.
  • - 9
flag Pinemtn (Apr 10, 2018 at 23:53) (Below Threshold)
 Please for the love of God lower the seat
  • + 19
 Like the Process 111.
  • - 14
flag Richt2000 (Apr 11, 2018 at 0:49) (Below Threshold)
 @Pinemtn: difficult when new bikes have the top tube down by your ankles! Agree - looks so stupid...
  • - 50
flag mhoshal (Apr 11, 2018 at 1:01) (Below Threshold)
 @Richt2000: agreed man these new low top tubes just look stupid but its the only way to market these excessively long dropper posts that no one ever needed. I run a 125mm dropper in my lg reign frame and its almost to much post.
  • - 51
flag mhoshal (Apr 11, 2018 at 5:11) (Below Threshold)
 You idiots can downvote me all you want it doesn't change the fact that I'm right
  • + 11
 @mhoshal right about what? That someone might want more post than you? Sell plenty of 170+ droppers. Never heard of anyone asking for less drop.
  • + 11
 Don't quite understand this new trend. Not quite an XC bike, not quite a trail bike = a shitty trail and xc bike. Who is this bike for? No serious racer will buy it, and people who want trail bikes buy real trail bikes. The "but I can only afford one bike and want to do it all" argument doesn't hold water either. Even if you casually race, your better off on your trail bike that climbs the same, but at least descends better. Bike industry running out of ideas, again.
  • + 8
 @mhoshal: I can see why you'd say that being from flat Ontario. For myself though, I need my seat as low as possible to ride Vancouver trails.
  • - 17
flag mhoshal (Apr 11, 2018 at 6:59) (Below Threshold)
 @Tmackstab: I lived in Nanaimo for a few years and rode Mt Benson and surrounding area a shit ton and nothing warrants a 200mm dropper at all I got along just fine on my lg giant reign. Plain and simple if you need that much seatpost your frame is too small or you're shaq.
  • - 17
flag mhoshal (Apr 11, 2018 at 7:05) (Below Threshold)
 @bonfire: ya because everyone that is buying them are riding frames that are too small for them so they need 300mm of seatpost.
  • + 3
 @mhoshal: Ok well I have a 200mm Fall line. I'm 6'4" and my bike is a Pole Evolink. At full extension my legs are at the optimal pedalling angle, at full drop the seat is usually out of my way unless I'm riding steeps even though my post is as low as it will go. Poles are big ass bikes and Shaq is much taller than me.
  • + 6
 Mhoshal, why do you care if people want to run long droppers? I only need 150mm but it's totally subjective and I totally get why someone would want the saddle as far out of the way as possible.
  • + 13
 @mhoshal: almost every time i see a dumb, negative, or ignorant post in the pinkbike comments it comes from you.
maybe start caring less about what other people want/like and go ride your bike.
  • + 2
 @Tmackstab: I'm 6'5 and my dropper is a good 50-60mm out of the frame. I'd need at least 200mm of drop to get my saddle fully out of the way. And that is on an xl yt Jeffsy that has a long-ish seat tube. So if I were riding a bike with a shorter seat tube I'd need even longer. So while I'm on the outlier side of tallness, dudes a few inches shorter than me are probably in similar situations.
  • + 0
 @gbeaks33: %100 agree. Before the 170mm reverb was released all that was available to me was 150mm. I still had to manually raise and drop the seat in the seattube so it really got me questioning why I had a dropper in the first place.
  • + 1
 @SlodownU: I would say it is a trail bike, a 29er with 5" or more is all MTN\enduro territory
  • + 1
 @SlodownU: This bike is in an interesting category - not quite big enough to over fork and not quite XC light or XC geo.

I would be keen on a 120mm 29 with 140/150mm forks and a fairly burly build. Something like the Process 111 that you can do few miles on but still smash out some DH runs. The new Smuggler is also on the list as it looks like a capable bike.

This bike just doesn't quite seem there. Maybe if the geo was a little more progressive it would make up for the lack of travel.
  • + 2
 I think the sniper is still the bike to beat in this category. Great price, good build, and geo looks spot on..
  • + 1
 @SlodownU: this is the style of bike most mountain bikers should be on actually. Efficient enough to do hilly loops for hours with enough confidence and capability to safely get through the hardest sections most local trails offer.
  • + 2
 @mhoshal: idiot!
  • + 1
 @SlodownU: I hear what you're saying... But this bike will sell in ridiculous amounts just on name and looks alone.. We here at pinkbike are but a very small portion of the ride community..
  • + 1
 @gbeaks33: I'm one of those dudes! 6'3 and on 170mm...Seat still not fully out of the way on my fuel ex...
  • + 1
 @fartymarty: I Remeber the 2016 fuel ex being sort of the start of this.. 130mm on the ex 9 with a 68.3 ha.. Sort of trail/aggressive xc... Rode awesomely!
  • + 1
 @SlodownU: I just got a Kona Hei hei which is pretty similar to this. Instead of riding my enduro bike on my flowy dh trails these smaller bikes make the downs fun and the uphills go by quicker when the enduro bike travel isn't needed. Way more capable than old xc bikes.
  • + 1
 @PLMedia: Totally agree with this! These bikes aren't for lycra wearers anymore... Very capable and just awesome for those of us that still like to hammer out the climb and beat most to the top..
  • + 15
 yetis look so damn good but their reputation of cracking and pf bb always turn me off in the end. those yeti arc and lawill dh frames in the 90ies were always stuff of wet dreams
  • + 7
 I know, I had to sell my SB66 because the rear triangle cracked and I was running out of warranty. I was gutted about it too since the bike was excellent.
  • + 12
 I think every single yeti sb6 owner I know, and there are a few of them, has cracked their frame/rear triangle. Apparently it's not just frames ridden by Australians that do this. Surely this warrants mentioning in any feature about Yeti's carbon frames??
  • + 7
 @Yahh: the power of anecdotes: I know four guys who own an SB6, one on the 5.5, and I have the 5. None have cracked the frames (a couple wheels but no frames), and they are riding tough terrain.
  • - 1
 I thought all the ones that cracked were from a pre-production run of 20 bikes

/sarcasm
  • + 2
 @shortcuttomoncton: riding Moab with some random guy last week. Wheel trapped the front and went slomo otb, bike landed on a rock and cracked the stays. Saw the whole thing and couldn't believe such a small impact had cracked it. Guy was gutted as he had only just got a new front triangle the week before that had also cracked. Said yeti were really good with the warranty tho.
  • + 4
 @catweasel: Yeah. That is exactly the definition of anecdote to which I was referring. Meanwhile I clipped a tree with my bar last year on a little downhill section, went OTB at 22kmph and catapulted my SB5 down over a 15-foot bank into a maple tree (oh Canada!). Sheared the butt end off the grip, tore the shifter cable off the derailleur, twisted the handlebars sideways, and not a scratch on my frame as far as I could tell.

Falling: it’s random.
  • + 1
 @shortcuttomoncton: on the one hand I'm with you, maybe the way his bike landed was just the perfect storm, on the other hand some maufacturers do have more anecdotes than others. I have those roval wheels that fail for everybody. Mine have been perfect, I even snapped 2 spokes last week and they were still true. I commented on this when I got the wheels serviced and was told that big guys tear them up. I guess that to some extent there is smoke where there is fire, and I see nothing wrong with people sharing anecdotes about products they own. Maybe it changes peoples buying choices or not, but I don't see the harm in the info being out there, providing it is truthful.
  • + 1
 PF BB’s went through a serious bad patch there, but recent bikes have proven very reliable. My last 3 PF bikes have had zero bearing or creaking issues whatsoever. Pre 2014, non Cannondale it was a creaking shitshow. Manufacturers currently can do better keeping everything carbon vs bonding aluminum threads into carbon..
  • + 1
 @ko-d: i have no issues with creaking. i had three specialized bikes with pf and had no creaking noises but i simply hate them to install and uninstall...i simply prefer a threaded bb to work with.
  • + 1
 @catweasel: Oh I agree. I just tend to find that a lot of people keep referencing issues like “rear triangles crack” or “switch infinity reliability” and it mostly seems anecdotal or from older models (I know the SB66 and early SB6s reportedly had some issues). Yet I keep hearing about how a guy like Richie Rude is so powerful he can break any piece of equipment at will, but his bikes seem to stand up to three or four straight days of EWS pummelling and crashes (ie more abuse than most of us will ever put on our bikes in a year, as anyone who’s seen an EWS course will attest) and I’m not aware that he has frame breakage or SI issues - and none of the people I know who own a Yeti have, either. So it really seems that a vocal minority have persisted about an issue that doesn’t appear to be a concern for most of us. (Knocking on wood....)

Having said all that, damn do I love me a nice beefy Devinci....
  • + 11
 Best industrial design of the year, hands down. The details on this bike are just beautiful- check out the tube shaping. As a Tallboy 3 owner running the same tire combo... yep, I get it. This should be a super fun bike. Nice to see shorter seat tubes, longer reach, steeper STA, and room for a full size bottle from Yeti.
  • + 3
 What size DHF and Aggressor are you running on your tb3?
  • + 1
 Agreed on the bike ID and surfacing. Tucking that SI behind and rotating 90 degrees made all the difference. The SB5 was getting way too molten plasticky and now this model gets a bit more edge without wasting material. More like the older SB66c lines.

I'm one of those people for whom the ID will sway one way or another when picking a bike. "But bikes are all about function", oh spare me.
  • + 15
 no kashima bars??? not interested.
  • + 51
 I tried some but my grips kept slipping off.
  • + 10
 Random question, and I might just be an idiot, but can anyone explain the benefit of a slack seat tube angle? This is yet another bike I would never ride because my somewhat longer legs mean I would sit uncomfortably far back at the correct seat height without slamming the seat forward, and being closer to the rear axle means nothing but worse climbing characteristics. So a 74º effective seat angle sucks for long-leggers, and on the other end of the spectrum, offers absolutely no benefit for stumpy-leggers.

So besides the aesthetics argument (which is nullified by a goofy-ass lookin saddle position), why on earth aren't all new bikes being designed with 77º+ effective seat tube angles?
  • + 8
 You should read the NSMB review of the Kona Satori.
  • + 2
 Because they would need to increase the reach another inch or more and large manufacturers are scared of going much over 500mm. I have a 38.5" inseam and bikes with even a 75.5* have me way off the (too short) backend, especially on the steep uphills behind my house.
  • + 8
 I think it's a compromise to the cross country nature of the bike, same reason road bikes are around 73-74 degress, it's a better position to be in for long sustained max effort peddling than sitting up straight like on a chair. The bike is a strange mix of traits. It will be interesting to see who it appeals to. With burlier bikes peddling well, not sure if it makes sense for the average guy looking for a fun rider, and it seems overkill for racing.
  • + 6
 @smithcreek: Agree. And the $3400 frame price doesn't make sense when compared to Blur, Sniper, Hei Hei for anyone other than Yeti fanboys.
  • + 1
 Perhaps some balance is warranted, because as great as a 77* seat tube feels when’s climbing, it would feel shit on rolling or modearate terrain.

Try slamming your seat forward on your current bike. I can get my effective angle to close to 76*. Climbs great! Rides lousy.
  • + 2
 @bikewriter: Yes. It makes sense if you think Infinity is better than other suspensions which many people do
  • + 1
 @AaGro: totally agree. I think there’s room for normal STA designs (73-74 deg) and steep STA Designs (75+) in the mtb world. For the riders that have trails that go straight up then straight down I can see the the steep STA making sense but for my riding I prefer normal STA bikes. Really steep trails can be difficult but it is rare and I prefer the overall balance of a normal STA.

I also think that many people are on bikes that are too much travel and are too slack which throws the balance off so a steep STA makes up for this.

Luckily we have an incredible number of great designs to choose from!
  • + 12
 "Fits 2.4'' tires"
...
it pains me to say this, but take note @TransitionBikeCompany
ahem, @carbonsmuggler420
  • + 12
 I’m on my forth switch infinity on my sb in 2 years. Yeti have been good about it though which I can’t fault Smile
  • + 6
 Out of curiosity, how many millions of cycles did each of them gone through before giving in?
  • + 2
 Not built for mud that is for sure....
  • + 2
 Gotta ask. How often do you bust out the grease gun for it. I'd be tempted to give it a squirt every time I cleaned it
  • + 2
 Your not the only one, seems pretty common with this platform based on discussions with a warranty rep... still a great pedaling bike though. Smooth and efficient, apparently worth it to tribe devotees
  • + 1
 @BadMotor: The problem with that sort of thing is loss of use. If you have a one bike quiver and you have to get your suspension hardware replaced (with warranty claim processing thrown in for good measure), that's time you don't get to use your bike. Annoying at best (especially if you have a solid LBS who send you out with a demo bike while they take care of it for you), dealkiller at worst.
  • + 2
 @jollyXroger: 15 month of PNW riding 4 days a week. Grease the SI link once a month. Included some Whistler lift access and many pressure washes. Still 100% smooth.
  • + 1
 @ko-d: Excellent! :O
  • + 13
 Holy water-bottle- inside-the-front-triangle Batman!
  • + 10
 A bicycle built on a frame from carbon fiber composites photographed next to a large body of water... dedicated to Pole Bicycles
  • + 2
 Hey, its not just Pole - The guy at Sick had a full bore live meltdown at Oli over the subject when he asked him where the study existed proving carbon was such a menace.
  • + 0
 Hm, maybe, I talked to them a few times and they didn't seem to be so zealous about it. You see they are smart, no record of such meltdown. And I also never saw them saying their bikes are the bestest and the most technologically advanced in the world. Then to be fair, manySick bikes are made of steel which is greener than alu. Finally, I just made a joke. Everyone can say whatever they want, I'm not on duty in keyboard jizz Police today.
  • + 10
 Why in the bloody f*ck is it so important that sliders are "Kashima" coated? All other popular stanchion coatings work just as well.
  • + 27
 because Fox, and premium branding from both companies
  • + 5
 Fox has ridden the Kashima marketing wagon a loooong time. Their Performance Elite works just as well yet costs so much less.
  • + 6
 Because to Fox the actual increase in cost of using the 'coating' will be fairly minimal in real terms over a standard anodising process - It is now the the symbol of you having a premium Fox product, and as above this is a premium bike so will see the full 'premium branding' treatment.
  • + 3
 The Kashima wears off to become silver anyways. I’ve seen enough of wasted Switch Infinity assemblies sitting on the counter at my LBS.

Fox, give us a harder, longer lasting coating please.
  • + 3
 We now have kashima lil' smokies and kaskima hot dogs!
  • + 1
 because dentists
  • + 4
 First you get the Kashima, then you get the power, then you get the women.
  • + 0
 @bogey: What scratches it are ceramics; there aren't many materials harder than ceramics and none that are also light weight.
  • + 2
 @JohanG: darn ceramics all over our trails!
  • + 10
 Or you can get a Sniper for $1,000 less. A grand. Even the SCB is $500 less.
  • + 5
 and it's half kilo lighter Smile
  • + 10
 How happy is Intense right now? Lighter, less money, less weight, two frame options.
  • + 4
 Yeti is actually Swahili for "Dentist's bike"
  • + 1
 Thinking about it today, you do get 3 shock’s worth of sliding bits. That has to be better than 1.
  • + 1
 @bikewriter: for reals the intense sniper is so much better and chaper.
  • + 6
 I can't help but feel yeti missed the mark a bit on this...

Why would a trail rider who occasionally race xc choose this over the sb4.5? Besides the water bottle option...(which will be on the next 4.5?)

And most (non sponsored) dedicated xc racers wouldn't choose this, no matter how technical the races are. Races are almost always on climbs, and I'm racing a 23lb asrc, which often is the heaviest bike in the lead group. I know a pound shouldn't matter, but when you already have an ftp above 5w/kg and just barly missing the winning move from the lead group....having a bike 3 pounds heavier makes a difference, especially races with 10k+ feet of vert.

Don't get me wrong, it's a lovely bike, and I'm sure it's a perfect bc bike race bike. But most races aren't like the bc bike race. Even super technical endurance races I've done in the Alps favor lighter bikes xc bikes or more burly bikes (winners riding 120-130mm trail bikes).

All that said...i still want one!
  • + 9
 Remember the days when 26'ers were a thing?
  • + 9
 Can Yeti make one in 26" and Aluminum so we can use it for DJ/4X etc....
  • + 4
 Everybody seems to be bitching about price weight etc. saying why would you buy that blah blah blah. Who cares lol it's just another bike. Lot's of companies make good bikes and it just depends on which one fits you best. Stop trying to say you're the best and just be fucking happy you have a bike and trails, you ungrateful ingrates! Also, have a nice day
  • + 2
 Solid words Flow
  • + 8
 It's seems more fitting as a shorter travel trail bike than xc
  • + 18
 But "XC" doesn't have to mean racing, does it? Smile
  • + 15
 @mikelevy: To be honest I'm kind of lost what all those disciplines mean and where they start and stop. When PB talks about XC they typically seem to go on about it being non technical, more about long harsh climbs than technical descends and all that. And then I see those race reports an sections of it aren't quite unlike what you feature in a trail bike or all mountain bike review. I later thought XC, enduro and DH are race disciplines and trail, all mountain and freeride are their non-race equivalents (where for lack of a clock you can mess about a bit more). But I'm wrong again, apparently. Sorry, I think it is time again to educate your audience again because I'm completely lost.
  • + 7
 @mikelevy: so you can't ride XC on a bike labeled as short travel "trail bike" ? This classification obsession is ridiculous Smh
  • + 3
 @zede: Sure you can, if you are racing just for fun. But if you are racing to be competitive, it might be a better idea to grab the XC bike.
  • + 2
 @vinay: That's a great explanation/comparison
  • + 2
 I'm with @vinay and @zede. The microparsing is confusing as all heck
  • + 2
 @mikelevy: is There a XC Shootout planed? With Bikes Like the new blur, sniper and sb100?

Those would bei awesome after work Power Ride Bikes anderen For all day epics
  • + 8
 5k for a gx equipped bike? Yer grand.
  • + 3
 They probably looked at how many of us Asrc owners were building out a more enduro style kit.

Wide bars
Dropper posts
Wider rims and tires
120-140 forks

And decided this fits that buyer.

With the Switch turned sideways it looks to me like you could add more travel than 100mm without a front triangle restriction?
  • + 5
 "not your Euro sub-10kg bike" : what's that supposed to mean ?
Americans just discovered XC and they already believe they invented everything.
  • + 6
 I think they are referring to the fact very few "euro" bike companies are making fun/beefy xc bikes. I haven't really checked but I guess, yeah very few brands are making xc bikes with 120mm fork and minions DHF.

That being said, one could just see this bike as a trail bike with less travel : so basically a bike too heavy/slow to race, with not enough travel to have fun on technical trails... I can understand why euro bike companies aren't doing this
  • + 4
 It's a 100mm trail bike. It seems XC racing bikes are not cool for some people,and they are trying to convince us we need a mini-enduro bike for the new XCO type of courses,or something.
  • - 3
 @zede: We have different trails, in USA the trails are too perfect, with a lot of flow, jumps and berms. That's why short travel bikes work so well. In Europe XC riders ride fireroads, and the rest of the people ride natural hiking trails, with lots of rocks and very few features, so we need more travel. Short travel Trailbikes suck around here.
  • + 1
 @zede: funny because I thought it's a (North) American thing.
  • + 3
 @Antoncor: I doubt that every American trail looks like an "imba approved" trail. I have never been mtbiking in USA so I can't say how different it is
  • - 5
flag leelau Plus (Apr 11, 2018 at 8:14) (Below Threshold)
 @Antoncor: Yeti is based in Colorado. With the exception of bikeparks/ Grand Junction and Fruita area the bulk of Colorado trails are smooth and fast. Hence this bike.
  • + 4
 @leelau: lol wut? the two closest trails to Yeti factory are Apex and Dakota Ridge. Dakota is very technical and rocky. Apex has its flowy sections but the bottom section of the trail is very rocky as well.
  • + 4
 @sooner518: Exactly. if you can't find rocky technical descents in CO you might want to try riding somewhere other than Boulder
  • + 2
 @sooner518: @badmotor thanks. Consider myself educated and corrected
  • + 5
 @leelau: "I always thought the rocky mountains would be...rockier"
"Yeah that John Denver is full of s---"
  • + 2
 @leelau: no worries. i think a lot of videos are of high country trails that are really beautiful, but also smooth flowy singletrack. these probably make the coolest shots for videos. but there is lots of techy stuff for sure.
  • + 0
 “Americans just discovered XC...”

Trust me. There were plenty of us here in the U.S. racing XC in the 1980’s.
  • + 5
 Well it looks cool but not sure if it breaks the mould - there's a few aggressive 29er xc options out there now. Which is a great thing
  • + 4
 So for $6000, you get a $500 drivetrain, Performance-level suspension and POS wheels that can be had for around $350? Sounds about right for a Yeti.
  • + 5
 Yeti... Please use this new Switch Infinity layout on a 6c so I can run a water bottle. Please.
  • + 6
 Looks like a single pivot.
  • + 2
 I love my SB6C more than my Raleigh Summit (mmmm early rockshox) and Whyte 46 from back in the day, but they need to sort the SI as it seems inevitably prone to wear (I'm on my 4th in 2yrs approx) they seem like consumable items albeit at £300-odd quid a pop! thank god for the 5yr warrenty on the SI and a great LBS. I'm not sure if it's UK mud, but I fail to see how Yeti managed a million cycles of the SI without issues. Its the bikes achilles heel for me.
  • + 2
 I hope this bikes does not hint at a geometry of future SB6-ish bikes retaining conservative (slackish) STA and (shortish) reach numbers.
Otherwise, it is a beautiful bike and new switch infinity integration looks superb (we'll have to wait for a durability report).
  • + 2
 I feel like this switch infinity system is the perfect situation to have a vid of the suspension cycling. I get that it's just a first look but it would do a lot more here than it did on that last review of a simple single pivot.
  • + 6
 Oh sweet, a Yeti Blur!
  • + 4
 Yeti Blur Sniper! Or just run a primer in 115mm mode...
  • + 5
 Was hoping for a threaded bottom bracket
  • + 2
 I was hoping they got rid of the switch bit. They are so unreliable especially if they see mud or cleaner
  • + 2
 Amen brother
  • + 1
 @CM999: What cleaner?
  • + 1
 @Loamhuck: Parts cleaner.
  • + 5
 to everyone winging about low top tubes, you're idiots
  • + 4
 It’s okay, they ride Giant bikes. It’s not their fault
  • + 3
 I like this bike except for the pricetag and weight. It sticks with the theme that if you want a Yeti so you can have a Yeti, you pay for a Yeti and then you have....a Yeti.
  • + 5
 So the real question....How does it handle in the sand?
  • + 2
 Becuase it’s a yeti everyone’s hyped. Basically just a Santa Cruz tallboy with less travel and a Switch Infinity Linkage slapped onto it.
  • + 3
 Seems like it is much like the Blur 3 you reviewed but with your fork and suspension upgrades. Am I close?
  • + 5
 Aggro marathon weapon
  • + 3
 @mikelevy Any possibility of a shoot out between the Blur, Sniper, and SB100?
  • + 2
 Sounds like an excellent idea.
  • + 2
 @mikelevy love that riser bar, slammed stem, lots-of-extra-steerer look. Why is it so hard to get a wide, flat carbon bar these days?
  • + 4
 Boutique Bike for Dentists and the likes.
  • + 5
 I know many people with Yeti's that are a) not Dentists and b) would ride circles around most Pinkbike comment gnomes. Your point?
  • + 6
 @bman33: I think his point was that their lowest build, a GX spec with mediocre performance suspension starts at 6K. You can get full carbon enduro bikes with top of line suspension and X01 for that price, Kona Process 153 for example. Yeti's are overpriced is all.
  • + 4
 @ianswilson815: ya. The Yeti is a gorgeous bike, but for the love of God they're expensive. To put it into perspective, you can get a Blur CC with X01 for $6k. And Santa Cruz aren't exactly known for being "budget" bikes.
  • + 2
 @indotrails Now that is an original comment
  • + 2
 Looks great! I'd like to see more 100mm trail bikes, at lower price points tho. At the moment it seems to be hardtails or 120mm and nothing in between.
  • + 3
 frameset $900 more than Intense Sniper - which is 1 pound lighter and can run 120mm rear shock.

please advise.
  • + 1
 Nailed it! Now that’s the bike I always wanted my 2016 ASR to be. Hopefully the rear of the frame isn’t under built like the other Switch Infinity bikes.
  • + 1
 We're gonna see so many killer slalom bike hacks come out of these advanced XC/trail bikes... can't wait! So glad 100mm is still around.
  • + 2
 Wait, what? ASRC retired a few years ago? @mikelevy ? It was just taken out of the line up for the 2018 model year!
  • + 1
 already up on linkage design: linkagedesign.blogspot.com/2018/04/yeti-cycles-sb100-2019.html

linear leverage rate drop off. not a progressive spring rate.
  • + 1
 I love Yeti bikes but with a market moving towards direct sales and a downpressure on cost, it makes you wonder how long Yeti prices can remain at the $8-9k?
  • + 2
 I'd really like to own a Yeti one day, but for those prices I'm forced to look elsewhere
  • + 1
 have to do the sb100 vs the intense sniper trail, that would be such a cool shootout since they're both more trail oriented xc bikes.
  • + 1
 Dear yeti Build that with 140mm travel rear 160mm front and you have a pre order sorted. I had countless dramas with my sb5.5 the SI they can't handle uk winters at all.
  • + 2
 back to G1 29er geo with the short offset fork - way to turn the bike into a snoozer yay.
  • + 1
 @yeticycles brilliant website model page though. really amazing presentation. better than most (all?) high-end cars even.
  • + 2
 Doesn't fit the mold, but finally fits a waterbottle.
  • + 1
 Nice protection for dirt collector I just hope what vpp “boutiques” make something like this for their problem spot.
  • + 2
 Nice, 2,540mm rear travel?
  • + 2
 A yeti that can take a water bottle (properly) YESSSSSSSS!
  • - 1
 Completes starting @ ~$5k, frame & shock @ ~$3.5k. Get out of here with that shit. This thing doesn't even look 'cool'. Just more of the same, in flat black.

Is the 'switch infinity' like Kona's old 'magic' link?
  • + 3
 Norco Optic......
  • + 1
 I think anyone is going to be stoked on any 100-120mm aggressive xc/ light trail bike they buy. I still have a blast on my 2006 giant trance at my local trail head (albeit I live in Ontario). Bikes are fun. Buy what you think is rad and ride it till the wheels fall off.
  • + 2
 I hate xc and everything about it but this bike is sexy as f*ck
  • + 14
 So you're saying you no longer hate everything about it!?! Careful - you're now on a slippery slope my friend!
  • + 2
 That’s a lot of “cashma” in that suspension lol
  • + 0
 Damn, that looks like a fun Bike to have. I could fit a 185mm Bike Yoke Dropper on it and still would have some Extension left on the XL.
  • + 3
 New sb6 this year
  • + 2
 The biggest news here is that they FINALLY fit a bottle cage in there.
  • + 1
 Check out Vital's racing rumor link:https://www.vitalmtb.com/forums/The-Hub,2/2018-Racing-Rumors,9845?page=52#post_34533
  • + 2
 YETI WENT METRIC!!!!!1111
  • + 1
 You say it's got a lot of standover, but it's still not going to fit many riders under 5'4"...
  • + 1
 So is this bike in the same category of Evil The Following? or is it one category down?
  • + 3
 Definitely one down, 429SL is more comparable
  • + 1
 Mike - how do I get my name on the bike? Without dropping $12,000 Canadian pesos of course
  • + 2
 Makes sense now as to why they signed Kabush.
  • + 2
 I was just about to comment that I'm guessing this bike will be showing up at BCBR under quite a few riders. With Kabush on one this year, and assuming he takes the win again, it'll become one of the "must have" endurance racing bikes for the next few years.
  • + 3
 Looks like a pivot
  • + 2
 Exactly... same frame weight as their 140mm trail bike, too. Haha
www.pivotcycles.com/bike/mach-5-5-carbon-anniversary
  • + 3
 Looks a lot *better* than a Pivot. Smile
  • + 0
 @mikelevy "Housing that disappears into the front of the bike exits at the bottom of the downtube" - please tell me you wrote it with a straight face. NOT
  • + 1
 30 bikes in their lineup, yet still no DH frame...
  • + 1
 Do you really want a 4500$ Yeti carbon DH frame?
That's without shock.
  • + 2
 RIP downtube cables
  • + 1
 Looks like a Session.... Always wanted to say that...
  • + 1
 Now that you've done it,how do you feel?
  • + 1
 @nozes: I could have not said it. Like the morning after, the money is on the end table.
  • + 1
 Scott spark is cooler....
  • + 1
 sorry
i wnat to know can it fit 100mm fork for xc racing?
  • - 3
 A dentist, also known as a dental surgeon, is a surgeon who specializes in dentistry, the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of diseases and conditions of the oral cavity. The dentist's supporting team aids in providing oral health services.
  • + 1
 Loving the angular lines! I hope they carry that through into the new SB55
  • - 1
 ..and that place behind the seat tube is where the caked in mud ball lives.. Brilliant place for slidey suspension components.
  • + 9
 Thats...why..the articles goes into detail about 5 times on the bolt on guard which covers that completely...or are you joking?
  • + 0
 @Patrick9-32: Take a closer look. There is a gap on the side. Mud will get in
  • + 1
 Looks like the perfect bike for the UK. Anyone willing to rent my ass out?
  • + 1
 I think Yeti as a brand is losing ground. Really not feeling the vibes.
  • + 1
 Did you guys ride Los Barriles in Baja? This beach looks very familiar.
  • + 1
 What was wrong with the ASRC?
  • - 3
 No matter h how many times I read these reviews I just can't get over the fact that bike companies think it's ok to charge £10k for a bike .. I can buy a great car or motorbike for that.. Download me if you will but that's it. I'm out
  • + 0
 This bike just might have me switch over to Yeti.
  • + 1
 Yeti brought sexy back.
  • + 0
 Besides the price, this is pinkporn!
  • + 0
 $9899 for a bike without a motor in it, f*ck off!
  • + 1
 I think I see what you did in there.
  • + 3
 I thought we don't like e-bikes here?
  • + 1
 @yupstate: Not about liking e-bikes or not, it's just a ridiculous and unjustifiable amount of money to ask for a bicycle. At least an e-bike has about $1000 worth of purely electronics in it to justify a price like this. As i've said before, if you HAVE to charge this much for a bike, you're doing something wrong, if as i suspect this is just scandalous mark up, they can f*ck off. I suppose i should be just laughing at anyone that would be stupid enough to buy such a sickeningly overpriced and embarrassingly boring bike with 3 inches of useable f*cking travel, but i can't help but be more irked by wankers like Yeti and others that build bikes with Dollar signs in their eyes or simply have too much time on their hands and not enough ideas. YOU CAN BUY A NEW DUCATI FOR LESS THAN THAT!!! THEY ARE LAUGHING AT YOU!!!
  • + 1
 @deadmeat25: Maybe they will learn from Intense.
  • + 1
 Rad bike.
  • + 0
 Look! Switch infinity pivot Mach 5.5!,
  • + 1
 Downvote
  • + 1
 Avarice
  • - 1
 Now we just need a new DH bike. Preferably non-carbon please.
  • + 1
 It may not be aluminum, but at least Yeti's springing a DH bike to be piloted non other than RR: www.vitalmtb.com/forums/The-Hub,2/2018-Racing-Rumors,9845?page=52#post_34533
  • + 1
 @deafdaddy: I hope that's real.

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2018. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.172441
Mobile Version of Website