e*thirteen TRSr Cassette - Review

Jul 30, 2017 at 16:17
by AJ Barlas  
e thirteen TRSr Cassette Review AJ Barlas

E*thirteen first had their TRS+ 11-speed cassette hit back in early 2016, and with its 9–44t spread it came close to providing the range of a 2x setup. Twelve months later they released a wider range, 9–46t cassette, the TRSr. The TRSr’s large 511% range is greater than that of SRAM's 12-speed Eagle drivetrains—which are 500%—and you don’t need to dump all of your 11-speed parts in order to get that range. We’ve put in a lot of time on the $349 USD cassette to see how it stands up in the real world.
TRSr 9–46t Cassette Details

• 11 speed, 9–46 tooth spread
• 511% gear range
• Tooth count: 9-10-12-14-17-20-24-28-33-39-46
• XD driver body required
• Weight: 307 grams (actual)
• MSRP: $349 USD
www.bythehive.com

When e*thirteen began working on the TRSr 11-speed cassette, they didn’t stop at increasing the range. They also worked on the fit of the cassette, with the older version susceptible to a little bit of creaking if not maintained, and they wound up getting the weight of the cassette down too; it now comes in at 307g (actual) versus the smaller 489% range TRS+ cassette's 333g (actual). The cassette is still constructed using the same techniques as the previous version—the top three cogs are aluminum, and the remaining cogs are steel.


Installation/Removal

The cassette only works with an XD driver. Installing it onto the driver is straightforward with the use of the provided, keyed BB tool and a chain whip. First, the one-piece alloy top end (large sprocket cluster) of the cassette is slotted onto the XD driver and the locking nut is tightened down with the provided tool and a wrench. From here, the remaining steel part of the cassette, which contains eight of the eleven gears, needs to be lined up with the slots in the back of the steel body to the three teeth on the alloy part—the indicators on the 28 and 33t cogs help out with this step. Make sure that the steel part of the cassette is pressed firmly all the way onto the driver, or it won’t lock into place once the slots are aligned.

e thirteen TRSr Cassette Review AJ Barlas
The indicator pictured lets users know when the cassette has snapped properly into place.

e thirteen TRSr Cassette Review AJ Barlas
The locking nut that holds the cassette onto the XD driver
e thirteen TRSr Cassette Review AJ Barlas
... is secured into place with the provided, keyed BB tool.

Removing the cassette is also pretty easy, but it does require two chain whips. If, like me, you don’t have two chain whips, it is possible to sneak it loose with the wheel still on the bike, attaching the whip to the lower portion of the cassette and turning it counterclockwise while the chain is on one of the upper three cogs (the alloy portion), with force applied to the pedals. Once the two halves of the cassette have been split, remove the locking ring holding the alloy piece on.


Performance

On the trail, the TRSr cassette's range was welcomed, especially with early testing being done toward the end of a tough winter. With enough snow and shitty weather to stop the regular riding we normally seek here in coastal British Columbia, fitness levels were at an all-time low and the slightly easier gearing at the top end made the pain a little more bearable.

Jumping through the range I found the gaps between gears to be quite good, and didn’t find myself looking for something in-between gears when on the trail. Once regular riding was back I did find myself between two gears while commuting on the road to and from the trail, but to be honest, it’s not fitted to a road bike, so this is hardly relevant.

e thirteen TRSr Cassette Review AJ Barlas
The key and slot that lock the two parts of the cassette together. After months of use, these are showing little sign of wear. The creaking of old is gone

The 9t is one small cog, and despite already setting the bike up to run a smaller front ring shortly prior to this cassette being installed, I still only found the 9t cog on one occasion: commuting on a road, with a tail wind. The spread through the upper portion of the cassette felt really good with a 32-tooth chainring up front, and I found I was regularly in the middle of the cassette on the trails, so I’m not sure going any smaller with the front ring is the right answer, at least for where I live. Although I didn't make much use of the 9-tooth cog, in locations with wide open, very high-speed trails I'd imagine that using the full range would be more commonplace.

The TRSr cassette was set up with a new XT derailleur, new housing, cable, XTR chain (HG901) on a bike that was only six rides old. With all of the parts for the drivetrain being only a short number of rides old I would have expected shifting to be on-point from the get go. Shifting performance was good along the steel part of the cassette, albeit not as light and smooth as SRAM’s Eagle drivetrain, but it was totally fine regardless. Unfortunately, I did run into some problems higher up the range and found that the original cassette didn’t like to shift from the steel, 28t cog up to the first alloy cog (33t). The derailleur hanger was checked, gear cables checked, housing, B-tension—everything. In the end, nothing seemed to work. Swapping back to the SRAM XG-1199 cassette that it replaced showed no signs of shifting problems, leaving me to believe the issue lay with the cassette.

e thirteen TRSr Cassette Review AJ Barlas
All of the parts that come in the box for the TRSr cassette.

After some discussion, e*thirteen did fire over another cassette that included some rolling updates that the team had made. After putting this cassette on the shifting issue was gone, immediately. No change to the cable tension, chain—nothing. To the naked eye, the two look identical, indicating that the changes were minor, but they were enough to make the shift cleaner and more consistent.

After hundreds of kilometers on the new cassette, finishing off with a six-day event that included more than 9,000m of climbing and 13,750m of descending over a distance of 200km, it’s still performing well. During the event, the cable tension went a little out of whack resulting in the shifts in the upper part of the stack to get hung up a little, but a little cable adjustment amended that.

The TRSr cassette doesn’t shift as cleanly or lightly as Eagle, but this is admittedly being pretty nitpicky, given they both shift very well. Despite having been in the top three gears (the alloy cogs) for plenty of time on countless steep climbs the amount of wear is reasonable, and there is still plenty of life left in the cassette. The steel cogs show little sign of wear.


Pinkbike’s Take:

bigquotesE*thirteen’s TRSr cassette offers riders a range that’s wider than what’s possible by going to 12-speed, without requiring an entirely new drivetrain. The steps between gears and the range offered are really good, making this something to seriously consider for anyone who had been holding off on converting to 1x until the easiest gears were more user-friendly.AJ Barlas



MENTIONS: @ethirteen-components



126 Comments

  • + 35
 I had a TRS+ cassette that I bought brand new and rode for 6 months and about 600mi. The top three alloy cogs all wore out and the chain would slip constantly. My daily ride includes some brutal steep and loose climbs and I just don't think those alloy cogs could handle that long term. I decided I was done with weight weenie aluminum drivetrain components, I now run a wolf tooth stainless steel ring and sunrace 11-46 steel cassette. It's heavy, but it puts up with my mashing up steep climbs much better.
  • + 22
 You could replace only those three rings without buying a whole new cassette and save yourself some monies.
  • + 4
 I am the same way. Switched to a heavy Box cassette that is dirt cheap and lasts 3 times as long as the expensive stuff trying to save weight in the wrong places.
  • + 7
 I wonder if something else is going on? I've run my TRSr for almost as long in some similar sounding terrain and the cassette still looks really good. It's been in mostly dry conditions, regularly clean my drivetrain, and use a Shimano XT chain (new one went on with the cassette). Pricey for sure, but I am happy with it and it has been a great way to increase the range of my drivetrain.
  • + 3
 Do you have lots of sand where you live? My drivetrain barely lasts 1500 miles due to the sand and mud.

That's a good case for gearboxes- way fewer external parts to wear and drag in slop.
  • + 10
 Fancy bikes with cheap heavy drivetrain wear parts always FTW.

Why people use high end chains, cassettes and 1x chainrings in non-race situations is beyond me (unless they have infinite budget)

Especially chains. Get a chain that's half the price, switch it more often and save your cassette and chainrin.
  • + 3
 @abzillah: Replacing just those 3 rings costs as much as a whole new sunrace cassette. On top of that, the top 3 rings have to be in stock. Previously they've been out of stock for months.

The segmented cassette seems like a good idea though.
  • + 2
 Mine lasted 2 months. The interface between the upper and lower cogs developed play. When I contact them they told me to put grease where the parts click together . The noise went out but the play between them stills there they won't get back to me. Currently sitting on a shelf. I need to find time next week to put a case thru small claims court.
  • + 1
 Just so you know the rivets holding those steel rings together in that Sunrace blew up on me in less than 3 months and a couple hundred trail miles. That being said my Sram XO 1x11 is going strong in its third season with a couple thousand miles on it. All I've done is replace the chain when the wear indicator tells me it's stretched. I'll gladly buy a chain or two a year to prolong my drivetrain.
  • + 1
 @dontcoast:

Light and durable aren't mutually exclusive. SRAM's XX1 and X01 cassettes are one-piece steel for all but the top cog. The weight was shaved from carrier mechanism, not the contact points; these cassettes in aggregate are more durable than XTR (6 titanium cogs) and well ahead of the boutique brands with multiple alloy cogs, despite weighing less than all of them.

Cassette weight isn't free on any bike, but this is doubly true with full-suspension. It's unsprung weight. If you're running a light wheelset, a heavy cassette can noticeably degrade suspension response.
  • + 1
 @enrico650: good luck with small claims court bud. USA!
  • + 1
 @lifeofloon: Interesting, I will watch out for that on mine. I am not super happy with the sunrace cassette, more that I was so fed up with the alloy cogs that it seemed like a good option. Also, @alexdi has a good point about the SRAM cassettes, the one piece steel is incredibly durable and long lasting, and I have been really impressed with its longevity (on another bike), I just wish someone would make a stainless steel large cog I could drop in Smile . I had to replace the alloy cog after a year, but otherwise it has been bulletproof. Also, the trails I ride are loose and dusty. Even though I lube my drivetrain every ride and clean it often, it is just a high wear environment, unfriendly to alloy components. My chainring also wore out in 6 months. I may try SRAM's GX Eagle next time I am due for a new drive, but I worry about busting chains...
  • + 1
 @alexdi: agreed on all your points; you can get light and durable but it won't be cheap. my point is that the suspension/weight performance difference is not worth the price difference for me (and I suspect most riders *unless racing or infinite budget* as above)

XG-1150 from $90 online to 144 msrp
XG-1195 from $250 online to $369 msrp
Yes 126g difference is significant, but is it over $150 significant? That's a lot of beer, burritos and brake pads.

That said, I feel more strongly about cheap chains than cheap casettes; as the difference in weight/shift quality is much more noticeable between a basic and high end casette and equivalent chains- and chains wear out quicker.
  • - 2
 how much for this review?
  • + 1
 @dontcoast: The value isn't there on cheaper bikes, but I find it a bit galling that so many at $5K and above are equipped with Shimano's 11-46. It's almost a half-pound heavier than the X01 10-42 (and has a silly jump to the last cog to boot).
  • + 1
 @alexdi: that's a different story...the battle of old hyperglide vs new XD. Agreeed though, weight-wise on high end bikes Shimano definitely suffers.
  • + 27
 $349 USD? $349 USD?? $349 USD!!!!
  • + 7
 still cheaper than 2 of the 3 eagle cassette options.
  • + 0
 @hamncheez: But Eagle is 12-speed specific.
  • + 18
 I just found SUNRACE 11-46 for 70 USD. That is exactly 5x less than the cost of this!!!! I hope the two cogs give you at least a 5x better riding experience.
  • + 7
 @IluvRIDING: It might be 1/5th the cost, but it is not 5 times less...your maths are wrong.
  • - 1
 @IluvRIDING: I ran sunrace cassettes until I noticed they rusted, none of my other cassettes rusted ever, quality of materials and coatings were sub par
  • - 3
 @FLATLlNE: your grammar is wrong
  • + 5
 @allballz: or, the simplest way to say it is- the sunrace cassette = the e thirteen cassette to the 1/2.67 power. That would be the most common jargon to compare the cost
  • + 3
 @allballz: or, the sunrace cassette cost is equal to the ethirteen cost raised to the 1/5 power. That's the simplest
  • + 1
 @Ryanrobinson1984: don't you mean to the 13/65 power?Smile
  • + 1
 @allballz: You're right, and you're wrong, like the OP. Your theory is correct, but the English around it is not correct. He said 5x (five times) less..."x" is for multiplication, not devision. I knew what he means though and I was just teasing.

0.8x less, or 80% less is correct phrasing. 0.8x less is not equal to 5x less. So, technically, you are both wrong.

Five times less may be interpreted as -5x by some.
  • + 1
 @Jack-T-Media: Yes sir, purposely so. I was teasing the guy.
  • + 1
 yeah dont think i'll be changing from sunrace cassette any time soon
  • + 2
 @FLATLlNE: @IluvRIDING : Now we not only have grammar nazies, we've got math nazies too. Let me tell you, I'm no native English speaker though for technical stuff I may be better with English than any other language simply because of the literature I used. And I'm still surprised to read an article that discusses alloy vs steel. Steel is an alloy too.

So now we have metallurgy nazies too. Sorry for that. I'm pretty tolerant to misinformation and I welcome nonsense. Peace.
  • + 14
 $349 is pretty steep for a cassette, but cheaper than a new 12-speed drivetrain I suppose.

Now that they seem to have all the kinks ironed out, I may give it a try when it is time for a new cassette.
  • + 34
 gx eagle full grouppo is under 500
  • + 4
 @y9pema: 349 (less than) 499. SectionThirtyOne's math checks out!

edit: no less than symbol allowed!
  • + 6
 @Sardine: true, but with 50$ more (without new cranks) you get a fresh drivetrain
  • + 2
 @Sardine: Full grouppo means cranks, derailleur, cassette and chain..
  • + 2
 So, $349 USD= around $450 Canadian!
While I am 1x curious- I'll opt for something more budget minded when I make the switch. FWIW- last year I paid $520 Can. all in for a complete 2x10 XT group including brakes.
Yes I am cheap!
  • + 3
 Your second cassette change puts it on par with the price of the entire GX Eagle groupset with two cassette changes. 350 for first cassette vs 500 for full gx eagle (one cassette). Second cassette puts you at 350 + 350=700 vs 500 + 200 = 700.

I'd say that if you really need that massive gear range (plenty of people don't), Eagle seems like the better buy.
  • + 3
 @JaredHarzan: This is supposed to be in the high end segment of the Market. This is supposed to compete with XX1 and X01. Both are more expensive. Eagle only has 500% range.

You are paying for the following:
511% range
XX1 Weight

Yes there are cheaper options but losing 150-200g costs people. If you are weight conscious then you will spend the money.
  • + 1
 @Snowsed341: That's fine. That doesn't make it the better buy, it just means you shave some weight with an increase in cost and decrease in durability. If you're happy with that trade-off then hats off to you.

If you're just trying to get a huge range of gears, GX Eagle is more cost effective.
  • + 0
 @JaredHarzan: How is eagle Cheaper in the same bracket?

Eagle XO1 is 750.00 for the Cassette, Shifter and Rear Mech

The cassette can be had for around 300.00 and added to any existing 11sp Drivetrain.
  • + 15
 They really should name cassettes after sharks, since they have so many teeth Big Grin
  • + 1
 I believe OneUp already has....
  • + 1
 Do eagles have teeth? Or just a beak? Sram x-sync 3 beak profile chainrings. No wait, eagles have claws. Surely, they could have worked that into a product.
  • + 15
 Imma stay on my 1 x 10 converted setup that includes a 30$ SLX-grade cassette
  • + 8
 e*13 has a 10 speed version of the TRS+ cassette that makes for a nice 1x upgrade to 10 speed drivetrains ;-)
  • + 2
 @ninjatarian: ...it costs a little more than $30 though
  • + 4
 Old 10sp Zee derailleur + Radr cage + 60 euro Sunrace cassette = a happy camper.
  • + 0
 2 x 9 and 26 inch wheels for me.
  • + 0
 11-36 4lyfe
  • + 12
 Sunrace, they have 46 and 50. Never had problems with my 10 speed 42s
  • + 0
 Heavy, cheap.
  • + 8
 @seraph: You say cheap like it's a bad thing
  • + 4
 @scottzg: that extra 150 grams is gonna totally have you screaming to the carbon fiber gods to forgive you for your sins on your next ride. /s
  • + 1
 @seraph: the sunrace stuff is lighter than the Shimano equivalent I think. Mx8 or ms8 or whatever the moniker is lighter than XT.

And all the weight is at the hub - makes squat all difference to bike handling imo.
  • + 4
 @scottzg: Depends if you like the added 150-200g. Its supposed to be a high end cassette that rivals Eagle and XTR.

No one else has 510% range.

I have owned this cassette and the shimano/sram offerings and i can actually feel the weight savings when i pedal. This was on my Evil Wreckoning and i will choose the weight savings all day if it shaves weight and allows me to run an ElevenSix without a weight penalty.

I run light parts because i have the money and i want a light bike. If you cannot afford it then that is understandable.

Its not designed for everyone's budget.
  • + 8
 The new Sunrace 11-46 cassette has been excellent for me so far as well. Its $110 CAD (about a quarter of the price of this one), and though not quite possessing the same range and being heavier, it does allow for good climbing gears (and who needs a 9 or 10 tooth cog while on the trail?). The gear spacing is great too with top gears of 28-32-36-40-46.
  • + 8
 Still loving my 2x xt8000 drivetrain. One click of the front mech shifts the equivalent of three gears in back. I'm so backwards but it feels good.
  • + 5
 I actually run the TRS+ 9-44 cassette on my road/'cross bike and it helps me from spinning out on the flats when I try to keep my speed up after a descent. Also the 44t cog is a big help with my 38t up front, allowing me an easier climbing gear than my XTR 11-40 did.
  • + 1
 @seraph do you notice a difference in how fast the e13 wears compare to the xtr?
  • + 1
 @Happymtbfr: Not yet. I have only done one major ride on the E.13 cassette so far.
  • + 4
 I've been really happy with this cassette after 700 miles and 120,000 feet of climbing. The spread is more natural for me compared to Sram's 1x11. I run a 30 tooth up front and I no longer need to switch to 28 tooth when heading north to ride in BC.

Removing the cassette with one chain whip is easier than using two.

My experience with e*thirteen's customer service has been really good. They have been quick to respond and really honor their warranty.
  • + 1
 I still hate that it can't just simply use threads on the cassette like a sram cassette. The first cluster is easy to remove but the second requires some patience with my shitty chain whip haha
  • + 6
 I've always liked e13 from when they got big over 10-15 years ago but why am I paying so much money for this. This is absolutely insane.
  • + 2
 Class leading 510% range and XX1 Weight. You could buy XX1 Cassette and spend 100 more. Its supposed to be a high end product.
  • + 4
 I run a Wolftooth Oval 30t, XT derail, and this cassette on my hardtail. By far the best cassette I have ever ridden. I weigh 160lbs but am very rough on the climbs (Standing on the pedals, shifting in full mash, etc...) but have not noticed much wear other than some peening on the top 3 cogs. Another grand slam from e*13!
  • + 3
 I'm guessing e*13 didn't proactively reach out to you about your cassette shifting issues. I bought one of their 42 tooth cogs back in 2014. The teeth were too round and didn't hold the chain, brand new. I only found out when I hit my first climb. I called e*13 and they sent me a new one. No comment, no recall nothing about the bad one. The shop I got it from still had 6 bad ones in stock. e*13 didn't call them either. And when the shop called, e*13 didn't say whoops we're sorry, yes we shipped some bad ones. They just brushed it under the rug. They were happy to let these cogs get sold, that were obviously mis-machined. I'm wary of them now.
  • + 2
 I have to thank ethirteen for getting me the range to switch to 1x.

I run an XTR drivetrain with a long cage rear derailleur. I have the same problems that the shifting especially as you go higher to the Aluminum cogs it's not very good - reminds me of worn LX about 10 years ago. Also backpedaling results immediately in a dropped chain anywhere on the 3 aluminum rings. I used the cassette last year and replaced the aluminum upper cogs at the start of this year. I think there is some issue with spacing between the steel/Alum cogs.

As per the author, I switched to a SRAM GX11 speed cassette and voila - the shifting is back to XTR standards. What was interesting is that I brought the upper and lower range set screws inwards indicating that the Ethirteen is somehow wider.

With the new GX eagle - reasons for purchasing this cassette dwindle unless like me you hate SRAM shifter ergonomics. I really give it to Ethirteen for being innovative and DO NOT regret my purchase and use of their produce - their are just better solutions now.

On another point - based on the text of the review - Ethirteen has a batch of these that did not shift so well then made a running change. You can be sure the reviewer go the newer one ASAP. When you buy this cassette - will you know which batch you will get, and if you have the older batch will Ethirteen rush to send you a replacement?
  • + 5
 Are the top three aluminum cogs available for purchase separate from the whole thing? Seeing as they wear quicker?
  • + 2
 Yep, but it will cost your a Benjamin. Seems kinda steep for 3 cogs. I wish they'd make a a steel cluster, you can buy aftermarket. I could drop a bill on that cluster knowing it would last me a few years.
  • + 2
 I'm convinced the e13 business model is designed to massively over price products (RRP) then sell at a really reduced rate to manufacturers who then look like they have high species bikes.

Then, when the products break - charge extertionate amounts for spares.

One is not a fan.
  • + 2
 @jamesdunford
I'm convinced the e13 business model is designed to massively over price products (RRP) then sell at a really reduced rate to manufacturers who then look like they have high species bikes.

That sounds like most bike part business models to me. The MSRP on most of this stuff is outrageous. They'd get a lot more folks buying if they would come to reasonable price points.
  • + 0
 @Poulsbojohnny: Agreed to an extent, but E13 seem to take it to another level entirely. I had to put a new E13 bottom bracket in a few months ago. Two bearings, $10 worth. It cost $100. They seem to push it further than anyone else.
  • + 2
 I've been riding it all summer. Price is a bit steep but you just got to shop around. Runnung it with a sram xo1, kmc chain, and it runs great. A little slower slower shifting but really is nit picking. Love the range as I am not getting any younger. Hopefully it holds up, but so far no regrets.
  • + 1
 I don't understand how this can compete with something like the Shimano XT 11 Speed 11-46t Cassette which you can pick up for about 75€/90USD (almost 1/4 the price!). Sure it's 150 grams heavier and has slightly less range but does the average MTBer really care? I don't!
  • + 1
 I have the 9-44 now on two wheelsets and I love it, especially the 9 tooth clog. Since I am limited to 30t in front it's the only way to get to faster speed. I cannot comment on the wear of the 3 aluminum cogs, as I don't use them very often. Therefore I did not go for the 9-46. I am not a weight weenie but If I get a lighter wheel I still appreciate it.
  • + 1
 What bike is limited to 30T in front?
  • + 1
 the new pinch bolt version of the TRSr cassette (201Cool is only held onto the freehub by a pinch bolt that clamps the larger 1/2 of the cassette around the smooth part of the XD driver, held on only by friction. this clamping surface is only about 4mm wide where it actually clamps around the freehub body. it does not have a lockring to permanently and securely lock it onto the freehub, unlike almost every other cassette out there. installed perfectly according to e13 tech doc, but the cassette slid laterally on the freehub body to the drive side hitting the carbon frame taking a chunk out of it. e13 offered NO help and said thats no possible to avoid liability for damaged frame.

BTW this was on a brand new bike, new cassette, new ethirteen plus wheelset. put the cassette on a brand new x0 hub and the same thing occurred. Even if this is a one-off manufacturing defect it is a TERRIBLE design.

BTW i have the lockring verson (trs +) and it works perfectly. avoid this new pinch bolt version AT ALL COST
  • + 3
 £100 for a Surface 11-50T eleven speed cassette that will hit a Shimano hub as well. Think e13 need to review their pricing.
  • + 1
 link please?
  • + 1
 Sunrace seem like a good cheap option, but I guess it depends how much 200 grams is worth to you. Also with the e13 you'll only have to replace the alloy rings for a long time since the steel piece will last. I don't think they are trying to compete with Sunrace, but rather SRAM. And compared to SRAM offerings, the e13 is a far better option.
  • + 1
 the new pinch bolt version of the TRSr cassette (201Cool is only held onto the freehub by a pinch bolt that clamps the larger 1/2 of the cassette around the smooth part of the XD driver, held on only by friction. this clamping surface is only about 4mm wide where it actually clamps around the freehub body. it does not have a lockring to permanently and securely lock it onto the freehub, unlike almost every other cassette out there. installed perfectly according to e13 tech doc, but the cassette slid laterally on the freehub body to the drive side hitting the carbon frame taking a chunk out of it. e13 offered NO help and said thats no possible to avoid liability for damaged frame.

BTW this was on a brand new bike, new cassette, new ethirteen plus wheelset. put the cassette on a brand new x0 hub and the same thing occurred. Even if this is a one-off manufacturing defect it is a TERRIBLE design.

BTW i have the lockring verson (trs +) and it works perfectly. avoid this new pinch bolt version AT ALL COST
  • + 1
 I've got about 20 rides or so on my TRS 9-46 with a 30 tooth front and I do like it. A lot lighter than the M8000 with the one up 50. One thing I can say is that I installed with grease following the instructions and then after one ride I simple ran some water over it (no pressure stream) to get dust and dirt off (as it is a nice looking cassette when clean) and it developed a ticking when in the lower, attached, locking part of the cassette. After taking it off twice and re-greasing, it still made the noise. I replaced the chain to a hollow point SRAM and it still kept up. Only when I put chain lube into the opening between the driver and cassette did it start to go away. I understood this was a problem with their older cassettes and they came up with kits and a plastic insert and included grease to remedy but it sounds like it may have still carried over to this one. I have yet to contact customer service about this as it seems to have gone away for now. It does come back on rides when mashing sometimes but only in the lower gears.
  • + 1
 fyi I used thick auto anti seize instead of grease on the threads. No noise but still recent.
  • + 1
 I'm pretty sure the kit was for the TRS+ cassette not the TRS race. Try greasing where the driver meets the cassette; it worked for me.
  • + 1
 @RichPune: I have but I'll try again. Plenty of grease. I'll figure it out.
  • + 2
 I'll stick to my all steel SRAM XG1150 cassette paired with a 30T SLX 7000 steel toothed chainring.... as I like riding a whole lot more then I do maintaining.
  • + 4
 E13 has produced nothing but garbage since bought out by the hive.
  • + 0
 The bigger cogs are the LOWER gears, the TOP gears are the smallest cogs, not the other way round as you have it here. Yes, the top of the big cogs are higher than the top of the small cogs, but the gear is lower, and that's what high vs low is about in gears. Jeez.
  • + 3
 Yup, you're right. I got them mixed up. Please forgive me.
  • + 1
 Sun Race or XT. Cheaper and longer lasting.

Plus how does a person know if they getting the model that shifts well, or the one with "issues" ? Do we like gambling with $349 USD?
  • + 1
 XT 11-46 with 34 T chainring... who needs more imho? Ok, if you have calves like Graves or Rude, ride a 36 T, but otherwise... a cassette for 350 USD is too much.
  • + 3
 $350 for something that I toss in 6 months due to chain jumping? Hm.
  • + 1
 Lets be honest: Who needs a 9t cog???Seriously...thats ridiculous. So its a overpriced 10speed with issues...great catch in my book.
  • + 1
 Has anyone had an issue with the pinch bolt collar breaking? Bought brand new cassette, and collar snapped when torquing to 35 in lbs, which equals 4Nm.
  • + 1
 any of you guys have the 46T bend? The 3 sets that I have all of my 46T bend. One bending a lot more and the chain keeps slipping.
  • + 1
 I bend a the original 44T design, but haven't had any issues with the 46T. Check your chain growth, that was one of the things we looked at when I bent the 44, something that gets forgotten a lot when people set up these larger Cog systems.
  • + 3
 Piss take price tag some idiot will buy it tho
  • + 1
 Have the 9-46 w/ a 28t and am pleased with it. I agree that Eagle shifts slightly better and also agree that I don't care.
  • + 3
 So is 26 back?
  • + 1
 I'd still not use a 9 or 10t when riding. I'd have to go down to a 28t front before that happened.
  • + 1
 I have the trs+ (non-race), lasted 1100 miles then replaced the top 3. 99% desert riding.
  • + 3
 Made of cheese.
  • + 3
 Agree.....had one, wore it out in about 2 months. Not even a quality cheddar, more a weak edam. Also, the cassette is not compatible with all bikes. When installed on my Evil Wreckoning the chain was too close to the chainstay when in the 9t cog. Its a great idea but not really worth the investment in my personal opinion, especially now GX Eagle is out.
  • + 1
 So this or the hope cassette? I already have pro2 hubs & with the proprietary driver the cost is the same.
  • + 1
 Enve's and an E-Thirteen cassette, damn, I'm going to dental school.
  • + 1
 A fool and his money are soon parted.
  • + 1
 What shifter was used on the test?
  • + 2
 a rear shifter
  • + 1
 How about a comparison between this and the Hope 11spd cassette?
  • + 0
 I have it an love it! And honestly e13 is the perfect customer service company - no sarcasm!
  • + 0
 Shimano should partnership with e-13, awesome shifting + awesome cassette and reasonable prices;
  • + 1
 $349 USD is cheap compared to a horse but you only get 1 horse power.
  • + 1
 should be awsome with a quadruple gears on the crank 18-24-34-52 hahaha
  • + 1
 A PG-1030 Cassette (60$) and some strong legs is all you need.
  • + 1
 Bring back the FD.....
  • - 2
 PINION
  • + 2
 oPINION
  • + 2
 @seraph: YEEESSSSSSSSSSSSSS
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