Yeti's Trainer Makes the Case for Strength Training - Video

Feb 1, 2018
by Enduro MTB Training  
Views: 8,810    Faves: 90    Comments: 3


If you've seen any of my prior Pinkbike videos, you know that ordinarily during this time of year, I've promoted mobility, stability and posture, but this year I’d like to tell you another story in the video. So check it out and listen to my confession as a coach and a "seasoned" enduro racing athlete, and to learn this four-exercise strength training superset you can use right now to create a “base” of strength for the 2018 riding/racing season.



Strength.

What picture comes to mind?

A competitor in the World’s Strongest Man competition? A body builder? Perhaps a concrete worker or logger? (Shoot, I think of the Carpenter Ant which is capable of lifting 50x's it's body weight which is the equivalent of a human lifting a car with it's teeth!) Although each of these uniquely strong people display and execute their strength differently, each built it the same way- with repetitive heavy load over time.

Unfortunately, besides track sprinters, can you think of any other cyclists who portray strength? I mean besides "the beast," Richie Rude (who can deadlift 450lbs!), I can't think of many other examples. But why? Why does out sport neglect one of the most important markers to performance? [Ed. note: obviously Mike Levy is the pinnacle of human strength.]

Yes, It is imperative that we ride to prepare for a season, but we obviously ride mostly because we love ride!

But, like the email I answered the other day to the question, "What is the biggest mistake riders/racers make?" My answer? They simply don't spend enough time into improving how their body moves which unfortunately shows up in many forms of riding and movement dysfunction like:

• Muscle Inflexibility and/or joint immobility
• Poor posture and breathing mechanics
• Balance and coordination that doesn't improve
• Difficulty in recovering during rides or after rides
• Difficulty in not getting over uphill obstacles
• Fatigue during downhill sections


So am I saying all of these dysfunctional movement related issues can improve with regular strength training? You bet your lifesavers I am!

In fact let me tell you a quick story. From 1999-2006 I was blessed enough to work with some of the best athletes in the world like Missy "The Missle" Giove, professional super cross and MX racers, pro and Olympic snowboarders, and pro golfers on the PGA Tour. During this time period gym training was frowned upon by the masses and even most of the pro athletes in each of these sports. Unbeknownst to us at the time, a handful of other coaches and I found ourselves immersed in shaping an important transition period within these sports that began to radically change the athletes and sports forever.

Why?

Quite simply, it was due to the fact that we coaches challenged the status quo and began "selling" the importance of training to these athletes. Now remember, I'm talking about professional athletes who already had tons of talent, yet were completely unaware of how much more talent they had to tap into! After a few months of training, they quickly came to realize how adding strength and performance training was not only going to radically change their ability to compete, but to succeed and to do both for a long, profitable career!

The cool part was watching how quickly this shift impacted each of these sports as the athletes who chose to hire coaches were now rising to the top. In fact, If you know anything about DH, MX, snowboarding and golf, you know that between 2000-2006 these sports began to go through a "performance revolution" where speeds increased, creativity and trick abilities blew up, tracks and half pipes got bigger and a new definition of "going big" was created! Simultaneously during these six years the public who were participating in these sports began to follow the lead of these pro athletes. They started to see and feel the value of regular training for their sport, and because of that helped to contribute to the overall growth of each sport and industry's that surrounded them! It really helped to shape the future for how massive each sport was to become!

Alright, so how does this apply to our mountain biking strength story you wonder?

Simple. Up till about 2012 or so, we knew that a handful of downhillers and some XC racers were "secretly" and seriously using gym training to up their game. Since EWS has come on the scene in the past few years, I think we're seeing a surge in the elite mountain biking athletes seeking the benefits of a regular gym training program to boost their performance and you see that with all the regular postings on social media and youtube. So based off my experience I shared in my story, I feel like the influence of the training activities of the mountain biking pro's are beginning to trickle down to the amateur and I'm hearing a lot of chatter about how it's really beginning to help all levels of the amateur rider! Good times for sure!

So on that note, I want to challenge you to add two gym training sessions per week. Try it for eight weeks and see what it does to your riding, not to mention all other aspects of your life... you won't be disappointed, I promise. You can try something like this, just be aware of your fatigue:

Monday - Off
Tuesday - Strength day
Wednesday - Ride, Interval type workout
Thursday - Strength day with spin after
Friday - Off or Skills day
Saturday - Big ride day
Sunday - Big ride day

How to's:

I suggest a good warm up using 12-15 reps, then 2-4 sets with 6-8 repetitions of each exercise. Take 3-4 minutes of rest between each superset. Perform two times per week for three weeks, then the fourth week will be an "active rest" week where you'll do the two workouts but with half the number of sets.

Superset #1:

Deadlift
The Deadlift start is important to having a strong downhilling position

Single Arm Cable Press
Focus on strong posture while keeping hips still so you can move your torso and arms.

Superset #2:

Bend Forward Walking Lunges
Start with light weights or you will get sore! Keep strong posture and reach toward mid-shin. Stand up and repeat in walking lunge fashion.

Single Arm TRX Pulls
Be sure the TRX is attached strongly AND the single handle your grab doesn't slip.

Very important... Please make sure your form is perfect and never sacrifice form for weight! What you put in is what you get out. If you program sloppiness into your movement patterns, it will show up in your riding and all other sports you participate in, so chose to be different than the other knuckleheads in the gym and be one who prides themselves in training in your best manner possible. I promise... better steaz and speed awaits you when you adopt that type of attitude in the gym!

Lastly, don’t be a hero. Lift what you can lift. Earn your weight just like you earn your speed.



I'm Coach Dee, the trainer for the @yeticycles team. I'm a 49-year-old enduro racer who's been top three in overall finishers in the last three years of the @bigmountainenduro series. For your off-season training needs, Pinkbike readers can download my brand new MTB Strong program here and automatically get $25 OFF.

View all of my previous articles and videos here, or visit my website for more info.


120 Comments

  • 93 1
 hecks yeah. more stuff like this pinkbike. maybe some articles on how to brew your own beer as well. gotta keep things balanced.
  • 86 0
 'Pinkbike's Guide to Brewing Fortified Beer, Losing Everything to Crypocurrency, & Making Exquisite Panettone.'
  • 3 0
 YES more videos please @pinkbikeaudience
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: Did you work for Rockstar Games?
  • 2 0
 @brianpark: you missed "all that while aeropressin' ".. keep the energy up man.. hahah
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: 40% down on the cryptocurrency today, don't think I have the time to brew the beer, I need it now!
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: This is what the people WANT and NEED.
  • 1 0
 Up up up!
  • 9 0
 Dee's program rocks. In my 4th week and seeing an improvement everytime I hit the trails. Looking forward to the next couple of months on before the Enduros start to ramp up. Thanks @enduromtbtrainer
  • 1 0
 I concur. I did 75% of it last year over the winter and spring. Without a doubt I was faster and more importantly, had fewer aches and pains during and after riding. Compared to the year before when I had terrible lower back and shoulder issues. I'm not racing at the moment due to unrelated surgery but am a firm believer that strength training = better results. Thanks Dee!
  • 1 0
 @ryan83: I love it Ryan, back at it when you can!
  • 1 0
 Been using one of Dee's programs off and on for two years... Time to get back on it starting tomorrow...
  • 1 0
 @kamsbry: Yes, get back on it!
  • 5 0
 There's definitely a reluctance in mtb to approach training scientifically or appear to take training too seriously. On one hand I love the relaxed almost surfer attitude this sport has - it's not all about power outputs, heart rates and body composition. On the other hand - if you actually want to improve you do have to do this stuff. All the pros and most people that are better than you are doing it behind the scenes.
  • 2 1
 Lots of people train these days (even us older guys in vets) as they realise it's not only best for their riding but for their general wellbeing. I have just added body pump to my training in the last few weeks as racing is not about a single rep its more about time under tension and how you can deal with that.
I still do weights also as they are very beneficial. Bench, lat pulldowns, rows and multi hit dynamic exercises are more important than single static ones.
A lunge is more important than a deadlift IMO as your feet are never in the deadlift position on the bike. Deadlift is great for form and back strength.
Body pump introduces pulses in a lunge position which is exactly what you are doing whilst racing. I will be interested to see if body pump gives real benefits on the bike. The next few weeks will tell me that.

Train hard. Ride hard Smile
  • 1 1
 @betsie: The deadlift is the most important of all of these. Explosive power on the bike comes from the hips. Really all the control is from the hips. It's the best single training tool for building the posterior chain. Not only that, they build really strong forearms. Most movements trained should be compound movements in which the entire body is utilized.

For most mountain bikers, a good kettlebell program with barbell deadlifts added would be the complete package. The time under tension is very important as you mentioned. Kettlebell complexes utilize the entire body with time under tension, just as riding does. Isolation exercise are good for correcting imbalances. Compound movements such as deadlifts, squats, cleans, standing presses, kettlebell swings are crucial for developing usable strength.
  • 1 1
 @dualsuspensiondave: standing press is the only exercise I have done prior to this year. Introducing dead lift (where your feet areally in completely the wrong position) has made me ride stiffer because my muscle memory is no longer correct.
Would rather do kettle bell single arm lifts where the kettle bell is on the floor and at my ankles and I am on a bosu ball with no plastic top (so not a bosu but not a ball) then pick up with the opposite arm and squat with good form forced due to the ball and shoulder press the kettle bell.
Adding reasonable weight deadlift may not work for me. I am going to stick with it for the next month and see if the body pump removes the stiffness that deadlift is introducing to my riding.

My aims are Scottish champs (2x defending champ), British champs (first time close enough to home to race comitted for some time) and world masters. So I have pedegree in my racing an am known as a smooth rider, therefore going stiff all of a sudden after introducing 1 exercise is slightly worrying. Hips are never an issue. I play 4 to 5 hours competitive badminton a week. Lunges are key to badminton. I have noticed some array shots there too since introducing deadlift (muscle memory is key and deadlift may just be too feet, hips and shoulders facing the same way compared to other exercises). Again, giving it a chance to see if this is temporary and complimenting with some better exercises.

Muscle memory will always beat absolute power or body builders and power lifters would be the best riders...
  • 1 0
 @betsie: Right on, do whatever you would like. Stretching and mobility work are going to be key for you. Yoga would do you well. Every race team trainer will tell you the same thing I did above, but you're obviously free to not take their professional advice. My advice comes from studying sports medicine and physical therapy at a D1 school, while training some of the strongest professional athletes. Cheers, good luck with your training.
  • 2 0
 @betsie: I don't think your claims are routed particularly in science - but if deadlifting doesn't work for you or you don't like doing them then don't. Good coaching is not just about knowing science, it's about creating training for people that they can adhere to and stick with. If people don't enjoy certain movements, even if there's a lot of science behind why it's a good idea, it doesn't need to be forced on them. So drop the deadlifting if you don't want to do it. Just FYI I think the "stiffness" you're referring to might be to do with your spinal erectors and lots of your stabilising muscles being fatigued and tight, resulting in you feeling stiff on the bike. This could easily be the case if you're new to deadlifting. Stretching and days off to recover are key. Also, it doesn't matter at all your feet are positioned differently in a deadlift to riding a bike. Practice doesn't have to be super specific for it to be effective and have carryover.
  • 1 0
 Science: American College of Sports Medicine position stand. Progression models in resistance training for healthy adults
certification.acsm.org/files/file/img-327023929-0001%20(1).pdf1
  • 5 1
 This is merely a point of discussion - I was wondering if the matter of performance-enhancing drugs in professional mountain biking has ever been discussed properly? I know the mountain biking scene is supposedly a more relaxed, freer movement than its road racing cousin...but let's face it, it's not.

It's fairly obvious in road racing and track where athletes seem to be on the fringes of what is legal and what is not. Now it's been reported 1 million people in the UK alone are using steroids and other IPEDs.

In today's world where riding is not solely about having fun, what sacrifice are people making to be the best rider they can be?
Are steroids and IPEDs prevalent in MTBing?
  • 2 2
 In the past it's been more about people cheating via different sexs in downhill racing... if you remember Michelle the destroyer. I wouldn't bat an eye at the thought of many pro racers being on something than Marijuana tho...
  • 1 0
 Being a cynical a##hole I wouldn't be surprised if it becomes more prevelant as prize money increases.

Whilst I believe professional athletes are motivated a lot by ego/passion for the sport, what it comes down to is money.

These are professional athletes, sponsorship only brings in so much money and they want to make a living from what they enjoy doing.
  • 1 0
 @OzMike: being cynical myself I don’t see prize money increasing...but in case you weren’t aware of the economics of bike racing - the money for these guys to make a living comes from sponsors. And the big money seems to come from energy drink companies. So more cynicism if you are prone to that.
  • 4 0
 I can say without a doubt with my lazy gym routine 2 days a week over the winter that if you stick to it the strength increase translates to many more smiles on the bike. Whether it be the first to the top of the hill. Or the fastest to the cooler for a beer at the bottom.
  • 7 0
 I find strength allows me a safety margin in my conective tissues, especially in the survival of potential OTB situations. What’s most important is to work on my weaknesses so tailor the session to what ya need.
  • 5 0
 I cant bring myself to wallow around a gym without losing my mind so I swim lanes instead and that has had some amazing results for my skating and overall cardio when being way for a while at work and coming home to play hockey. Doesn't quite feel like I am starting over at square one with no wind or legs after being gone for a month. Looking forward to seeing how it impacts the trail rides when the snow clears. Anything that we can do to keep the muscles working and the blood flowing pays off in the spring.
  • 3 2
 @VPS13: Swimming is hypoxic training you are running on a lack of oxygen. When you transfer that to a full breathe as much oxygen as you can environment your luck shit anything is easier than swimming, because you can breathe freely. ie. Swimming is really hard.
  • 1 0
 @cooki3s: say what?
  • 2 0
 I wonder if beer would be considered a 'performance enhancer' then?
It certainly motivates me.
  • 3 0
 @OzMike: as long as it isnt light beer
  • 5 0
 @OzMike:

A few J's and a few sips of whiskey turns me into Sam hill
  • 6 0
 When are you going to show us these so called Yeti's that you have been supposedly training?
  • 5 0
 Dee’s a great guy that really knows his stuff. I’ve been doing his enduro training program and it’s helped tremendously.
  • 3 0
 Great to hear @nocker! Keep it up!
  • 4 0
 ^This. Incredibly nice guy, generous with his time and knowledge, and damn quick on the bike. Helped me at a few BME/EWS stops.
  • 4 0
 @OriginalDonk: Appreciate the props! Happy to know I was able to help Smile
  • 5 1
 Wow, that is way too much effort. I appreciate how hard some people work to be a helluva lot better rider then me. Please pass the burgers n beer.
  • 2 0
 I love this guy! Hey, enduromtbtrainer, I have no idea where you're located but I'm a CSCS, love what you do and I would be stoked to drop in and chat if I'm ever in your neighborhood! Keep up the good work! Hey kids, get your work in! Listen to this guy!
  • 1 0
 Thanks @dang3rtown! Im in Denver, you?
  • 3 0
 Strength training isn't worth missing rides for, but most days it is much easier to sneak in a gym session than a bike ride. Besides, my pivots and drivetrain appreciate a break from all the mud in the winter.
  • 6 4
 Thursday - Strength day with spin after... this is termed concurrent training and this approach ensures you improvements from strength training are minor to non-existent. Best to separate your resistance training from your aerobic training as much as possible.
  • 7 0
 If you're looking to maximise muscular strength and hypertrophy, then training for endurance at the same time will compromise that goal. You'll still get stronger, and achieve greater muscle mass (assuming your program is designed for that purpose), just not as much stronger/ bigger than if you trained exclusively for those. But adaptions from strength training at a neuro-muscular level, and it's effects on the connective tissues should not be discounted as potential benefits. I don't disagree with your suggestion to separate aerobic and strength training where possible, but concurrent training doesn't diminish your gains down to minor or non-existant, especially if you schedule them appropriately (Eg. endurance training in the morning, strength training in the evening). Most elite athletes will train multiple times per day, with each session having a specific - and frequently completely different physiological- focus. Training concurrently is often, if not always the most practical solution due to the training time required to perform at that level, so no one should discount it if it works best for them and their situation.
  • 4 1
 @Deuce-DeuceAndAHalf: if only us normies had the time for two workouts a day.....
  • 6 0
 I think by "spin" in this he is talking of a very relaxed cruise around just to support blood flow and recovery. That's been proven to boost results.
  • 5 0
 @Nathan6209: You are correct!
  • 2 1
 @toad321: Yeah, this looks like a conditioning program for somebody that doesn't have a job. Can I get the "father of 3 with a 2 hour commute version", please?
  • 2 0
 @bvd453: EEEK! A two hour commute... I feel for you bro! Anyway- I try to create all my programs to be less than 45 mins including mobility work.
  • 1 0
 @enduromtbtrainer: (there and back) on the up-side I have a pretty sweet gym at my office.
  • 4 1
 The irony of a guy named smuggly giving pointers to an accomplished professional trainer...
  • 3 0
 I'm on the snow six hours a day as a snowboard instructor, yet I been working the program for ten weeks now. It's awesome! Can't wait to get back on the bike in the Spring. Thanks Dee!
  • 4 0
 I do his suggested schedule of gym and bike and I feel pretty darn good at 49
  • 3 0
 I'm 59 and it's done wonders with mostly only two gym visits a week (I make sure they're tortures though!) And I'm sticking to the story that it helps survive crashes better also based upon first hand experience.
  • 1 0
 Gnarly. I think the proposed schedule up there would burn me up, and I'm 35! Maybe it's the two kids 3 and under....
  • 1 0
 @Agleck7: I can relate, just turned 40 and my kids are 7 & 10 but when they were much younger was probably when i was in my worst shape. Doesn’t help i wasn’t mtb’ing that much and still riding bmx.
  • 4 0
 @enduromtbtrainer Ok ok Dee, tell us about the #riprow from Lee McCormack. One can always spend money!
  • 3 0
 @WAKIdesigns check out the website, I have five videos on there at the moment and making more!
  • 2 0
 What day in that suggested programme would you put a yoga session? The class I go to is pretty hard work so couldn’t be a ‘rest day’? Curious to know how to incorporate it?
  • 2 0
 Hi there. I'd probably put it on Friday and do it more for the stretching and recovery aspect since you should be doing some sort of specific mobility/stretching work daily anyhow. After training on Thurs could be a good time to hit some of the poses you feel best address your body issues.
  • 1 0
 Been hitting the gym solidly for the last three years (twice/week on season, 3-4/week off season) and I've seen major improvements on the trail and in injury prevention. What do you recommend for lifting targets? I've been targeting 1.5x my body weight in deadlift/squat and body weight in bench (just as metrics, I'm doing alot of other exercises beyond these to improve on the bike). I'm a super tall skinny dude and putting on muscle is hard.

Thanks for the video! I've been thinking about checking your program out after using James Wilson's for a few years (which are also good but I want a change).
  • 1 0
 Nice work on your training. 1.5x is a good start, but if you can maintain perfect form, go for more! Yes, James is the standard, but would also love to have you check out my stuff too Smile
  • 1 0
 @enduromtbtrainer What do you recommend for this snowy season we're going through at the moment? Should I add one or two workouts throughout the week to make up for the lack of the weekend rides? I have a lot of free time so six days in the gym is actually an option for me
  • 1 0
 Yes, sounds like indoor trainer time! Doing 3 days of a structured weight training program mixed with some medium heart rate work, interval work and a mix is good. Doing other forms of 'cardio' is good too. Run, XC ski, alpine ski, snowshoe, etc.
  • 1 0
 @enduromtbtrainer: How long should each training session be? And should I do full-body or split workouts? I'm 17 and quite fit. Also what are some good mtb specific workouts?
  • 2 0
 Kettlebells are my preferred weight training device. Thirty minutes on those and there are not too many muscle groups that are not crying for mercy.
  • 2 0
 Agreed!
  • 1 0
 Me too, I work out in the living room after my kids go to sleep. Its amazing how strong those smaller weights can make you. Lots of reps and lots of burn and pump. I love it. I have a chin up bar and I scored some retired gymnastic rings to mess around on also.
  • 2 1
 Is the video password protected because is a "pay per view" or for suscribers? or just because you forgot to open it? Thanks for all the work and recommendations!
  • 3 1
 Should be good now, thanks for the props!
  • 3 0
 I hope I'm this fit at 49.
  • 16 1
 If you want to be this fit at 49, don't wait until you're 49. Start now.
  • 2 0
 @TheR: you got that right. I hit the gym twice a week now and at age 60 it has helped me a ton. I have a trainer who does an assessment every three months or so and gives me a program at that time. My balance is better, my previously injured and repaired knee doesn’t bather me nearly as much nor does my back. My focus is not racing and beating other riders but an maintenance. We should all be doing this because riding or pretty much any sport is going to overdevelop one set of muscles and we become unbalanced. That’s when injuries can happen.
  • 2 0
 I prefer to take Thursdays and Fridays as off days, so the weekend big ride days are fresh, among other reasons.
  • 2 0
 I'm 100% on board with any plan that has me off Monday and Friday and doing big rides on Saturday and Sunday.
  • 1 0
 Despite dude being awesome and program looks good and doable for majority of the population; His website looks kinda ugly as f** without structured info;
  • 1 0
 thanks for the feedback, I agree and am working on it!
  • 1 0
 @enduromtbtrainer: u welcome, actually structured info and few tweaks at the color scheme will do the trick.

User should be able easily understand purpose, and differentiate free and paid content, especially novice racers or new person at the mtb scene
  • 1 0
 Thanks Dee. I am someone who has had to have lower back surgery because of weak discs, is there any exercises that you could substitute for the deadlift and walking lunges?
  • 1 0
 Uh major important ones, YES! Send me an email and we can talk and do it BEFORE surgery!!!
  • 4 3
 Beer and pizza all day! Why work out when 50t is available? And don't forget the E-bike!
  • 4 2
 just my 2 cents, but I ride a bike because going to the gym is boring!
  • 1 0
 Going to the gym is also fun- but like all things, not for everyone Smile
  • 2 0
 more stuff like this guys. this is valuable content.
  • 1 3
 Where's the section for n00bs/groms about FAPing to reduce arm pump/fatigue? LoL

In all seriousness, good article! I always spend 10 - 15 minutes in the lot at the trail head stretching as much of my corpse as possible. A 10/15Lb dumb bell, resistance bands and an incline/decline bench work wonders and get the job done at home!
  • 2 3
 Dirt roadie.. What a d**"
I was trained as a roadie back in 1987 and we trained 1 day weights and body weights and 1 day turbo for sprints etc. Then our road training. Mtb is just catching up.
  • 1 0
 You can't do a strength days Tuesday and Thursday (i.e. 1 day rest) you'll lose strength and muscle that way.
  • 2 0
 Strength: Chris Kovarik
  • 1 0
 good one!
  • 2 0
 He said repetwat...
  • 1 0
 49 and jacked. Dee is the real deal.
  • 1 0
 Thanks @jbling! I figure I have to represent to be legit Smile
  • 1 0
 Thanks for posting Dee! Always enjoy and learn from them!
  • 1 0
 Your welcome!
  • 1 0
 Nice advice! Thanks!
  • 1 1
 @bighit117:
Some neg reviews though;
The book is unclear and not practical at all.
January 24, 2018
Format: Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Too much useless paragraphs and the plan is unclear.
I did not need this book to convince me that weight lifting is important
  • 2 0
 @d0wnhill-d: Everything has negative reviews. How many people that actually like something write a review.
  • 1 0
 @d0wnhill-d: i'd give that review a negative review...
  • 1 0
 @d0wnhill-d: It doesn't offer any new ideas, just packages established lifting philosophies into something that should appeal to non-lifter endurance athletes. It's solid advice, but definitely is ideally paired with some time spent with a trainer to establish correct movement patterns and form.
  • 1 1
 too much work for someone like me that minces down trails at a snail pace
  • 3 0
 You could move from snail to worm tho if you did a little strength training
  • 1 1
 @m33pm33p: ha ha ha ha - I'd love to join a gym but my current lifestyle choice doesn't allow me to do such a thing sadly. Hopefully I'll get into uni for teacher training in August and I can join the uni gym. Also I'm off the bike at the moment due to a knee problem Frown
  • 2 0
 @poah: check out my youtube channel @enduromtbtraining and look for my "Rebuild/Restore" series, it will help you with your knee!
  • 1 0
 @enduromtbtrainer: check out my youtube channel for me mincing down hills lol www.youtube.com/c/mtbscotland
  • 1 1
 Forgot to say it's patella tendanophathy I have @enduromtbtrainer:
  • 1 0
 Good stuff Dee , Thanks
  • 5 7
 Since when was deadlifting 450lbs impressive?
  • 1 0
 Most people who don't lift a lot think its impressive, but they don't lift a lot youtu.be/T9Y4o_BqC0A?t=31
  • 2 0
 For someone who is essentially an endurance athlete it is a lot... and impressive... not a lot of need to do more for a mountain bike rider
  • 1 0
 Its very impressive to anyone with a back injury.
  • 1 0
 Nice trolling attempt Wink

no reference to weight but given that for anyone weighing less than 200lbs, a 450lbs deadlift is getting towards advanced and elite level lifting

99% of folk with no training would struggle to lift their own bodyweight with good form, and i've also seen lots of gym rats struggle with basic stuff like deadlifts. turns out endless bicep curls aren't much use in the real world!

(210lbs here with a 410lbs 1RM deadlift)
  • 1 0
 Will O'Brian is that you? Not everyone is an arrogant 20 something year old powerlifter like you.
  • 2 0
 While 450lbs is a respectable number for anyone trying to remain at a decent pwr/weight ratio, I do concur that many BMX racers can deadlift in that range and above. One might go further than that and say they exemplify strength in cycling.
  • 1 0
 @DirtnapMcGillicuddy: That would be something interesting to see. Top level cyclists from different disciplines going through a bunch of tests: V02 max, power, strength, flexibility etc and seeing who comes out on top where.

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