A not-so-common trail in the Stonebridge area in Whistler, I knew this rock roll could look good at night. This is a composite of about 100 images showing the movement of the stars, with Alex riding the rock roll in the first frame.
You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
A not-so-common trail in the Stonebridge area in Whistler, I knew this rock roll could look good at night. This is a composite of about 100 images showing the movement of the stars, with Alex riding the rock roll in the first frame.

26 Comments

  • 12 0
 the light is 'spotty' or 'dashed' because LEDs use a PWM, Pulse Width Modulator, to control brightness and efficiency. Its like a very fast strobe light that strobes faster the brighter you want your light to be. Like a movie, our brains see it as a constant flow rather than discrete steps.
  • 3 0
 Cool, had no idea!
  • 1 0
 You can even see the doppler effect.
  • 7 0
 very Van Gogh
  • 11 0
 I ear ya
  • 3 0
 Thats awesome!
  • 2 0
 Dang man, nice work.
  • 1 0
 Great shot! What time did you start shooting the sequence?
  • 1 0
 Thanks! I think I started this one around midnight
  • 1 0
 nice juan monica poulinski
  • 1 0
 Stellar!

One long exposure or...?
  • 1 0
 Hey idiot, it's a composite
  • 1 0
 This one is a composite, I have done them as single exposures as well, but you need a different set of conditions for that.
  • 1 0
 Thats twice you've managed to make me look good on a photo @poulin1
  • 1 0
 Twice you`ve made me look good in photo form @poulin1
  • 2 2
 Where are the stars like that? They dont do that in England
  • 3 0
 Whistler
  • 2 0
 @That-guy-with-3-ears It is a long exposure shot. Long enough to capture earth's rotation in relation to the stars. It is possible anywhere, but it is probably better in Whistler, because everything is better in Whistler!
  • 1 0
 @Caiokv: Id imagine the centre of the circle of stars is the northern axis of the earths rotation. If you lived to far south than you couldn't capture it. I think England is more north than whistler though, so the stars should do that.
  • 1 1
 @Caiokv: Apart from Whistler Blackcomb, it is known they are c*nts but when you get to Whistler you're like "Oh shit these guys are O.G. twats"
  • 2 0
 my question is: is this two long exposure photos put together? Im no photographer but, wouldn't the long exposure capturing the stars be too slow to get a clear picture of Alex Poyser?
  • 1 0
 @jubs17: I believe that the rider was frozen in the shot with a flash, but it's tricky to get everything balanced on shots like this.

@willsoconnell: Good point, when I tried long exposures shots where I live (Tropic of Capricorn) I did get curved star trails, but not even close to this, and maybe the southern axis is too far away to capture too. I will look into it!
  • 2 0
 @jubs17: To go with along with @Caiokv the flash or light source that is out of frame to the right and facing the downhill shone or flashed enough light on the rider for the sensor to pick him up during a longish exposure. You can see that towards the rider's back/right side where not as much light hit he is kind of "ghostly." After that the light was taken down and the photographer continued to photograph the stars in that spot. To get the circular star trail effect it requires many, many 30 second exposures all stacked together. So when the photographer says it took nearly 100 photos to get this shot, 1 was used to get the rider, the rest were long exposures which were then stitched/stacked together. Very cool effect!
  • 2 0
 Yes they do. You just need to look at Polaris which they rotate around. 100 frames, maybe 10-20 second exposures for each one to show the rotation.
  • 1 0
 The stars certainly will do that in England, you just need to look north! But you also need to track the movement of the stars over about 60 minutes to see this much rotation.
  • 1 0
 beautiful

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.015968
Mobile Version of Website