Kenny going really fast, the Dempster Highway more than 2,000 vertical feet below. Sections of the Dempster are sometimes called the 'Joe Henry Highway.' 

Joe and Annie Henry knew this land intimately. In 1898, Joe was born near the Hart and Wind Rivers while Annie was born in Black City in 1904. After marrying in 1921, they hunted and trapped together on the Blackstone Uplands. Joe and Annie had 13 children, one of whom died in infancy. Their children attended school in Moosehide and Dawson but the family still spent time on this land, right below where Kenny is riding in this shot. Their oldest son Percy became a chief of the Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in and a deacon in the Anglican Church.

Joe Henry guided the cat trains that built winter roads to the Peel plateau in the 1950s and, many years later, the surveyors who marked the route of the year-round road. Annie never stopped working and even in her later years, she was still beading moccasins. They continued to use their trapline cabin at Wolf Creek until their deaths. Joe and Annie left an invaluable legacy through their work recordings stories of the land and their travels, traditional knowledge and Hän language.
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Kenny going really fast, the Dempster Highway more than 2,000 vertical feet below. Sections of the Dempster are sometimes called the 'Joe Henry Highway.' Joe and Annie Henry knew this land intimately. In 1898, Joe was born near the Hart and Wind Rivers while Annie was born in Black City in 1904. After marrying in 1921, they hunted and trapped together on the Blackstone Uplands. Joe and Annie had 13 children, one of whom died in infancy. Their children attended school in Moosehide and Dawson but the family still spent time on this land, right below where Kenny is riding in this shot. Their oldest son Percy became a chief of the Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in and a deacon in the Anglican Church. Joe Henry guided the cat trains that built winter roads to the Peel plateau in the 1950s and, many years later, the surveyors who marked the route of the year-round road. Annie never stopped working and even in her later years, she was still beading moccasins. They continued to use their trapline cabin at Wolf Creek until their deaths. Joe and Annie left an invaluable legacy through their work recordings stories of the land and their travels, traditional knowledge and Hän language.

1 Comment

  • 2 0
 Nice background. Good to see writers actually research instead of throwing together some vignettes pulled out of god knows where

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