Yeti SB75 - Review

Apr 7, 2014
by Matt Wragg  

REVIEW
Yeti SB75
WORDS: Matt Wragg
ACTION PHOTOS: Simon Nieborak

Yeti aren't shy with their SB series bikes. Calling a bike a "superbike" is like painting a bullseye on it, setting a very high standard for the bike to be measured against. Yet with both the SB66 and SB95, we found that they more than lived up to that moniker, leaving us very impressed with their all-round capability as true mountain bikes. Yeti's first foray into mid-sized wheels, the 575, left us pining for those superbikes - there was something special about them that the 575 was missing. So how does the SB75, the introduction of mid-sized wheels to their superbike line up fare out on the trail? Does the 127mm travel, aluminum-framed, 27.5" wheeled bike live up to its heritage?

Our test bike was supplied by Yeti's French distributor, Tribe Sports Group, who don't bring complete builds over to Europe. However, they also distribute Fox so the bike was kitted out with an OE spec 140mm Fox 34. This is the same fork that the full builds come with, so we will look at that as part of this test. For the rest of the build we swapped in parts we know well so we could focus on the performance of the frame and fork as a package.


Yeti SB75 Details

• Purpose: trail / all-mountain
• Rear-wheel travel: 127mm
• Wheel size: 27.5"
• Fork: Fox 34 Factory Series, 140mm
• Shock: Fox Float CTD
• Switch Technology suspension system
• Sizes: XS, S, M, L
• Frame weight: 7.7 lb (frame and shock, claimed)
• MSRP (frame with shock): $2000 USD




Yeti SB 75 detail shots
Yeti SB 75 detail shots
  These things are subjective, but as far as we're concerned, this is a handsome bicycle

Construction

Visually, the genealogy from the SB66 and SB75 is clear. The low-slung top tube has the signature seat tower rising above it and a hydroformed downtube reaches up to join the burly tapered headtube. It strikes a delicate balance between curves and square edges, appearing muscular yet simultaneously delicate. We don't want to end up writing bad amateur poetry here, but the point is that it's a seriously good-looking bike. And the plain, yellow paint job is an absolute winner in our book.

The bottom bracket is a standard 73mm affair, for an externally threaded unit, a welcome sight. The bottom bracket shell is splined to accept an adapter to mount either an ISCG03 or ISCG05, or it can be removed to save a little weight if you're not running a guide. At the base of the seatube there is a port for an internally-routed seatpost. Out back a 142x12mm axle keeps things sturdy, although it can be changed to take a 135mm QR, if you prefer.


Yeti's Switch Technology

Yeti SB 75 detail shots
Yeti SB 75 detail shots
  To the casual observer the Switch Technology may look like a single pivot, but there's a lot more going on in there when you look closely

As with the SB66 and the SB95, the SB75 uses Yeti's Switch Technology, a suspension design that uses an eccentric pivot to alter the wheel path of the bike. Initially, the link rotates counter-clockwise, to create an efficient pedaling platform by using chain tension to slightly stiffen the suspension. As the rear shock sinks deeper into its travel, the link's path changes directions, and it begins to rotate clockwise, a motion that removes the majority of the chain force from the suspension in order to help with large bump absorption. The Switch eccentric is tucked low on the frame, just above the bottom bracket, and rotates on sealed cartridge bearings. Additional o-ring seals are also in place to provide further protection from moisture and grit. No special tools are required to remove the unit for maintenance or bearing replacement.


Setup

We went for a fairly racey feel with this bike. To dial in enough compression damping for our taste on the fork we set it to the hardest setting in "Trail" mode and then set the sag to about 25%. The Fox 34 is a noticeably stiffer fork at 140mm than it is at 160mm, and it seems to control the travel more effectively when it is shortened. Fox have stepped up their game with their 2014 CTD forks compared to 2013, but, if you push the bike hard on challenging terrain, it does still dive a little, and right when you most want control you can find your front end lower than you'd like it to be. However, we have been using a version of the fork with a modified compression profile and it is nothing short of brilliant - a short trip to a Fox service centre can turn it from a decent fork into a great one. To keep things balanced we went for a matching setup on the shock, never running it wide open in "Descend" mode to try and keep the same feel for front and rear. It was one of the little details we really liked about this bike - set like this you didn't have to touch the suspension again, you could roll up to the trailhead and straight on into the fun stuff. It is also worth noting the sizing of the bike - the medium is a 19.5" seat tube, which meant that for a 5'9" test rider we had to run the seatpost almost as low as it would go, which leads us to throw caution on Yeti's recommendation that a 5'7" rider could go for the medium.






























Riding the SB75


Climbing

From the very first climb we were impressed by how the Yeti climbs. Heading up to the test tracks around Sospel you always start with a stretch on the roads and fireroads. On that first road climb we simply felt we were going faster than we had before, like the bike was subtly encouraging us to push on rather than take it easy. Even without switching the shock into the "Climb" position, you felt like all of your effort was being translated directly to the rear wheel and the long cockpit and 73 degree seat angle put you in a really comfortable position to tackle distances. After experimenting a few times, we stopped bothering with the "Climb" mode at all and kept the shock in the "Trail" setting for virtually our whole time with the bike, as the difference was negligible thanks to the Switch suspension system. When the road ends and you reach technical climbing it really suited the 1 x 10 setup we ran for our time with the bike. It responded well when you attacked a section and we found ourselves clearing lines that we had struggled with on other bikes. Despite being one of the longer mediums we have tested, getting weight and placing the front wheel were never an issue, it felt very intuitive and precise. This is helped by the relatively long 442mm chainstays, which make it easier to keep traction through the rear. More cross-country focused riders would probably find the 7.75lb frame weight of the SB75 a turn-off, yet the numbers don't really do the bike justice, out on the trail it feels lighter than the numbers imply.

Bike Test
  The SB75 impressed us on the climbs, with excellent manners that rarely had us switching the rear shock out of Trail mode.

Descending

The SB75 is a lively bike, and we found 127mm to be really nice amount of travel if you are the kind of rider who wants to play with the trail. On paper we would have guessed that a long top tube and 442mm chainstays would make for a bike that was happiest in a straight line, but again, you need to set aside the numbers. From early on with the bike we found ourselves seeing if we could add little gaps and cut lines into our regular runs. To shoot the bike we took it to some of the play lines at Woburn Sands, and it instantly felt at home. The bike is stiff enough to really compress it hard into big berms, and precise enough just to flick the back after you off a little drop or thread line between two berms to carry speed into the following section. Time and again we'd reach the bottom with a huge grin on our faces, feeling like we could make the bike do whatever we wanted it to.

Bike Test
  In heavy compression berms the SB75 just felt stiff and eager to be pushed harder

On faster, rockier terrain it was easy to forget it only has 127mm of travel as it feels stable, sturdy and capable. When things got steep and technical that precision was invaluable and the bike gives you the confidence to feel like you can place it wherever it needs to be. But, you could definitely find the edges of the bike. Practicing for a local enduro race there was a two minute rockfest, with barely a moment to catch your breath before you were dealing with the next jagged outcropping. Here the shortcomings of the fork were brought into focus as it didn't always stand up in the way we hoped it would. By the end of the run we felt like we had taken a fair amount of abuse to the arms and hands as after dealing with all that ugliness there wasn't travel left for comfort. It was a similar story when we got up to really high speeds on the long straights of the Sospel DH track, it could be done easily enough, but to hold the bike wide open took a bit of commitment. Those limitations aren't what stuck in our mind from riding the bike though. What stayed with us is the very fact that a bike with little travel was encouraging us on to try find those limits, and no matter how ugly it got, it was always a lot of fun.


Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesThe SB75 sits outside fixed categories. It probably isn't the bike to buy if you want to win races, either up or down hill. It's not a bike for people who worry about numbers, as the weight, chainstay length or head angle cannot tell you the whole story of how it feels on the trail. Rather, it's a true mountain bike, a bike you can ride the entire mountain on and come out grinning at the end. More than all of this though, it has that rarest quality of all, personality. And for that reason alone, it's more than worthy of keeping the "superbike" title. - Matt Wragg

www.yeticycles.com


149 Comments

  • 174 12
 This is an epitome of pinkbike reviews. They even said the bike can't win descending or climbing but it has "personality" . Are you kidding me? Apparently the sb 75 is a fat chick
  • 41 3
 if you aren't racing, the bike with personality is the better one to own than the fastest surely? I'd rather have a bike with a style or personality I love than the "fastest" thing going... I'd still have an SB66 in this case, but just as a general point.
  • 18 2
 " I'd rather have a bike with a style or personality I love than the "fastest" thing going..."

I second that.
  • 6 11
flag maxlombardy (Apr 7, 2014 at 4:35) (Below Threshold)
 And they hand-picked the spec, and chose a fixed post? AND 2X10?!?! But now you can't gripe about it!!!
  • 12 0
 In what way does the drivetrain or seatpost affect the frames performance?

They're not testing an off the shelf bike, where they have to take spec into account.

Actually...did you read the article?
  • 6 1
 It is said that they ran it 1x10, you can see it in the second picture with Matt riding the bike.
For the fixed post, even if I am a true defender of it (#freeride #downhill and all the dumb hashtags you can think of), choosing a dropper for such a bike would have make more sense.
  • 20 1
 Isn't this the argument for 26" wheels? "I'd rather have fun than fast!"
  • 6 0
 The bike he is riding is quite different than the one on the demo pictures at the top. Look at the second to last pic, dropper post, 1x10, different wheels, bars, etc....
  • 8 2
 I read the article, I know they're not reviewing the full bike. My comment refers to the fact that EVERY time a bike comes through without a dropper or with a 2X up front, they beat into the ground the idea that you MUST have a dropper and a 1X setup. Then when they get the chance to build their own "With parts we know well" and they put on a fixed post and a 2X. Just pointing that out...
  • 3 0
 Ahh right I hear ya, sorry. I get quite tired of it too to be honest, but I guess 1x10 and a dropper is what's current at the moment so let the fashionistas focus on the kit, and everyone else focus on what new trail they're gonna explore next!
  • 2 1
 pretty sure it has a dropper in the riding pics, otherwise, what is that bulge just above the seat collar? and has been pointed out, they say specifically that they ran it 1x10. edit: if you look close, there are some differences between the setup in the riding pics, and the press shots. edit: ninjad by lanka due to my own inattention.
  • 1 0
 definitely has a dropper. you can see the remote on the left side of the handlebar in the last picture. it appears to be swapped out between test riders because there is a lot of excess housing.
  • 3 0
 @Jimmy0 you got all the yeti lovers mad at ya! I think this review is really about what it's not saying about the bike. When all they can say is "it made me smile" I think to myself--well, just being on a trail makes me smile so.... bike ain't too hot.
  • 6 2
 Does pinkbike ever give a bike a bad review? I feel like its always the same "fluff"
  • 3 1
 Jesus, people. I'm pretty sure the top picture is how the bike comes built from Yeti, and is not the bike they rode. If you just take fifteen seconds to compare them with the riding pictures, the spec is completely different. The differences I noticed instantly: 1x10, dropper, Renthal bar, wheels that aren't CB.

Edit: Someone else pointed this out. Disregard.
  • 1 0
 Beyond the fact that it was already pointed out that the bikes in the pics are different, Yeti has never offered a spec with CB wheels, raceface anything or renthal bars This thing is 100% custom.
  • 3 5
 @erik, 1. Watch the language. 2. We are proud you noticed that. You are so smart. Here's a cookie.
  • 4 0
 Language? Words are an abstract representation of thought and intention... He neither said nor meant anything offensive. You, on the other hand, are belittling and patronizing him for his observations.
  • 2 3
 Another smart guy. I'll obviously lose this battle of words.
  • 63 4
 why would anyone get this bike over a sb66?
  • 8 22
flag Slash9 (Apr 6, 2014 at 23:32) (Below Threshold)
 Nope! Would get that either.
  • 9 0
 Depends what you want from the bike, the SB66 is a proper enduro bike (even though I hate that term). The SB75 with less travel is a bit more a trail bike, i.e its a bit less point and shoot/plow and a bit more up orientated so it doesn't descend as well. Two very different bikes.
  • 14 0
 I saved like a bitch and got myself a SB66c frame last year and built it up to the spec I wanted as a one bike do it all, honestly say best bike I've ever owned or ridden. Im not transfixed on the wheel size debate like most but I fully accept all the selling points of 650b and the advantages it has over 26" and when the time comes for a new bike in the future I will get one. This is where I'm confused by Yeti and agree with @tawnzy12, if this was essentially a SB66 in terms of geometry and travel but with 650b wheels they would have had me cursing my luck I didn't wait out a bit longer. Surely something with 127mm rear wheel travel has a limited appeal, probably only to those folks with a ton of different bikes in the shed, but most of us have one main sled and 150mm/160mm lets you do essentially everything. Interesting by Yeti.
  • 4 0
 haha @Slash9, you clearly have not ridden one.
  • 1 10
flag jcklondon (Apr 7, 2014 at 6:14) (Below Threshold)
 What is a sb-66?
  • 2 0
 @tawnzy12 - because from what i hear, yeti's stopped production of the sb66 and so you'd have no choice, but to buy a sb75
  • 12 8
 Yep, SB-66 production is ending due to lack of demand from actual customers (not pipedream customers on web forums).
  • 7 1
 The bike that's "replacing" the 66 is yet to be released. It'll be a 6" 27.5.
  • 2 1
 Fortunately its not one of us, but some people live where there are only smooth trails that don't warrant more than 5 inches of travel. On smooth, pedaly trails the 66 is probably at a disadvantage to this bike.
  • 2 2
 Oh dear...nobody liked that.
  • 3 10
flag jcklondon (Apr 7, 2014 at 7:38) (Below Threshold)
 Deeight, what exactly were those yeti sales numbers btw? Maybe you are just a parroting "facts" provided to you? Looks to me like they still sold quite a few sb66 to places like competitive so don't be swallowing the bait so easy. Could be they're just jumping on a bandwagon and had to cut a model!
  • 12 6
 It was announced FOUR months ago they were discontinuing the SB-66s and that remaining stock was to be discounted to dealers, who have since discounted them to customers. Just because you live in this little closet world of pinkbike where you don't get any info except what is fed to you here, doesn't mean the rest of us do also. Anyone capable of independant thought should have realized that Competitive's discounting of SB-66s by 30% was a clue that the model wasn't selling at
regular price.

I've provided bike industry sales numbers in the past and all it got was denial / ignored, go find your own information. Or live in ignorance. I won't lose any sleep over it.
  • 4 10
flag jcklondon (Apr 7, 2014 at 9:39) (Below Threshold)
 That was sub-par chest puffing. Not interested though. Please show me the numbers for the specific model we are talking about and defend your claim.
  • 4 9
flag jcklondon (Apr 7, 2014 at 9:54) (Below Threshold)
 Hold on. Cancel that request, it was rhetorical anyways. I know you haven't those facts and it is likely you just made the sb66 cheapshot about pipe-dreams and "low" sales to troll people. I don't want to feed you.
  • 4 1
 Why would a manufacturer discontinue a model that sold really well? To "jump on a bandwagon"? Really?
  • 7 7
 @smike... Except it didn't sell really well...not once 650Bs exploded... Santa Cruz had lots of well selling 26ers also and then they released the Bronson last year and the bottom fell out of the barrel for their 26er sales and by late summer they were deeply discounting them to clear them out of the wharehouse. If the children on here (and I don't care if legally they're adults when they continue to act like children throwing tantrums because they can't get their way) want to keep denying it, that's fine. But real Yeti customers spending real dollars made the decision for Yeti just as they did for Santa Cruz.

@jcklondon...trolls like you often ignore facts and call others trolls, after being caught trolling. which you have.
  • 3 0
 Yeah, I know. I'm asking jcklondon.
  • 12 2
 Here Jack... proof... John P (the poster) is their International Sales Manager.

forums.mtbr.com/yeti/no-more-66-yeti-892394-post10921548.html#post10921548

I'll quote something relevant....

"As some other shop guys have stated in this thread, an interesting thing happened toward the end of 2013 - despite all of you guys (and us here at Yeti!) professing love for 26ers, tangible demand for that wheel size fell off a cliff. In our domestic preseason bookings, in which we literally book hundreds/thousands of bikes for shops, demand for our 26ers was almost zero. Literally, there were less than a dozen 66's on order nationwide. Yikes. Meanwhile, demand on the 75 and 575 (both 650B bikes) was off the charts."
  • 2 0
 i'm good with being in that less than a dozen nationwide statistic but gonna give this 650b thing another honest go tomorrow afternoon on a demo. it definitely hasn't been the best of both worlds revelation at all for me. it is a wheel size choice & not an instant skills upgrade to me.
  • 4 3
 Yeti made this only for the sake of having a 650b....
  • 3 1
 ohhhh my god that is really scary shit the SC Nomad and the SB66 were my winning argument towards 26 inch wheels now they are gone.
correct me if im wrong but Commencal, Specialized and Evil are the only guys left making 26er all mountain (enduro) bikes. I guess is safe to say R.I.P 26 inch wheels.
  • 2 10
flag jcklondon (Apr 7, 2014 at 12:50) (Below Threshold)
 Thanks d8 for parroting that up with no further insight. It sort of proves my point. I mean you are quoting their bookings, not actual sales? The sales are what will be interesting. Do you know how many sb-75 were sold so we have a comparison? Nice that you are here to catch trolls...

Smike... Companies ditch currently profitable products all the time due to fear of being left behind, seeming outdated and not innovative. Everybody wants to get on the bandwagon before it is "too late" ... Fear like that produces some crazy shit.
  • 7 0
 Sorry, it doesn't prove your point. At all. I'm not sure why you're fighting it. And I also think you're wrong about ditching profitable products. Companies don't do that. Period. You can get on a bandwagon without ditching your bread and butter first. But I have a feeling you will continue to believe what you will.
  • 3 1
 @fercho25... Rocky still has the Slayer, until it comes up for its re-design which should probably be for 2015 model year (Flatline is about due also). Their new for 2014 Thunderbolt 650B has replaced the Element 26ers in the lineup (Elements are 29er only now), which leaves JUST the Flow, the Slayer, the Flatline and a single entry level XC hardtail called the Edge.
  • 1 9
flag jcklondon (Apr 7, 2014 at 13:34) (Below Threshold)
 Ok. Tell me what you think my point is? I think my point is that the SB-66 was not as much of a poorly selling product as is being made out to be and that it was dropped so yeti could jump on the 659bandwagon. You wanted to know if a company would drop one currently profitable product line to focus on a new one that they decided will be the future. The answer is clearly "yes". Or to put it the other way. What company waits until actual sales are only a dozen(less than 10% of normal)?
  • 7 1
 And many of us think you are a moronic troll. The SB-75 is NOT the replacement for the SB-66... how many times does this need to be said by people in this thread for you to grasp that? If the international sales manager of Yeti isn't a good enough authority on why they dropped the model, nobody and nothing will satisfy you.
  • 2 2
 Id buy an SB66 over this taxi any day Now if Yeti and co used their heads they could have kept selling all three wheel sizes with a bit of clever marketing Hell maybe Felt will :-)
  • 4 1
 @Headshot...as JohnP pointed out in his response on mtbr about the SB66 being officially ending of production... people saying they'll buy one isn't the same thing as people actually putting down money and ordering one. Dealers didn't order them because their customers showed practically no interest in them. No dealer is going to order a bike and stock it in their store just to waste money and floorspace, especially not for a boutique brand of bikes like Yeti. As to buying a Felt...well...if supporting a company that steals and patents another inventor's bicycle design simply because they realized he hadn't filed a patent application yet... is what you like to do, well... really nothing more to say to you then.
  • 1 0
 You missed the point There is no sixer marketing Its all 650b The 1 April 559 article is a joke but goes to show how easy it is to puff up a product. The only reason I dont have a 66 is cost and a perfectly good 2013 bike. As for Felt show me where I said Id support them. I dont like their bikes, even the sixers.
  • 6 8
 Reading the thread, I think that sales guy is making a convenient truth to try and diffuse a group of disappointed customers. I can easily be satisfied if somebody could add something beyond what that guy says(low pre sale, we cancelled). Is that the whole picture or just spin? I think sb66 was cut dramtically/prematurely and current 2014/14 inventory dumped to avoid risk of not being up on the latest wheel size bandwagon in 2015. Probably right after the 650 think tank sent the new projection.. man are those think tank guys shoving it at us..Yeti were probably very fearful of losing market on another wheelsize shift ever since their 29r positioning.

Obviously deeight you just accept what they told you at face value, that is fine for you, but i wanted a little more. I thought you or somebody else might have known something special about the move. Instead it is just the same news but with lots of condescension, pokes and insults.
  • 1 0
 @smike "Companies don't do that. Period." I think you mean "Profitable companies don't do that." Some do (like Microsoft), but they generally don't stay in business.
  • 7 2
 Yeti said they'd resume production if demand is there but that means legitimate buyers, not whiners on a web forum.
  • 8 0
 WHINE ABOUT HOW EXPENSIVE BIKES ARE. SWEAR TO ONLY BUY USED/CHEAP! Oh, you aren't selling the model I like anymore?
  • 2 0
 Ride a bike with 26 and then with 650b and see how different they really are, i honestly don't feel drawbacks to my 650b trail bike and it makes me want to convert my DH bike to 650b as well
  • 1 0
 @fercho25--just picked me up a Transition covert 26. The offer it in a 27.5 or 26.
  • 5 0
 @jcklondon - I'm a bit confused when you seem to be so convinced about the SB66's sales figures, when your first comment on this thread was asking what an SB66 was.
  • 2 0
 Sympathy vote Wink
I lusted after an SB66 when they first came out now it's the Bronson for my internet pipedreams. YetI reliability writes worried me too much (and the astronomical price / income differential!)
  • 30 2
 Heavier than a Bronson or a Nomad , with the travel of a Solo. This is a parts bin special. Yeti were clearly caught napping by 650b..
  • 25 6
 RIP SB66. Your replacement is nothing more than a bastard child.
  • 13 1
 This is not the sb66 replacement, yeti has commented in the mtbr forums, that Jared Graves will begin the EWS series on the sb66c but he has been testing the new bike, and when it's ready for production he will be switching over. Probably by mid season.
  • 7 10
 Yet Yeti has announced that they will no longer produce the SB66 so this IS the bastard replacement.
  • 7 2
 See my above comment...the 75 isn't even intended to be in the same category, 1" less travel, steeper angles..i.e. It's a trail bike, not an aggressive all mountain bike, THAT bike is currently in development.
  • 7 1
 Triber - you're attempting to educate the uneducatable. can't wait fir the new "new" sb66/67.5
  • 5 2
 Pretty much...mtbr is where manufacturers actually tell people what's coming, pinkbike is where people complain about what they're being told months later. Probably has to do with the fact mtbr was started as "Mountain Bike Consumer Review" meaning, that consumers...the actual ones spending money is who the site was created for... not the kids that wanna pretend they're consumers.
  • 5 1
 The SB75 is much more likely a "replacement" of the ASR-5 -- Yeti's single pivot 127mm 26" trail bike. No doubt the SB75 was inspired by the SB66, but it's definitely not it's replacement. The ASR-5 was a great bike but the Switch Technology that proved itself on the SB66 probably made the most sense when Yeti went to redesign their 26" trail bike in order to join the 650B "revolution".
  • 2 1
 And yeti's "Switch Technology" came from the French budget brand Rock Rider. Check out the NEUF link.
Thanks for edumacating me.
  • 10 1
 This review says the bike rides way better than the numbers would predict, and it is only limited by the fork. I think that's pretty honest. Having ridden Yetis in the past, I can attest that there is a "Yeti handling" characteristic that cannot be derived from its numbers. The whole is greater than the sum of its parts. That said, I agree that it looks like Yeti threw this thing out there while completely invested in the SB66c. I expect the SB75c or SB76c will be much more refined. Yeti says they would love to keep selling the SB66c, if people would buy them. Seems almost nobody is interested in buying a new 26" trailbike, except maybe the 150 holdouts who frequently bitch about wheel size on Pinkbike - and most of you aren't actually buying bikes. (PS - I like, ride and prefer 26ers too, but for now, they are done). Jared Graves pretty much proved the SB66c is the most versatile and capable trailbike built, and they still can't sell them.
  • 1 0
 100% agree. I can't believe Yeti got caught out by the whole "new wheel size" again. You would have hoped that maybe they learned their lesson the first time.
  • 2 0
 But that is the tragedy: as you write a great rider proved it is one of the best. And yet it does not sell - because of company's marketing: they needed something new to make money with. And all the people who are jumping in are weekend warriors at best with more money than time and just listen to the marketing. I bet they dont buy them because they demoed them side by side with the same 26. So in conclusion company's greed and their victims, clueless consumers bury one of the best bikes and the people who know enough to appreciate it are left mourning. Its like burning books.
  • 2 1
 Herzalot-Just bought an SB66c and built it up properly. Loving it. No desire for 650b wheels. Maybe next bike, but only if I am forced whicih it seems I will be.
  • 1 0
 @packfill - if you are referring to their SB-95, I think they responded quite well. @ Sontator Yeti didn't want to go to 27.5 any more than Knolly, but nobody is buying 26ers. @chasejj - yeah buddy! Enjoy that rig - it's among the best bikes ever produced.
  • 11 1
 I must say, yeti makes some good looking bikes!
  • 9 0
 This isnt the replacement for the SB66. they have something else coming
  • 11 2
 650b?
  • 4 2
 hahahaha
  • 9 1
 127mm travel is very specific
  • 11 1
 Yes, specifically it's 5 inches!
  • 4 1
 Exactly 5"
  • 16 2
 Oh... Awkward
  • 8 0
 I bought an SB66 Carbon for $1900 yesterday. Viva 650b!
  • 2 0
 nice dude, i'm loving mine, and honestly hope I'm riding it until the 650b 'demand' evaporates in favor of the next wheel size du jour.
  • 3 0
 Oh Crap! Yeti is no longer selling the SB66c?!?! I better sell mine right now because the last thing I want is someone to see me riding an outdate bike with an outdated wheel size. I might as well sell my 575, ASR-5 and Cannondale Caffeine F2 as well. I just don't think my ego could handle the ridicule of riding 26" wheels on outdated bikes.
  • 4 0
 I feel the same. Now I only ride at night and hide in the bushes if I hear someone coming.
  • 3 0
 OK, here are other reviews. Take your own conclusions. The only common "complaint" is weight, which IMO is shared by all this new 650b alu, like the SC 5010, Bronson, norco sight, bla bla bla. If you are a weight weinie, go put your spandex, grab your road bike and go drink a coffee with your boyfriends.

www.texasmountainbiketrails.com/yeti-sb75-review

www.vitalmtb.com/product/guide/Bikes,3/Yeti/SB75-Race,13000

www.bicycling.com/mountainbikecom/bikes-gear/first-ride-yetis-new-sb75-275-mountain-bike

flowmountainbike.com/tests/tested-yeti-sb75

www.bikerumor.com/2013/09/17/first-ride-tweener-madness-the-yeti-sb75/#more-66374
  • 5 3
 Why do I learn more about these bikes from the comments than the reviews? What exactly is 'personality' in a bike? What exactly is a freaking 'superbike'? It's certainly not aluminium. It seems every bike is amazing in the reviews but that's impossible. I want critical reviews that tell me exactly what is done well or not, the trails it works on and doesn't and what riders it suits and who should look elsewhere. I want comparisons. To bring it up again, do all bike manufacturers provide incentives for good reviews. It seems that way.
  • 1 0
 You don't bite the hand that feeds you! Its hard to trust anything that you hear on the internet because you never know who is in bed with who. Really stinks but that's the way she goes!
  • 6 2
 I just started watching the "Bible of Bike Tests" series on youtube, I think it's by Bike magazine. Those reviews are awesome, and the guys don't really pull any punches. They flat out hate some of the bikes and they come right out and say it. I think PB usually does a pretty good job reviewing, but you really have to read between the lines to figure out if a bike was actually good or not. Instead of a scale from "awful" to "amazing", PB seems to use a scale from "good" to "amazing".

Btw, Bible of Bike Tests kinda hated the SB75 Smile
  • 4 1
 ^^^ This so much. I just started watching the bible of bikes tests too and they absolutely blow the other reviews I read away in objectivity. It's so nice to see a negative review every now and then because at least you know they're not just a mouth piece for the manufacturers. And the sb75 was reviewed very poorly by them. All the reviewers said it wasn't as good as the 66 or 95.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=rWMgTHHAglw
  • 6 0
 Did you not hear them say the SB75 was the most fun bike they tested all day, it just wasn't as good as the SB66. Unfortunately the bike bible guys didn't understand what they were testing and rather than more clearly inform the viewer the SB75 was excellent compared to the other bikes they tested that day, they compared it to the SB66 which is apples to oranges.
  • 6 0
 ^^^^ That review is useless. They are not comparing the SB75 to another 27.5 bike, they are comparing the SB75 to a 29er and a 26er, and they don't even talk about the bike itself, so you wasted 6.08min of your life watching a stupid discussion basically about wheel sizes.
  • 3 0
 "As a standalone trail bike, the five-inch-travel SB-75 could hold its own against many other 27.5 offerings, but it is outshined by Yeti’s 26-inch and 29-inch SB models."
gear.bikemag.com/2014-bible-of-bike-tests/all-mountain/yeti-sb-75-race.html

How is that apples and oranges? They're all trail/AM bikes by the same company and meant for similar stuff, it's just one of them doesn't seem to do the job as well as the others (according to the reviewers). Point is, if the bike doesn't perform as well as Yeti's other bikes in the same class, why would you get it (unless you're just determined to have a 27.5" bike)? I want to know how it compares to other trail/AM bikes, of any wheel size. Doesn't make sense to review it any other way, unless it's a 650B shootout (which it isn't).

I would like to know which other ones they rode that day, but I can't find that info anywhere. Even so, there are tons of other bikes they were much more enthused about in the reviews. After reading the PB review and watching BOBT, I would definitely skip the SB75 when looking at new bikes. If the intended use and price point are similar, but the performance is worse it just doesn't make sense to look at.
  • 2 0
 Personality? In 2014? I thought it was all about exact size and measurements (extended top tubes/shorter stems/chain stay length), and accurate angles (head angles to within .5 of a degree) at this point of bike development. So no definitive verdict except that it has 'personality'..... geez, why are the websites and magazines so concerned with an increase in the size of a wheel radius of .75“ (though it's not really that, is it) when the definitive measurement is 'personality'.
  • 3 1
 Can I ask what the personality is? I'm fine that the SB75 has it, but would like more detail. Is it easy going? Slightly depressed but fun when drunk? Rigorously analytical? Or is it full of desperate coldness, isolated from the world by what it perceives as the meaninglessness of life, but desperately wants to good, to make the world a lighter place, even as it adds darkness in the form of its own cruelty to others it perceives as being evil?
  • 2 0
 Demoed one of these last weekend, It was amazing. Rolled over everything, and cornered like you would not believe. No bob when climbing, little to no extra movement in the suspension when interacting with bumpy terrain, and climbed like a goat. I would recommend this bike to anyone. Especially if you are a little larger of a man, as I am 6'2"-3" and weigh anywhere from 220-230lb on any given day.
  • 2 0
 I got he SB95 and it is really an awesome bike. I then got a a great deal on SB66c which is even more fun bike to ride but it truly is a beast on the trail. I've never crashed so much before i got this bike but that is because the SB66c makes you wanna go faster and test your own limits.

I'm happy with both 26" bike and 29".
  • 6 1
 So why would you want this bike over the 66?
  • 11 0
 Vital reviewed this bike and decided that it was "ok" , but not as good as either the 66 or 95. Neither fish nor fowl. I'd buy a 66 over this anyday.
  • 6 0
 basically all reviews od the sb75 end up in the same: "it climbs pretty well (switch tech)" but.....hmmmm BUT... "it just doesn´t feel right or funny and left everyone scratching their heads"

Having the super SB66 and SB95, the SB75 makes no sense - at least this 2014 version -, I agree with whom commented that: clearly Yeti was so invested in the SB66 that got caught up napping by 650B
  • 2 2
 Who
  • 1 0
 Check out the Bike Mag Bible video reviews (google it). They do a really good comparison the three different Yeti models.
  • 5 2
 Jack of all trades master off fuck all. Classic case of expensive form over fuction. Gimme a santa cruz anyday. Too much kudos too little performance
  • 1 0
 I still can't believe people set their forks up using sag and LS compression, instead of for/aft balance in open first. You will be amazed how well that fork behaves with more air pressure in Descend. A bit of a compromise in Trail however, as It can feel very firm;-)

So why is Yeti having a hard time tearing the SB66c from Grave's cold dead hands?
  • 1 0
 Me neither, but then if more users understood how to setup their forks in the first place, Fox wouldn't have pushed CTD on everyone.
  • 3 0
 Graves will be on the 650b wheeled replacement for the SB66 (which the SB75 isnt') as soon as it is ready for prime-time.
  • 1 0
 I picked up a almost new SB66c frame last week. Coming from a Mojo HD, the SB is a bloody missile. Long, low, stable. It actually feels (stability wise), like a dialled Bronson. It just snaps forward faster and has a ton of pop. I actually sold a set of 650b wheels and fork to fund it. I do alot of racing, but I'm not too concerned about a second here or there I'm not out to do the EWS (except for whistler). One last go at the 26" version of this bike, and I will go to the 650b version in a year or two when it gets dialled. I'm sold on the Switch big time. Weird saying I won't go back to DW....but I probably won't.
  • 1 0
 I *just* built-up my SB66 for aggressive trail-riding and some light-park duty and as a general "All-rounder" and it is a beauty! I can see the benefits of having the switch technology in the 127mm variety but I'm pretty sure my next bike will be a shorter travel 29" or 650b XC variety for the quick before and after work local trail attack! Would absolutely consider the SB75 but theres no way I can afford 2 Yetis :-S
  • 2 1
 Really like this suspension design, took them a while to get to a design very close to a design that was trying to build about 5years ago, Wonder if I would have any claim that they infringed my IP. But since any patent that I have produced just left me open to lousing all rights Why bother?
But really would like to try one to see how good it is, rather than reading a right up
  • 2 0
 That's ok... US patent office would have granted a patent for an identical design even if you already had a european patent probably, forcing you to spend money fighting it in a US court. Hell they grant patents over the same inventions claimed by different inventors all the time (ie DW's Split Pivot fight versus Trek's ABP) which are equally ridiculous given that concentric axle pivots are a century old idea. There's now a european patented version of the concept also which I'm sure was done simply to avoid cease & desist letter from Dave for an old idea he didn't actually think of first. Hell even in mountain bike suspension, pivoting a swingarm section AROUND an axle...gee... Cove/Kona/Supergo/Wheeler have all had frames where the swing arm pivots around the BB shell/axle. Again, century old idea. Did they try and patent it? Nope... but do it around the rear hub/axle for the first time in a century and Ooooohhhh it deserves a patent.
  • 1 0
 YES the European patent process is now so flawed that its not worth the money spent sorting it out, but by registered mailing documents signed and dated and kept sealed is evidence if you want to go through lengthy court proceedings to contest, Not surprised to here just as bad in the US But more interested in just getting a bike that I am happy with riding right now Also only really going to sell enough frames that justify getting the moulds made for manufacturer of carbon frames that will fit sealed drive gearing design any way SINCE can not get any one interested enough to help out will do it all my self
  • 1 0
 I've ridden this bike. I ordered one from Black Seal in NZ (trip got canceled, so they shipped it stateside). It's a great bike, but feels just too much like my old ASR5 carbon, which weighs 23 pounds! Nice bike and it rides really well...but just doesn't outshine in any one area, as the review says. Though it doesn't "feel" heavy, it ain't 23 pounds either! I picked up an SB66 carbon on sale (and sold the SB75 frame yesterday). I agree with comments that the SB66 is the best bike I've ever ridden. The switch link is more noticeable on the SB66. But my guess is this bike will get shelved SUPER quick (pardon the pun) as soon as Yeti reveals their latest 2014 bikes around Sea Otter. You want a solid and simple 650b bike...buy a 575, or (forgive me Yeti)....a Santa Cruz.
  • 1 0
 Great article! I like how they didn't have a full build so they tried to match the parts as close as they could to the full build parts. I personally love this bike, I love having fun on the trails and usually weight isn't a huge issue because that can just translate to a stronger frame. I like how the bike looks and you can't go wrong with the all mountain bike with 27.5 wheels. It seems like all the major bike companies are trying to make the best and fastest thing when they are starting to forget what biking is all about, having fun on the trails, and the SB-75 definitely shows the world how much fun you can have on the trail! I Love this bike!
  • 1 0
 I've been on the 66 since it was released in 2011-- it is hands down the dopest bike I've ever owned. Just picked up a 66C frame at a stupid price thanks to the big wheel Kool-Aid cult (just doing my part as a loyal Yeti fan and helping them clear out their "obsolete" inventory). Now it'll be just a few more months until Shimano jumps on the 11 speed bandwagon and I'll have super cheap 1x10 drivetrains as well.

The fact that 66 orders completely fell off a cliff really blows my mind. I've never come back from a 650b test ride convinced of... well, anything. It's just a *slightly* better rolling bike that's *slightly* less fun to get rowdy on. Why would I want to optimize my bike for the less-fun sections of trail? So that I'm "faster overall"? Clearly I'm missing something here...
  • 2 0
 I have the SB66, it will be with me till I die, I've had quite a few different bikes of this standard and non of them come close to the 66
  • 5 0
 It looks like a taxi :-)
  • 2 0
 How can you expect a 140 fork to stay up in its travel when running 25% sag? Its already a 1/4 compressed before you hit the first bump?
  • 1 1
 Dear Author, just so i get its right... you are saying it wont win races neither up or down so this means it is not as good as the sb66 (the one with the tini-tiny wheels) which won and ended up on the podium at all kinds of races?

interesting...
  • 6 2
 should be a sb76c imo XD
  • 3 3
 The first number denotes wheel size, the second travel. Sb66 is 26" and 6", Sb95 is 29" and 5", so the 27.5" 5" bike should definitely be the sb75. Alloy always gets released before carbon too, I'm sure the sb75c is in the pipeline.
  • 5 2
 i know and i stand by my statement Smile
  • 2 0
 Definitely hope they do this as a carbon version. I'm riding an old Yeti 575 now, love it. Wanting an SB66 but I can see the appeal of 27.5" wheels...
  • 1 0
 I have a sb95c, the sbs are indeed superbikes with great character. But yes this fully needs a carbon version.....and some pikes!
  • 1 0
 I love yeti I cant wait for my 303wc to be done funny thing is the only part Im waiting for is the enve carbon stem XD

#yetitribe
  • 1 0
 The SB 66 is one of my most desired bikes but unfortunately I can't afford one Frown Hope they still produce it when I have the money. The 75 looks fun, too!
  • 1 1
 Good point ,- now why does D8 love 650b and hate CTD ?They have both been forced on us by the evil empire because consumers dont know how to tune a fork or ride properly as the case may be...
  • 3 1
 I found this review around 2 weeks ago, how come it only got posted now?
  • 2 0
 Matt Wragg always looks super pinned in his review pictures.
  • 2 0
 Just wait for the SB75C. mmmm delicious.
  • 1 0
 Before we had wheel size options I'm almost certain there wasn't ever this much interaction on any article pinkbike put out.
  • 2 0
 nut up pink bike and just say the BIKE IS SHIT
  • 1 0
 one thing is missing-the hydraulic seat post.. ^^
  • 1 0
 I need to acquire one of these masterpieces
  • 2 0
 Tonka Toy
  • 1 0
 id be content as a one steed man, baby, yeah .. groovy
  • 1 0
 Let´s ask Jared Graves if he can win or not on that bike
  • 1 0
 I'll take the 66sb any day
  • 1 0
 Put some pikes on that b***h!
  • 1 0
 the colour looks mad!
  • 2 2
 127mm? Does that mean that Graves is racing SB66 in 2014?
  • 1 0
 For the beginning yes. A SB66 replacement is currently under testing and he'll probably run it for the end of the season.
  • 3 1
 If he wins the series, it will get interesting.
  • 1 0
 Just because graves is starting the season on a 26er doesn't mean he'll be finishing it on one.
  • 4 1
 I don't care deeeight, I mean I do but only as a funny thing. I thought of people like you, how it will affect your view of the world. Shadenfreude you know. I mean, I know it won't change your world view, you are too old for this. But it will bother you at leadt a bit hehe. So... Trollolooo, hehe, so... writi g this with Jokers smile, let me enjoy the moment... Now, sorry, so! Do you think that Jared will change a bike during the season? But he did not khympffff hehe, sorry... but he fid not change the bike to downhill bike on world champs because he wanted to remain on a bike he feels comfortable on.., will he make such a dramatic change in the middle of the season that seitching from 26 to 275 is? Oh this is just too good to be true...
  • 2 0
 He'll ride the new replacement which will be a SB66c with a 275 front wheel and CTD fork. Then you guys can both be right! Or wrong.
  • 2 1
 twozerosix - deeeight and I are the High Nerd and High Troll of Pinkbike. If you are going to interrupt discussion on such important subject, with something so controversial, I will have to give you Wikipedia editor treatment:

"He'll ride the new replacement which will be a SB66c with a 275 front wheel and CTD fork" - reference required

If this was an occasional joke, I may need to ask you for a disclaimer. We are trying to determine which wheel size is better, so rooting out any rumours, misinformation and pseudo science is in the utmost interest of humanity.
  • 1 0
 From what I'm told, yes, he'll at least start the season on the SB66. I hear rumours of a new bike in the works. The SB75 isn't an ideal race bike, you could race an enduro on one, sure, but it wouldn't be the one you'd want specifically for racing.
  • 1 0
 Well he can start on SB66, have a too long interview with Steve Jones from Dirt and jump straight on SB95 Big Grin
  • 1 1
 127mm?....I thought the 75 had 135mm and the 95 had 127.0
  • 1 1
 Holding out for the SB76
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2020. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.021776
Mobile Version of Website