SUNringlé Charger Expert AL Wheelset - Review

Jan 6, 2017 at 10:10
by AJ Barlas  
Sun Ringle Charger Expert AL 27.5 Wheels


SUNringlé's Charger wheelset has been a staple in their range since about 2008 and the brand continues to make updates to improve them. This latest iteration features their new SRX straight-pull hub and a stiff, aluminum tubeless-ready rim profile. Charger wheels come with all the trimmings needed to run either a 15 or 20-millimeter front hub; a QRx135 or 12x142 rear hub; a regular Shimano or XD driver; tubeless rim tape is installed, and valves and sealant are included. The wheels are targeted at riders looking for a durable all-mountain wheelset who are all about "cleaning the line versus pinning it against the clock."

Charger Expert AL Details

• Size: 27.5" (29" option available)
• Intended use: all-mountain
• Internal width: 23.6mm
• Rim material: aluminum
• 28 double-butted spokes
• All trimmings for tubeless
• All adapters included
• Weight: 1,775g (3.9 lbs)
• MSRP: $549.99 USD
• Contact: SUNringle
Charger wheels come with rim strips fitted, and with the supplied tubeless valves installed, they weigh in at 1,775 grams—a reasonable weight in this price range. Speaking of which, retail on these wheels is on the more affordable side of the scale, at only $549.99 USD. There's also a 29-inch option, and both sizes are available for either 12x142-millimeter or Boost-width hubs. The SRX hubs run on large cartridge bearings and swapping out the included adapters (on the non-Boost versions) is simple and takes only a couple of minutes.


Sun Ringle Charger Wheelset w SRX front hub
The SRX hubs feature an easy to change hub adapter.
as are adapters for 15 or 20mm front 15mm shown and QRx135 12x142 rear axle options
Simply twist to pull them off and press on the new ones.


Construction

The Charger wheels use SUNringlé Helix TR275L rims, which feature a hooked bead profile and are equipped with eyelets, which will no doubt put some riders at ease. Internal width on these rims is on the narrower side, coming in at 23.5 millimeters. That narrower width was immediately apparent once 2.3-inch tires were mounted and, more importantly, when on the trail. Lacing up the wheels are 28 straight-pull Wheelsmith spokes, which is part of the SUNringlé family.

The hubs are SUN's SRX and house large, sealed cartridge bearings. The large bearings are claimed to increase bearing life while also reducing weight. The three-pawl driver is of the tried and true variety, which features an average level of engagement, with 30 teeth on the drive ring.


Sun Ringle s SRX front hub with straight pull spokes
The SRX hub and its robust, low, straight-pull flange.
The 3 pawl freehub body of the XD driver which is included with the wheels as is the regular driver body
The driver body uses three pawls.


Performance

Mounting tires on the Charger Expert AL wheels was straightforward, especially with the supplied sealant and valves, and already taped rim. The Michelin Wild Rock R2s were my tire of choice, and they went on without fuss—tight enough to air up, but not so loose to suggest burping issues. Mounting an XD driver was also required, which was a very simple process.

As I mentioned previously, the rims feature an internal rim width of 23.5 millimeters and while that would have been fairly standard only a short time ago, most options in the AM category are now wider. The narrower width was noticeable in the profile of the tires, which I usually ride mounted on rims in the 27 to 30-millimeter range. On the trail, I found traction wasn't quite what I was used to expecting from my 2.3-inch Michelin's and had to use a little more effort in order to keep the bike on line.

The wheels were great in a number of riding scenarios but tended to lack some of the liveliness I was accustomed to. (I had been riding a set of custom wheels, built up using Easton's ARC rims.) That shortage of zest gave me the sense that the Charger wheels weighed more than the scale claimed, and I felt they required extra rider input to lift the bike out of holes and undulations in the terrain. It was also quite apparent when exiting corners, with the wheels granting less acceleration than I was accustomed to. That is compared to custom-built wheels, however, and when the Chargers are compared to similarly priced wheels, the experience is really quite good (not to mention having all the parts in the box included to set up your bike).

Sun Ringle Charger Wheelset w SRX rear hub
Charger wheelset with the new SRX rear hub.


After a few rides the wheels required a true, which is common for most wheelsets, and while truing straight-pull spokes can be tricky, I didn't experience the same issues with these. Once done, things remained tight and in place throughout the rest of the test. The rims themselves are very solid and durable, and there was never an issue with flat spots, something that's pretty common in my experience with alloy rims. The hubs also ran really smooth on their large, sealed bearings and rolled on effortlessly, with little drag to speak of.


Issues

Toward the very end of testing, while on a road trip in the Kootenays and (unfortunately for me) at a time when I had decided to ride the Seven Summits in full, I experienced what began as a minor but strange feeling when applying force to the pedals. Having pretty well ridden my legs off during the course of the week, I initially put the subtle feeling down to fatigue, but after two more episodes, it became obvious that there was a problem. Eventually, about three-quarters of the way up the Seven Summits climb, while rounding a steep switchback, my foot spun freely through the pedal stroke with no transfer of energy to the rear wheel.
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The freehub had gone and I was left having to skate and hike my way to the top of the trail. Once home, the driver was removed, revealing no major issues to the naked eye. Closer inspection revealed that the engagement ring had broken free from the inside of the hub and was spinning freely.

I reached out to SUNringlé about the experience and was pleased to hear that, not only would they cover it, but reportedly, they had not experienced that scenario since early testing:

"While we have seen the problem that occurred on your wheelset, it’s the first and only one that’s taken place 'in the wild.' Two Hayes test riders had this happen. The issue has been identified and corrected. Here in the US, Hayes Performance systems and SUNringlé stand behind all our product found by the factory to be defective in materials and/or workmanship within one year (two in European Union countries). If this problem were to occur on any other SUNringlé wheelsets, our Hayes global customer service team would replace this wheel, regardless of the time elapsed." - Eric Schutt, SUNringlé


Wheels w regular freehub and tubeless tape plus sealant tubeless valve stems and XD freehub are all included
Straight pull double butted spokes hold the wheels together
Included parts, in addition to the Shimano driver and rim strips that come already on the wheel.


Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesThe Charger Expert AL is a true working man's wheelset that offers a lot for little. Their weight is reasonable, their adaptability out of the box is unmatched at this price, and they kick on with little fuss. The issue I had with the hub seems to be an anomaly, and Sun firmly stands behind their product, stating that they are prepared to fix an issue of this nature, even outside of their warranty period. I think that says a lot about their confidence in the Charger's durability. - AJ Barlas


MENTIONS: @HayesBrakes


116 Comments

  • + 26
 I miss my Rhyno Lites welded and machined 26ers
  • + 67
 I also miss hammer pants, Tupac, and Oldsmobile.
  • - 4
flag schofell84 (Jan 13, 2017 at 3:41) (Below Threshold)
 @scottzg: I honestly miss Tupac. If you dont, I question your judgement.
  • + 3
 I just built up a pair of welded MTX 33's last summer for my outdated 26" trail bike... they may not be light but they are bomb proof!
  • + 1
 Really I thought my rhyno lites and ditch witch rims were both garbage!! Hit one big jump with them and bam flat spot on the rims. Now my mtx33s and my s-types34s are a different story both sets are bomb proof!! I used to use double tracks but found that they were overkill!!
  • + 6
 I still have a Rhyno Lite on a Deore front hub that I run daily. It hates tires. But it loves making that crisp BANG sound and continuing on without a flinch.
  • + 14
 @bizutch: oh I member...Yea I loved the $89 rhyno lite/deore wheelsets back when qr was used front and back
  • + 2
 True story
  • + 0
 @schofell84: I never knew him personally to miss him in the first place.
  • + 19
 One thing you get with Hayes, awesome customer service, Ive always liked Sun rims, the seem to ride well
  • + 8
 Yep, a plastic cam broke on my Manitou qr axle 4 months over warrenty. Whole new axle in the post from Heyes Europe, no hassle, no quibbles. That's customer service
  • + 4
 Same experience for me. I have a lower-end Charger wheelset on my hardtail. I broke a rear axle without realizing it, and ended up completely wrecking the ratchet ring and pawls... not only did Hayes/Sun rush me replacement pawls, spring, and ratchet ring, they gave me a stronger axle (chromoly instead of aluminum) and the ratchet ring removal tool (proprietary) no questions asked. Great service.
  • - 2
 Yes, great service. Absolutely top notch. But great service on garbage doesn't improve garbage
  • + 3
 Agree. Amazing service from those guys. I've had Manitou issues in the past, and the guys at Hayes were always SUPER friendly and prompt in fixing the issues. They are on my list of "good guys".
  • + 2
 I had a bleed nipple on my old hfx9s that was spurting oil when I braked and Hayes sent me free of charge, no questions asked a new set of spares to fix the problem after just 2 emails, the 2nd confirming my address. Only a small thing but absolutely top notch service.
  • + 8
 A riding buddy of mine had the 'free the freehub' engagement problem also (but with another wheelset). This occurred on the first climb of what would be an awesome day on the trail (3hr ride to get there). I would categorize this as some kind of traumatic experience for bikers. Like slapping an ice cream out of a childs hand. It's great sunringle will replace the hub without cost but I would suggest they address this problem beforehand.
  • + 7
 Why make it straight pull? To force the consumer to buy their proprietary spokes? And internal rim width of 24mm shows that they do not keep up with time. Still a long time fan of sun rims tho, been running them for 10 years.
  • + 5
 I had a set of Chargers a few years ago. I blew spokes out all the time on my rear wheel and was hard to find a shop who could service it with the straight spokes. Never again a Charger for me - sorry Sun!
  • + 2
 Straight pull is cheaper to build and can be pitched as a 'feature.' Bad for the end user, good for the manufacturer.
  • + 8
 This is why we carry straight pull spokes but at a 310 length and just cut to size and thread them. You loose the double butted aspect but that is less than a gram of weight. I'm surprised more shops don't do the same. Having the pro version of the wheels I have only broken the flange off the nipple and most likely that was caused to having a little bit of stans get into the rim itself.
  • + 6
 @drummuy04: Not a lot of shops want to drop the money to get a spoke thread maker. Aren't they like 500 bucks or so?

@everybody else: but shouldn't we all admit that the world would be better if straight pull not j-bend was the industry standard? No stupid scf's at the j-bend area. That's where all spokes break anyways.
  • + 2
 @drummuy04: is it bad to get Stans in the rim cavity. Does it corrode the metal?
  • + 1
 @VTwintips: Curious why they couldn't they just use a standard die to thread the spoke?
  • + 2
 I've always liked the look of straight pull over j bend, but will contest to their "special order" status.
  • + 3
 @Adodero: Spoke threads are formed, which doesn't remove any material. A traditional die, cuts threads, which removes material, making it weaker.
  • + 3
 The thought with straight pull is they don't have a bend, meaning a more robust wheel. The down side, if you do catch a stick, you don't have that extra play (from the J-bend) to take up some of the hit. People can buy extra spokes ahead of time to keep as spares. I'm surprised people with SP spokes don't do that more often.

As for spoke cutter/threaders, they are awesome! I've built around 1000 wheels with them, just mine alone I've built 15 sets of wheels or so. So nice. The machine, if you can find one, is very expensive. But you can order one length spoke and cut it down. You can also do DB spokes, but you need a few different sizes to keep enough material on the spoke. I've never been disappointed with a custom cut wheel and never received any negative feed back from anyone I built a wheel for.

As for my opinion if SP are better... I really couldn't say. I've seen both fail and both go 1000's of miles. I've only used J'bends and have yet to break a spoke, have had popped eyelets, but not needed to replace a spoke in almost 10,000 miles. That spoke broke because I sucked a chain into the wheel.
  • + 2
 @silverfish1974: Stan's and other sealants contain ammonia and will corrode aluminum that is not anodized. I did that to some unanodized Dura Ace wheels.
  • + 1
 @scottzg: The spokes are cheaper to make, but the hubs are more expensive.
  • + 1
 @Endurahbrah: Thanks for the info.
  • + 1
 @silverfish1974: Yes, it is very bad. Unfortunately it happens when the tape goes bad. @VTwintips They are only like 250-300 but it pays for itself within good time. The same idea goes for J-bend spokes as well. It really saves space with the amount of spokes you have to carry and you for sure will have the size for a customer that comes in, instead of having to order a box of 72 for each 2mm increment.
  • + 8
 straight pull spokes are not proprietary.
They are available from common spoke manufacturers includeing DTSWISS and SAPIM, as are straight pull hubs. Straight pull spokes provide more lateral stiffness, in the same way radial spoke lacing does, but with the torsional strength of a crossed spoke pattern. They can also allow for a wider hub flange, due to the spoke head's lower profile, resulting in a wider bracing angle and stiffer wheel.
They are also a lot easier to lace and replace.
That being said, they are harder to find in a local bike shop, so I understand why people think they're proprietary.
+1 on the rim width.
  • + 3
 Hozan makes a spoke threader for $100. It's great for a shop to have for spoke replacements, when a customer has one or a few broken spokes. It's not practical for threading a whole wheels worth at a time, but for a small shop, it means they only have to carry a few boxes of different blanks. Everyone is usually willing to wait a few days to special order spokes for a wheel build anyway.
  • + 1
 @rontarson: Me too. I have Charger Pros with cool ano nipples that look great, but fail regularly. Almost made it through 1/2 the spokes one at a time.
  • + 2
 @VTwintips: with many thousands of miles on many wheels I've never had a spoke break at the j-bend.

Last summer on a trip to Winter Park had a spoke break on my King/Flow rear wheel, first run down. Since it was a basic, serviceable, design the slope side shop had it repaired in about 30 minutes. They had a new spoke on hand that fit because my setup was pretty basic.

Riding in the NE getting small branches stuck in you wheel is not an uncommon thing. I've had some bad ones that locked up the rear, but with no real damage to the wheel or spoke.
  • + 2
 @MikerJ: So have you ever broken a spoke? If so, where did it break? Only other place would be the nipple.
  • + 1
 @VTwintips: Yeah, but only a few in many miles of riding. One may have been at the nip IIRC, but the few others were mid-spoke. Never at the J bend. Spokes are made pretty thick at the bend, correct?
  • + 2
 @MikerJ: having worked as a bike mechanic, most spokes break at the elbow on the drive side. Often enough the spoke was damaged by a chain into the spokes but when spokes break from age it is most common to break on the drive side at the j bend. Mid spoke breaks are usually from damage. Nipples can fail and I have seen spokes break at the nipple. Because the spoke is bent to create the j, that is a weak point. Straight pull spokes avoid that and should be stronger. An issue with straight pull is how to hold them from turning when cranking the nipple. Bladed spokes can be held with a small slotted tool and j bend will only twist a bit. But you have to eliminate that twist when you build them.
  • + 6
 Its difficult to compete with spank, stans, and for a little more dt 471. Such good value for money which are the same weight if not a little less, and wider.
  • + 4
 BS these guys had never had issues described: it's clearly a defect they've ignored (or just been unable to address) for years. I bought a Cube Fritzz in 2014 which came with OE Sunringlé wheels (rebranded) that experienced the exact same failure. Except that failure happened suddenly, on a steep uphill, with a 30-35ft drop off to the side... Rolling backwards down a hill, unable to pedal and in mortal danger is not an experience I'd care to repeat.
  • + 5
 Totally. Utter nonsense. Happened to so many OEM ringle hubs, then they would warranty them and upgrade to the charger. Just to have it happen again. If you don't open the email, it never happened.
  • + 12
 Brakes failed at the same time?
  • + 0
 @Fattylocks: The irony of a grown man who calls himself 'Fattylocks' but really looks like a bald Frankie Boyle and isn't funny...
  • + 3
 Infreno31 rims are great rims, but it's 2017 now...

Don't try to sell me $150+ hubs with 4paws and 27/30POE when I can buy 6-offset paw, 54POE $130 hub. Don't try to sell me rims over $40/$50 that are 24mm or under internal width, and without offset spoke patterned 4D spoke drilling; when I can buy 25mm internal width offset spoke patterned 4D spoke drilling rims for $55/$60.

These things matter!
  • + 1
 Agree. Who's ponying up for 24mm rims in 2017?
  • + 3
 if these were $ 350-400 ok... for that price, next... I'll stick to Stans ..
  • + 5
 That's only 1mm difference...
  • + 1
 @passwordpinkbike: When it comes to offset spoke patterns, the 1mm is a lot of room.

"Every millimeter counts"
  • + 3
 For light riders doing the all mountain thing this is a nice wheels set. For your average 180 pound dude doing a weekend enduro here and there probably shouldn't get these as there other options that are wider. I still think this wheelset will find a home and I could easily seel this at my shop as a mid level good enough to race on if needed wheelset.
  • + 2
 out of the entire industry hayes has the best service hands down. Hell, I got a manitou travis triple instinct given to me from a friend, it was missing the axle and hardware. I sent a message to hayes and they shipped me the parts to my door at no cost...... WTF! it was a total shock to me that any bike industry company would do this but customers are paramount to them.
  • + 2
 23.6mm rims? What is the point? Surely these are just old rims they had lying around in the warehouse or bought some old stock from some other manufacturer. What company in their right mind would manufacture new "all mountain" 23.6mm rims?
  • + 2
 I once rode 23.5 rims, almost died.
  • + 3
 "Issue identified & corrected" - care to share, Sun Ringle?

This is likely to be one of two things, (1) lousy QC resulting in a defect & part failure or (2) a design flaw.

So which is it?
  • + 3
 They used the same pre-production process as Yeti maybe?
  • + 4
 27.5 or 29".... any recommendations for durable all-mountain wheelset at an affordable price but for an old fashioned 26" ??
I know... I'm so 2016... maybe even 2015 !..
  • + 2
 You might be best off with some hand built wheels. Some SLX hubs with a decent rim should last a long time and be really durable.
  • + 3
 Spank still sells rims in 26" dia, at least according to their website. Lace to any hub. I have Spank rims on both my trail and DH bike and couldn't be happier. I broke the trail bike's chainstay while landing a jump and the wheels didn't even need spoke tension.
  • + 0
 durable/affordable? 317 + hope + dt
  • + 1
 I smashed a stock Duroc rim on my 27.5+ and got a new Duroc 40 wheelset with SRX hubs to replace it, Boost width. Not the same rim as in the review, but the Durocs tend to burp easily (hence the smashed rim), so I have to run higher pressures than I would like. Also, look at how much material exists between the spoke interface and the disc mount -- why? Why go Boost width and not get the stiffness benefit of pushing the spoke interfaces out? I know, there could be a good reason (less dishing, more even spoke tension, but I am skeptical). Still a solid value for the money, but could be better. No issues with the freehub. I will be moving these to a backup emergency set in the near future, though.
  • + 1
 I've had both Charger Pro (26" and 27.5") and Black Flag Pro wheelsets on a few bikes over the last five years. I've never had and major issues with them. They've seen every type of riding from cyclocross, trail and park. My only criticism would be damage to the aluminum freehub body. For the price I think they are a great value.
  • + 1
 I love great customer service, and agree that Hayes has some of if not the best in the biz. But regardless of how good the folks on the phones/emails are, what I truly think makes great customer service is having product designed and manufactured well enough that interactions with tech support over product failure aren't really needed. It starts in engineering. Sadly, there are too many companies that don't recognize this.
  • + 2
 That freehub problem aint new.. i had a set of old rim brake ringles and the freehub stopped working no customer support... also the rims are soft.. i dented up a set of mtx32.. sun ringle chewing gum rims...
  • + 2
 If you're denting your rims you should slap bigger tires on them I've never dented my mtx33s and I've been riding the same set on my dh rig for 5 years now and I'm running s-types on my dj which are an mtx34 and again solid af!!
  • + 3
 God damn it. These reviews always making me second guess my rims with 23mm internal width... "Is too small?" "Would people make fun of them?".
  • + 5
 If you are running 2.3" tires or there abouts, 23mm is on the narrow side of ideal, but in the ideal range none the less IMHO. Truth be told, many of the current crop of tires, such as the Maxxis Minion 2.3 DHF/DHR were quite likely designed around a rim with of around 23mm (I've read there actually were designed around exactly that, but I take that with a grain of salt). Approaching 30mm, and the rim and sidewall are to exposed to damage at lower pressures with many tires.

Run your 23mm and don't think twice. When they die, buy wider, sure, but your 23mm's aren't holding you back - you likely won't notice much difference bumping up unless you do so to install wider tires too. Save your cash.

I have two bikes. My 29'er trail bike (process 111) has 23mm carbon rims with ~2.3" tires (alternate between HR2's and Ardents) . I have no intention to go wider at this time. And, a 27.5 longer travel rig (Banshee Rune) with 25mm internal rims, that I am just now building up to run 2.3" Minions. I am quite content to stick with these sizes for the time being.
  • + 1
 Nothing wrong with having some old wheels that are 23mm. There is something wrong with buying a new set of wheels in 2017 that are 23mm. Would you buy a new 2017 all mountain bike with a 71 degree head tube angle? If you are going to buy new then you should be getting the benefits of new technology.
  • + 1
 @aharris: Ha! I did that. My options were the WTB rims i23 or i25, and I choose the i23 because at the time I thought it was a good idea to save a few insignicant grams (lol).
  • + 1
 @FLATLlNE: Matter of fact I use the Minions DHF and DHR combo in 2.3. I would like to try a High Roller II 2.4 in the front but maybe when I get a wider rim to really take advantage of the bigger tyre. I like the DHF a lot anyways, does well except when terrain is too loose.
Thanks for the comment. Actually the tyres feel good tubeless with very good grip.
  • + 2
 @passwordpinkbike: Even 2.4" will mount up fine on a 23mm rim I imagine, so I wouldn't sweat it. To correct myself, I am alternating HR2 2.4 (not 2.3), Ardent 2.4 and 2.25's on my 23mm Noble rims, without issue. Had the 27mm internals been available at the time, yeah I would have bought them, but I avoided the 30-something internals purposely as in my opinion, they are too wide for not-so-high-volume tires I ride - I don't want box shaped tires. The expense associated with upgrading now is just not worth considering - so maybe next time.

Yeah, i25 in hindsight would have been the way to go at the expense of the very small weight addition. However, 2mm extra width is going to give you very marginal performance gains that are hardly perceivable (if perceivable at all) by an average rider.

The HR2 2.4 is not noticeably bigger than the Minion 2.3 casing as far as my eyes can tell, and I can't be bothered to measure in that case. I am interested in trying the new Maxxis Aggressor this season on my 29'er - should be faster than the HR2, with the cornering grip of the minions - looks to be a great dry tire!
  • + 1
 @passwordpinkbike: Sorry. I will recorrect myself and confirm I am indeed on HR2 2.3's, sorry!
  • + 1
 Running an older set of sram rise 60 carbon hoops with 21mm internal. Thinking about some flow mk3s...necessary, no, but curiosity yes
  • + 3
 @sjdeweese: Funny. If you told anyone you were going to buy a 21mm rim today, they'd tell you how squirmy they are, how you'll roll your tires off your rims, how they will burp, etc etc. Funny that this has only come to light in the presence of wider/ultrawide rims. Tell me, when you trail ride with your buddies who have newer 25mm+ wide rims, do you find your tires spontaneously rolling off your rims more frequently? Wink

Truth is, for the application (all-mountain?) your are using them for, 21mm is probably fine. Yeah, 25-27ish might feel a little better/more stable, but will it improve your bike dramatically? Are you currently THAT unstable? Will you now be able to relax and auto-pilot lines you struggles with before? Unlikely.

I have a set of Crossmax Enduros that now reside on my overbuilt XC hard tail. They have 21mm front, 19mm rear. I rode them with dh sidewall 2.35 tires originally on my bigger bike, and for lift assisted DH on many occasions. I'm not ultra fast, but likely average or slightly faster than the average on typical black-diamond terrain, and maybe 160lbs. For me, they worked okay - I've never rolled a tire (though I have dented them), etc. Admittedly, 19mm is really pushing the narrow end for DH, and 25mm is a huge improvement, but left on my XC hardtail with a 2.25 mounted...meh, fine by me.

If I let myself sweat over all the latest over-hyped must-have's I'm curious over, I'd be broke. I imagine you bought your bike in 2013 and it worked bloody well when you bought it. If you never picked fault with 21mm back then, keep on em for the now. I'll run my 23mm's into the ground, and take whatever cash it would take to replace them to work less and ride more, or take my skinny rims on a nice riding trip to BC or Quebec to drown my size-envy sorrows, lol.
  • + 2
 @FLATLlNE: Same though process for me here. Haven't had any problems at all so far, minor jumping, rocky areas, couple cased landings, wheels still true and fast. Got a few "you shouldn't jump on xc rims" before. I'm just out having fun, not smashing things. The one benefit noted in this thread is the skinnier rims are more protected from sidewall strikes, which for any rim is a good thing. Running lower pressures and the better, shallow rim bed / bead designs for tubeless are the more important features of new rims. Now say I can lace my existing hubs, spokes to mk3 hoop, that would be a cheap option, and if I listen to reviews, the best option. By far the biggest difference comes from the tire casings. If I run RS Xkings around flat track, climbing, they are bouncy, but very fast and require far less effort to spin up. These single ply need higher pressure not to squirm though and can feel uneasy on steep take offs if your not dead strait. Switch my tires to Mich RockR2 Advanced/ Reinforced front and Shwabble RR rear super gravity and the difference is night and day. No bounce, tons of stability, no squirm. But at the penalty of effort to spin up. The lighter tires are more enjoyable on pedal happy tracks because I can go faster with less effort. I can get twice the workout with the heavier tires (if that's what your after). Also much more cut resistance / durability with the big boy tires. l guess the question is: Is putting a lighter tire on a wider rim going to give you the same or better support as a heavy casing tire on a skinny rim? Can you get the support and save the weight? My bike is a 29er, so rotational mass is exaggerated more so. I'm after the best compromise of both and haven't found it yet
  • + 2
 225 lbs 19mm rims 2.3 tires no problems.
  • + 3
 28 spoke, straight pull, 3 pawls, 'safe' rim... designed for a price point. Bummer they failed during testing... built to a price point too?
  • + 4
 I had a set of charger pro 26" on my old remedy. Great wheels. Good weight and bulletproof
  • + 4
 When did 549$ become affordable lol
  • + 5
 Apparently, affordable now means non-dentist.
  • - 3
 If that's not affordable, I think you're in the wrong sport! Hiking is cheap.
  • + 3
 @MtbSince84: Bollocks to that, I just got a new wheelset for £125.
  • + 7
 @justwan-naride: How come every mountain biker thinks all people with money must be dentists? Are dentists the only people around with disposable income? As a broke dentist, I take offense to this stereotype.

P.S. Sorry Jimmy...Some day the tooth fairy will bring you a new set of teeth...to replace the ones that I destroyed.

#notalldentists
  • - 3
 @MtbSince84: I'm with you man it is a very reasonable price considering we are starting to see 2000$ rimsets. These kids whining about the price are probably just that kids lol because I make more than enough to justify buying these rims at this price and I don't have that great of a paying job at all lol!!
  • - 1
 Wow I see the broke kids are quick to hit the down vote lmao!! Get a job!!!
  • + 1
 @serathestaii: Is your business located in a van?
  • + 1
 @serathestaii: Sorry mate, did not mean to offend. The "dentist" thing thing is a mtb stereotype, used tonque-in-cheek. I will use the term "hollywood dentist" from now on.

In fact, a couple of my friends are dentists, I seriously doubt they could afford a 4.000-5.000 euro bike.

@MtbSince84: If you think disposable income should define who participates in a sport, you should pull your head out of your @ss.
  • + 1
 @justwan-naride: HahaHaha...Dude, I'm just kidding. I'm not a dentist. However, I do see one occasionally and he says to say...

#notalldentists
  • + 2
 @bizutch: I conduct all my business in a van.
  • + 3
 Surprised that with my 26 wheels and non-tubeless tires I'm still able to ride and have fun....
  • + 3
 I recon you can do Hopes and Stans custom wheels for not so much more...
  • + 0
 Spelling Nazi here. RECKON...not recon.
  • + 1
 @bizutch: Thanks
  • + 1
 For below 700 EUR you can get a new Syntace W35MX wheelset (28.5mm inner width). Weighs the same, holds twice as long. Just saying.
  • + 3
 Sun makes the best rims in the business.
  • + 0
 Exactly the same issue on my ADD pro wheelset - I'm now on my 3rd spring and pawl kit for the freewheel - absolutely disastrous design, never never ever again will I go near these clowns for a wheelset.
  • + 2
 Sure it's nice that the customer service was awesome, but that should just never happen.
  • + 0
 Sun hub issues are not an anomaly. I broke 2 Sun fat bike hubs which suffered the same exact failure. Obviously the above hub is different but I find it curious that I had the same issue with it breaking under pressure.
  • + 1
 Charger and Black Fag wheel sets are awesome! Tough, reasonably light and priced wonderfully. I have two sets and would not at all hesitate to get another.
  • + 3
 ^ hilarious typo. Trying to imagine the marketing for that wheelset haha
  • + 1
 @bkm303: Lol, thanks auto correct. .
  • + 1
 I had the A.D.D. expert, never again! Spokes broke many times, rims dented super easy.

That is what I get for trying to save a few bucks (usually build my own wheels).
  • + 0
 I broke the pawl spring on my Demon hubs. Which I replaced and 2 weeks later it happened again this time the pawls breaking up too.. and then the axle snapped.. and then the wheels went in the bin. I would avoid.
  • + 1
 Yeah... For that money I can pretty much buy a set of Spank Oozys, and they are my favorite wheels for all mountain by far.
  • + 1
 aaaand another wheel review without stating the number of points of engagement on the freehub. Kinda important detail.
  • + 2
 Qrx135 but not 26". Didn't know 27.5 bikes came as qrx135.
  • + 1
 According to the sunringle site they do come in 26".

sun-ringle.com/mtb/wheelsets/charger
  • + 1
 Had a set a few years ago, destroyed the freehub after 6 rides and constantly broke spokes. Absolute rubbish wheels!
  • + 1
 Looks like the azonic outlaw wheelset which is still offered in 26"
  • + 0
 PB is broken. Moral of my long story: why the hell do companies still make skinny rims?
  • + 3
 Not every rim is made to go balls out straight down a mountain eh!!! I know it's mind blowing but believe it or not some people actually ride on flater ground and don't do jumps. Lmao some people!!!
  • + 1
 @mhoshal: Everyone benefits from tubeless tires at lower pressures that offer more grip. If anything, I'd say people who shred like maniacs and get huge air are probably the only people who could benefit from a taller tire profile and higher pressures to avoid rims strikes.

I ride like a dad and I love wider rims and softer tires. What's not to love about more grip and less squirm?
  • + 0
 @JesseE: wait until you are 3 hours into a remote trail and blow your tubeless tire and no matter what you do you can't get it reset on the rim trust me it's not fun at all have to take 7 hours to hike back out. I'll never make that mistakes again. Now I always carry a few tubes and an extra tread for long rides
  • + 1
 @mhoshal: I totally agree. Carrying a tube is a necessity regardless of how good your tubeless set up may be. When I occassionally ride in more remote areas I'll bring a whole tire too, cause walking out 10k takes a long time. Tubeless tires are amazing, but not infallible. I always carry a backup tube. Still, I'd rather ride without tubes until disaster strikes. Nothing worse than getting a stupid pinch flat or something little stuck in your tire that you miss and then you get another flat 20min later and have no more spare tubes. I have had 1 flat in about 5 years and it was a big piece of glass. I'm a total tubeless convert (obviously)
  • + 1
 Hard to tell if this is sarcasm?

I assume it is as you're on i25's (at least that's what you've lised), which are give 0.75mm extra width on either side of the rim over the rims reviewed, which is virtually nothing...

If it is sarcasm....Im with you!
  • + 1
 Not bad, but they could be wider.
  • + 1
 Freehub went on my charger wheelset after about 2 weeks, got a refund.
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