Review: YT's All-New Izzo Trail Bike

Apr 17, 2020
by Dan Roberts  



The Katana sword is touted by historians as one of the finest cutting weapons in military history. Used by the Japanese Samurai, it was precise and fast, as opposed to some of the slow and cumbersome broadswords of the same era.

That philosophy of speed and agility took hold at YT recently as they attempted to come up with a bike that would speak to a segment of riders they had previously not spoken to. Better known for catering to the kneepad and goggle crowd, they wanted to offer a bike that would suit the trail riding that most of the YT employees did after work.

But despite the Japanese influence, the German roots of the brand didn’t take long to emerge, and the naming of the bike, the Izzo, is a mix of the two languages.
YT Izzo Details

Intended use: Trail
Rear wheel travel: 130mm
Fork travel: 130mm
Wheel size: 29"
Material: Carbon fiber with aluminium link
Sizes: S, M, L (tested) , XL, XXL
Colours: Titan Silver
Weight: 12.1kg / 26.68lbs (L, w/o pedals)
Price: $5,299 USD, €5,299, £4,599.
More info: YT Industries

The Izzo is a 130mm travel, relatively lightweight trail bike with 29” wheels envisaged for riders looking to embrace the uphill as much as the downhill. Teetering on the lower end of 12kg to 13kg, depending on spec, with my test bike selling for $5,299 USD / €5,299.

In German, “Das ist so“ is a confirming statement meaning “That’s the way it is.“ Often shortened to “Is' so” and pronounced with a bit of Japanese flair, the Izzo had a name fitting to the roots of the brand and the Japanese story and marketing campaign that YT would use to show off their new creation.







Construction and Features

Easiest to spot is the layout change that the Izzo has. Given the concept of appealing to the non-goggle crowd and bringing more enjoyment to the ups and traverses, the drivers behind the Izzo project were different from that of the other bikes in their line. Weight gained more, well, weighting in the criteria, but so too did having good stiffness at that low weight. And while the Izzo has the least travel of any YT bike, suspension performance was also high on the list. Smaller drivers, like better hydration possibilities, also played a role in driving the frame layout change.


2020 YT Izzo
A full carbon fiber composite construction, bar the aluminum link, reduces the frame member overlap, drops weight, and opens up space inside the front triangle.


Shorter link lengths with less overlap help reduce the amount of material between pivot or load points, and opening up the front triangle gives more space for a larger water bottle on all sizes for the thirsty work of being on the gas pedal more often.

The Izzo's front triangle, chainstays, and seat stay are all constructed from carbon fiber, while the compact link is made from two separate forgings of aluminum welded together in the center of its bridge. All Izzo models share the same lightweight frame.


2020 YT Izzo
The compact aluminum link uses hidden hardware from the drive side and houses a small chip to adjust the bike's geometry.
2020 YT Izzo
One neat feature is the main pivot cap that keeps the cable from getting tangled in the chainring.


Inside that tiny link is a small 4mm long flip-chip, allowing you to switch between a low and high mode. There’s a 0.5-degree change in head and seat angle and a 5mm change in bottom bracket height, along with some other changes to the likes of reach and chainstay length.

It uses single-sided hardware that houses the threads directly in the link to allow for narrower packaging around your legs while still being easy to access, and it keeps the drive-side of the bike looking clean. The rest of the hardware remains easy to access and, around the main pivot, it doubles up its duties by guiding the cables from the front triangle to the rear of the bike.

All cable routing is internal, with split bolt-on guides at the head tube and rubber grommets around the rest of the frame where the cables enter and exit.

The shock is now mounted vertically in the frame and puts all those loads down towards the bottom bracket, an area that needed to be strong and stiff anyway. That frees up the tubes of the bike to simply be tubes, requiring less reinforcement and so material.


2020 YT Izzo
Shock forces are now directed into the bottom bracket area, which needs to be stiff and strong anyway, leaving the tubes to just be tubes and drop some weight.
2020 YT Izzo
The 210mm standard eyelet shock is now tucked up against the seat tube and uses a handlebar-mounted remote lockout to switch between open and firm modes.


The boxy bottom bracket area handles those loads but almost looks a little out of place on the bike in such close proximity to the slender and sharp top tube and rear triangle. As the bottom bracket builds up to the lower shock mount, it does create a bit of a collection hot-spot for debris and mud. YT included a drain hole on the side for any water that gets trapped in there. YT also opted for a standard eyelet shock, forgoing the shorter eye-to-eye trunnion option, stating, quite politely, that it didn’t offer any performance advantages, and they could achieve the desired packaging with the standard eyelet shock.

That 210 x 55mm shock is also fitted with a remote lockout. Situated at the handlebar is the RockShox Sprint lockout with a Grip Shift-like twist action and a button for release.

There’s also a PressFit 92mm bottom bracket, and Boost hub and chainring spacing. Out back, there’s 82mm of tire clearance on the seat stays and 79mm on the chainstays. The specced Maxxis Forecasters measure up at 60mm wide on the 30mm (internal) DT rims, giving just over 9mm of tire clearance and allowing space for meatier rubber to be used if that’s your thing.


2020 YT Izzo
The RockShox Sprint lock twists to unlock the shock, and the release button puts it back to firm mode.
2020 YT Izzo
Mounts for a gear strap are on the underside of the top tube, so you can ride with most of your essentials on the bike.


Brakes are post-mount 160 front and rear, although the bike does come specced with a larger 180mm rotor at the back and a 200mm at the front. YT uses its own seat clamp with some additional sealing around the 31.6mm post. Frame protection is found all over, with a dual-density chainstay protector and a single-density version for the seat stay. There’s also clear stick-on frame protection on the lower part of the down tube and around high-wear areas, like out at the end of the chainstays.

On the underside of the top tube is a two-bolt mount for a gear strap, and YT uses their own Fidlock mounted bottle, aptly named the Thirstmaster, with two versions available that offer 600ml and 835ml capacity.

The overall design of the Izzo follows that Katana sword idea, with sharp detailing on the top tube that carries all the way down the seat stay. In my eyes, it is a lovely looking little bike. That continuous design line from the head tube to drop out also drives a low standover.


2020 YT Izzo
I guess the ribbed protector train is the hot ticket, as YT now also covers the whole chainstay with it. There's really good coverage on the seat stay, too.
2020 YT Izzo
The Thirstmaster bottle comes in either 600ml or a whopping 835ml.





Geometry & Sizing

The Izzo is available in five sizes from S to XXL, with all sizes on 29” wheels. The geometry of the Izzo is designed around a 60mm stem and 760mm wide handlebar. There’s a fixed seat angle for all the sizes, but the chainstay length does grow 5mm for the largest XL and XXL sizes. Although, when I got the measuring tape out, on our L size test bike the chainstay length was longer than stated at 436mm.


YT Izzo Geometry
Geometry measured in low chip position when only one number is quoted.


The flip-chip in the link alters the head and seat angles by 0.5° and changes the bottom bracket height by 5mm. But not stated in the geometry table is that chips effect the rest of the geometry, likely to avoid too much confusion. Moving from Low position to High, the top tube and reach grow by 8mm, and the stack reduces by 6mm. The chainstay length also reduces by 2.5mm. Measured bottom bracket height with the Maxxis Forecasters is 331mm, lower than quoted, but does play ball with the 175mm cranks quite well. The rest measures up true to the geometry table.





Suspension Design

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As mentioned, the layout change of the Izzo is the most striking difference comparing to other YT bikes. It’s still a four-bar system with a Horst Link, but now with that compact rocker link actuating the shock from above rather than behind.

Sadly, I don’t own a 3D scanner, so I had to resort to old school measuring to get an idea of suspension characteristics. The Izzo has around 37-percent progression starting at around a 3.1 leverage ratio with a fairly smooth change all through travel. That’s quite a bit of progression for such a short travel bike but fits in with the rest of YT's line of suspension design.

Anti-squat with a 32-tooth chainring for the size-large we rode is hovering around 100-percent in all cassette gears, with the 50-tooth cog having less drop as you go to the end of travel. Even in the 10-tooth cog where the drop is most prominent, the anti-squat level never drops below 60-percent. Anti-rise goes between 45-percent and 60-percent with, again, a smooth change all the way. Pedal kickback doesn’t exceed around 27-degrees in the 32/50 combination.





Bike Setup

The suspension setup is easy when it comes to the Fox 34, with all the pressures and recommended adjuster settings printed on the back of the fork. These are a really good base to go from, with deviating from these only necessary if you live somewhere with really steep descents. For my 78kg self, I set fork pressure to 90 psi with 6-clicks of rebound and 15 of low-speed compression. The pressure is about 13 psi higher than recommended, but that's how I’ve got my own 130mm Fox 34 set up. The forks come with zero volume spacers installed.

Shock setup is also fairly simple, although some pumps might not fit with the shock in the frame, my favorite Syncros shock pump being one of them. I started with 180 psi and 4-clicks of rebound. That gave 25-percent at 13.8mm of sag. The shock comes with a 0.2ml volume spacer already installed.

The L size comes with a 150mm dropper and, for my 87cm inseam length, I had quite a bit of post showing above the clamp.


Dan Roberts // Technical Editor
Age: 33
Location: Champéry, Switzerland
Height: 188cm (6'2”)
Weight: 78kg (165 lbs)
Industry affiliations / sponsors: Garage Bike Project, former engineer at Scott Sports
Instagram: @le_crusher
Test Locations: Switzerland: Champéry, Thun & Fribourg

One point to note is getting the Grip Shift-style lockout in a good position. It’s better to run the lockout protrusion under the brake, allowing the release button on the lockout not to be covered by the dropper lever. It’s also worth noting that the barrel uses a smaller diameter grip, and you should ensure that the two aren’t slammed together, hindering the lockout from spinning back when released. Run them with a small gap to keep the lockout spinning free.

Getting a preferred lower bar height out of the box could be tricky if you’re picky about that. The large Across headset top cap takes the place of any spacers, and the fork steerer is cut to fit exactly that length. If you like to play around with cockpit height, then you’d need a new top cap and some stem spacers.

Champéry is best known for its seriously steep trails, but hiding away up the valley are a bunch of lovely singletracks that are better suited to trail and enduro bikes. Keen to not only ride it on one style of terrain, I also took the Izzo to the trails around the cities of Thun and Fribourg to see how it handled more man-made bermed and jump trails of Thun and the endless network of trails around Fribourg that dodge, dip, dive, duck and do more dodging around trees.


2020 YT Izzo
Getting the dropper, brakes, and remote button all in a place where they play nicely together needs a minute.
2020 YT Izzo
If you're a fan of a low bar setup, then you'll need a new top cap as the Across one is massive.


The little Izzo did initially pose some chin-scratching about its true purpose in life. Its lightweight nature, skinny tires, and lockout point it more at a modern cross-country bike. But then the four-piston brakes, big rotors, and 130mm travel maybe hint at something looking for more downs.

Designed around a 60mm stem and 760mm handlebar, the seated fit of the Izzo can feel a bit stretched out and if you prefer a more upright pedaling position. Something that initially caught me out was the lockout. Up until the Izzo, I had always had bikes that had their shocks rest in the open position. You’d then push a lever on the bars to lock out the shock and another to release and spring the shock back to open.

On the Izzo, it’s the reverse. The shock rests in the locked position, so you need to twist the lockout to open the shock. Pushing the button releases the tension and sent the shock back to locked. I can’t say this is something that I just got used to with time, as to open the shock up you have to take your finger off the brake and do quite a big wrist movement to get your hand back in the right place and ready for the down.

The extra-capacity bottle is lovely for long rides, but my god does it rattle around. It never once fell off, but constantly gave you the feeling it was about to. The recessed Fidlock mount on the down tube allows the bottle to constantly hit the frame, too, and it leaves a mark after enough time. Also, that strong design line flowing along the top tube, mimicking the shape of a Katana sword, is one of the main design features on the Izzo. While looking pretty, it is a sharp edge to have in an area around your legs and knees in particular. During testing, I had nothing but dry trails and so didn’t get to test the bike in all-out sicky slop, but no doubt that sharp edge would struggle to keep its paint after months of winter riding. And with this bike aimed at the no kneepad crowd, their knees might not love it.


Climbing

That slightly stretched out seated position does feel a tad dated compared to a lot of current trail bikes with steeper actual seat tube angles. Moving the seat forward does help, but you should pay attention to the geometry if you’ve got extra-long legs and need to run your seat high. The spec of the Izzo is definitely a lot more focussed on the climbs than anything YT has done before. Comparing to an animal it, definitely climbs like a rat up a drain pipe.

The carbon DT Swiss wheels and light tires mean it accelerates wonderfully and wastes minimal energy, and that ability to climb and cover ground at the rate it does is a bit addictive.


2020 YT Izzo Photographer Ale Di Lullo


The lockout gives a very firm feel to the suspension and is almost only for tarmac or the smoothest sections of the trail. On bumpy climbs, it’s better to keep it open and let the suspension work to keep the tire in contact with the ground. The leverage ratio and anti-squat do a great job of supporting you without the lockout, and it’s only when you ride through bigger compressions or into large steps in the trail that the Izzo tends to use a bit too much of its travel. That lag, especially on steeper, more technical climbs, can suck a bit of your speed away.

For those situations, an in-between mode on the lockout could have been handy to have enough suppleness to absorb impacts while giving just a touch more support.


2020 YT Izzo Rider Sebastian Maag Photographer Daniel Roos


It never needs much body language or effort to get it around steep, tight turns or up and over steps or roots in a climb. YT said they wanted a bike that relished the ups as much as the downs, and it really feels like that's the case with the Izzo. It's a touch more contemporary in its climbing than most of the other modern trail bikes out there, with their focus a little more on the descents. With YT already having the Jeffsy, perhaps it gave them the option to approach the Izzo with a more lightweight, XC flavor.

Its ability to climb, traverse, and cover ground is its shining characteristic. And for those trails where it’s a constant, unrelenting series of ups and arounds, the Izzo's peppy spirit makes you want to push a bit harder on the pedals or head around to do the loop just one more time.



Descending

With the sliding scale of the Izzo leaning towards the modern cross-country side of things, it’s no surprise that for flat-out descending the bike performs a bit better if you turn the speed down a notch. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but if you’re used to flying into descents or technical sections of trails with a death-grip on longer-travel bikes, then you might get a bit of surprise. Some modern trail bikes swing more for the descents and can feel like they have capabilities greater than the travel number suggests. The Izzo feels like a 130mm bike, and never more than that.


2020 YT Izzo Rider Sebastian Maag Photographer Daniel Roos


The fork comes with zero volume spacers installed, which could lead you to just increasing air pressure to get more support deeper in the travel if you need it. Throwing in a few tokens helps out a lot, and it lets you run a softer setup for more grip. The bike works best with that kind of setup rather than being all-out firm. The shock comes with a 0.2ml spacer, and not once did I get a hard bottom-out, likely due to the bucket loads of progression that the suspension system has.

In really chunky technical terrain, it can get thrown around a bit, but bringing the speed down just a touch lets the bike pick its way through much better.

Having ridden Maxxis' Forecaster tires before, I knew the level of grip they offer. And for the trails around Champéry and Thun, I had to swap out the front tire to a Schwalbe Magic Mary Snake Skin. With the gradient being a bit steeper and with the 200mm front rotor, you could easily overpower the front Forecaster and have some sketchy moments. With the Magic Mary measuring in at 62mm, it’s entirely possible to run it in the back, too, if you ever feel the need. Despite that ample clearance, you can still hear the tire buzzing the inside of the chainstays if you really throw it into a big, supportive corner.


2020 YT Izzo Rider Sebastian Maag Photographer Daniel Roos


For the trails around Fribourg, where it’s more undulating than one big up and one big down, the Forecaster is a great tire. And that’s really where the little Izzo started to make sense. Around those steeper home trails, with one big climb to the top and one big descent, the Izzo felt at the limit of its comfort zone. It coped with everything on the downs, but it always felt like it was just surviving rather than letting you really attack and push.

But once it got to those forest trails that zig-zag in loops, it really becomes such a bundle of fun to ride. That ground-covering nature comes through on the downs, and you can play around with the bike, throw it from corner to corner, and pick it up over bumps and obstacles.

It would be a great companion for long tours out in the Alps, just as long as you’re not setting the trail alight on the way down. It’s low weight and ability to get from point A to B quickly are going to help you get to the mountain hut in time for dinner.


Maintenance

The YT is generally easy to work on. To do a complete strip down needs 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8mm hex keys, and T15 and T25 Torx. All the torque values are on the hardware, and the rest of the components are also easy to work on and use. All the pivots on the Izzo have additional sealed spacers that can be a bit fiddly to assemble, so using grease helps them stick in place while you work on the bike. But they do a stellar job of keeping the muck and water out of your bearings.


2020 YT Izzo
The Izzo is pretty easy to live with and doesn't need two degrees and three pairs of hands to work on it.


2020 YT Izzo
Internal cable routing enters at the top of the down tube and is held in place with a bolt-on piece.
2020 YT Izzo
Rubber grommets fill the entry and exit holes on the rest of the frame, and there's additional cable guiding around the main pivot.


The sealed seat clamp is a nice touch, but the slot in the seat tube faces the rear so it can still let a bit of dirt inside the frame. There’s also a lot of clear frame protection in high-wear areas, although the down tube protector covers the bottom bracket drain hole, so the frame can fill up with water after washing. Poking a hole in it to let the drain hole works as advised.






How Does It Compare?

2020 YT Izzo
The YT Izzo Pro Race.
2017 Scott Spark Plus Custom
My own Scott Spark.

As a comparison to the Izzo, I have my personal 2017 Scott Spark Plus fitted with 29" wheels and a 130mm fork that makes a good comparison with the Izzo given its intentions.

Both bikes approach the trail segment with a more modern cross-country flavor rather than coming from the opposing enduro bike end. Both bikes cover ground and climb well, too. But, interestingly, there are three years between them and the seating position between the two feels remarkably similar. I’m really a fan of steeper seat angles and, for me, the comfort they bring when climbing or pushing hard on the pedals for long periods. Perhaps YT could have gone steeper with the Izzo, but at least it can be remedied by running the seat further forwards.

For technical descending, however, my Spark beats the Izzo. Coming from a more downhill background, I was constantly fighting thoughts to swap out the stem and handlebar to up the descending capabilities of the Izzo without sacrificing too much of that addictive ground-covering character it has. This is exactly what I did on my Spark, with grippier tires, a longer fork, a wider handlebar, and a shorter stem. Now, this isn’t inexpensive, but those modifications could be done at a relatively small cost, and the Izzo could become a bit more focussed on the downs without ruining its character everywhere else. Hell, there’s even a standard headset so you could slacken it out if you really like tinkering.

Essentially, the Izzo is more focussed on the ground-covering and comes in a spec that reflects that. But it also offers an excellent platform to adapt it with some more gravity-orientated components to change it up a bit, without pushing it into the territory of the Jeffsy. You could even go the other way and make it even more lightweight focussed.





Technical Report

Fox suspension: Easy to setup, easy to maintain, and great performance all the time. The 34 is a good fit for how YT has specced the bike, and the lockout will make sense to many people. Although, for me, it works the wrong way around.

Maxxis Forecaster tires : When the going gets steep, they aren’t the best, but for razzing around a forest, they’re more grippy and predictable than their scantily knob clad exterior would suggest. If you take them out into the rocky, chunky mountains, you’d need to raise the pressure but, for where they’re intended, I had no flats and minimal burping.

SRAM G2 brakes: On everything but the steepest and most prolonged descents, they work well with a good chunk of power and feel. But as soon as you start to overheat them, they change character to something a bit spongey and with less bite. The brake power is good, but in some really loose, low-traction situations, the big front rotor and Forecaster can get a bit overpowered.

SRAM X01 Eagle drivetrain: With a few of the other bikes I have on test right now running Shimano XT and XTR 12-speed, the SRAM isn’t quite as good when you need to shift under heavy load, but this is real nitpicking.





Pros

+ Great ground-covering machine
+ Feels fun and lively on the right type of trail
+ Frame offers great options for personalisation, if you like to do that
Cons

- Can feel a bit out of its depth on steeper and bigger descents
- Shock lockout not the most intuitive





Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesI was Initially left chin-scratching as to what the Izzo wanted to do, and it took a minute to find its desired terrain. Some mixed messages from the spec lead me to believe it was trying to be a Jack of all trades and a master of none. But after finding the right setting for the bike, where the trails cover small forested hills like spiders’ webs, where you’re always looking to get a few pedals in to keep the speed and fun levels up, the Izzo becomes a riot.

In a market inundated with trail bikes that look to the enduro category for inspiration, it’s refreshing to see a bike that maybe looks more to modern cross-country for ideas about how to do things. Maybe that’s why it left me a touch confused at first, but then the trail category spans a lot of terrain and riding. And with YT already doing gravity-focussed bikes for so long, perhaps they were up for coming at this from a different approach.

For the trails that go up, down, and around with your dropper up and down like a fiddler’s elbow, the Izzo is a hoot. The Izzo is a Jack of most trades and a master of one.
Dan Roberts








436 Comments

  • 193 15
 "I'd rather ride the 3 year old bike in my garage". Probably not what YT was hoping for with this one.
  • 3 2
 Haha
  • 11 3
 that seat tube angle tho. the rest of it was some of the parts spec.
  • 9 4
 Can't find that sentence in the write-up. Or am I missing something?
  • 78 13
 "I'd rather ride the 3 year old bike in my garage, that I'm accustomed to and that I spent thousands of dollars on to enhance it to exactly my liking"

Thats what the review says - thats neither a fair nor an objective comparison. And thus its kinda pointless.
  • 15 2
 The idea was to show the possible upgrade capacity of the Izzo, if that's something you like to do. Many people will be happy with the stock bike, same for the Spark. But a few people like to swap things out and that's what I did with my Spark and what is also possible on the Izzo. Which is a good point in my book.
  • 27 2
 Reviewer is 6'2" and riding a large YT. I wonder if he would have felt more at home on an XL frame?
  • 9 2
 @rossluzz: I am the same height and would definitely go with the XL looking at YT's sizing.
  • 4 0
 @MTB-Colada: "As a comparison to the Izzo, I have my personal 2017 Scott Spark Plus fitted with 29" wheels and a 130mm fork that makes a good comparison with the Izzo given its intentions.

Both bikes approach the trail segment with a more modern cross-country flavor rather than coming from the opposing enduro bike end. Both bikes cover ground and climb well, too. But, interestingly, there are three years between them and the seating position between the two feels remarkably similar. I’m really a fan of steeper seat angles and, for me, the comfort they bring when climbing or pushing hard on the pedals for long periods. Perhaps YT could have gone steeper with the Izzo, but at least it can be remedied by running the seat further forwards."
  • 17 4
 @dan-roberts: so a 77° STA is too slack? When did that happen?
  • 14 0
 @jojotherider1977: 77 effective but 69 actual and no idea at what seat height that was done and the offset.
  • 9 0
 @jojotherider1977: interesting thing is, what the STA at his spark? looks like really slack!?!
  • 4 1
 @TonieMelonie: Very. But the seat is all the way forward and there's a 35mm stem with a mountain of stem spacers.
  • 1 2
 @TonieMelonie: from what I can find, the Spark is 73°. Dunno if that's effect or actual. 76° effective STA on my capra feels pretty good. 77° probably feels good too.
  • 2 0
 @dan-roberts: some jacked up geometry for a XC bike
  • 1 0
 @clink83: that's why it's not shown in profile, or the Spark. But it works for N1NO! Can I get one with a 37mm offset fork and 40mm stem? I'm disappointed.
  • 2 0
 @ceecee: I meant the authors spark with the big fork, short stem and forward seat. The izzo has pretty standard geometry, if you reduced the travel to 100mm or 120mm it would have comparable geometry to an XC bike. I'm super interested in it, it might be my next daily driver when I don't want to hammer on a 100mm bike.
  • 7 16
flag chrisups (Apr 17, 2020 at 22:36) (Below Threshold)
 Hilarious Because I worked in the bike industry, I know the price markup and it’s clear that the company has always, like most overpriced the bikes. It’s a beefy trail bike you can get these specs for cheaper elsewhere , plus I think it’s ugly though it’s probably fun to ride like all bikes. I watched bikes not even a year old go for 90% off just because a store is closing or cosmetic defects. The bike price markup is crazy high, it ruined buying bikes for me to see the truth and actual worth of the product behind the scenes. Seeing awesome bikes be built poorly, crappy setups making the experience for the customer worse. And then seeIng what people are being charged for thinking they’re getting a dope deal,
  • 7 2
 @chrisups: not sure what you´re considering by saying "worked in the bike industry" but based on my experience you are wrong...except you do have some experience with chinese made low price stuff made for walmart or so. but sorry to hear, that you lost it somewhere
  • 5 1
 @TonieMelonie:
Retail price for most mainstream companies bike's in France is in the 1.8x-2x wholesale price range ...
So it give you an idea of margins from raw to wholesale...
I can give you the production cost of a mainstream company alloy or CF full-sus frame exwork in TW if you like to put a real value on what you maybe ride, but it will tear you apart ;-)
Better put some money on a Nicolai if you want to invest in design, conception and materials rather than marketing, multiples commercial intermediaries, transport, custom and importation fees...
  • 4 0
 @gnralized: Businesses have to get profits to pay for their expenses. I don't think this comes as a surprise to anyone, and 40-50 % is a quite typical markup for sporting goods.

High-end bikeshops don't sell a huge amount of bikes per month but they still need to pay salaries and rent, so the markup per bike has to be quite big. This is the main reason why you get better components per € from companies like YT and Canyon. I just got a Canyon road bike for 1200 € and a comparable model from a bike shop would be around 1700-1800 €.
  • 4 1
 @dan-roberts: Just look at actual the STA of the Spark on Scott's website. It's clearly several degrees slacker than than the Izzo, which is why I'm very confused about you saying YT could have gone steeper yet, yet you end up saying the seated position on the 2 bikes is similar.
  • 3 13
flag chrisups (Apr 18, 2020 at 5:40) (Below Threshold)
 @TonieMelonie: dude markup is at least 150-200% I’m not wrong it is what it is, an ugly bike that’s overpriced, never bought a bike from Walmart, I like how quickly you pull out the Walmart alloy comment as if every bike is isn’t raw material underneath all the branding brainwashing got to you dude.(everyone’s response when they were overcharged for their bike) Lmao and my bike msrp was 5k, my other 1.5k paid less than 3k for both and they were brand new.
  • 5 4
 I'm 6'2" and prefer a large Capra to XL. Reaches have gotten too long.
  • 2 5
 @lelandjt: not what ur mum said the other night
  • 1 0
 @jojotherider1977: ya the 77 on my sb130 feels perfect.. Not sure how this one could feel that much different
  • 2 0
 @gnralized: I‘m interested in that price! So is it invested in own toolings or open mold stuff? incl own machine tests or proofed by the factory?
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: I want this bike
  • 1 0
 @bohns1: Yeti doesn't have a bent seat tube. ESTA/TT masks bent seat tubes when it's taken at stack.
  • 4 1
 The STA on the Spark is around 74 but he wishes the 77 degree Izzo was steeper like his Spark. Hmmmm..... Splain that please.
  • 1 0
 ????????????
  • 114 5
 Wasn't that stoked. Then I read this:

"But after finding the right setting for the bike, where the trails cover small forested hills like spiders’ webs, where you’re always looking to get a few pedals in to keep the speed and fun levels up, the Izzo becomes a riot."

and

"For the trails that go up, down, and around with your dropper up and down like a fiddler’s elbow, the Izzo is a hoot."

And realized this is a perfect description of most of the riding in Arkansas (and a ton of other places).
  • 128 3
 I have a request for the pinkbike staff, in general, specially the ones who test bikes. Could you please, during the reviews, include more footage of the riding itself? We see pictures and a few slowmo videos (like the ones on the field tests, for example), but there is no real riding being shown. I mean, a few weeks ago, another mtb website (it was Vital) posted a Norco Sight being ridden as if there were no tomorrow, and it was awesome. It gives so much more credibility about what a bike can do.

I am pretty sure the staff is also quite capable. I mean: Mike Levy rode with Gee Atherton and was hauling ass. Kazimer wouldn't have stayed far behind. You broke two frames during last field tests and I don't think it happened while doing a wheelie in a parking lot. But I really would like to see how it happened and how you guys are treating the bikes being tested.

Sincerely yours,
  • 12 0
 This sounds EXACTLY like the Back 40/Little Sugar trails. You really don't need any more bike than this for those loops.
  • 22 3
 @aug7hallak: Filming and testing are basically mutually exclusive: Testing means getting as many runs as possible in, trying to ride in lots of different terrain and thinking about what the bike can do. Filming means pushing up a short section of trail over and over getting the shot and thinking not about the bike but about the camera if you want the footage to be good.

They could do POV runs of the type of thing they are testing on though to give us an idea of how their terrain compares to our own but it wouldn't be a Sick Edit tm.
  • 8 0
 @Patrick9-32: Mr. Patrick, you do have a point. But they could at least film a gnarly section from the bike they chose as the best one or something.
  • 5 0
 @cdygreen: Back40 is a downcountry paradise. A fairly lightweight 120/110 is so much fun out there.
  • 6 0
 @Hogfly I've been in Denver, and thinking seriously about cashing out and heading to NWA. I spent some time in Bentonville not long ago and had a blast on the trails around that immediate area. I am native Atlanta and NWA trails remind me a good bit of North Georgia area trails. Really miss that fast, flowing type of trail. I have 140mm trail bikes and DJ and DH machine. With my work, I can easily fly to Colorado for long weekends riding the DH machine when I need to scratch that itch. How is the DJ scene around there? I am an ex BMX/DH semi-pro so often looking for that type of riding as well.
  • 6 0
 @bman33:

We gave great pump tracks. Currently there isn't really a great jump area. The one they have built is closed constantly due to drainage problems (evidently Velosolutions is about to come in and pave/fix a lot of it, so that's encourage). They've also recently redone a "slopestyle" zone, and it's pretty suitable for dirt jumpers.


That being said: the rumor is that there's going to be a very large indoor complex in the near future (think Rays meets Woodward).
  • 18 28
flag DoubleCrownAddict (Apr 17, 2020 at 7:51) (Below Threshold)
 @cdygreen: Essentially non technical trails where you have to pedal alot. Boring trails and another boring 29" PFBB mid-travel bike. I miss the days when Pinkbike prioritized downhill. They review 15-20 of these mostly generic 29ers for every double crown bike they test.

And what's with the pathetic grip shift lockout? Are we technologically going back in time 10-15 years or have some companies still not figured out how to design efficient peddlers?

Also, I don't see any Japanese influence on this bike, it's Japanese influenced marketing, which is nothing but nothing but fluff. Some vague sharp detailing on the top tube equals Japanese influence? Give me an intellectual integrity break.

Specialized made some p series bikes years ago with national themes where the bike actually represented the country visually.
  • 8 0
 @DoubleCrownAddict: or how about trails that have your razzing between tightly stacked trees like you're on a speeder bike in return of the Jedi? Where there are loads of roots and mini booters, and you need something snappy handling and fast accelerating
  • 1 0
 @cdygreen: there are spots on Little Sugar where a little more bike than this comes in handy if you are taking the alternate lines, something like a Druid, Optic, Following, etc. that are in the same travel sphere but more capable in the descending/big hit department would be perfect for LS.
  • 5 0
 @Hogfly Glad the trail description came across in the words. Sometimes it's hard to describe exactly the right terrain for a bike!
  • 3 0
 @bman33: Railyard in rogers is your DJ spot, couple velosolutions pump tracks here too. They keep adding/expanding flow trails in Slaughter Pen, there's a 4 pack halfway down All American you'd probably have to get towed in for but a fun double double. Couple of my buddies put together an edit from some of the stuff in Slaughter Pen when visiting from FL: www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3RglI_dpi0

Cashed out of South FL and moved to NWA last fall. Zero regrets. And back on topic: this kind of short travel 29er would be the perfect 1 bike solution for NW Arkansas (and probably alot of other places too).
  • 1 0
 @aug7hallak: good point.. Their editing does leave a lot to be desired..
  • 2 0
 That's kansas city. You guys have more sustained DH options, we have to pedal all the time. Do I buy an ebike or drive to NWA. Decisions decisions..
  • 2 0
 @Hogfly: Rumor? Tell me more! we're 3 hours north of Bentonville.
  • 18 0
 @aug7hallak: yes, we're trying to add more video to all reviews. Ultimately the goal is to just do a Field Test every quarter and have video bike reviews for every week of the year, but that's a little ways off still.

And, with moving launch dates and global weirdness at the moment it won't always be possible.

As for breaking bikes during the Field Test, one of them broke on camera during the little huck to flat, and the other one broke on a warm up A-line lap—the one time we didn't have a GoPro on. Ugh.
  • 3 0
 @fruitsd79:

It's definitely going to happen. The only real question is how far along the project is. I've heard everything from "a warehouse has already been purchased" to "they haven't decided where it's going, yet."
  • 7 3
 Abso-freakin-lutely true.

I'm getting kinda sick and tired of all these reviews of downcoutry (oooff) bikes that complain that they don't descend like Enduro or Downhill machines.
  • 1 0
 The things they do just to fit a bottlecage
  • 1 2
 @aug7hallak: I think "It gives so much more credibility about what a bike can do," I think that would be crediting the rider more so than the bike. I not exactly sure what riding scenarios would actually demonstrate strengths and weaknesses of the bike since so much of it is based on the subjective feel the rider experiences, and that is really hard to show in riding footage. Unfortunately, I think the best way to communicate capabilities would be a mix of slow-mo video with dubbed over commentary about the bike's performance from that rider's perspective.

Pinkbike, recommendation, when putting together test videos splice slow-mo riding through unique obstacles and provide commentary on the bike's response through the obstacle...that would be great way to evaluate the bike and provide an enjoyable and valued review to watch.
  • 2 0
 @Patrick9-32: Just a POV follow of the tester riding would provide a lot of context for variety of terrain being tested, speeds, etc.
  • 11 2
 Is the XXLcalled the "Lizzo"?
Heey-ohh!!
  • 4 1
 Looks perfect to put some 650s on, and drop that head angle, and rip some big slalom berms...
  • 2 0
 @Patrick9-32: autonomous drones can follow riders really well these days. If YouTubers can use them in their production videos, then there's no reason PB couldn't incorporate it into their content.
  • 2 0
 @DoubleCrownAddict: I wish so much you could go ride with Nino Schurter and that PB would publish the footage here for us to watch.
  • 2 0
 @scary1: hahahaha!
  • 1 0
 @Hayek: ok, but he might end up hiking some sections.
  • 1 0
 @drpheta: Have you ever used one of those? It would certainly be possible for the team at PB to shoot great videos with one. Testing a bike at the same time would not be possible though. The drone would dictate where and how you can ride.
  • 1 0
 @Patrick9-32: look into the Skydio 2. It's probably the best follow me drone out there, and you dictate where it goes simply by licking its tracking onto you and letting the AI do it's thing.
  • 1 0
 @aug7hallak: wanna se a bike treated how I treat it
  • 57 0
 Review before a first look. Surely a record
  • 15 0
 Yes, but I find this better than the also usual "first look" with half a dozen comments ending with a "will update you on how we like the bike over time" that never leads into anything
  • 5 0
 It would've been cool to have some info/photos/prices on the other build specs rather than just the one. Other sites seem to have done it.
  • 35 1
 So, no Jay-Z reference?
  • 45 31
 For shizzle my nizzle.
  • 34 17
 @fatduke: That is Snoop Dogg.....
  • 13 6
 @Tripmo: haha. At least he tried I guess.
  • 4 0
 This bike is the 8th wonder if the world. The flow of the century.
  • 25 0
 @Tripmo: please look up “Izzo” by Jay Z and listen to the lyrics. You’ll hear that mr fatduke has this one right.
  • 13 0
 @fatduke: used to dribble down in VA.

Don’t know why people are downvoting you for getting lyrics right lol.
  • 11 0
 @diegosk: yeah it's like they only know one artist who's used shizzle and nizzle in a song.

I'm ok with it though.
  • 8 0
 @fatduke: That's the anthem Mr Fatduke, get your damn hands up
  • 4 1
 @diegosk: cuz its pb and people like to be miserable..
  • 2 0
 Other sites had Jay-Z references...
  • 1 0
 @Telebikes: other sites probably don't have the same breed of commentators.
  • 10 0
 H to the IZZO, V to the IZZAY!
  • 3 0
 @rondre3000: For sheezy, my neezy, keep my arms so breezy
  • 1 0
 @diegosk: Snowflakes tend to do that Smile
  • 29 1
 Yes, more bikes with remote lockouts! I’m serious, I just took a DNA test, turns out I'm 100% that b**** when it comes to climbing.
  • 3 0
 You guys should make a Hazard with a remote lockout. I'm sure there's a big market for that!
  • 27 4
 Yay, another one with sensible trail bike geometry, rather than the mini enduro sleds with geometry writing cheques that the travel can't cash! Sounds just the bike for anyone who doesn't live in champerey or Whistler...
  • 8 2
 Yeah pretty glad to see this. I really don’t understand why anyone would want DH geometry and less than 150mm travel. Enduro and DH bikes are great but I don’t want my trail bike to pretend to be something it isn’t and kinda spoil the things a trail bike should be good at when it’s never gonna be any good at the things a DH or Enduro bike are built for. Worst of all worlds?
Maybe we’re finally witnessing the comeback of more agile bikes? If anyone can make that idea cool again it’s YT
  • 17 2
 @ProperPushIrons: Strongly disagree. These "mini-enduro sleds" are the perfect bike for most of the riding in the UK and are the best of all worlds rather than the worst. It means they can cope with steep technical trails without being burdened with 160mm+ of suspension which is uneccessary and saps some of the fun and efficiency away from the bike. It all depends where you ride though.
  • 1 0
 Agreed. Not every bike needs to be a Norco. Some of us want our downcountry bikes to actually be good at downcountry things.
  • 7 4
 You're entitled to your opinion, of course, but I've never understood this logic. Why would you ever want a bike that is less stable on the downs and more stable on the ups? Unless you're Nino, you're not doing over 10mph on the climbs and any "slam" you suffer will be inconsequential. If you're a XC racer, then sure, climbing ability is valuable but for every other MTB rider, unless you ride the climbs and get off and push your bike on the downs, stability whilst descending is faster, safer and, as a consequence, more fun.
  • 4 0
 @swansejack22: it does kind of depends on the downs though. Some are steeper than others. Guessing by your name, you've got plenty of vertical near you. I have to deal with much less step trails where gravity doesn't lend such a helping hand, so an overbuilt bike is a pain away from every tight corner. I have a 160mm sled, and with lockdown, it's hard work on the trails I've got nearby.
  • 10 1
 @swansejack22: I take a little different perspective on the same idea, and always recommend people buy the bike for the part of riding they love the most.

If only 20% of your average ride is techy downhill, but that’s what puts the biggest grin on your face, get a bike that excels at that and suffer a touch more on the way up.

If you really love long explorations with varied terrain, get a shorter travel trail bike and enjoy the whole ride.

If you’re a cardio bunny that loves grabbing KOMs on the climbs, get your Lycra-clad beautifully sculpted thighs on a XC rig and happily wave at the endurbros as they pass you on the way down.

‘Course, it also goes the other way round. When I was on my Nomad I basically lived for fast, steep tech descents. After a year on my Smuggler and training for a stage race, I’ve come to enjoy more of my local mountain, and actually beat all my downhill PR’s from when I had the Nomad through the little-known secret technique known only to the most elite, high-level racers like myself called “occasionally pedaling through the flats”.

TL;DR: Buy the right bike for the kind of riding you love most, even if that might not be the ideal bike for your everyday rides.
  • 3 0
 @mountainsofsussex: I get that for sure, 160mm does sound overkill for where you live, but, for me, I would want 120 -130mm with aggressive geometry. That would still deliver poppy fun on the shallower trails, but provide you with a stable platform when/if things got steep and techy. But I really do appreciate that you know your riding style and typical trail way better than me so I wouldn't dream of telling you you're wrong.
  • 3 0
 @atourgates: 100% agreed. I think the most recent enduro sleds are awesome and I would love to ride double blacks, but my skill level/risk tolerance just isnt there (I live in the PNW so those sort of trails are available). I mostly ride blues and dabble in black diamonds occasionally so a trail bike is perfect for me. This bike looks like it would be a great fit.
  • 1 1
 @atourgates: I cannot disagree with any of this; they are wise words.

However, with regards to the article, I'm left wondering where does the Izzo fit here? I would guess in the shorter travel trail bike category but then, again, I question why you would not want more stable geometry on the descents as that's where the danger lies. What do you gain from marginally better handling on climbs on a non-xc race bike?

In my mind it speaks of MTB conservatism. There's a portion of riders out there who scoff at that which differs from the traditional. Dropper posts, wider bars, shorter stems, disc brakes, even rear suspension back in the day, all were torn down as being needless, over complicated, and gimmicks. I feel like the same is happening with "aggressive" geometry now, and this is a bike that appeases those folk, which is fine, but which also leads me to scratch my head a little in confusion.
  • 3 3
 I love how the writer got on a bike designed for climbing performance...then pushed the saddle forward. Doh
  • 4 1
 @mtmc99: So this interests me, and this is a genuine question (I'm not trolling, I promise): as you are risk averse, which is absolutely your prerogative, would you not prefer a short travel trail bike that has geometry that supports you when the trail becomes faster and more technical, even for short stretches? What do you gain from a steeper head angle that is more inclined to pitch you forward?
  • 5 0
 @swansejack22: fair question. To be honest I dont think of 66 degrees as all that steep. My current bike (a Canyon Spectral) has 66 degree head angle and that has been more than sufficient for my needs. To me there are benefits on tight, rooty, flatish trails. When the front tire is way out in front of me it can be difficult to get enough traction in those situation and I end up washing out.

Maybe I just haven't seen the light on the slacker trail bikes. Ive only demo'd a couple of times on a bike slacker than the Spectral so my experience is a bit limited.
  • 2 2
 @ProperPushIrons: my Nicolai g13 is a 510 reach and 63 ha 130/140.
Its so much fun because i dont have to go half speed on the downhills, its so stable and safe despite the low travel
  • 4 0
 @clink83: They get these downhill guys to review an xc bike, so what do you expect? He doesn't write like a rider who enjoys putting the power down. This bike is for those people.
  • 4 0
 @swansejack22: A properly setup XC bike is perfectly capable on most terrain short of an enduro track. Look at what the pro level riders are doing and tell me those bikes can't handle 90% of the mountain biking terrain real people ride.
  • 3 0
 @JohanG: Yea, it really drive me nuts. If they had someone who was fairly fit and into XC/ "spirited riding" review it I think it would be a much more useful review. I have a feeling this is a pretty incredible bike, if set up right. It looks like a stage racers dream to me, aside from Fox's backwards lockout.
  • 1 1
 @clink83: it's a Fox/Rockshox collabo! No one but you is thinking of making this a 130r/100f. I like it, though I'm too lazy to steer that much.
  • 2 0
 @ceecee: I have no clue what you are talking about.
  • 1 0
 If your trails are fast and/or steep but not super rough then short travel and long, slack geo make sense.

It is good to see new options for riders who don't ride super steep or super rough.
  • 3 0
 @swansejack22: you're asking the 100% subjective question of 'why do you like strawberry over banana, when banana is clearly better?'

And is not better, dude, is just a different flavor, a matter of you and your taste buds
  • 1 0
 @clink83: Rockshox supplies the remote for the Fox shock--anything can happen now. Further up, you mention reducing travel to 120 or 100mm. Now we're in the same no clue boat. Peace out
  • 1 0
 @ceecee: I said if you reduced the travel to 100mm or 120mm like most bike in itts class the bike would have pretty standard geometry...aka the bike has pretty standard short travel geometry.
  • 20 1
 This is not a knock on this particular bike (which looks pretty great), but the MTB industry is definitely starting to remind me of the auto industry, where each iteration of the model is 10% longer, 10% more travel and in a couple years it's basically moved up a car class. When you Civic is the size of the Accord from 5 years ago, I guess you need to now introduce a Fit to actually have a compact car in the lineup. Same principle with the Jeffsy and Izzo it seems.
  • 17 0
 26" wheels, 67* head angle. Super playful and fun, but still fairly capable on technical stuff. Coming in 2023. You heard it here first.
  • 2 0
 @rickybobby18: The Specialized Pitch will be reborn in 2023
  • 2 0
 @madocreg2: what a great bike!!
  • 20 3
 So it’s a Gen1 Jeffsy with a 130mm fork and rear lockout, expect heavier and better water bottle holder. Having had the gen1 Jeffsy not necessarily a bad thing. That bike was a ton of fun! But surprised the weight on this thing. Both the Scott spark and ibis Ripley come in way lighter and just as capable, if not more with wider bars and shorter stems.
  • 69 0
 Hadn’t decided what I was gonna complain about today, but that all works.
  • 7 0
 Looking at the spec, I'm amazed how heavy this came out to be. My brain is expecting no more than 26lb without pedals. I have a Pivot Mach 6 with 1000g tires and it's mid 29s with pedals. I'm totally baffled.
  • 5 0
 @JohanG: To be fair, Trek, Pivot, Scott and Ibis have all dialed in the weights of their bike without becoming warranty nightmares, but you pay a good premium for those reduced weights. I think YT probably overbuilds their bikes because warranty is a bit more tricky without dealers.

The Pivot Trail 429 is comparable in weight and intention, but cost a few grand more for similar builds. There aren't too many sub 27lbs aggressive short travel bikes anymore. Ripley, Spark Trail, Top Fuel might be it.
  • 1 1
 @PHeller: The new Kona Hei Hei seems like a contender. Giant Trance 29 maybe?
  • 3 2
 I agree. This is supposed to be YT's quicker short travel lightweight bike and it weighs 29lbs (w/o pedals)? Like the reviewer (Dan Roberts), I did similar changes to my 120mm travel 2015 Scott Spark SL, adding wider, gripper tires, shorter stem, wider 760mm bars, Fox 34 SC fork, & dropper. This XC bike is now a lot more trail capable now and still weighs just over 23lbs "with" pedals. Also my 2019 Giant Trance Advanced Pro weighs just over 26lbs and it came with Minions, wider 800mm DH bars, piggyback shock and a much more complex rear suspension.

The new YT Izzo Trail bike looks good, but when I saw the weight at 29lbs with lighter Forekaster tires, I was quite surprised. I think YT has a good idea to finally jump on the popular short travel bike category, but really missed the mark with such a heavy bike for this category. It also looks like this bike is confused on what it wants to be. It's definitely not a very capable short travel downhiller, especially when the reviewers 2017 Scott Spark has better technical descending capabilities and at 29lbs, it sure isn't going to out climb lighter bikes like the Scott Spark.

Too bad YT, great looking bike, but if you had made it lighter, you might have something here, but there are so many capable bikes available that are not only lighter, but better at going up and down...
  • 1 0
 @roma258: The Trance Advanced 29 might have the lowest cost of entry, but I'm not sure it's the lowest cost per pound. Not sure what the Kona Hei Hei CR might weigh, but its $4500 is a bit more than the similarly weighted Ripley, and more expensive than the likely lighter Trek Top Fuel 9.7 (with tubes removed). I still give the edge to the Top Fuel, because it's a bike that you could rock with a bigger fork for gnarlier terrain, or go full race-whippet setup and get down to under 25lbs. It's got the lightest frame by a good margin, and only the Scott Spark matches it - both are under 5lbs with shock.
  • 2 0
 @RowdyAirTime: it says 26.6lbs.
  • 2 2
 26.68lbs for a 130mm XC-trail bike I think is fair play? My target scale for size L has always been ~

XC Race 120mm 24lbs / XC Trail 130mm 26lbs / Trail 140mm 28lbs / AllMtn 150mm 29lbs / Enduro 160 mm 30lbs
  • 2 0
 @reverend27: As I read the comments above, I kept thinking: doesn't it say 26 and change at the top??? What is all this bitching about weight...26.6 is pretty respectable for a 130 bike. I mean, not if you count the additional weight savings from your lighter wallet by buying the Ibis, Pivot, or Yeti...then you're likely looking at 2-3 extra lbs. here.
  • 8 0
 In typical YT fashion, the cheapest build kit is crazy good value tho.
  • 1 1
 @RowdyAirTime: Or my 2020 Norco Optic XL with Conti Der Baron Projekts (1000 grams each), Mallet E LS, B-Rad mini stuffed full and a Lyrik 150mm coming onto the scales at 32.5 lbs.
  • 2 0
 Im not necessarily baffled by the weight on this thing. For me what’s surprising it that it seems like the Gen 1 Jeffsy models in 2016 were actually lighter and seemed to be relatively better speced for trail riding than this thing.
  • 2 0
 So my brain was correct, after the corrected weight was posted.
  • 4 0
 @smartyiak: Because it said 28.8 when the article was first posted.
  • 2 0
 Okay, so weight was "updated" from 29lbs to 26.5lbs. But still my Gen1 Pro Race Jeffsy was 25lbs flat size large without pedals. Pretty much same spec X01 Eagle, Fox Float, Carbon Wheels, Fox 34. MT7 brakes. So 1.5lbs in frame weight seems a bit absurd to me. ~But haven't ridden the bike, I bet it's great bike and not a bad value.
  • 1 1
 @smartyiak: that's pretty light. Get rid of the dropper and put on light bars,seaport, and stems and you could be at 23 lbs or so depending in2 tires.
  • 2 0
 @marktuttl3: Extra weight seems to be the trend these days. A similar spec'd size large Tallboy weighs in at close to 30 lbs.
  • 3 0
 When the bike suddenly drops 3lbs, then it gets competitive real quick. At 26.5lbs this is probably one the lightest 130mm bikes for the money.
  • 2 1
 @JohanG: Same here, my GG trail pistol, which is not a light frame for the category, with a much burliest build an Minions is less than 2lbs heavier. Swap the Minions for Forecasters and they’re nearly the same despite basically every component on my bike being heavier because I opted for a brick shithouse style build. That Izzo frame must be beefy.

My made in USA biked was also about the same price.
  • 2 0
 @reverend27: Looks like PB changed it, as earlier it showed 28.88lbs (they must have had a typo error). No complaints, as 26.68lbs is ok for this type of bike. Nice when a bike can suddenly lose over 2lbs. Anyways, good job YT, as it looks like you might have another good bike here, especially for value.
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: Yep, I think there must be some mistake My 2019 Jeffsy CF Pro is sub 29 lbs bone stock.
  • 2 0
 @benmoosmann: they mixed up the Comp and the Pro on the website; at least they did not realize their error until yesterday. Buying a Pro at the price of a Comp would be dream though - they will ship the Comp with M1900 and Rhythm anyway. And the price is fair for that.
I always wonder why people pay 5300€ for a bike with marginal better parts when you can get away with 3000€.
  • 15 1
 Fantastic review! Would love to see more reviews with info about ease of maintenance, bearing life, etc. As someone who would like to be able to tear down my bike and put it back together... this is important info.
  • 13 2
 "Despite that ample clearance, you can still hear the tire buzzing the inside of the chainstays if you really throw it into a big, supportive corner."

9mm of clearance, and at 165 lbs you can still flex the back end enough to buzz the tire? Are you sure it's hitting the chainstay and you're not just hearing the tire and ground interacting? Because if it is hitting the chainstay, that's f*cking terrible, and would immediately take this bike off my list, and I'd think off of most people's lists.
  • 10 0
 The two lines up the chain stay back up my writings.
  • 3 0
 Very strange.
  • 1 0
 RED FLAG--though Dan recently exploded a more recent DT hoop.
  • 1 0
 Could also be a wheel/tire flex and not necessarily the chain stay. The forecaster is quite thin and I run mine at 26/28 to prevent squirm (and somehow they grip better at higher pressure as well).

And to each their own but I’ve found DT Swiss wheels to be a bit more on the compliant side of the spectrum vs my 32h i9s with aluminum spokes.
  • 12 2
 "does feel a tad dated compared to a lot of current trail bikes with steeper actual seat tube angles."

The effective seat tube angle is 77 in the low setting. And it's dated? I get that the actual angle isn't 77, but geez. How does YT measure effective st angle? At the top of the seat tube or something?
  • 8 2
 Only quouting two seat angles doesn't really say much about the seat tube offset or at what seat height the engineers took for changing the actual seat angle.
  • 4 4
 Effective STA doesn't take offset from bb into account, nor actual saddle height. Along with ETT, it's the most potentially misleading dimension in mtb geo.
  • 5 1
 @ceecee: I find it utterly baffling that companies are overlooking this information given all the chatter about seat tube angles these days. Maybe the eSTA is so slack that they are worried about publishing the numbers?

Personally, I don't like eSTA's steeper than 74 because most of my rides are on up-down-up-down traversing terrain. I like a more roadie-like power position.
  • 2 0
 I guess here is how YT defines effective STA... (although appears YT's site is being crushed today - may take forever to load)
ytmedia.azureedge.net/image/hvz/2020/detail/GEO_IZZO%2029_CF.png

Seems like they measure effective ST with a seat height at the top of the head tube. I think most of us run our seats quite a bit higher than that, so maybe this is why it feels slacker than 77 degrees.
  • 2 0
 It seams that most measure seat tube angle at stack height. My 29" inseam gets a "recheck your measurements" from the Canyon website and my seat is still higher than stack height on my medium Norco. So as your inseam grows, the seat tube angle moves from the effective angle towards the actual seat tube angle. They need to give effective seat tube angles for the average inseam or change it up in some way.
  • 1 1
 @bogey: some have improved. Transition now gives actual angle, offset, height at which ESTA is taken, and ESTA. UK reviews usually favor actual angle.

Your remark is confusing because road actual angles are mostly much closer to effective angles. The closer they are, the more we can ignore leg length, femur/tibia length ratio, and foot/cleat placement. Position over pedals should be independent of terrain, provided front center is long enough to accommodate the more forwardly located center of mass. BMX and DH don't count, since hard pedaling is standing only.

Have a look at Fezzari La Sal Peak (78/75 actual). If your eyes don't spontaneously combust, you'll see a roadie pedaling position mated to mtb steering. I'd say more, but people seem to hate this topic. The default suggestion is: demo event.
  • 3 0
 @JayUpNorth: Some manufacturers are now giving effective angles at a certain seat height (ie centre of seat post at distance from centre of BB).
  • 1 0
 You can look at the bike and see it has the right geometry for its travel and intended use...
  • 2 0
 @ceecee: roadie pedaling position? what road bike has a 78 degree seat angle? that’s tt bike territory.
  • 1 0
 @srstudent: TT bike it is then. I figured road bike was already a stretch
  • 3 0
 @ceecee: hip angle doesn’t mimic a TT bike though. That’s the missing piece of the puzzle.

For a strong pedalling position roadies and XC racers have it right with STA’s between 72 & 74 deg. Loads of data on this.
  • 1 2
 @bogey: then keep your HTLT
  • 2 0
 @ceecee: what does this have to do with any of this? It is a great bike!
  • 1 0
 @bogey: right?
  • 1 1
 @bogey: At 73.7*, the HTLT has an STA which yields a powerful pedaling position. I hear there's loads of data about it. The Izzo is for triathletes.
  • 1 0
 @ceecee: I get the feeling that you’re not quite sure how the whole effective seat angle thing works. The eSTA is measured at stack height. With an actual STA of 69 deg it means that the eSTA at full pedalling height will be quite a bit slacker. This is where Pinkbike’s slackish seat angle comment stems from. The angle is not 77 deg unless the saddle is dropped (or you have very short legs).

Sounds like it suits a more traditional XC position very well.
  • 10 0
 It’s easy to fall into the trap of believing that you’re so hard core and your home trails are so rad that you “need” a 160mm 29er to ride them, but in reality bikes like these are probably more fun for the majority of riders and trails. My Stumpjumper ST with it’s too-short-according-to-PB reach and its slack STA and 67-degree HTA is way more fun to ride on the after work loop than Big Squishy.
  • 10 0
 Maintenance tear-down was a great section. I'd love to see that in every review going forward. I'd also love to see sealed spacers in literally every bike. There's no good excuse to not include these in your design.
  • 1 0
 Agreed!
  • 9 1
 "That slightly stretched out seated position does feel a tad dated compared to a lot of current trail bikes with steeper actual seat tube angles."

This is an interesting statement. So, 77 degree seat tube angle is dated and stretched seated position? Is the 2030 Grim Donut's 83 degree STA the new norm? I must have been cryofreezed at some point and regained consciousness back to the future.
  • 7 0
 I don't really understand when reviews for short travel bikes say they are bad on gnarly or steep descents. No one buys a 130mm or shorter bike to bomb down double black tech. Why mention it as a negative? I dunno, I figure the reviewers should focus on what the bike is intended for. This is like me reviewing my gambler and saying it's terrible on the climbs.
  • 4 0
 Lots of people do. Half the reason the original Jeffsy was so popular was because you could pedal it at your local trails and survive your bikepark
  • 1 0
 @bulletbassman: didn't the jeffsy start off at 140mm and designed for all mountain? The type of bike you ride really depends where you live. I live in BC and I haven't seen anyone on less than 150. 170 or 180 is the norm. If I lived in an area that's not so steep or gnarly I'd down size to a 140.
  • 1 0
 @ThunderChunk: plenty people i know are on 130-140 bikes and ripping down black tech. Whether it's the local Cinco/toonie/beer league racing or guys ripping around on chromags.
  • 3 1
 @kingtut87: that's pretty badass but my point was that it's not what the bike is intended for so shouldn't be a negative. If someone is using a 130 bike to shred gnarly steep trails that's their personal preference. I know guys who pedal their DH bikes up Squamish but that doesn't mean climbing should be in a DH review.
  • 2 0
 @ThunderChunk: I think The perceived limitations of the bike is definitely relevant for a reviewer to include.
  • 9 0
 Great review, highly technical with relevant comparisons and references. Old mate knows his shit.
  • 5 0
 This isn't the first time I see complaints about the high Acros top cap on YT bikes. Perhaps reviewers don't know this because what they get is different from what the customer gets, but my YT came with a lower, disk-like, Acros top cap on the tool box.
  • 4 0
 My TUES came with 2 spacer caps - 1 tall like pictured & 1 small in the parts bag. Maybe he didn't see it
  • 3 0
 @endlessblockades: Exactly, just like my 2018 Capra.
  • 5 0
 If be curious to know how the Izzy stacks us against its *very* direct competition, the Canyon Neuron. The target customer will likely be comparing the two as they are both in the same Trail category, have the 29/130 suspension, and are both German DTC oriented.
  • 1 0
 geo wise the izzi is 4 years ahead of neuron
  • 8 1
 I don't know why fox made this push to unlock suspension garbage, but they should be ashamed of it lol.
  • 3 0
 Seems like they are copy SRAM. My RockShox forks' lockouts all work this way - they default to locked so it's 'push' to unlock and 'trigger' to lock. This has always seemed like the wrong way round to me because if you get a cable or spring failure you're stuck with the suspension locked out. It's also easier to accidentally release the trigger and then guess what? Yep, locked out again. Dumb.
  • 1 0
 @mcvittees: do you have the RS hydraulic lockouts?
  • 1 0
 Agree, I have a new Trek Top fuel 9.8 with Rock shock twist grip/Fox fork and shock and it works the opposite (Twist to lock, press to unlock). I've accidentally pushed the button on multiple occasions, and know that if it defaulted to 'lock out' on a rough section it'd be annoying to say the least!
  • 5 1
 A short-travel trail bike with the shreddy attitude YT is known for, but also with actual manners when it comes to speed and efficiency. Whats not to love about this combination?
  • 6 0
 I like that you compared it to the Spark which is a benchmark rather than something obscure like the Mondraker Foxy.
  • 5 0
 Agreed, except that I really don't think its a good idea to compare it to a Spark that has been upgraded with over a thousand bucks worth of parts solely to enhance its downhill capabilities and then criticise that it descends better than the Izzo.
  • 4 0
 @benmoosmann: especially when those parts were chosen specifically for the reviewers wants/needs. If he took $1k and threw it at his criticisms, would the Izzo suddenly be amazeballs...to him?
  • 7 0
 Scott makes a better Scott
  • 3 0
 @dan-roberts At 6'2", why did you go with a size L with *only* a 472 reach number? I get that this is a trail bike, and not an Enduro machine - but that reach with a 760 bar width seems on the shorter side for someone your height.
  • 2 1
 I’m the same height and have a bike with a reach of 455 that has the same effective top tube as my 480mm reach bike. I know that stack and reach are useful for sizing but just like before there is not one number that determines the best size.
  • 5 0
 @KJP1230 From looking at the geometry, rather than the size chart on the YT website, I'm smack bang between L and XL, and while both would be rideable, I chose to go for the L. I needed to shunt the seat forward on the L, so with the same seat angles on all sizes the XL would have felt stretched out while seated with that 60mm stem.

I also wanted to ride the bike as specced from YT rather than swap out a bunch of parts to make an XL fit better.
  • 1 0
 @dan-roberts: Thanks for the response. I am 6'1" and trying to decide on a new bike with either an 487 or 511 reach. I've been leaning toward the 487 as this is right in line with my previous bike. I think your response has helped put my mind at ease on my decision, as the new bike's seat tube is a touch slacker than my previous bike as well.
  • 4 0
 @KJP1230: I am 6 3 and prefer a shorter reach bike my current is 460 and 50mm stem feels great. I know they industry is pushing longer bikes to be better at speed but I find the shorter bikes to change direction quicker in a pinch. Fwiw my ragley has a head angle of 63.25° and seat angle of 64.5° but its a hrdtail(overforked ragley mmmbop). I hope this post just helps you to pick what is comfortable for you and not what they tell you.
  • 1 0
 @DrPete: Out of curiosity, why does one care about "effective seat tube"? If I think about how a bike is going to fit, "reach" is probably an appropriate metric because you will always adjust your seat post and saddle to position your hips identically relative to the bottom bracket. "Effective seat tube" is really determined by stack height and seat tube angle, whereas reach is measured directly from the BB position.

Seriously asking - not trying to argue. More trying to understand if there is some consideration I am missing for geo vetting.
  • 1 1
 @KJP1230: I’m talking about effective top tube, which is also a measure of cockpit length when seated.
  • 2 0
 @KJP1230: because people with long legs need a taller seat height. The higher the seat is from the bottom bracket the slacker the seat angle is. Some people like the seat angle steep so their knees are in a good position. some like the steep seat angle to keep the front tire weighted. I am tall and I like a shorter bike so my front tire has plenty of weight on it. And I have been riding a long time the spread out feeling he comments on I am used to that. But there is no 1 answer for everybody
  • 2 0
 @dthomp325: I'm at exactly the same measures as Dan (188cm, 87cm inseam), and was stretched (during descending, I don't really care about my climbing position) on my size large Scout (475mm reach for 617mm stack, so about 484mm of "normalized" reach -virtual reach at 600mm stack) with 45mm stem. Now I ride it with 35mm stem and feels far better.
  • 1 0
 @Cspringsrider: Bravo! Choose a correct stem length and front wheel is weighted without any extra effort. Steering and pedaling are independent departments connected by seat tube angle and reach. Your fit also works because Ragley's seat tube angles--in the 650b models--are one and the same--74*
  • 1 0
 @ceecee: Steering is decided by stem and handlebar length. The further the turning axis of the handlebar (based on stem length), the "looser" (larger turning radius) and "lighter" (more leverage) the steering will feel at the hand contact points related to the actual turning of the front wheel.

A longer reach + shorter stem will create a tighter, heavier (less leverage) and more responsive steering feel. The downside is that this selection would reduce weight on the front wheel, as the front-center and wheel position grows relative to the reach from the BB.
  • 1 0
 @vweb: Thank you for the reply. I am 186cm, 89cm inseam (long legs!) and my new bike is a 487mm reach. I am going with a 35mm stem, and I will likely trim the bars to 780mm. Based on others' experiences, this sounds like the right approach, rather than going all-out for a 510mm reach.
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230: steering is decided by trail (HTA, fork offset, and wheel size). All else being the same, a shorter stem steers faster/lighter--it's the only way a 20mm stem can work on @SintraFreeride's 62 degree HTA Pole. Here are some published articles:

cyclingtips.com/2015/03/how-does-stem-length-affect-a-bikes-steering-and-handling

www.adventurecycling.org/default/assets/resources/20140601_MechanicalAdvantageTrail_Heine.pdf

www.pinkbike.com/news/exploring-the-relationship-between-handlebar-vs-stem-length.html
  • 2 0
 @KJP1230: Yep, limousines are (really !) great to ride extra-fast in rough, or steep, and not-so-twitchy trails, but... 1 : travel must be in adequation (130mm in the rough with a 1300mm wheelbase is just not better than riding a hardtail in roots). 2 : riding level must be on the point. You easily travel faster on a limo bike of course. But if you have to correct your trajectory it is harder AND the extra speed requires the change to be extra-quick. 3 : a lot less fun on "classical" trails (aka. non-EWS trails), or on twitchy ones (even when bermed all the way), a lot less prone to using all the trail to pull a manual or a bunny-up, etc...

But I talk, I talk but all of this is obvious I hope.
  • 4 2
 I just bought a new bike in this category (cough... downcountry), having written the Jeffsy off as being too long-travel, then this turns up. It looks very much like the Top Fuel which I eventually went for.

However the issue with all these bikes is that the pro model that gets reviewed has a respectable weight... but the lower models weigh as much as a light-ish enduro bike, defeating the point of them really.

E.g. the Orbea Oiz in any alloy version is over 30lbs. The 25lb models are $5k. Bet the 'comp' Izzo is 32lbs at least.
  • 3 1
 27lbs my friend.
  • 1 0
 @Shafferd912: Looks like the specs for the comp were copied over from the pro by mistake, they're the exact same. Specs list Fox elite susp and GX group, but pictures show Rhythm fork and NX group. Likely closer to 29-30lbs.
  • 1 0
 @WY228: oh ok sick! Still 5lbs lighter than my bike.....
  • 2 0
 " But not stated in the geometry table is that chips effect the rest of the geometry, likely to avoid too much confusion. Moving from Low position to High, the top tube and reach grow by 8mm, and the stack reduces by 6mm"

Which reach/stack/top tube measurement is shown in the geometry chart? High or Low?

I heavily factor reach and stack numbers when purchasing bikes and a 6-8 mm change is a big deal.
  • 2 0
 I've updated the geo table caption, thanks for pointing this out. Geometry is in low position for when there's only one number quoted.
  • 1 3
 @dan-roberts: Why not put all the numbers in? 8mm of reach increase and 5mm of less stack is arguably at least as important as 5mm of BB height, and definitely more important than half a degree of seat tube (because the saddle rails can account for that easily)
  • 2 0
 "Getting a preferred lower bar height out of the box could be tricky if you’re picky about that. The large Across headset top cap takes the place of any spacers, and the fork steerer is cut to fit exactly that length. If you like to play around with cockpit height, then you’d need a new top cap and some stem spacers."

My Jeffsy came with a zero-stack headset top cap and a couple of stem spacers in the box. I think all production models come supplied with them.
  • 4 2
 "Some modern trail bikes swing more for the descents and can feel like they have capabilities greater than the travel number suggests. The Izzo feels like a 130mm bike, and never more than that."

What's causing that difference? Izzo has pretty modern geo, and you said it's got a super progressive rear suspension, and those are what is often quoted as making those bigger bikes feel more capable...
  • 5 0
 Very good review, thanks, and well done.
  • 5 0
 I would like to see Lizzo on an Izzo
  • 5 0
 JRA ...
  • 1 0
 After waiting 20 minutes for the page to load the comp and pro look to have the same specs with the comp coming in at $900 more? If the spec on the comp at $3k is legit, that's a pretty solid bike for the price.

M1700 wheels, G2 RS brakes, and Fox perf elite shock & fork.
  • 2 0
 maybe specs are wrong? on pictures its nx group
  • 2 0
 The specs are certainly wrong for the comp
  • 1 0
 Looks like the specs and a few pics for the were mixed up between the pro and comp. Most pics of the comp show a rhythm fork and NX group, and a couple pics for the pro in black show an NX group also but should be GX.
  • 2 0
 The Pro specs are listed under the comp. I was about to pull the trigger on the comp if it came with that spec but noticed the pictures show an NX drivetrain.
  • 1 0
 Fidlock bottles rattle because the locking mechanism is really only attached at one little point and as soon as the glue loosens up it rattles. But it's nothing a little gorilla or electrical tape can't fix. It isn't perfect or pretty, but I love mine. Still the easiest to grab and put back while riding. Never falls off, either.
  • 1 0
 What glue do you mean?
On the bottle or on the piece on the frame?
  • 1 0
 @FloImSchnee: the glue on the bottle. It loosens up then everything rattles.
  • 1 0
 @ksilvey10: Hmm, I don't remember there would be glue anywhere?

You simply screw the holding plate onto the bottle with a coin, and attach the (previously called "Gravity Kit") metal strap with two screws. There is no glue?

Cf. fstatic1.mtb-news.de/v3/24/2475/2475072-wr8d1y4zqlrq-20200506_145756-original.jpg

If I shake my empty bottle, I also hear a little rattle. This comes from the locking mechanism though: fstatic1.mtb-news.de/v3/24/2475/2475071-h4pzjiaw1f8e-20200506_150036-original.jpg
  • 1 0
 I fully agree with the technical report on the brakes, I have the same non ultimate G2 RSC brakes on my Mondraker foxy and on the first couple of rides I've had to adjust the reach on the brakes several times because of the bite point fade, even in the middle of the descent because they just didn't brake and I am not on the heavy side with 75kg fully equipped...
  • 1 0
 I think this is a sram issue in general. I have code R and same thing
  • 1 0
 LOL then the "mini Code" feel wich they promote the G2 brakes with is correct!!!

I'm going to give them another chance till the end of summer, then I´ll see if they stay or not...
  • 1 0
 @Echaniz: This is not normal with Code RSCs, nor did I have it with my old RS's. I would get fade with the Guides, but only in situations when any non-park brake would do so. Worth trouble shooting a bit. Can't be more specific than the general stuff (bleed, check pads, lube pistons), might be able to be more helpful if there are any other details.
  • 1 0
 @TheRamma: RSC and RS have eliminated that feel with the swing lever design. I'll be upgrading my levers
  • 1 0
 @ThunderChunk: yeah but @Echaniz has RSC, which is why he shouldn't have that feeling. Guide R's I rode absolutely had some issues.
  • 1 0
 @TheRamma: oh damn I missed that. Now I'm not sure if I want the RSC levers
  • 1 0
 As @TheRamma said I have the G2 RSC (non Ultimate) they have less than 5 rides so I want to believe they must be trouble free in terms of the general stuff check he advises. My setup has the contact adjustment all the way back so it has minimal lever throw until bite point.

Other thing to notice is that at the bottom of the first trails I didn't move outwards the lever reach in case I've overheated them and the bite point came back as the brake temperature decreased on the uphill wich never did.

This summer I tried a couple of bikes with code R's and guide R's wich worked flawlessly with minimal noticeable fade.
  • 3 0
 Nice name indeed: Izzo = "Ist so" in German = "The way it is" in English almost as good a their downhill steed Tues = "tue es" German = "Do it" in English
  • 1 0
 Nice and super complete review, the only thing is just for me seems strange that the Spark beat the Izzo on the descensd. And for me seems a two completely different bikes, with the Spark coming from XC racing with a mostly linear LR curve and the Izzo as you said with a Kinematics more related to an Enduro bike with this levels of progresivity... also two different suspensions layout... I don't see a Izzo on a XC course even not on a stage race where the Spark make more sense. Could be better to compare with a Tallboy or Yeti SB100 ?
  • 1 0
 I am really interested in this bike... my only worry is that the seattube is to short! Im 189cm tall and sit on 85cm centre-top...

How long is the seatpost?
I really dont want to buy size xxl... im to old school to have such long reach.
Im an old xc-racer becoming more and more trail-biker Smile
  • 5 2
 Looks great. Can we have a version in the fun over fast wheel size too? Be an interesting alternative to the 5010!
  • 1 0
 With the chainstays in the 430s, there's no reason you can't put the fun size wheelset on there and uptravel the fork to 140mm.
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: that’d make for a pretty low bb - or a monstrously long fork - unfortunately...
  • 1 0
 @dominic54: You can also stick a spacer in the lower headset, run 2.6 tires, a 170mm crank, and offset bushings. People say that offset bushings don't like to work upside down but I have some installed and they work fine.
  • 3 1
 This is a good point. 5010 is the only choice now for fun wheels on this travel spectrum.
  • 1 0
 @HopeFbn: Mojo 3
  • 3 0
 @HopeFbn:

Nukeproof Reactor 275 is a hoot.
  • 2 1
 Just checked it out. The COMP is not bad. Full carbon frame, GX (no problems with my GX), 27lbs. Just let me get a 150 fork on there. It would be like a my Jeffsy, just a little better pedaling platform.
  • 2 0
 wrong specs on the comp for sure, check the pictures
  • 1 0
 @pAzk: really? man. I'll check it out
  • 1 0
 @slayersxc17: Yeah the comp has the specs of the Pro model listed. Comp comes with NX, Fox 34 rhythm. The Pro is definitely the sweet spot for the prices.
  • 4 2
 So basically it feels like a 130 bike up and feels like a 130 bike down? Hard pass. Seems like there are much better bikes in this category from 5 years ago.
  • 6 0
 On the upside for bike journalism, this is the first review I've seen in forever that doesn't say *rides like it has more travel* and *climbs better than the travel suggests*
  • 2 0
 @parkourfan: True that. I'm sure the bike's pretty great in all honesty. I just think YT missed the mark a little bit this time around. While that first Gen Jeffsy was such a dope bike even if it was a little more downhill suited. A better rear shock choice/tune is probably the difference between good and great Izzo.
  • 1 1
 "when you ride through bigger compressions or into large steps in the trail that the Izzo tends to use a bit too much of its travel. That lag, especially on steeper, more technical climbs, can suck a bit of your speed away.

It never needs much body language or effort to get it around steep, tight turns or up and over steps or roots in a climb."

And those big steps lifting up the entire weight of rider and bike, if the suspension wasn't utilized as much, doesn't suck away any speed? And it definitely would need more body language if the suspension was firmer and soaking up less of the trail.
  • 3 0
 I'll take one size large on back order please, out of stock is great too whichever is easier.
  • 1 1
 That's one hell of a sexy looking trail bike. It's nice that it comes in at 26.7 lbs but that's not including pedals. My Scott Genius is 26.01lbs pedals included and I've got 150mm travel both front and rear. I'm sure you can drop the weight on the Izzo as well. YT knows how to market and make bad ass looking bikes. Well done YT!
  • 2 0
 Would be interesting to compare this new YT to the new Kona Hei Hei. The Hei Hei is probably a better climber but is the YT really better when it’s time to ride down?
  • 22 23
 "Used by the Japanese Samurai, it was precise and fast, as opposed to the slow and cumbersome broad swords of the same era"

That's one heck of a ignorant sentence right there.
European swords were only slow and cumbersome in crappy movies, not in reality.
Go check some HEMA content please
  • 29 2
 Looks like someone upset the history major
  • 2 0
 @Ajorda: Thanks, how kind of you
  • 3 1
 HEMA? Like the Dutch Ikea?
  • 2 0
 @km79: Google is your friend
  • 2 1
 Take a chill pill. Not everyone is a Master of the Blade like you.
  • 3 2
 @Almazing: So, out of curiosity, I was downvoted because of my tone or because of the factual accuracy of what I said?
Cheers
  • 10 2
 @Arierep: Neither. It's because you're acting like a real Neckbeard Mall Ninja Master of the Blade.
  • 2 1
 @Almazing: I didn't even see the advertisements until after I saw this article. I just saw you were mad
  • 4 0
 @Almazing: Wouldn't a Neckbeard Mall Ninja Master of the Blade be perpetuating the same Japanese vs European/Viking sword myths, instead of debunking them? I think you're right on the chill pill part though.
  • 3 1
 @Arierep: This is a Pinkbike commend section. Facts aren't allowed here
  • 1 1
 @mecabeat: I’ve seen it go both ways. This is a world where European and Japanese Masters of the Blade can exist.
  • 3 0
 So Japanese blades are remarkable because of the circumstances under which they were made. Japan had access to very poor iron ore because of its geography and self-imposed isolation from trade. The Japanese swordsmiths did a great job with what they had, and their handiwork is unarguably beautiful, but compared to Europeans who had trade access to the entire Eurasian supercontinent the Japanese weapons are lacking.
  • 3 0
 @Arierep: Saw that line and the one about “finest cutting weapon”. Seven hells I know this isn’t a sword forum but that’s some of the weebiest shite I’ve heard in a while.

Also checkout the armored combat league stuff if you haven’t already.
  • 2 3
 "Designed around a 60mm stem and 760mm handlebar, the seated fit of the Izzo can feel a bit stretched out and if you prefer a more upright pedaling position."

The 616mm ett seems like a good compromise. For comparison, I have a similar bike with 630mm ett, 20mm setback post, 65mm stem and 760mm bars, and I'm 2" shorter than you. The presence of a dropper should mean that we can go more aggressive on the pedaling position while still being able to get low for the descents.
  • 1 0
 I have a bike with a similar ett, I’m an inch shorter than you and I run a dropper with the seat slammed forward and the bars with all the spacers under them to try to get the seated position to feel right and not hurt my back when I’m out for long days.
  • 1 0
 Effective top tube is only measured horizontally from the head tube back to the angle line of the seat tube, and when your seat’s up it's way above that point. The Izzo isn’t the absolute steepest actual seat angle so when you have your seat high the distance from your hands to your seat gets a lot longer than the ETT would suggest.
  • 1 0
 @dan-roberts: ok well my 630mm ett is center of seat tube at the saddle rail height to center of steerer, my measurement.
  • 2 1
 In the last post I already find the name of the new bike Wink nice guess, It deserve a present ^^ no ? remember me SCOTT Sports few month ago :p
  • 2 0
 The shorter travel bike YT-bros always secretly wanted, but wouldn't get caught riding another brand's.
  • 2 0
 I can't even access their website. You think they'd have learned from the Capra and Jeffsy launches and got more bandwidth.
  • 2 2
 Well hot damn, a YT that can actually fit a bottle. Good geo but 60mm stem and 760mm bars, is it 2012?" The remote lockout thing is a no-go for me, so hopefully they don't have that in all the builds.
  • 1 0
 Hmmm I wonder if this is a sign to come for the next gen Capra. Straight tubes, steeper seat angle, new suspension design, longer reach...
  • 1 2
 Another one with no mud (little bit of clay mixing in it )clearance,c’on YT and a phew others ,that’s ridiculous,Santa Cruz in the old days used to think in the real rider now brands just don’t ,it’s a shame cause paying the same and in the name of performance they forget the most important thing low maintenance,it’s almost incredibly so many new software and knowledge and yet they forget that simple things 0,what a shame ,just another one in the best anti whatever and this and that ,but you have to take care of bikes like never before ,it’s the new world ,I’m regretting not to buy an ORANGE ,but it will my new bike if I bought a new one and don’t tell me that it will not do this and that and that it’s all a piece of crap.
  • 3 0
 Now they just need to turn it into an e-bike called the Lizzo
  • 1 0
 Every bike that ever comes out from now on "Embraces the uphill as much as the downhill"... yes mountain biking is a series of going up and down
  • 1 0
 The pendulum clearly swung too hard toward everyone wanting an enduro bike where “still usable on climbs” was a selling point.
  • 3 4
 "Measured bottom bracket height with the Maxxis Forecasters is 331mm, lower than quoted, but does play ball with the 175mm cranks quite well."

331mm BB height and 175mm cranks is horrendous. I know everyone is like "oh it's just 5mm here, 5mm there", but that would put the pedals at least 5mm lower than my current bike (Stumpy 27 Large 2019) which got blasted for having too low of a BB in low mode. I switched to 170mm cranks, half to get shorter cranks, half to add a bashguard, which this Izzo should definitiely have, and pedal timing is still something to think about. so 10mm lower overall would mean I would have zero pins left in my pedals from bashing them on things.
  • 4 0
 Kinematic and suspension setup also play a big role in where your feet end up dynamically. Not just comparing all the static numbers.
  • 1 1
 My current bike has a 329mm bb height and I use 175 cranks in rocky terrain with no problems.... don't blame the numbers... pedal timing is a skill that can be learnt. Sure, a higher bb will let you get away with more mistakes, but it's all a compromise.
  • 1 0
 @thegoodflow: Sure pedal timing can be learned, but it's nice to not _have to_ ratchet up almost every single climb. Its less about mistakes and more about being able to even get a full crank rotation in more places. Maybe some places have only smooth climbs, but many people have to actually ride up climbs with rocks and roots and such in the way (as opposed to just pedaling up a fire road or groomed climbing trail). Being able to get a full crank in at least some of the time becomes pretty important.
  • 1 0
 @just6979: nice to not have to learn a skill? Quit your bullshit with thinking that your the only one that rides tech natural trails. 29ers smooth out the trail too much, blah blah blah. Dude said it was "horrendous" and I said actually it's not though. If you want a higher bb so you can just pedal straight up the tech, fine. I'll take the low cg and better cornering. It just feels really good. So, going by the logic that you apply to 29er wheels, if you can't handle the increased fun factor of the lower bb, maybe you should just stick to road biking.
  • 2 2
 "In really chunky technical terrain, it can get thrown around a bit, but bringing the speed down just a touch lets the bike pick its way through much better."

Isn't that true for literally every bike ever?
  • 5 0
 Jesus, you've really got a bee in your bonnet about this review!
  • 1 0
 @dan-roberts: Well...you didn't give him a reach around and say this latest TY was the best thing since sliced bread! lol

Back to reality...Thorough and well done on the review. Keep up the good work.
  • 1 0
 Does that twist lock function the same as the 2020 Top Fuel? Resting in the locked position? I expected it to be the opposite, like the writer said.
  • 1 0
 No, the Top Fuel works opposite.
Rests on open position, activate to lock. TF is a push to lock system, YT is a push to unlock.
Probably they went this route because Fox recommends on their products the push to unlock mechanisms, saying that is engineered to reliability.

Edit: FOX recommends PTU remote systems over PTL systems as they are optimized for reliability and reduced lever force.
www.ridefox.com/fox17/help.php?m=bike&id=955
  • 1 0
 @HopeFbn: The review saying the exact opposite: the YT is twist to unlock and push to lock.
  • 3 1
 If it rides half as well as the Banshee Prime they copied it should make them a good profit.
  • 2 0
 A carbon Banshee Prime wouldn't hurt my feelings.
  • 2 0
 Me reading this:

Yes!

Yes!

"...PressFit 92mm bottom bracket"

NOOOOOOOOO!
  • 1 0
 My Rotor BB92 bottom bracket has held up great, but yeah-I’d love to see threaded come back and stay.
  • 1 0
 Threaded can be f'ed up just like PF92. None of my PF bikes have ever had a problem. I also run NTN bearings, far superior to Enduro.
  • 5 1
 looks like a scout
  • 2 0
 A horst link bike never seen one of them before..... No wait seen hundreds who cares.
  • 1 0
 Fix the shock mounting to get rid of the twist grip BS and I'd consider it. If I rode trails that were flat or machined without any chunk that is. This is the way
  • 1 0
 Insightful and detailed review, well done. That tear-down was exceptional. I do wonder how long that blind aluminium rocker thread will last in the hands of the ham-fisted...
  • 1 0
 It seems to be a robust thread with a decent thread length. But having worked in bike shops I’m aware what ham-fisted can achieve!
  • 1 0
 YT 's bike are getting heavier and heavier ???
My Jeffsy pro 27,5 has almost the same weight with more travel and 1500$ less.
  • 2 0
 In about 2 months we will see people upgrading the bike with a 36, coil shock and DH casing tires.
  • 6 3
 It looks like a Scott
  • 1 0
 Looks like a YT Play.
  • 2 0
 @vinay: I wish they'd bring back the play, or something like the Canyon Stitched to the US
  • 3 1
 Looks like it’s got a tumor above the bottom bracket
  • 4 0
 Funny no one else has mentioned it but that shock positioning and all the material around it looks a deep dirt collection point with no way of cleaning it without removing the shock. Major PITA if that's the case.
  • 5 3
 Looks like a s...Scott Spark
  • 1 0
 How on earth does the IZZO look like a Scott spark? The sparks rear link is different even though they both are vertical shocks. The top tube is also different.

There's even a photo of the IZZO next to another photo of the Scott Spark in the article haha
  • 1 0
 With increasing size of the frame, the standover gets lower? Except for the XXL frame, weird.
  • 2 0
 That area on top of the BB will work as a great dirt storage.
  • 4 4
 What I liked about YT is that they had a unique design. And now it looks like every other bike. but I’m sure it rises great
  • 5 2
 Looks like an Atherton
  • 1 0
 Yeah, when I saw the bike I immediately thought "Gee!"
  • 4 2
 So....... still can't touch the Ripley then? Cool.
  • 2 2
 I want to get on a test ride of this, last time I rode a Ripley it seemed much more like a bike that you ride on top of, not really ride in. This one doesn't look the case
  • 2 0
 Geometry numbers are nearly identical to the Ripley and the Izzo is thousands of dollars less expensive for the top spec'd build. As someone that was planning on buying a Ripley in a few months, I'd have a hard time justifying the extra $3000 to get a comparable Ripley build. I just bought an Izzo.
  • 1 1
 @TheStabbyCyclist: Ripley is about $1.2 more for entry level builds. I agree you can get way more for your money with YT, but I doubt the Izzo pedals anything like a Ripley. I’m personally not a fan of climb switches either, but to each his own. It’s a cool looking bike and I dig the colors. As long as it gets you on two wheels that’s all that matters!
  • 3 4
 Why ffs they dont start making bikes with threaded bb!!?? I mean how complicated that can be. Charge your bike 50€ or 50$ more because of that, no problem, but it will be much more desirable.
  • 3 0
 My Tues is press fit where the bb shells thread together. Works great. Stronger bb area, none of the metal insert bonding issues with carbon and easy to work on.
  • 4 1
 So, it's a Trek Fuel?
  • 1 0
 I thought the same!
  • 1 1
 sans the acceptable seat tube angle...
  • 1 0
 @TheBearDen: Today I learned that 77,5° apparently isn't an "acceptable" seat tube angle.
  • 1 1
 @benmoosmann: and tomorrow you can learn that theoretical and actual are not the same! Oooh boy!
  • 2 1
 @TheBearDen: ... all the while you can learn that looking at a single number in isolation without the context of the others is bs anyways, so no point in "comparing" two totally different frames. People like you need to stop obsessing about single specific geo numbers. There is literally no point at all. If it works, it works.
  • 1 1
 @benmoosmann: Must be nice knowing everything
  • 2 2
 There is one problem. Small and Medium sizes will ship in August or even late September. What is the point for launching a bike if you'll ship it with 2021 bikes.
  • 26 1
 Rumor has it there was a big work stoppage in Asia this year for some reason...
  • 1 0
 @DHhack: Yeah but why do L-XXL ship on the 29th April.
  • 1 0
 @vid1998: probably built and shipped first
  • 1 0
 @DHhack: its ok; turns out it was just the flu, bro.
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: you’re barking up the wrong tree
  • 1 3
 Is it just me or is the shock upside down? Why fit the bearing end of the trunnion mount at the end with only a couple of degrees movement where they will seize up, but use (what appears to be) a bushing at the end with more rotation where the bearings would work better? Form over function?
  • 3 0
 Not a trunnion: “ YT also opted for a standard eyelet shock, forgoing the shorter eye-to-eye trunnion option”
  • 2 0
 The shock uses normal eyelets on both ends, not trunnion. That means bushings on both sides.
  • 2 0
 Having the heavier part of the shock mounted to the frame means your suspension doesn’t have to accelerate the air can and internals every time the suspension moves.
  • 1 0
 The sticker is on upside down though.
  • 1 0
 @srstudent: Oops... Not sure how I got that confused!
  • 2 0
 I’m more concerned about the 1ml of lubricant that is nowhere near the damper body seal.
  • 1 2
 I'm more concerned that the DPS keeps getting spec'd on any bike over 100mm travel.
  • 1 1
 As an owner of a YT Jeffsy Al Comp, I am so happy with my bike, it performs well but...in terms of design and colors, it is too simple and not creative...
  • 2 0
 Just in time for those stimulus checks
  • 4 4
 Good geometry.
Retarded twist lockout.
Heavy.

Might as well build a carbon Smuggler with 34 forks and you’re rippin’....!
  • 1 1
 No ISCG mounts either huh....?
  • 3 0
 H to the.....
  • 2 0
 Is it possible to run a normal bottle cage?
  • 1 0
 So does the "Launch model" indicate that there will not be an AXS equipped option in the long run? ????
  • 2 0
 For clarification: The four question marks was an emoji that PB doesn't handle well - not an attempt to be rude (too late to edit).
  • 2 1
 The grip shift lockout is clever. Definitely cleans up the cockpit and makes it less busy.
  • 1 1
 "The bike works best with that kind of setup rather than being all-out firm."

Quite a blanket statement there. Think you forgot "for me" in there.
  • 6 6
 Does it come with the typical YT features of cracked frames, unresponsive customer service, and 3 month waits to get warranty replacements?
  • 2 0
 also out of stock always.
  • 2 0
 Looks like my 1999 Turner O2.
  • 1 0
 The XXL looks perfect for me. I love a good number of the beast(666) top tube! ????
  • 1 3
 I was all excited until I realized it was Horst linkage. The front triangle is rather pretty, but that rear suspension design is quite disappointing. If they did a DW link, VPP, or some other novel arrangement with more anti-squat this would be more appealing. Horst linkages just suck under pedaling in my experience.
  • 2 0
 You can get tons of anti-squat from a Horst link and low anti-squat from DW link or VPP designs - it’s just a question of where the pivot positions project the instant centre.
  • 1 0
 Nice review. Interesting, however, that there are no pictures showing off the silhouette of the bike in the review...
  • 1 0
 I couldn't care less how it rides or looks. I was sold as soon as I saw the sweet "live uncaged" sticker on the chain stay.
  • 1 0
 I want this review to say "will be OK for the occasional XC race." ????‍♂️
  • 1 0
 More expensive than a roughly equivalent Scott Spark. That's... interesting.
  • 2 1
 HTA looks way steeper than 66 degrees
  • 3 1
 Or dare I say turner!?
  • 2 1
 looks awesome - and very expensive too
  • 2 0
 "Frame member overlap" ?
  • 1 0
 Looks like a (mini) Atherton
  • 2 0
 Looks like a Canyon
  • 1 1
 Is that geometry chart definitely correct?
A lot seems a bit weird, eg 69 degree seat angle - ey?
  • 1 0
 well done on the dodgeball reference
  • 2 0
 Looks like a penguin
  • 4 2
 Swing and a miss.
  • 1 0
 Wonder how it compares to my 5 year old Canfield Riot....
  • 3 1
 Rest assured it's worse, plus it's a YT so if you break a derailleur hanger you get to wait three weeks for a new one
  • 2 0
 @nation: Or, I don't know, buy a few extra like a smart boy when you buy the bike?
  • 1 0
 @gbogie: While I firmly agree in this practice and do so for my own bikes, I'm approaching this as a bike shop employee who often has to tell customers their bike will be out of commission for a month while I wait for YT to graciously bless us with the wrong hanger that I conveniently can't get from Wheels Manufacturing. And yes to quiet further speculation, we as a lbs stock YT hangers and never seem to have the right one cause there's like seven different hangers across the Jeffsy, Capra, and Tues plus we end up basically giving them to our customers because awesome YT won't offer wholesale on anything. To be clear, my appraisal of other internet brands is far less scathing as most others, notably Commencal and Canyon, have interest in supporting non-dealers with technical documents, parts, and perhaps most importantly are friendly to talk to when we're trying to resolve an issue. Maybe YT just hates our shop, but I'd wager anyone who's dealt with both YT and Canyon's warranty or service departments would go Canyon any day. Disgruntled bike shop employee rant over.
  • 2 2
 KATANA, the only bike I ever remember having that name was my Suzuki Katana, and more fun than this YT.
  • 2 1
 You know what @YTIndustries , I like it. I like it a lot.
  • 2 0
 YT Lizzo, lol..
  • 2 0
 That's a good value
  • 1 0
 This bike seems more Euro than everything else YTs done
  • 1 0
 I guess it covers ground .
  • 1 0
 How does a rat climb a drainpipe?
  • 1 0
 Excellent review, very thorough. Thanks!
  • 1 0
 Is that now "downcountry", "trail" or "super xc" ??
  • 1 0
 This bike looks like it would be the Shizzo for my kinda riding!
  • 1 0
 So my question is 2020 spark 920 that I have been looking at, it this?
  • 1 0
 That bike’s a real head Turner.
  • 1 0
 Trail and cafe prestige , nothing more .
  • 1 4
 Fugly bike, upside-down shocks are stupid, not a fan of SRAM who whores out their products to every bike manufacturer. All mountain bikes do the same thing squish squish. YT seems to be the talk of the town lately their bikes would be one of the last bikes I would think about buying.
  • 1 0
 So an AM/trail bike that doesn't clime great and doesn't descend great.
  • 1 0
 I'm not sure what happened to the shrug emoji....
  • 1 0
 I just want this to say it will be OK for a few XC races a year too...
  • 1 1
 at least it can fit a water bottle now
  • 1 0
 Ribbed for your pleasure
  • 20 21
 These direct to consumer bike prices are getting right on par with the retail ones now.
  • 24 3
 Huh? The comp is $3k for full carbon, DT M1900, For 34 Rhythm, G2 brakes, NX. You can't find anything at retail for that kind of price with those components.
  • 16 1
 @rickybobby18: I think that comment was a "Wow, $5000 is an expensive bike, I could get a Yeti or Pivot for that" without any real research into spec and actual prices.

@neimbc : Kashima everything, full carbon frame, carbon DT wheels, X01 drivetrain. That's an $8000+ bike for any non-DTC bike.
  • 6 0
 Are you high? This kind of build is $7k for the SC tallboy, $7300 for a SB130, Ripley is around $7k as well.
For this bike and build, this is $1500-2k less than any equivalent non direct to consumer brand.
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: Norco Optic C3?
  • 2 1
 @sewer-rat: the equivalent build on the optic is the C1 which is still $6300 but it has rockshox which is cheaper than fox factory, worse wheels and a couple other things like e13 crankset, so probably tack on another $500 to get it to match. And that's the closest non direct to consumer pricing I can think of.
  • 2 0
 @sewer-rat: sure, for $800 more. That's a 27% price premium.
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: yeah my bad, I was thinking GBP haha - either way I'd still pick the optic for my local trails
  • 2 0
 Not to mention the Optic is a heavier bike too. I feel like the Optic has more short travel enduro bike intentions, and it's spec reflects that (SD DH Ultimate). Even the higher prices C1 ($6300) and AXS ($8900) aren't considerably lighter. If you want a lightweight bike on a budget (haha not!), I think the Ripley NX model at $4200 from your local Ibis dealer on sale is probably as good as gets - 27ish lbs with lots of room for upgrades. Or the Trek Top Fuel 9.7 at $4k.
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: Right? The Comp version is crazy good value
  • 1 0
 No, not at all.

The IZZO Comp is 3000€ - Short travel trail bikes with comparable specs:
SC Tallboy: 4600€
Giant Trance Advanced Pro: 4200€
Specialized Epic EVO: 4100€
Trek Top Fuel: 3900€
Norco Optic: 3400€.

If anything, the IZZO Comp is great value for money compared to similar downcountry bikes.
  • 1 1
 didn't even mention the flip chip...
  • 2 2
 the fail is strong withe the seat tube angle...
  • 1 0
 Dat Izzo Fuel
  • 1 2
 OK, but why it's heavier than 5 year old caribe??

still waiting for promised Saturn 14 review
  • 1 0
 Looks like a genius
  • 1 2
 Looks like the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor with a Japanese katana. Well played YT.
  • 1 1
 Looks like every released bike not Santa Cruz!
  • 1 0
 This is the way
  • 1 0
 Don't looks like an YT!
  • 1 0
 looks like a....
  • 1 0
 dat head angle doe...
  • 3 3
 Looks like a session...
  • 2 3
 Looks like a Fuel EX. I’m sure someone already said this.
  • 6 8
 Meh more carbon fibre crap. Great just what the world needs
  • 1 0
 Get a job.
  • 1 3
 Looks like a maiden
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