YT Jeffsy CF Comp 1 - Review

Jan 16, 2017
by Mike Kazimer  




There was no shortage of hype surrounding the YT Jeffsy, partially due to the extensive (and slightly odd) ad campaign that YT ran in the months prior to its release. When the cloak of secrecy was lifted to reveal a 140mm 29er, there were certainly some surprised riders out there.

After all, this is the same company whose focus has been on maintaining a 'No f*cks given' image, with wild men like Andreu Lacondeguy and Cam Zink representing the brand – a 29er trail bike isn't exactly what comes to mind when you think of those two riders. The thing is, most riders don't have Red Bull Rampage-sized hucks in their backyards, which is why it made a lot of sense for YT to add a more well-rounded bike to their arsenal.



YT Jeffsy CF Comp 1 Details

• Intended use: trail / all-mountain
• Rear wheel travel: 140mm
• Wheel size: 29"
• Carbon fiber frame
• BB92 bottom bracket
• 12x148mm rear spacing / 15x100mm front
• Sizes: S, M, L, XL
• Weight: 28.8lb lb / 13.06 kg (size large)
• MSRP: $4,599 USD
www.yt-industries.com / @YTIndustries
YT's direct-to-consumer sales model is what helped put them on the map in the first place, and the trend of offering a lot of bike for the buck continues with the Jeffsy. The full carbon version is available in three build configurations, with prices ranging from $4,399 to $5,999 USD. There's also an aluminum-framed model available for riders whose budget isn't quite ready for the price of carbon, with prices beginning at $2,699 USD.

The CF Comp 1 reviewed here checks in at $4,599 (it's currently on sale for $3,499 - the 2017 version will be $4,299) and comes equipped with a SRAM X1 1x11 drivetrain, and a 140mm RockShox Pike RCT3 paired with a Monarch RT3. Race Face takes care of the cranks, stem, and handlebar, while SRAM's Guide RSC brakes help keeps the speeds under control.


YT Jeffsy Review
The rear derailleur cable is routed through the carbon frame, with all of the other housing running along the top of the down tube.
YT Jeffsy Review
A flip chip on the seatstays allows for two different geometry settings (the low position is shown).



Frame Details

The Jeffsy looks like what would happen if you took YT's enduro beast, the Capra, and put it on a strict diet of smoothies and soup for a few months. The overall outlines are similar, but the Jeffsy has a more svelte look, and the brace that runs between the seattube and the downtube on the Capra isn't present on the Jeffsy. This allows for just enough room to squeeze in a pint-sized water bottle, an accessory that's available as an add-on from YT.


YT Jeffsy Review
A full-size water bottle won't fit, but YT do offer the Thirstmaster 3000, a small, squat bottle and cage designed specifically for the Jeffsy.
YT Jeffsy Review
It's nice to see a 150mm dropper post in place on the M, L, and XL sizes.


YT resisted the lure of going wild with internal cable routing, and with the exception of the rear derailleur housing, everything runs along the top of the downtube. It might not be quite as aesthetically pleasing as hiding all the housing inside the frame, but it does make installation and maintenance much less of a hassle.

There aren't any ISCG 05 tabs to be seen on the Jeffsy, which means there's no way to run a bashguard, but it is possible to put the front derailleur mounts to good use and run an upper guide in order to eliminate the chance dropping the chain.



YT Jeffsy Review


Suspension Design

YT went with their Virtual 4 Link suspension layout for the bike's 140mm of travel, a design that sees the rearmost pivot located on the chainstay, underneath and in front of the rear axle, and a short link that connects the seatstays to the bike's downtube. Like the Capra and the Tues before it, the Jeffsy has a very progressive suspension curve, with a strong ramp up in the later portion of its travel. This also makes the bike work well with a coil shock for riders looking to try something different.


Geometry



YT Jeffsy geometry

The Jeffsy has two geometry choices, which can be changed by flipping the small chip located where the shock is bolted to the seatstays. In the high position the bike has a 67.6-degree head tube angle, while the low setting kicks that back to 66.5-degrees. I'd classify the 445mm reach for a size large as modern, but YT haven't gone too crazy with the numbers either.

One notable feature is the difference in chainstay lengths between the large and XL bikes (440mm) and the medium and small frames (435mm). According to YT, this was done in order to preserve the balance of the bike and help maintain the same handling traits between sizes. YT aren't the first company to use this idea - Norco comes to mind as a company that has been doing something similar for a number of years - but it's a trend that makes sense, and it's good to see others catching on.





Specifications
Specifications
Price $4599
Travel 140mm
Rear Shock Monarch RT3
Fork RockShox Pike RCT3 46mm offset, 15x100mm
Headset Acros AiX-326
Cassette SRAM XG 1150
Crankarms Race Face Turbine
Bottom Bracket Race Face
Rear Derailleur SRAM X1
Chain SRAM PC1130
Shifter Pods SRAM X1 11-speed
Handlebar Race Face
Stem Race Face Turbine (50mm S/M, 60mm L/XL)
Grips Sensus
Brakes SRAM Guide RSC
Wheelset DT Swiss M1700 Spline
Tires Onza Ibex 2.4"
Seat SDG Circuit
Seatpost RockShox Reverb 150mm

YT Jeffsy Review








Climbing

What differentiates a trail bike from an all-mountain bike? These days, that's a good question, especially considering the increasing number of genre-blurring options hitting the market. For me (and I'd imagine for most riders), a good trail bike needs to shine while climbing and going downhill – after all, if the climbs aren't going to be at least slightly enjoyable, why not lug around something with slacker angles and more travel?

Thankfully, the Jeffsy hits the mark, with a very composed and efficient feel while climbing. It doesn't quite have the small bump sensitivity (and the resulting traction) as Yeti's SB5.5 or Trek's latest Fuel EX, but it's not far off, with a satisfying quickness at every pedal stroke. Checking in at a hair under 29 pounds, the Jeffsy's weight is very reasonable, especially considering that the frame is the only part that's made from carbon fiber – a weight conscious rider could easily upgrade select components to drop that number even further.

There's a little extra motion with the shock fully open, but it's minimal enough that running it open all the time is certainly feasible. I ended up using the fully open position to gain traction on chunkier, more technical sections of trail, and then ran it in the middle compression setting for smoother climbs. The bike's fit is well-suited for long bouts of climbing, thanks in part to the 74.7-degree seat tube angle (in the low setting), which, combined with that moderate reach number, creates a more upright, rather than stretched out, riding position.


YT Jeffsy Review
Donny Allison dropping in aboard the Jeffsy.


Descending

There's no shortage of 29ers sporting 130-140mm of rear travel these days, and for good reason – those numbers seem like the sweet spot for creating a bike that can be pedaled all day while still delivering a good time on the descents. That's certainly the case with the Jeffsy, and while its geometry numbers aren't wildly radical, it has a very neutral feel out on the trail, which allows the rider to be the pilot, rather than a passenger hanging on for dear life.

In steeper terrain the Jeffsy remained easy to handle, a trait that became especially apparent during a trip to Colorado where I ended up riding some seriously strange trails, ones that were extremely loose (think knee-deep kitty litter), and punctuated with tight, slow speed corners. I managed to make it through without dabbing (or cartwheeling through the spindly trees), partially due to dumb luck, and also thanks to the Jeffsy's ability to wriggle its way through awkward terrain without getting hung up. The relatively slack head angle, and the fact that YT chose to spec a fork with 46mm rather than the more common 51mm of offset, help create a bike that strikes an excellent balance of quickness and composure in the steeps.

As composed as it is on technical terrain, compared to the Yeti SB5.5, the Jeffsy doesn't encourage quite the same level of brakes off, bombing down the fall-line. It's like comparing a broadsword to a chef's knife – the Yeti tears the trail apart in one stroke, while the Jeffsy would rather slice and dice, bounding from one feature to the next. Regarding the overall handling, I'd say that Specialized's Stumpjumper 29 is the Jeffsy's closest contemporary, which makes sense considering the geometry and suspension design similarities, although the Jeffsy seemed more resistant to bottoming out from large impacts, and had a slightly poppier feel out on the trail.

YT Jeffsy Review
bigquotesThat playful and peppy nature is due in part to the the Jeffsy's progressive suspension curve, which makes it incredibly well-suited to trails filled with bermed turns, rollers, and jumps.


That playful and peppy nature is due in part to the the Jeffsy's progressive suspension curve, which makes it incredibly well-suited to trails filled with bermed turns, rollers, and jumps. On those types of terrain features the strong ramp up kept the Monarch RT3 in the sweet spot of its rear travel, providing a welcome platform to push into while snapping out of a turn or off the lip of a jump.

What about running a coil-sprung shock? I was curious about that too, so when Push offered the opportunity to try running their ElevenSix I took them up on the offer. Of course, the price of that shock is nearly 1/3 of the Jeffsy's entire asking price, but it did allow me to get a feel for how the bike's personality changed with a coil rather than an air sprung back end. The difference was instantly noticeable, and while I hadn't thought the amount of traction was lacking before, the ElevenSix helped keep the rear wheel glued to the ground in rough terrain, making it easier to feel confident charging into rocky, rubble-filled sections of trail.

The Jeffsy's sprightly nature was slightly diminished, but the strong ramp up, even with a coil spring, meant there was still plenty of pep left for lofting off of jumps and bounding from one side of the trail to the other. The stock Monarch RT3 holds its own out on the trail, as does the 140mm RockShox Pike, but I can see riders looking to morph the Jeffsy into an even more aggressive machine going the coil shock route, and possibly going with a slightly longer travel fork up front. The good news it that the bike works well with a coil shock, and the 200x57mm dimensions means there are a number of suitable options.


YT Jeffsy Review
The 140mm RockShox Pike worked flawlessly...
YT Jeffsy Review
...although issues cropped up with the Reverb post and Guide RSC brakes.


Component Check

• RockShox Reverb Dropper Post: I've lost count of how many RockShox Reverb posts I've spent time on over the last few years, and for the most part they've been entirely trouble free. However, every once in a while one shows up that's not up to snuff, and that was the case with the post on the Jeffsy. After only a couple days of riding it developed roughly 20mm of play, squishing down into its travel whenever I sat on it. RockShox took care of it quickly, and the replacement held up for the remainder of the test period without any further trouble, but it's unfortunate that even after the recent redesign the new version of the Reverb still isn't immune to this issue. On a side note, I also wish that the remote was located on the underside of the handlebar rather than on the top.


• SRAM Guide RSC Brakes: SRAM's Guide brakes are another component that I've had extremely good luck with, but the front brake on the Jeffsy didn't want to play nicely. The lever would occasionally 'stick', refusing to return to its fully extended position without some assistance. This is an issue that would be covered under warranty, and according to SRAM, they've since made changes to the tolerances of the master piston that should make this problem less likely to occur.


YT Jeffsy Review
The DT Swiss M1700 Spline wheels made it through the test period unscathed, but this bike is a prime candidate for wider rims.
YT Jeffsy Review
Onza's Ibex tires aren't the grippiest option for wet weather riding.


• Race Face Turbine Stem / Bar: The Jeffsy comes spec'd with 760mm bars and a 60mm stem on the size large, numbers that will be just fine for some riders, but I'd still like to see wider bars and a shorter stem come as stock equipment; after all, this is a bike that YT claims has “gravity oriented geometry.”


• Onza tires: Onza's Ibex tires are nice and wide, and they offered up plenty of traction in moderately soft conditions, but the side knobs had a tendency to want to squirm around during hard cornering. Part of this could have been due to the pairing of a 2.4” tire with rims that have a 22.5mm internal width – there's not as much support to keep the sidewall from folding over. The tires also had trouble handling slippery roots, with a disconcerting tendency to slide out unexpectedly. For more aggressive riders, and anyone whose frequently rides in wet conditions, I'd recommend swapping these out.




Pinkbike's Take:

bigquotesThe Jeffsy leaves little to be desired out on the trail, and no matter whether your ride takes you on a mild XC loop or a more wild, technical trail, a lively, energetic performance is in store. There were a few component related issues, and riders in wetter climates should be prepared to swap out the tires, but on the whole, the Jeffsy's price vs. performance ratio is a tough one to beat. - Mike Kazimer




Visit the high-res gallery for more images from this review




About the Reviewer
Stats: Age: 34 • Height: 5'11” • Inseam: 33" • Weight: 160lb • Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Twenty years deep into a mountain biking addiction that began as a way to escape the suburban sprawl of Connecticut, Mike Kazimer is most at home deep the woods, carving his way down steep, technical trails. The decade he spent as a bike mechanic helped create a solid technical background to draw from when reviewing products, and his current location in the Pacific Northwest allows for easy access to the wettest, muddiest conditions imaginable.



254 Comments

  • 162 8
 "It doesn't quite have the small bump sensitivity (and the resulting traction) as Yeti's SB5.5 or Trek's latest Fuel EX, but it's not far off, with a satisfying quickness at every pedal stroke." This is the gold that we are looking for. Great review.
  • 55 0
 This review makes a lot of sense. Sure there are other bikes out there that may have some superior qualities due to proprietary tech, or longer refinement or bigger R&D budgets - but if you want an incredibly solid bike for the price, look no further.
  • 19 12
 Ive used the top version of the jeffsy and thats the part of the review I would disagree with.
That version comes with a fox evol/34 though, which are more sensitive than the monarch/pike.

also, sadly, the US version of the jeffsy when not doing promo is significantly more expensive than if you bought it in the EU even after conversion. Basically if you live in NYC you could fly yourself to Frankfurt, buy the bike, and fly back, and pay about the same price overall (including flight)

Oh and finally, while I don't care much for tires (I swap em most of the time..) I found the saddle and grips to be a little sub-par even thus it's always a bit of a personal thing, swapped these too, which adds to the cost.

Got the jeffsy pro for 4750USD ( after converting EU/USD) about 1mo after release day after pre-ordering.
  • 6 1
 Weird statement if you look at the leverage curve for all of those bike....but maybe it's because of the different suspensions fitted in the bikes
  • 20 0
 @bankz: "That version comes with a fox evol/34 though, which are more sensitive than the monarch/pike."

Not least because the SB5.5 that was reviewed ran on Fox Factory 36 and Float X.
  • 63 17
 Gold? Far from it I'd say. Although it draws useful comparisons to other bikes, the reason or bike part that causes the difference is not descibed at all. So you don't know if it is the chassis itself or air spring curve or damping curves. Which is important to know to get a feel for the bike's potential.
In this case it's easy, I think: It is the lack of debon air. The leverage curve would allow it for sure, see the findings with a coil spring. So no idea why YT is sacrificing small bump compliance and mid stroke support on the damper. Avg leverage ratio also isn't too high, so go for debon air/evol/corset, if you like going down the hill.
Also I don't get the comparison to the SB5.5 and Stumpy when it comes to ploughing, gigidi. Why, just why is it worse in that area than the Yeti and more comparable to a bike with a 1° steeper head angle a tad less rear wheel travel? I cannot make sense of that. That needs deeper analysis imo. The potential should be there. For me it all seems to come down to suspension setup. But in the review it sounds like it is the "bike's" fault.
I've said it before and I will say it again: I wanna see more in depth analysis (maybe with changing parts or at least tuning the suspension) to get to the root of unwanted behaviour and unfold the true potential. Theory and practical experiences should thereby be in consensus with each other. Maybe I am asking too much and I am the only one thinking in that direction. But in my mind the review does not offer enough to make a buying decision for example.
  • 8 1
 Sorry, I didn't menton the 11/6 try out. That is definitely a step in the right direction. But there is no comparison to the other bikes with the updated damper. That would be helpful.
  • 21 1
 @ArturoBandini: This is the problem with most bike reviews is that you never full understand if it is the chassis (the expensive bit you don't want to change) or the bolt on bits (shock, fork etc) that can easily changed (albeit for a reasonable sum of coin).

I guess a lot of people just want to buy something that works out of the box without having to change things.
  • 10 2
 @bankz: in that case if anyone from America wants one I'll order it and ship it over for a fee. This time next year I'll be a millionaire!
  • 2 2
 Just means the fork and shock aren't as good.
  • 3 0
 @ArturoBandini: myself riding the same bike as reviewed and having experimented with different shocks on other bikes i would also say it is the combination of all parts of a system. So considering the suspension curve it is likely the monarch that causes the small bump sensitivity la k. But lets sY for a moment that you buy the bike as a whole and want to compare how it performs as a whole or at least if you compare it with other bikes you want to make sure they are set up similarly, not one as an eficient climber and the other as a couch, then something like the shockwhiz would be a great tool to make it more objective. You could take one profile like aggressive or playful in the shockwhiz and set up the bikes following suggestion and see how they oerform as a whole. If you want to make it really scientific you swap in known 'control' parts like a debon air or a double barrel and do the shockwhiz setup and then you can compare how different suspensions behave independent of the shock.
  • 3 0
 @ArturoBandini: What I have read here on the forum, debonair is not suiting well with V4L (linkage design). The midstroke feels less supportive said someone from YT (rephrased). Though it was at Capra thread.
  • 2 0
 @pulDag: They said the same about coil shocks, even though Regnier had one on his Capra during one of the EWS races. I'm afraid it's a case of trial and error..
  • 17 1
 Jeffsy is a very progressive trail bike with a decreasing leverage rate during the travel, as a consequence it would make the bike sightly more sensitive than most linear trail bikes. Given the progressivity you can even run a bit more SAG and therefore more sensitivity, without bottoming-out too much, The debonair sleeve has more mid-stroke support and more sensitivity than standard air cans due to the higher negative volume. So, the linkage works quite well with a standard air can, but it will work better with a debonair/evol sleeve.
You can get more info about the Jeffsy Linkage here:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=J1OrxmEQK4g
  • 12 0
 @mikekazimer @pinkbike to add my point with all those talented photo/video-graphers why don't you produce 5-10min video review to bring additional information that simply cannot be covered in writing - some things are better to be shown than described by words.
  • 4 0
 @ratedgg13: Exactly. This is what I'd been waiting for, and frankly, probably just set me on this bike over the Turquoise Stunner (Sb5.5) and saved me a few bucks too... I'll be buying a new bike after surgery and therapy, and this is what I wanted to see!
  • 13 0
 @ratedgg13: You forgot to mention this is a couple of thousand €, £, $ less than a 5.5 for about 95% of the performance. What is there not to like.
  • 3 0
 are any of YT's bikes going to be updated for 2017(geometry wise) or are they just going to have newer components and diff colors?
  • 1 0
 Yes!
  • 10 14
flag graeme187 (Jan 16, 2017 at 7:40) (Below Threshold)
 @fartymarty: My problem is that if you buy one of these, its going to need longer forks, and a burlier shock as suggested in the article, then you'll need shimano shifters and gears and probably better wheels, which is pretty much the whole bike - I wish they sold this as a frameset....
  • 4 1
 @graeme187: I'm sure that one of their mechanisms to keep the price low is OEM parts. It's probably a case of "buy, ride, change, ride, change..." repeat when funds are available.
  • 2 3
 Sure, even if that statement does not mean anything really. Just a bunch of adjectives that try to quantify a purely subjective impression base on ... what .. memory?

But besides the futility of such comparisons what strikes me is how used we have got to 29 pounds bikes. Don't get me wrong, it is not just YT, with everything getting bigger and heavier most 29 in the 130-140 range are getting close to 30 pounds ... beasts of bikes for a ton of money!
  • 22 0
 Thanks, @swamper, and sorry to hear you were underwhelmed, @ArturoBandini. In our reviews we try to strike a balance between describing how a bike 'feels' and what the charts and graphs say. You can stress all you want about one bike's leverage ratio or head angle over another, but in my mind, riding the same section of trail back to back is a better way to see how things work in the real world.
  • 2 0
 @pigit77: been told by JM at YT it,s mostly cosmetic and groupos for the 2017 version ,
  • 23 1
 @graeme187: Seriously, if you feel the need to up-fork and up-shock the Jeffsy then you bought the wrong bike in the first place. Should be looking at the Enduro sector.
  • 4 0
 @bankz: For me, swapping out the tires, grip and saddle is par for the course. I don't expect anyone to spec what I like to run.
  • 1 0
 double post
  • 2 0
 @dro-cfr: Might well be. It is just a subjective opinion. Sorry if it came over too offensive.
  • 3 1
 @pulDag: Then he is telling lies, because physics say the opposite. A myth that is coming up quite often. It's like saying a coil sprung shock will work worse than a solo air on that design (given the same damping). The only reasons I can think of is 1) too high avg leverage ratios in some cases hence too high pressures, 2) very high leverage ratios in the first half of travel --> uses travel too easily in the first half. But that would then apply even more on coil shocks. And Giant for example uses DB on the Reign and other bikes and the lev ratio at the beginning is like crazy high.
  • 5 0
 @graeme187: spend some time reading the Jeffsy thread and you will get an idea of what guys are doing , it,s like $60 to bump the fork travel to 150mm or 160mm . As for the wheels guys are relacing them with a wider DT rim and reusing the spokes . I think your are looking at this bike from the wrong view . Also in regards to the shock I get the feeling he had the option and time frame to test it on the bike so he did , had this option not arised there may not have been any mention
  • 3 1
 @fartymarty: Well I did say "solid bike for the price". There are cheaper bikes than the Capra but you wouldn't get anywhere near the same level of performance.
  • 5 3
 @mikekazimer: I totally understand where you are coming from and your procedure is valid. The problem lies in the definition of balance and the definition of real world. Sometime I would just like to have a specific theoretical explaination for a specific trait, that stood out for some reason. Just to know, where exactly it is coming from (and maybe how the customer can fix/influence that trait).
Concerning real world: It can be hard to trust any tester, because there are 7 billion real worlds out there. And I have read complete misinterpretations of certain behaviours in the past (not only on PB). That's why the tendency to trust the theory a bit more. But It is getting better and better and don't get me wrong, your reviews are among the better ones for certain. Sometimes I just miss that geekiness of a Steve Jones or Chris Porter for example. But that could be just me. So yeah, sorry if my tone was a bit radical, It try to be more moderate next time...
  • 2 2
 @Obidog: not quite, for several reasons, the jeffsy isn't very slack so a few extra mm on the forks will help, the capra can't fit a water bottle and isn't a 29er...
  • 3 0
 @cheetamike: that makes more sense, I'd not thought about simply replacing the rims... and adjusting the fork travel... food for thought indeed. The problem is there is waaay too much choice out there when looking for a new bike and building one from the frame up seems like the easiest option, wish they'd sell these as frame only...
  • 3 0
 Cam Zink better huck a canyon gap with it or I'm not interested
  • 4 6
 PF92 + proprietary low-volume water bottle. On a trail bike. Good thing it's direct sale so shops don't have to deal with this mess.
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13: indeed you did, sorry missed that.
  • 2 0
 @fartymarty: I think frame, suspension, and wheels are all pretty costly components. Changing anything right out of the box is a tough pill to swallow after spending X amount of moneys on a brand new rig. The value to doing so is most beneficial if you plan on flipping the bike after a single season so it still has unused components on it when you try to sell it... Otherwise i think it's a bit kooky to be looking at $3 - $6k rigs and planning on swapping any of the big money parts of it right out of the box.
  • 2 0
 Has anyone tried running a 150 or 160 fork on the front? Probably but if so how did it ride?
  • 1 0
 @CaptainSnappy: totally agree - almost wish grips, tires and saddles were not even sold with bikes the way pedals are omitted due to personal preferences.
  • 2 0
 @andrextr: How would a Monarch Plus change things?
  • 1 0
 @TerrapinBen: ...or you resell all the bits you don't want to recoup some of the cost. It's still a bit crazy though. This is why I generally don't buy full bikes and build up myself. At least that way you can save on the parts you aren't that hung up on.
  • 3 0
 @acali: The air spring from what I've seen, it should be similar between the Plus and non-Plus monarch. The difference it would be mainly on the damper side. Never saw any real test data comparing both shocks, so I don't have a very solid answer to your question, but structurally the Monarch Plus has more oil volume and it has two compression circuits in different places (one in the main piston and another on reservoir / piggy-back), so theoretically, the damper should be more refined and it will work better under heavy loads with a more consistent feeling and less temperature build up. Again, without any real test data is not easy to compare both. Bye.
  • 4 0
 @tblore: There have been several people in the Pinkbike YT Jeffsy Owners forum who have added a 150 or 160mm fork on the front and report it rides very well. There was one user who also chose to run it in the high setting to keep the head angle roughly the same and the seat angle still steep.
  • 1 0
 @pigit77: I inquired with YT about this, particularly about the Tues and they replied that (at least in the case of the Tues) that the only changes will be in colors, spec and price.
  • 1 0
 @pdxkid: @pigit77. I also was told this by yt. They were even saying changing colours devalues their current existing products out there so significant colour changes may not happen as often either.
  • 1 0
 @tblore: check the PB YT forum there is a thread on all the tricks and tips guys are doing
  • 1 0
 @fartymarty: An isolated review will call for a frame review instead of a bike review. But with most sell with kits, that will not happen very often if at all...
  • 1 1
 @fartymarty: I won't stop you from getting one, but if I buy a bike from my local dealer and the seat post and brakes fail the first week or so, they'll make it right immediately
  • 1 3
 In other words, it's not as good as the 5.5...
  • 1 0
 @ArturoBandini: I think you are misusing the word theoretical. You're asking for an explanation that in reality an experienced vehicle dynamicist would struggle to create.
  • 3 1
 I dont understand why nobody gets it. Put bike and shock on a dyno and see how the system as a whole perfirms would get objective data. Tweak shock to optimize results. Then you can compare several bikes and see how well they perform, which system gets closer to an ideal pwrfirmance. Switch shocks and give suggestion as to which shock works best with a certain frame fir a certain application. Next best option: put a shockwhiz onto test bikes to get comparable setups so similarly performing bikes then see which has the edge. A simple data recording tool like that would help testers to be even more objective. Not affiliated with shockwhiz at all, just pledged on kickstarter got it and very surprised with the results.
  • 1 0
 @Sontator: This is what bike companies should be doing before the bike is put to market.

The issue is price point... obviously specing a cheaper shock / fork is going to save the customer but does not the bike any favours in terms of reviews.
  • 1 0
 Also it must be difficult comparing a bike like this to something that costs several thousand €, £, $ more. There are always going to be compromises which the purchaser will either have to accept or upgrade.

Maybe this is why it is always better to compare the top speced bikes with each other. That said you also need to know how a mid spec bike compares to the top speced bike and decide whether the extra cost is justified... a real mine field if you ask me.

Maybe bike companies need to let the customer spec their bikes in a similar way they do with cars (I think Canyon do this as well).
  • 1 0
 @fartymarty: if you do the work you might also get surptises: oh the debonair performs as well as the float x on this suspension if setup like this. Or at least negligible differences. Just arguing for evolving test standards.
  • 3 0
 BIKE Magazine's review of today says it "tracked really well", though they also say SB5.5c was in a league of its own in that regard. So it's consistent with this review, relatively,, but they make it sound more like the Jeffsy's a solid B where the SB5.5c is an A+.
  • 3 0
 @graeme187:

Some good points. The new Stumpjumpers 29 now have 150 instead of 140 forks and the SB-5.5 has 160. I could see a lot of riders wanting a 150 for this bike as well as a piggyback rear shock.

Maybe YT should offer a 150 fork and piggyback for the top couple models? A longer stroke air shaft is only like $30 though and not horrible to install.
  • 1 0
 @WasatchEnduro: yes sounds like lots of riders are changing out the travel to 150mm or more. I'll leave my stock for now but maybe up to 150 eventually. Can also run a longer fork but run it in the "high" setting to keep the seat angle steep to avoid the feeling of hanging back so far.
  • 1 0
 @duzzi: except for the fact u can get the fuel ex 9.9 2016 version came in at 24lb..I have this and tossed a 130mm pike on it so its heavier but still nowhere near 29lb...The 120mm rear travel is more than enough on the wagon wheels even on big hits
  • 1 0
 @bankz: Funny... That's the kind of thought that we, europeans had and still have about many american products, selled at way lower prices in the US than here.
  • 68 5
 I hate that water bottle, looking all smug tucked perfectly into that frame. Yuck.
  • 31 3
 Well you need a Yeti.
  • 34 13
 one word : Camelbak
  • 11 0
 And it doesn't stay in the cage when the going gets rough on my mates Jefster. Gets boring picking it up for him if he's in front!
  • 5 0
 That Thirstmaster / water bottle combo are rubbish though, I didn't order one with my Jeffsy due to all the issues people are having with them. The first iteration wouldn't hold the bottle properly, while with the recent one, you need to really pull on it to get the bottle out. For 50 euros, it's a ripoff.
  • 15 0
 @bigtim: because he's in front a lot?
  • 1 1
 @Euskafreez: raceface stash bib or similiar
  • 6 0
 I quit reading at Thirstmaster.
  • 2 2
 @kopaczus: fabric water bottle might fit, no cage and will not move even in the roughest of chowder.
  • 4 0
 @kopaczus: It's 50€ for 2 water bottles and carbon cage. An avarage carbon bootle cage costs around 30€ so it's not such a bad price considering its customized for Jeffsy.
  • 3 1
 @bobtjustice: rubbish, mines always falling off
  • 3 2
 @pigman65: rubbish...you're doing it wrong.
  • 1 2
 @pigman65: mine too - rubbish design - sent it back to them and got my money back
  • 5 1
 I hate it because I'd stupidly be fumbling around down there trying to get the bottle, hit a bump, and chop off one of my fingers in the linkages. And before you say it, yes I'm well known for fumbling around down there.
  • 1 0
 @phatcapone: yeah, but it would have to work to justify the price. And it doesn't.
  • 2 0
 @kopaczus: it works on my bike. obviously it's not as good as on a regular frames (e.g slash) with regular water bottles within the main frame. it's placed very low and you need to be carefully if you don't want to chop off your finger in the linkage. but if you go for a regular ride and want to drink in a standard situation means not when your heart rate hits 170, on the uphill or downhill, it's just fine. it's better than not having any water bottle on some sunny 2-3 hours rides. for all day rides you need camelback anyway, even with some other frames and regular size water bottles.
  • 58 1
 You can get a YT for half the prize ! No wait...
  • 51 0
 Thirstmaster 3000...HAHAHAHAHAHA
  • 1 0
 It'll keep your stash dry. That's probably about it. Priceless in that regard.
  • 40 0
 Can you put Brawndo in the Thirstmaster 3000 and mutilate your thirst?
  • 23 0
 Of course you can, because it's got electrolytes.
  • 23 0
 It's got what plants crave.
  • 13 1
 @bigtim, @KottonGin I like the Idiocracy references. Way underrated movie that.
  • 6 1
 the reality is way overrated
  • 42 5
 New bike New face
  • 30 4
 lol what
  • 32 0
 @owen224: dont laugh at him dude, probably google's wrong translation Smile
  • 13 1
 Post of the year
  • 2 1
 @owen224: what?
  • 21 0
 It's a pity that I'm neither young nor talented, really Frown
  • 16 1
 I love how they've actually made a water bottle and cage that fits inside the front triangle instead of lazily bolting one to the underside of the down tube.
  • 7 1
 if only it actually held onto the bottle when you rode down some rough stuff
  • 4 0
 Maybe you should check how much it costs then... Wonder what would this price be if it was distributed through the traditional way...hahaha
  • 3 1
 @Obidog: Hint: rubber band.

You're welcome.
  • 2 2
 It's a location a water bottle will fit - not something that retains it. That part is an exercise for the user.
  • 19 3
 YT's design is unreal, hell, look at the Millennium Falcon.
  • 8 1
 Nice reference, but CEC designed it, not YT.
  • 5 0
 @iamamodel: What is CEC?
  • 8 0
 @Fenderrbenderr: Corellian Engineering Corporation. They made the YT-1300 (the model vroomvroompartystarter was referring to). To be fair I didn't know the model, just the make, so, again, kudos for the original reference.
  • 3 0
 @iamamodel: Aaaaaw yiss, Star Wars *.*
THanks for eplaining, thought you meant the guys at YT Industries Wink
  • 32 7
 @iamamodel: CEC is responsible for staggering deforestation of Endor. They support tyrannic government which marginalizes sexual minorities.

#wookielivesmatter

Support intergalactic Act #225F.05.43.^3{65D} appendix B

Sign petition now.
  • 2 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Neither Wookies nor CEC are home to Endor. Their planets are Kashyyyk and Corellia respectively.
  • 2 0
 @iamamodel: if I'm correct, I believe CEC uses Wookiee slave labor as part of their defense contract with the Empirial Fleet.
  • 1 0
 @bridgermurray: I was not aware of this... Gotta find me a new intergalactic spaceship manufacturer.
  • 1 0
 Sorry, interstellar, not intergalactic.
  • 1 1
 @iamamodel: CEC is using wood from Endor forests as a interior material for their luxurious ship . It's been widely described by Coprophilian journalists.
  • 18 5
 How many thousand dollars is this less than the SB5.5? That said, the review is a bit too muted for my liking. This bike flat out knocks the competition into the weeds on a price v performance graph. :-)
  • 15 0
 what the hell, running a boost frame but not fork..... are you TRYING to make it impossible to buy a wheelset these days???
  • 2 0
 This is one of the reasons I got a Hightower instead. That and the Santa Cruz warranty and support from the local shop.
  • 16 5
 Such an awesome looking bike! Can't beat the price either. Way to go YT tup
  • 18 10
 No mention of the ridiculous lead times. Also will you stop saying that carbon vs ALU is a budget based decision? If you live somewhere with loose rocks you don't want carbon. Simple as.
  • 9 2
 That's why carbon bikes have downtube protectors.
  • 7 4
 Too right. There's no way I would want a plastic bike in Wales. It's just going to get destroyed.
  • 5 0
 Good point. I shattered the downtube of my carbon frame about 2 months into owning it. Luckily the manufacturer (Rocky Mountain) gave me a super cheap replacement frame and I've custom made a downtube protector. That being said, next bike will be going back to ALU on account of durability.
  • 10 1
 I was scared about my carbon at first, but I've hucked it into all kinds of gnar (sometimes without me on it), and it's survived just fine.
  • 3 1
 @skelldify: it's the slate they have in Wales that would kill a carbon frame.
  • 4 1
 Used to work at a test facility and trust me carbon doesn't do very well with puncture, shot and twist. It does perform fantastic in crush tests provided the crush forces are in line with the weave. Even with 100te force on a tube there will be still one piece left of ALU, whereas carbon will shatter. You don't want one of those shards in you either. As I said. Nothing to do with budget, everything to do with how and where you ride.
  • 3 0
 @ratedgg13: My next will be cromo like my last 4 bikes. The problem is they last forever which makes justifying a new frame difficult when you have a perfectly good one aitting there.
  • 2 3
 @skelldify: The thing with carbon fibre is that it fractures microscopically - no visible evidence of damage - and then fails catastrophically...
  • 2 0
 @loose rocks: Then you dont want yt alu either, believe.
  • 4 0
 right, that carbon stuff is so brittle.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=xreZdUBqpJs
  • 2 2
 @theteaser: Hah, I've been looking for that one! Just bought a Bronson and feeling pretty good about it!
  • 1 0
 @theteaser: you're right the carbon grsme did fail in a brittle manner. The issue is when you crash it in rocks how do you know if there is damage or not?
  • 3 1
 @theteaser: there isn't a puncture test here so my point is still valid. Believe me mate I used to do the stuff in this video for a living. Show me a shot test or puncture test and the Ali will win
  • 1 0
 @Cefn: oops.. downvoted you by mistake.. sorry... do you have video of frames failing with puncture?.. would be interesting to see.. I keep going back and forth over getting carbon or not for that very reason... also listen to the video above, on the first test you can hear it cracking way way before it fails, like around 450 when he first talks
  • 6 0
 @Fire-Starter: unfortunately due to the confidentiality I was having to work with I was unable to make videos at my work. Military and sports customers would f*ck my life up if I did.

The ticking noise while under pressure could actually be the machine, the pins that hold it in place will tick as they bend ever so slightly, without being there to determine where the noise is comih from its hard to say if its microfibres snapping or not. Its a known issue with carbon as stated above downtube protectors are standard. This will be where most rock strikes happen. But if you crash you can potentially have a pointy rock going anywhrre.

The elephant in the room though is high end bikes with carbon are made to win races. That means outperforming the competition one time only. After that, replacement is required to get the same performance. Its the same for any race based sport. The high end stuff just isn't built to last, its built to perform in a single event. A good example is brakes that don't work at all once the pads are half worn down and pad replacements are required. Its not a rule of thumb everywhere l, but it does seem to be the 'planned obsolescence' of bike manufacturers. Obviously they will deny this, but when you sell a million bikes a year, you want at least half of those customers to come back and buy again. If they all had bikes that lasted forever, the market would shrink.

Manufacturers like santa Cruz will put these videos out to promote carbon fibre because they sell at a higher price, thus making their portfolio much more attractive to investors.
  • 2 1
 @KeithReeder:
Not always true. I cracked my Enduro half way round the seat tube just up from the bottom bracket and it didn't fail completely.
  • 4 1
 @Cefn: I had SC's first carbon bike, a Blur xc 2010. Just sold it last year, no problems at all, just a couple of scratches in the carbon. My aluminum bikes, meanwhile, are beat to heĺl - need paint, have dents etc. Top teams give their WC racers 2 dh sleds (and possibly a custom one for world champs) and one trail/enduro bike each season. one of the dh bikes is kept for racing and the other is training/play bike kept as a backup in case there is a failure. Failures are very rare. You almost never see failures on anything but the wheels or chains when watching WC. The riders then sell at the end of the season when they get the next year's bikes.
  • 4 0
 @Rubberelli: I'm sure if I had 3 bikes a year, sorry scratch that, SEASON. I'd see no failures on mine either. Look I'm not saying youre wrong for buying carbon, its a great material. But where I love there are lots of pointy bits of slate. Slate disintegrates when it comes in contact with ALU, but it can puncture and pierce carbon. Its a different material, it performs differenlty. As someone who used to smash them to pieces for a living both ALU and carbon tubes Id feel more comfortable with an ALU bike, my only gripe with the review was that it mentions ALU vs carbon as a budgetary restriction. It wasn't for me. As for your experience with paint chipping I don't know anything about how paint bonds to carbon vs bonding to ALU. I don't really care either I was just pointing out that its not a budget consideration thabks
  • 1 0
 @Cefn: Some good points well made, I had a carbon Demo 8 and was constantly worried about it's integrity.

Rock guard got smashed off riding the Swiss national track and took a couple of nice chunks out of the BB shell, took it back to the reputable retailer I bought it from in Cardiff and they told me it was fine but it was always in the back of my mind.

Eventually I'd noticed the brake and gear cables had worn to huge gouges through the shock tunnel and I lost faith in the frame. Back on an Ali DH sled now and will leave carbon for the pros
  • 1 0
 @Garpur44: These are the exact reasons I wont buy a carbon bike (unless I start shitting cash).
  • 2 0
 @Garpur44: It is probably a completely irrational fear but one that is hard to overcome.
  • 1 0
 @fartymarty: I prefer the feel of aluminum. Carbon is great for a short travel bike though because it does feel zippy when pounding the gas. But coming down stuff, it feels very rigid, almost like it is working against the components rather than with them. That said, if you're constantly cleaning your bike and taking pics of it, get carbon because years later it will look brand new. I'm not sure about how the paint is done, but on my SC it was like the coloring was part of the carbon, so it never gets scratched or faded unless the carbon itself gets scratched, like a gouge, but after years of abuse I only had a couple of those on my bike before I sold it. And btw, the 6-7 year old bike was sold for like $1,600. Pretty sure it was because it was carbon and that it looked virtually new. So the extra you pay for carbon will mostly be regained when you sell the bike.
  • 1 0
 @fartymarty: A rock strike caused two massive chunks to come out of the BB shell, shop seemed to think it would be ok.

The final straw and the brake and gear cables had worn through the frame down to the tubes containing the rear linkage bearings, I had that frame from new for 2 years! given that the linkage bearing tube was now exposed and I was hitting some pretty decent sized stuff on it I wouldn't say it was an irrational fear.

Would you have bought a second hand carbon frame with that level of damage? I know I wouldn't
  • 1 0
 @fartymarty: To illustrate my point would you want to do this on it with holes in the frame?

www.pinkbike.com/photo/13284123

That's why it had to go
  • 2 2
 @Garpur44: Who cares about your tricks. Let's see pics of the frame where the cables wore through it!
  • 1 0
 @Garpur44: I'm an old man so keep my rubber on the ground. Now if I were a youngster with suitably large gonads I wouldn't be doing that drop with a holy carbon frame.
  • 8 0
 I bought a Jeffsy AL (base model) for $2400 and couldn't be happier. So fun and didn't require nearly as much hostage negotiation with my dear wife as some other comparably-performing models. Highly recommend the Jeffsy.
  • 7 0
 After looking at similar builds on different bikes I took a chance and ordered a Jeffsy on line. Way different than going into my LBS, but the price break and no sales tax was the deciding factor. It afforded me the chance to upgrade parts as needed to dial in the fit and to personalize my new ride. I easily adapted to the bigger wheels and modern geometry. What surprised me the most was how quiet the bike is and how fast if picks up speed. It climbs well and can handle anything from mach chicken to slow tech lines as well as tight switchbacks with ease. It is both confidence inspiring and a blast to ride. It makes me want to ride faster, harder and longer and constantly induces a shit eating grin!
  • 10 4
 I don't know if it's just me but I'm not sure I'd class 445mm reach as modern for a large 29er frame. My 4 year old Nicolai AC 29er is 440mm for example, with the same 140mm travel ,and I don't recall it being classed as long even back then.

Personally I think the Hightower is more in keeping with modern geometry as it has slightly longer reach numbers, but more importantly the seat tubes are short enough to accommodate longer dropper posts (XL frame ST is 490mm compared to the Jeffsy's 520mm), and I think that's at least as important a number on a modern frame as reach, especially when hoping to size up.
  • 5 1
 This. Average at best now.
  • 1 1
 My 2012 L Surly Krampus has a 441mm reach. I was also thinking it is on the short side. Maybe an XXL would cure this.
  • 11 2
 I'd like to see a shootout of new school 29ers HT and full sus
  • 41 13
 Only to find that they climb like a goat and come to their own when terrain points down... there is no meaning to your suffering
  • 3 1
 ...or a shootout between the aluminum Jeffsy and the NS Snaab Plus.
  • 5 0
 Hardtails on PB aren't compared to full sus bikes or even to comparable hardtails. They are compared to twitchy old school XC hardtails (with some reference to tight fitting clothes). And then they come to the conclusion, hey it is actually quite capable. Next hardtail review: same story.
  • 4 0
 @WAKIdesigns

You just explained perfectly why I want a shootout. At least then we can get into a relative comparison. I think it's the only way to have a meaningful review these days. Many brands seem to be converging on excellence and we have to start relying on colour preference or brand loyalty to select. I don't get to ride a lot of demo days so I rely on the rectangle to tell me what's worth buying. I know there are other shootouts but I happen to like the way PB writes and goes into the gory details.

@vinay

I meant a sus and HT category. But yeah, there is a lot of that XC reference going on. depends on the writer.
  • 2 0
 @conv3rt: brand loyalty- that's a one funny concept if you think about it...

But I can tell you from my experience based opinion that it doesn't really matter if it's a Fatbike or a XC racing full susser put together - they still ride like a - hardtail and a - full suspension bike. The only time when they feel similar is the roughest bits. Fat and Plus bike rolls over small stuff like a 160 Enduro bike but hit something big with that fat tyred thing and you soon realize it is a HT deep to the core.
  • 1 0
 @conv3rt: I assume with "new school HT" you mean a hard tail that can be ridden aggressively. What I recall from reading PB reviews on these, they all go as if it is the first time they ride one of these. Comparisons are made to trail full sus bikes (PB: oh geometry and handling is comparable but you notice when you hit the bigger stuff) and (old school) XC racing hardtails (PB: oh it actually much more stable but you'll notice when climbing). To me these "insights" are pretty useless. A shame as indeed when reviewing full sus bikes, PB does actually make sensible comparisons. I think a better place to look is the UK market and get your advice there as well. Dirt Mag UK actually does review aggressive hardtails properly. That said, Dirt tech editor (and frame builder, currently working for Robotbike) Ed Haythornthwaite did write a proper review of a Stanton bike here on PB.

As for shootouts, I initially didn't have an opinion about shootouts. But when Dirt went out of print, my subscription was transferred to MBUK and they pride themselves on their reviews and shootouts. I quickly grew to hate them, makes for a horrible read. (I'm subscribed to Cranked now, no reviews at all Smile ). But to each their own.

There was a recent vote here on PB for what was the best hardtail (or something along those lines). It may not be exactly what you're looking for but it might come close. I developed a crush on the Kingdom Vendetta (raw finish, 2017 version), never heard of that one before. Sure you'll realize when you hit something big but then again I don't go and hit something big only to not realize it.
  • 1 1
 @vinay: I had a15" XC hardtail frame from 2001 with argyle. I have ridden that bike rather aggressively... term aggressive bike is ridiculous. It's like technical terrain. BMX track is fkng technical. One can argue that a HT with big fork is cool for those who want to ride in big mountain but cannot afford a fully. But I'd rather have an average fully than a HT fully kitted with Pike, XT drivetrain (or better) and some fancy wheels. And there's plenty of those bikes around these days. I'd rather have a SLX kitted 26" fully without a dropper than one of these fancy HTs. At this moment I have 160mm Fox36 in my NS Clash HT and it feels like crap. You can't ride it on pumptrack, hard to practice skills on asphalt, balance in rock garden is terrible with big fork sinking into the holes and then rear kicking me up. Fricking worthless. Waiting for the hub adaptor for my front wheels so I can install 100mm Reba. And I know I will be faster on it in the woods, even on roughest bits, and then I will be able to practice skills outside of woods.
  • 2 0
 @vinay Thanks for the ideas. I'll check those out. Living here there aren't many opportunities to go throw a leg over just any bike. I've ended up doing lots of reading and forum tracking. Even contacting PB users and asking their opinions. Surprisingly very helpful group of people despite the image of "I'll bitch about anything given the opportunity". And I get that, that can be kinda fun in a twisted way. Anyhow I bought myself a Ragley BluePig 2015 and an NS Snabb E. Love them both and ride them on the same trails depending on who I'm riding with and what kind of ride we want to have. @WAKIdesigns I ride with different technique on the hardtail and my 160 equipped 'pig is far from worthless. There are times when I've passed other riders on sus much to their disappointment. Depending on the day and person of course. Hardtails are a preference and I'm a more thoughtful rider because of having one. While "aggressive" may not be technically appropriate I still know what someone means when they say it. Vernacular, jargon, whatever you want to call it. That said, I'm not going to tell you what to do. Lot's of options and lots of good reasons for each.
  • 1 0
 Indeed I used both terms in my post. "A hardtail that can be ridden aggressively" is more accurate, "aggressive hardtail" is shorter. Both have their advantages and so far I've used and interpreted those as interchangeable.

I haven't yet ridden a hardtail with 160mm forks in the front. Only up to 140mm but I didn't feel I was on the limit. My previous hardtail (a steel Voodoo Erzulie) got a bit steeper in a crash and I've been riding it for months after that (with an 85mm fork). Twitchy indeed. Could still adapt to that so I expect it goes the other way around as well (slacker with more travel). In fact I found it harder to adapt to a full suspension bike. I can live with the fork diving in corners and while braking and landing, but much harder to cope with if the rear suspension extends. Yes I should apparently lean back more to keep it from extending but this is simply not something I have to worry about on a hardtail. On rough less tight terrain yes I can go very fast on the fully simply hanging on and it compensates for mistakes as well. But that's not the way I like to ride. The hardtail allows me to be more precise and if I'm not then well, I'll know right away. As for practice on asphalt and pumptracks I haven't had trouble with my 130mm forks. Haven't tried the fully on asphalt and pumptracks yet. Velosolutions will probably build a pumptrack 3 minutes from home (really happy) and I see no reason to bring anything bigger than the BMX for that.

But yeah at the end of the day it depends on what suits your style and terrain. A hardtail is a good match for me and I welcome a bit more travel for the more rough terrain. I'm standing up anyway so the rear end is reasonably free to fly about. For most of the riding that I do, it is good fun. And I fully understand that those doing epic full day rides on rough terrain and who find themselves seated a lot are much better off with a full suspension bike. That said, there definitely is a time, place and rider for a long slack hardtail with a long travel fork. Not solely from a budget perspective.

@conv3rt One company I think is quite clever with their direct sales model is Propain. Some riders register as "friend" (if I recall correctly) and potential buyers can hook up with them to ride their bike. Of course these friends benefit from certain advantages from Propain. I think it is a very clever and honest way to test a bike, rather than try it at an lbs. You may want to check if could test ride one of their bikes in your area. Not sure if they cater for Canada yet. Otherwise it may come soon. It seems like those German companies have only recently found their way to North America. Also because much of their full suspension bikes were built around a Horst Link design which they used to have to pay Specialized for in order to sell them over there.
  • 7 1
 Very nice bike but I don't see any point in putting a coil shock and extending the travel upfront, if you want slacker angles and a better feeling on the downs, sacrificing the ups, get a capra
  • 5 0
 There is something to be said for 29" wheels. Some people prefer them but want a more gravity focused ride. The Capra is a really sweet bike though, but even better would be a Capra with ability to fit 29" wheels, even if a few mm of rear travel was sacrificed. I predict we will see a lot more of these 150-160mm slack 29ers that I dream about.
  • 3 0
 @JDFF: @fedemeta exactly.... but if you purchase a jeffsy, put a better shock on it, and longer forks, then likely some better wheels, and lets face it a shimano drivetrain and brakes, thats practically the whole bike replaced, if they sold it as a frame option I'd be interested, but this just seems like a whole lot of faff to get it set up right.

For the price of the CF pro, you're into Specialized Enduro 29 territory and I think I know which one I'd prefer...
  • 3 0
 @graeme187: exactly why I'm on the '17 29er enduro!
  • 2 0
 @JDFF: interesting point , so I checked the specs , the S and M Jeffsy share the same stay length as the Capra with 430mm , the L and XL on the Jeffsy then switch to the 440mm stay as mentioned , makes one wonder if you could do a 29" Capra .
  • 1 1
 @graeme187: I agree on all points, except I would go with an Evil Wreckoning at this point. (But also excited for a few other longtravel 29ers very near release.)
  • 1 0
 @cheetamike: good question.
  • 7 3
 Love my jeffsy carbon pro! I never thought a 29er could be so fun! With atlas pedals my small jeffsy weighs 27.5 on the scale. Plus I got it for $4600 shipped! I'd like to see the review on the carbon pro model as it has better wheels, wider bars, and a fox suspension setup.
  • 12 0
 You voting for PB to review the high spec model is courageous and a welcome change to the thousands of readers insisting on reviews of the affordable models.
  • 3 0
 @Rubberelli:

The "highend model" is still lower priced than everyone else's by like $2k with equivalent spec. I picked mine up on sale for the cost of the bike they tested $4600 shipped. If someone needs a small they still have them on sale for $4,499! Thats a steal for this bike which really well spec'd! dt swiss carbon wheels, renthal bars, next sl cranks, guide ultimates, a good dropper and suspension.
  • 7 3
 How much rigmarole was involved in getting the seatpost and brakes sorted ? Pop it back to the local dealer and get them to sort it ? I imagine not. My mate was waiting 8 weeks for a replacement frame from Canyon last year and missed the best bit of summer riding. The last time I had problems with a Specialized under warranty it was sorted in 3 days and I got a loan bike. You get the service you pay for generally.
  • 2 0
 they don,t have a store front and the majority are sold online so how does one take the bike back unless ones lives in say Squamish where there is a YT store .
  • 3 1
 Or you pay for what you get when you don't think of the need for service later on...
  • 6 1
 Compare it to a bike with a 36 and float x and then say it's not as supple.....well no shit. Sorry if I'm I bit triggered haha but I love yt and my capra is the softest off the top of any bike I've had.
  • 9 2
 Jeffsy with a coil.. coz ya can
  • 8 1
 Because you want Big Grin
  • 2 0
 I have the jeffsy cf comp 1 now for some weeks. amazing fun and fast bike! Since i`m living in switzerland i payed less than 3000 euros for it. What a bragain!
if you ride rough trails you might want to buy a longer air shaft for the pike and run it with 150 or 160mm travel.
My reverb has the same problem as stated in the review. But mine now sqishes down half of its travel when sitting on it. annoying! still waiting for help from yt...
  • 4 1
 Not sure what YT have got up their sleeve for this year, but if it's 650b and Jeffsy-like with 150mm-ish of travel, they're going to sell a lot of bikes, including one to me...
  • 6 1
 I honestly doubt that, because it is both too close to jeffsy and capra. Tho if you look at Rose granite chief its exactly that (completely underrated brand also imho)
  • 2 0
 Loved the review, and you and commenters pointed out a few things I didn't think of. I almost ended up with a Capra when buying my last bike. Price was a factor and I couldn't ignore the bang for the buck. This is a great bike for many and I hope YT keeps up the good work at low prices.
  • 3 0
 Heck with the bike, the bottle and cage will be sold out always!! Been waiting for a stubby bottle option. I was running a kids water bottle with dinosaurs on it to fit my Tracer.
  • 3 0
 Stormtrooper? I always thought stormtroopers were pretty cool apart from being the bad guys, and kind of idiots. That is a dapper bike.
  • 5 2
 "and according to SRAM, they've since made changes...that should make this problem less likely to occur."
Hahahahahaha! That sounds familiar.
  • 5 2
 I have the CF pro and its the best bike Ive ever ridden. Climbs, jumps and handles some pretty aggressive terrain. Customer service is top notch as well.
  • 2 0
 I don't think the YT business knows what customer service is outside of the states. Good for you though.
  • 2 0
 @Bustacrimes: Indeed. Here in Canada it's atrocious. Been waiting since July 2015 for a set a bearings to replace all the faulty ones in my Tues Comp. Had to go trough the Head Office in Germany to have them look into the issue... and I'm still waiting.
  • 2 0
 @Bragelonne: that sucks.
  • 5 1
 So it's a bike worth its price. Makes sense to me! Good little review.
  • 4 0
 No picture of it with coil shox?
  • 1 1
 The aluminium versions seem over the top heavy - does anyone have a comment on that? I'm sure I could lose a few kilos around my spare ribs but keen on thoughts. It also didn't seem like a particularly loving review, a bit ho-him.
  • 7 0
 Alu version of the same bike is 29.7 lbs. I don't know what your version of over the top heavy is, but that's slightly better than the norm in my world.
  • 5 3
 I've been waiting for this review to come out for ages and it's left me feeling a bit flat.

It would be great to know how this bike compare against the Capra?
  • 9 2
 Why? You don't already know the difference between a trail bike and an enduro bike?
  • 5 0
 Do you want a lighter Trail bike that climbs better or an Enduro/AM bike that descends better? Yes, it is that easy.
  • 8 3
 Looks like a stumpjumper
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer, was your Colorado kitty litter experience in Colorado Springs? This stuff takes some getting used to!
  • 4 0
 Yep, you got it. Fun stuff, but very different from the dirt / loam in the Pacific Northwest.
  • 1 0
 I would also like to know of what trail he's referring to!
  • 1 0
 @briceps: Pikes Peak granite. It's loose, decomposed granite, and it can make things slick. It can take some getting used to, but once you're used to it, it's fine.
  • 1 0
 @briceps: sorry, misread your comment. I thought you didn't know what he was referring to when he said kitty litter.
  • 1 0
 Tight, low speed turns through kitty litter could be the upper part of Jack's, coming off buckhorn.
  • 3 0
 I might have missed it but, what size bike was tested? I'm the cursed 5' 11" and always fall between M and L sizes.
  • 3 0
 Size large.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Thank you
  • 3 0
 I'm 5'11" and have a Large it fits me perfectly, the only thing I would say is I have a 32" inside leg and only have about 1" of post out of the frame so if you are 5'11" with short legs beware of this..
  • 1 0
 @haslamps: yep, 5' 11" and 32" inside. Thanks for the info!
  • 3 3
 @mikekazimer & @pinkbikeaudience - I know honest reviews have gone the way in name of sponsored ad content, so in a world where every bike is the latest and greatest and "leaves little to be desired", how about suggesting what type of rider might benefit from this ride and what ride won't.

For example, you could say something like 'for those of you who like to pop off every root and bump, you'll like the whatever-suspension curve' or 'for riders who prefer the sit-and-spin approach to climbing, you might find the slack seat tube and short chain stays difficult on steep ascents. That sort of stuff, because -in all honesty- every review reads exactly the same.
  • 9 1
 None of our reviews are "sponsored content," and every bike isn't the latest and greatest - if you read more than the last few lines of the review, you'll find that I mentioned the component related issues, and compared the bike's handling to others in its class. We do have more comparison articles in the works, where we lay out the pros and cons of multiple bikes at once, which might come closer to what you're looking for.
  • 1 0
 Had the chance to flip a demo bike at Fortbill this year onto an airbag, they fly pretty damn good! Very comfortable bike to ride, feels like it has way more travel than it actually does
  • 1 1
 I was very close to buying this bike to replace my 26" 2011 Giant Reign X, but I balked when I had it in the shopping cart and found out that shipping to Hawaii was $300. Then it went on sale for Black Friday and it was $500 off ($3,499). When I went to buy the large size was sold out...maybe 2017, looks like they have better wheels for 2017 (E13 TRS). I will continue my Jeffsy lusting...and until then...26" is still a lot of fun...
  • 3 0
 Does it come with the shock sleeve perfectly aligned like that?
  • 3 1
 The gold in this bike is the size specific rear centre and 46mm offset CSU.
  • 6 8
 I never got it, why make as much offset as 51mm instead of slackening the head angle?
  • 7 2
 @WAKIdesigns: Slow vs fast speed handling
  • 7 0
 more offset tricks you into thinking you've got some nice steering then you try go round a corner and the front wheel fucks off way inside your steering arc, you tuck the front end and eat shit. We need even less than 46mm. And slacker head angles And longer rear centres And free money
  • 3 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I wish bike companies would quote trail so you could compare the actual effect.
  • 3 0
 @fartymarty: if you know the offset this works: yojimg.net/bike/web_tools/trailcalc.php
  • 2 0
 @bvwilliams: That's quite useful.
  • 1 0
 Forget all the tech talk, you know it'll sell based on what it looks like and the YT price model. It looks really good, even with the big wheels.
  • 3 0
 At 5'11 i would go with Large, maybe put shorter stem on.
  • 1 0
 The reach numbers suggest you could probably even do large with the normal stem and it would be more in line with modern bikes.
  • 1 0
 see my comment above.... standard stem is 50mm and fits fine
  • 3 0
 This bike with a 150mm Lyrik and a 11-6 would be so vicious.
  • 2 2
 But could it hold up for what your proposed suspension was intended for?
  • 1 0
 Since you know the price of the 2017 model that hasn't been released yet, what else do you know? Release date? Metric shock maybe? 150mm fork maybe?
  • 2 0
 Pretty sure the water bottle is smaller than the bike's travel and the jumps you'll be hitting on it lol
  • 2 0
 Would love to know how the ride of the Jeffsy compare to the Evil Following...... anyone?
  • 1 2
 Smart looking bike, decent spec and great VFM. Shame the business model needed to make this bike for this money will weaken the small independent LBS brands and strenghten the big 3. Result...lack of choice in future. Strengthening of existing global corporations. Mtb negative EV in the long run. But we live in the generation of having it all and caring not about tomorrow.....
  • 1 0
 So for comparably speced retail bikes, how much cheaper is a YT being bought direct (not on sale)...retail shop bike to retail mail order bike price comparison.
  • 4 2
 Such a sick bike. I wonder how Gwin compares it to his capra!
  • 3 0
 He told me he wanted to get one this season, that his Capra is too much bike for some of his local trails. They didn't let him keep the one he rode in the launch video.
  • 1 0
 @Rubberelli: Damn must be a pretty sick bike. That's strange I wonder why....
  • 2 0
 @Rubberelli: The one he rode is the same frame everyone rode in the video, they just swapped out the componentry. Currently he's got a 2017 Jeffsy Pro Race
  • 4 1
 beautiful 29 bike
  • 2 0
 jeffsy is a nice guy, but he doesn't brush his teeth
  • 2 0
 Thirstmaster 3000. I'm Sold
  • 2 0
 Hey.... this is my bike !!! Smile

.....come back home immediatly !! Big Grin
  • 1 0
 I love the look of this bike although I would have had to have had the aluminium one but hey it looks nice to me.
  • 2 0
 That waterbottle is so cute!
  • 1 0
 The real question is when the CF-1 is going to be available in the US again...
  • 1 0
 How does this version stack up against the topline CF Pro, does the Fox 34 and Float stack up against the Rockshox kit?
  • 2 0
 Based on what I've heard and experienced on similar bikes, the Fox 34 and Pike will be quite comparable, with a slight edge to the Fox, depending on who you ask. The big difference will be between the Monarch and the Float X, the Float X with the additional volume has a good bit more small bump compliance, which was one of the complaints in the review. Personally, I wouldn't buy this bike without a Float X/Monarch plus.
  • 1 0
 Sounds like an awesomely fun bike! First thing I'd do is increase the fork to 150mm and throw a set of Magic Mary's on tup
  • 7 6
 Way! Too! Short! for an XL.
  • 1 0
 @pipotte imagine roucher ça
  • 1 0
 when they show 2017 tues?
  • 1 0
 Looks just like a stumpy FSR
  • 1 0
 So how does the Jeffsy fare with The Evil Following?
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2020. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.043122
Mobile Version of Website