Yeti SB5 Turq - Review

Sep 15, 2017 at 18:07
by AJ Barlas  



When Yeti first revealed the SB5 back in 2014 people were really excited. The brand had once again gone and created what many deem to be one helluva good looking bike. It turns out that those looks were supported in the ride too, with many riders singing praises for the bike’s abilities on the trail.

Shoot forward two years and the brand rejigged a bunch of things, revealing a new SB5 in 2016, one that cleaned up some of the lines but overall appeared very similar. The most obvious changes were the move of the cable routing to the inners of the frame and some amends to the top-tube/seat-tube junction. The weight of the bike stayed roughly the same; the spec, similar, and the geometry, while growing marginally, didn’t change a great deal.

Yeti SB5 Details

• Intended use: Trail/All-Mountain
• Travel: 127mm
• 27.5" wheels
• 66.5-degree head angle
• 73.6-degree seat angle
• 12 x 148mm rear spacing
• Custom valved Metric 210mm x 50mm shock
• Switch Infinity Suspension Design
• Sizes: XS, S, M, L, XL
• Weight: 12.06kg/26.58lbs as tested (SRAM X01 Turq)
• Price: $6,999 USD
www.yeticycles.com

One change that Yeti made was the decision to move to two different carbon frame price-points. The Turq carbon reviewed here is the more premium of the two and as a result, fetches a higher price. The Turq series frame comes with a claimed weight of 5.5lbs (2.5kg) whereas the regular carbon series frame weighs in at a claimed 6.27lbs (2.84kg), giving a saving of 340 grams for the Turq. Aside from the weight savings, Yeti say that the Turq series frame is stiff, yet smoother than the regular carbon.

bigquotesTurq Series bikes are made with the highest quality carbon fiber available and offer the perfect balance of stiffness and compliance. The result is a bike that feels smooth, solid and aggressive.Yeti Cycles

Suspension Design

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Yeti didn’t change their suspension design with the new SB5 and the bike still features their unique Switch Infinity suspension design. As the bike drops into its sag, the carrier in the Switch link moves up, allowing the rear axle to move rearward, a trait often sought after for improved small bump performance. Deeper into the travel the carrier then begins to move downward, relieving the tension on the chain and aiming to improve the bike’s traction and ability to handle bigger hits that put the suspension deeper into its stroke.

One update that Yeti made with this most recent model was to the shock tune. The team worked closely with Fox to develop a custom tune that they feel is perfect for the SB5. That work involved coming up with valving and an air volume configuration that they felt would help the bike perform how they desired. The result is what Yeti claim to be better mid-stroke support and small bump compliance over the previous iteration of the bike.

Yeti SB5c Turq Review
Yeti SB5c Turq Review
The SB5 features Yeti's unique Switch Infinity suspension design.


Using the stock setup with Yeti’s recommended 15mm of sag in the rear I had a bit of a hard time on the trails of Coastal B.C. After a number of adjustments, I found myself settled with 16mm of sag and Fox’s small volume spacer for the DPS rear shock. With this setup I found the bike to perform better on the chattery and feature-rich trails of this region, but more on that in a minute.


Geometry/Sizing

As mentioned, this version of the SB5 did see a slight change in the geometry, with the bike evolving a little in a number of elements. The head angle was slackened half a degree, now coming in at 66.5 degrees, and the seat tube steepened slightly to improve climbing performance; from 72.75 to 73.6 degrees. As a tall rider on an extra large, the effective seat tube angle could be considered pretty slack, however, I found that the actual seat tube angle provided a better seated position than some bikes with steeper effective angles when the seat was fully extended—I wasn’t left too far off the back of the bike.

The reach of the bike is not overly large by modern standards, with a medium coming in at 424mm and for the XL tested, 463mm. A brand that was once somewhat synonymous with the longer, lower, slacker mantra is now no longer. While the reach numbers throughout the range are smaller than a lot of the competition, the stack (and head tube length) are on the larger side. The stack on the medium measures in at 610mm, taller than many of the competitors, while the head tube is also among the biggest in the trail bike segment.

Why am I pointing out these intricacies? Because of all the bikes that I’ve ridden over the years as a product tester, the 2017 Yeti SB5 was the most difficult to get comfortable on in terms of ride position, with the bike exhibiting a tall, upright stance for the rider. More on the effects in a bit, but when sizing for the bike, consider the charts below, your current bar/stem setup, and preferred ride height.

Yeti SB5c Geometry Comparisons
The SB5 in a medium compared with a number of similar bikes.

Yeti SB5c Geometry Comparisons
The SB5 in an extra-large compared others. The stack and headtube are relatively large compared to others.



Specifications
Specifications
Price $6.999
Travel 150/127
Rear Shock Fox Factory DPS
Fork Fox Factory 34
Headset Cane Creek 40 Inset
Cassette SRAM 1275 10–50
Crankarms SRAM X01 Carbon
Bottom Bracket SRAM GXP BB92
Rear Derailleur SRAM X01 Eagle
Chain SRAM GX Eagle
Shifter Pods SRAM X01
Handlebar Yeti Carbon
Stem Race Face Turbine 35x50mm
Grips Yeti
Brakes SRAM Guide RSC
Wheelset DT Swiss XM420
Hubs DT Swiss 350
Rim DT Swiss XM420
Tires Maxxis Ardent
Seat Yeti x WTB Volt
Seatpost Fox Transfer 150





2017 Yeti SB5c








Handling

The carbon frame of the SB5 Turq definitely is light and stout, with the XL size tested weighing in at 26.58lbs (12.06kg) without pedals, a fraction lighter than their claimed weight. On the trail, the frame made for a very active ride with the bike being easy to put where you want it. I did find the carbon frame to feel a little “tingy”, translating more of the feedback from the trail through to the rider, not something that I have noticed to such a degree with other carbon frames.

Further adding to the increased feedback on the rider over similar bikes, was the custom tuned suspension. The damping is quite heavy, resulting in a ride that wasn’t as light off the top as preferred for the trails of Coastal B.C. This resulted in less confidence in the bike on rooty, fast-paced sections of trail, with the bike preferring to skip rather than track. Push aggressively into the bike and the claimed improvements to the mid-stroke became apparent, with no dead spots in the middle of the stroke and plenty of support to push out of.

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When it comes to ascending the firm top end made for a spritely ride, and the bike accelerated effortlessly. If the trail features a lot of roots and square edges, I found it to be on the uncomfortable side of things when going up. Once the suspension was adjusted to have a little more sag and a volume spacer this did improve, but it still exhibited a tendency to get hung up on square edges a little more than I would like. On smoother trails there were no issues, and it flew up the climbs. This resulted in little use of the compression damper adjustment on the DPS shock, and I opted to leave it open the majority of the time.


Yeti SB5c Turq Review
The light weight and firm suspension make it a pleasure to go uphill on, if that's your thing.


Even with only the above information, it’s pretty clear to see where the SB5 excelled. On smoother terrain that featured less feedback to upset the balance of the bike, it was a weapon. The light weight combined with the stiff frame and firm suspension made for a very active ride on the descents. It rewarded a more assertive rider—one that confidently tells the bike what they expect of it, but the geometry is neutral enough to grant less confident riders confidence, however, may be a little uncomfortable thanks to the firm suspension.

In braking situations the SB5 likes to squat into its travel, which helps to keep the rider more balanced front to rear, combatting the weight of the rider being thrown forward when the anchors are dropped. I did, however, find that in terrain with high feedback—lots of roots, rock or holes—under heavy braking it had a tendency to dance a little and the bike required more attention to keep it under control, thanks to the rear end stiffening up when the stoppers are involved. On trails where these situations could be avoided performance under braking was good, with the squat enabling the rider to remain more neutral with less (subconscious) effort.


Yeti SB5c Turq Review


The bike excelled on lower-grade trails with less feedback, with the firm suspension and light, stiff frame accelerating effortlessly out of any backside you could place the wheels into. Accuracy in these situations—and on the bike in general—is important, as coming up short often resulted in a more abrupt decline in speed thanks to the firm suspension. The SB5 really benefits from an active rider that is looking to play with the trail and attempt to place the wheels in all of the right places in order to maintain, and often continue to build momentum.



Thoughts

Geometry: The extra large SB5 tested was one of the more awkward feeling bikes that I’ve ridden in years. The reach is considerably shorter than what other extra larges I’ve ridden in the last while are, but that wasn’t the issue. The tall stack and long head tube length became more of a problem than I could have imagined. Adding to the tall front end, the bike also ships with a tall 15mm headset cover, plus an additional 25mm of stem spacers and the bars come prepared to fit a giant.

In order to get the bars down to a more reasonable position, the headset cover needed to be removed, placing the stem on the bearing, with a 20–25mm rise bar. Despite the hands being at a height that was closer to normal, I found the bike to feel tall and ‘tippy’, rather than well balanced and stable, in terms of geometry. After looking at a number of other key bikes in this demographic it became pretty clear that the SB5 is at least among the tallest in the category, and while the stack height may work for tall riders (taller than 6’4”), I'd argue that the reach is not long enough for a rider of that stature.

What was more surprising was that the stack is tall on the other sizes as well, though admittedly it isn't by as much and wouldn’t be as difficult to get the bars to a suitable ride height. It’s something to consider, especially for riders that commonly have their bars close to, or completely slammed on their other bikes. For those interested, I generally have at least 10–15mm beneath my stem and run between 25 and 30mm rise bars—none of this was remotely possible with the 2017 XL SB5.


Yeti SB5c Turq Review
Look at that headtube! It really reminded me of the Giant frames of yesteryear.


• Terrain Type: Yeti pitch the SB5 as their “most versatile all-mountain bike”, but when looking at the build kit: Maxxis Ardent tires, 160 rear and 180mm front brake rotors, ultra light weight, and a heavy suspension tune, to me the bike certainly looked and felt more fitting to the trail segment. It would also suit exceptionally well as an XC riders aggressive bigger travel bike.

Throwing bigger, more aggressive tires on the bike and adjusting the suspension to suit helped the stock bike handle the rough terrain of Coastal B.C., but personally, there are more versatile “all-mountain” bikes available, ones that are as happy on rowdy terrain as they are more mellow trails.


Yeti SB5c Turq Review
The stout rear of the SB5.


• Finish: Yeti oozes quality in everything from their website, to their videos and photography, and their frames are the perfect exclamation point. The quality of construction is second to none and it can be felt when riding the bike. There are no rattles or creaks to speak of and everything feels solid, even after time and a number of large days in big terrain.

• Details: Attention to detail is something that Yeti has covered, for the most part. The cable routing is sleek, from the position that the cables first go into the frame—minimizing head tube rub—to the always out of the way and rattle free nature they exhibit. The chainstay protection works perfectly at both protecting and keeping things quiet and didn’t require any additional taping. Where they miss an important factor for me, and any other rider that finds a pack incredibly frustrating is not having the ability to place a water bottle in the front triangle. True, you can mount one up under the frame, but I may as well drink from the murky watering holes my dogs hydrate out of when considering a bottle exposed to the filth of the trail, roads to and from, and water crossings we ride through. Not to mention it's more difficult for someone over 6-feet tall to reach down there and access it.


Yeti SB5c Turq Review
The finish is on point, thanks, Yeti.
Yeti SB5c Turq Review
Really clean cable routing making the transition from the front triangle to the rear.


Component Check
• SRAM X01 Eagle: It may not be the top-tier Eagle drivetrain but you wouldn’t know. Shifting was incredibly light and precise, operation silky smooth and quiet and the chain retention perfect. Not once was a chain dropped during the test on the SB5.

• Fox Factory 34: It may be the smaller brother fork, but it’s perfectly suited to the SB5. While it can hold its own in rowdier terrain, the 34 provides confidence to the SB5, putting your mind at rest when entering into sections full of roots and rock. It shipped with two volume spacers and we needed to up it to a total of five, but once we had the front of the bike kept a very balanced and composed stance in the grossest of situations.

• SRAM Guide RSC: The Guides are a great brake, most of the time. I've found on a number of them now that one ride with a number of sustained, steep sections of trail will make them unhappy, fading by the time the bottom is reached—that remained true with the SB5. However, to be fair, I’ve already commented on where I found the SB5 to excel, and in those situations, the Guide stoppers are more than sufficient, with no issues.

• DT XM421 Rim and 350 hub: The DT wheels, built using the 350 hub and XM 421 rim performed flawlessly. The star ratchet is reliable, the hubs are easy to pull apart and service when you need to and they roll smoothly. The rims took some action and shrugged it all off. They feel solid on the trail and they're reasonably light. The 25mm inner width may upset some, but it shouldn’t be a major concern. These are a great wheelset to come stock on a bike.

• Fox Transfer: The 150mm Fox Transfer on the SB5 performed flawlessly throughout testing. Its return speed was a little slower than others (RaceFace, 9Point8, Specialized) and I found the lever required a little more effort to get it going. The lever paddle is not as big as some of the others available now but is more than enough to find in a hurry.


Yeti SB5c Turq Review


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThe 2017 Yeti SB5 is an incredibly playful, lightweight bike that requires little energy to get it moving forward. In rougher terrain, the model tested was found to get a little overwhelmed, requiring extra input to keep it moving forward and tracking, but can still get it done if you're willing. Where it really excelled during testing was on lower grade terrain that featured less wheel eating roots and rocks, and when in such situations was a blast to ride. 

AJ Barlas






333 Comments

  • + 199
 can $7K bikes stop being spec'd with guide brakes please?
  • + 7
 Exactly
  • - 21
flag christianlund (Sep 18, 2017 at 7:16) (Below Threshold)
 I don't get it, guides are awsome
  • + 33
 @christianlund: The kind that lead you on a tour? Yes. As a mtb brake? No bueno.

I've been pretty underwhelmed by my Guides for their price.
  • + 23
 @christianlund: Not really, they're OK-ish only in their top tier versions (RSC, ultimate)
  • + 17
 @Whipperman: RSC are okay at best. Funny 7k and you need to replace parts off the bat....
  • + 28
 Better than the 5k Ibis I was just looking at that had sub-Deore level brakes.
  • + 15
 eagle and guides go together, strong bond noone can break, not even yeti,
but sometimes you can change one of the elements: eagle+roam, guides+pike...
you always get some crappy thing in the end, that's the trick
  • + 2
 This!!!!!!!
  • + 12
 @Whipperman: i love my rsc guides Razz
  • + 10
 I run guide rs brakes for downhill and I used saints before that, the guide rs feels so much better, they have a better lever feel and have plenty of stopping power, especially for a guy who is over 200, they stop on a dime. people have they're preferences, I just like guides more than any other brake.
  • + 11
 @ejob: I have guides on both my bikes and I love them, never had a problem other than the time I tried to bleed them after a bunch of beers. Other than that spot on brakes for me
  • + 18
 Nothing wrong with Guides...the new Codes modulate a bit better but I got 100 days at Whistler Bike Park on my Guide Rs and they have held up awesome...no complaints. Shimano fan boys need to actually try these brakes.
  • - 10
flag nvranka (Sep 18, 2017 at 8:50) (Below Threshold)
 @MikeyMT: you barely need brakes at whis....especially if you are sticking to the park lines...stupid example.

Guides are spongey garbage...at least any I've used.

I have always been a saint guy, but plenty of other good brakes out there (e.g. Hopes)
  • + 11
 I have been running guide rs for nearly 3 year and they have been faultless. Awesome feel and power. Standard pads arnt the best but other then that there awesome. Former Shimano fanboy here.
  • + 12
 Last two bikes have had Guide RSC with zero issues. Have another set in a box to go on and older bike. Great brakes. Sorry.
  • + 3
 @Whipperman: 3 warranties on RSC...not even OK-ish(unacceptable)
  • + 9
 Ask any serious bike mechanic not some dude on summer job: any brake system fails eventually and any brake system can go for years. It just depends on your luck with a particular pair. Brakes of all makes are like a genetic lottery among Children born next to Charnobyl. The only kind of bike components these days that comes close in terms of inconsistency is dropper posts. I may try what crossfit vegans recommend: Hope, but if they fail too I'll go medieval on this thing.

My Guides RS failed (master cylinder), Guides on my buddies bikes go strong. My XT8000 need bleeding once a month and bleeding Shimanos these days is nothing like it used to be.
  • + 7
 I weigh 190lbs and ride big descents on my Guide RSC's and they are amazing. Most braking issues (outside of warranty issues) are due to improper bleeding.
  • + 15
 We have already sent 5 new sets of Guides back for warranty. The levers get either stuck or really hard to activate . Anybody else has found a similar problem?
  • + 2
 Guides have been okay for me but I'm 67kg so not a true test of heat dissipation etc. Still not as easy to bleed as Shimano but more modulation.
  • - 8
flag WAKIdesigns (Sep 18, 2017 at 10:53) (Below Threshold)
 @jclnv: in what way are the latest Shimanos easy to bleed? First brake system where I said fk that and give it to a mechanic.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Removing air from the system. SRAM have always had air-trap calipers.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: have you tried TRP Slate T4 brakes? Assuming we are not talking about true DH stoppers these are by far my favorite that I've run. I currently have them on my Remedy and have been thoroughly empressed! I guess you would call me a retired Shimano fanboy as I previously wouldn't run anything but XTs or saints! The stock pads really suck but I put some Saint metalic pads in there and they suddenly came alive!! Modulation sits square between the mushy SRAM feel and a light switch Shimano feel.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: you're doing something wrong mate...suggest checking out epicbleedsolutions...they have pretty clutch shimano bleed kits for the new system.

I've not had any trouble bleeding new Gen shimanos with those kits...never done it the shimano way

I'll still say that I miss the old m810 levers...bleeding was so easy
  • - 3
 @DragontalesDH: are they easy to bleed? I mean like 2010-2014 Shimanos? All I was doing with them was one flush down with refilling the master cylinder, a bit of lever pump, then plastic bag around the lever, flush it upwards using syringe a bit of tapping, few pumps. Done. These days with XT 8000 fk me...
  • - 4
flag WAKIdesigns (Sep 18, 2017 at 11:38) (Below Threshold)
 @nvranka: I'm sure I do. I just can't get it right by following Shimano instructions. When I watched the mechanic do it for me, he was doing some hokuspokus that wasn't in the description.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: TRP has a very similar bleed to Shimano but their reservoir and caliper design make it super simple!! Double syringe set up. Evacuate air from caliper when first attached. Force a bit of fluid up the system. As long as the reservoir is at the highest point in the system so the air moves up your good.

Once you replace the bleed nipple on the caliper and clean everything up. Put the wheel and pads back in. Force enough fluid backwards into the system with the lever syringe so that the wheel won't turn. Flip the lever a few times while holding pressure on the syringe. And done. Rock solid brakes. Replace that bleed cap and ride hard!!

Not to mention the G-spec version is super light for a brake with that much power!
  • + 0
 Never had an issue south my Guides in 2 hard seasons of riding DH. Just switched back to 2015 Codes though because I like those even more. You can't follow SRAMS bleed procedure though if you want to make the most out of the pad contact adjustment (just the pre bleed pad contact adj setting)
  • + 0
 @christianlund: yeah if you're paid hourly to handle warranties! Guides blow. I've had three or four sets of them and wanted to swap every single one with shimanos
  • - 4
flag trialsracer (Sep 18, 2017 at 12:48) (Below Threshold)
 @MikeyMT: refer to my other comment. If guides actually worked, I'd be fine with them. You got the "reverse lemon", i.e. you managed to snag a pair that haven't given you issues. That is the exception, no the rule
  • + 1
 @enrico650:
Same for me
I rode every kind of Guide and in heavy duty condition (not bikepark, more than 1000m down in the alps): they are all spongy crap.
Saints harden a little with heat but thats all.
  • + 2
 @nvranka: "I have always been a saint guy," there is your bias right there....try them out and then come back to this thread.
  • + 1
 I have XTs and Guides, and I prefer Guides. They can get away with being bled once a year, maybe even less, because the fluid doesn't degrade or have air bubbles unless you run the pads down super low. XT mineral oil rapidly turns black, which seems to be correlated with a loss of power. I lose power and have to flush the fluid every couple of months on my XTs to fix it. Guides stay powerful all season without a bleed and also feel more powerful out-of-the-box.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: any serious bike mechanic I know recomends Hope, crossfit vegan or not
  • + 2
 @MikeyMT: pretty sure I also said any guides I've used felt like spongey garbage you git
  • + 1
 @ismasan: Of course they do, Hope makes the most reliable brakes on the planet pretty much.
On my third set now, and I've never had a single issue with any of them, decent power, best in class modulation and amazing reliability, and super fade resistant.
  • + 1
 I'm always surprised. People seems to have polarized experiences with brakes, shocks, telescopic posts.
For some it's the best, for others it's crap, whatever the brand.
Has it something to do with poor manufacturing tolerances, and loose quality control?
For instance, formula R.
I've heard a lot of complains, but in my experience they're juste perfect.
  • - 3
 @Oskarpol: exactly, but some parts are more problematic than others. Brakes are just that turd. people rave about hopes, but generally Hope is like crossfit or veganism. People do put more on it than what's there. I bought many of their products over the years and haven't found them that great. They don't always work and for most of the time they just work. Their pedals are reliable, yea, so what if they don't grip as well? Brakes are maybe great. But the feel crap to me. Woody feel - I could learn to like it but they are damn expensive to just try. I hated formulas, but I can see why would someone like them.

Cheers!
  • + 1
 @christianlund: They are awesome, some dickhead shooting his mouth talking shit that's has never tried them again. Shimano wooden feel rules all BRAH!!!!
  • + 2
 @enrico650: I think 35-40 levers this summer. It's mostly a heat issue caused air build up furniture the bore size being off (forgot if over or undersized) easiest way to tell is put a cold pack on the lever, if it returns to normal, warranty!
  • + 1
 @enrico650: common problem pre-2017. The piston in the lever gets hot and swells. I need to warranty mine. Even with that issue, my guide rsc brakes are my favorite disc brakes.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: Hopes are good. I'm not a crossfit vegan but I am friends with some yoga teachers (who love cheese) who cover their crossfit coworker's (who love meat) schedules sometimes. The only time a hope brake failed for me was when i crashed and twisted my bars around enough to pull the hose out of the lever assembly. I still had the rear brake so i rode out (with a cracked rib). At first I thought the bleed process was crude because you are supposed to overfill and spill it, then i bled hayes primes (with the avid style special bleed fitting) and lost fluid anyway when you can't screw in the bleed fitting screw fast enough (so you overfill to compensate). My favorite part of bleeding hopes is the bleed port screw at the piston. You can close it periodically and pump the lever to see what your final feel will be. They could get more elegant and have a dedicated screw in fixture at the caliper, and a reservoir style cup like the shimanos for a "back bleed," but the crude method works fine and you clean it up with alcohol. A few years goes by and you look at your weird hope bleed kit in the garage you made out of $3 worth of medical supply store syringe and tubing, and wonder how long it will be before you crash like that again. The one downside to hopes is the slim pad clearance. They have a great feel and minimal dead space because the pads sit very close to the rotor. True your rotors. Paul morningstar died in 2015 but get his tools on ebay before they are all gone.
www.ebay.com/itm/NOS-Morningstar-Drum-Stix-T-R-Ale-Tool-Disk-Brake-Rotor-straighten-true-repair-/302137689394
  • + 1
 ive owned 5 sets of guides, including the warranty replacements.. they feel great until they go out.. xt has fantastic stopping power however Modulation isn't on par with sram.. I'll take the reliability and consistency of shimano.. also you're not riding while you're brakes are being warrantied and sram customer service is horrible!!!
  • + 0
 @Apex06: as far as I am concerned, judging by my XT 8000 and latest Deores, then knowing many mechanics in town (and outside of it), the latest breed of Shimanos is far from being reliable. They all say that Shimano "fixed" the inconsistent lever feel on XTs/XTRs and Saints, but it is not entirely true. Compared to 2012-2015 XT, they just cut the "bad weed" by half. I owned 2010 Saints and they were my best brakes, didn't bleed them for a year, opened them and fluid looked better than what it looks on my XTs after 3 months. My XTs are from the "fixed" breed of 8000, they are relatively consistent in feel but they need bleeding once per month to feel perfect and they get sht in 3 months. And every single bike mechanic I spoke to says: that's how they roll these days. Also, Deore may not have the "feel" of power that XTs have, but the modulation is better. Don't ask me how. My Guides never really had the power like Saints or Codes. I tried them on few bikes and almost each bike felt differently. What I can't blame them for is modulation. When you can modulate your braking on steep, wet granite rock face, you know you have the best modulation in the business.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: everything you say here is correct. It's amazing how every single thing you read in the bike media just repeats the same tired line about how Shimano's are reliable and powerful.

They are putting out garbage that is 2 to 3 years behind SRAM in terms of technology and nobody will call them out on it.
  • + 1
 @wibblywobbly: I wouldn't call it garbage I had Hayes Mag and HFX9
  • + 1
 @enrico650: we sent in 4 breaks with that issue already. now we advice our customers to switch to shimano or hope.
  • + 1
 @ismasan: I only know two crossfit vegans, and neither know anything about brakes
  • + 1
 @truffy: if I have to explain it to you the crossfit vegan analogy is about requiring a lot of self conviction in order to be so devoted to a particular thing. I know from own experience of owning and using many of their products that they just are not that good as many (mostly Brits) picture them. Some are decent, some are just good, some are bad. But there's nothing spectacular about them. I haven't own their brakes, my friend just odrered M4s, if he's happy I may give them a try.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: my comment was somewhat tongue-in-cheek but, not being American, I don't feel the need to add 'LOL'

And, as a Brit, I've only tried one Hope product, a pair of flats (F20 I think). One of the pin holes was badly threaded and I had to return them. Got RF Atlases instead and have been very happy with them.
  • + 1
 @truffy: I used F20s a bit, I was rather disappointed with the grip. Changed to Boomslangs. Too much grip Smile . Currently with OneUp, seem perfect.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I have the OneUp pedals also. It's a great pedal, grip is really good and I come from Twenty6 Predators. They are not without their faults though. The threaded part of the body is very thin. If you smash a pin and shear/ mushroom it, you have to draw the damaged pin through the threads, and it trashes the threads and makes that location no longer useable. No way around it. Luckily the are a lot of pins. This could be remedied by a shear point added to the pin. Other than that, great pedal, very easy to service.
  • + 113
 So basically it rides like crap in areas where there are rocks and bumps, but looks really nice and is good on smooth trails, but not spectacular. There's the blunt version
  • + 37
 Also add "the geometry is plain weird, and seems pretty dated.... oh and the brakes are kinda rubbish, but we can gloss over that"

Definitely one of the harsher PB bike reviews I've ever read.
Looks nice though, so the Dentist/Lawyer crew will love it
  • + 13
 basically "this bike is fantastic for the average 50 year old mountain biker (spends far too much on a bike while only riding the smoothest and easiest trails)"
  • - 4
flag UtahBikeMike (Sep 18, 2017 at 12:26) (Below Threshold)
 Stack height is for people that can't bend over: middle aged dentists
  • + 12
 Don't forget their website is nice.
  • + 19
 @IllestT: it's harsh but it definitely beats the latter. I mean lets be honest here, for the past year or two reviews have gone along the lines of, bike climbs great, descends even better, good bike..... with hardly any critiques and every review was the same... So honestly hats off to the guy he killed it. he tore the bike apart and pointed out the few things it did well.
  • - 6
flag mikealive (Sep 18, 2017 at 12:45) (Below Threshold)
 Exactly my take on Yeti as of late--beautiful bikes for people who don't really ride bikes. Their latest design philosophy has left me scratching my head. The geo, the shock tunes, the price.. it's buying a bike for the sake of being boutique.

It's kind of funny that you either have to be a god-level rider like Rude or Graves, or a below average rider who wouldn't know any better to enjoy this bike Big Grin
  • + 7
 I think many of the reviews are like that because so many bikes ARE that good now. Climb like goats and descend like fireballs. What they miss is the fine details like suspension characteristics and how the bike behaves on different terrain. How bikes act in tight corners compared to wide open, rough terrain and if it carries speed through berms, does the suspension feel linear or rampy? How's it compared to other bikes?
  • + 10
 @The-mnt-life365: Yeah don't get me wrong - I thoroughly approve of more honest style reviews like this.
I'm glad PB had the balls to publish such a review. I'm totally sick of the lego-movie-style "everything is awesome" type BS that usually gets shovelled out
  • + 9
 @IllestT: I definitely agree. I even felt the hurt from the constant "this is the greatest bike ever" BS that gets spread via these reviews with my slash. Yes its an incredible bike, and its awesome DOWNHILL but up hill its a freaking disaster, its one of the slowest and toughest climbers out there and I hate it for that. I took the review done on the bike on here into consideration when I bought it and to be honest they WAY over sold its uphill capabilities. It's fantastic on fire roads but wow is it shit on anything with alternating grades. But I guess it's stuff like this they get payed not to tell us right?
  • + 4
 @mikealive: I would really love it if you shared more of your opinions on their "latest design philosophy". Tell me something you don't like about their latest design philosophy that wasn't written in the article. Start with the 5.5 or maybe the SB6. Maybe you could make a comment or two about the leverage ratios on the rear suspension not being to your liking when you were decending remote lines in the back country of North Shore BC.
  • + 15
 @The-mnt-life365: The average 50 year olds I ride with ride like savages, so find another group to pick on.
  • + 11
 So basically, the guy tested a trail bike and expected it to ride like an enduro bike. Unfortunately we see more and more reviews like these. But damn, everyone is not looking for an Enduro bike ! If you look for a bike which soften everything, get something like a Santa Cruz Nomad or other enduro bikes. If you like to play with the ground, if you have teh skills to make your bunny-hop to clean the rough trails, if you want a dynamic bike , then this bike is an excellent option.
  • + 3
 @The-mnt-life365: regarding your 50 years old remark : perfect comment from a max 10 years old brain (and I'm even nice mentionning there was a brain...).
  • + 5
 @yeti115: nah I think you've missed the reviewer's point a bit. Looking at the comparison chart, what they seem to be saying is that there are loads of bikes with similar travel that are just plain better
  • + 3
 And yet the longer travel version is one of the winningest enduro bikes ever, hmm.
  • - 2
 @UtahBikeMike: Or tall people, sorry you are 3 feet tall
  • + 1
 @mikealive: All this coming from a guy who has multiple low spec bikes on his profile and clearly doesn't understand what he is talking about
  • + 0
 @poozank: Do you think I post every bike I've ever owned on my profile? Are you really that dense? Would you believe I owned a SB95 and loved it? In fact, none of the bikes I currently own are on my profile, so what?

Jesus, the Yeti fanboys have gone full butthurt over this article. F*cking hilarious.
  • + 12
 @IllestT: I guess I just don't get it. I tried the SC 5010 and Hightower, Devinci Troy and Django, and a couple other similar bikes. I liked the Yeti the best and my shop could get it in Canada for the best price. It definitely likes to skip over chunky stuff rather than plow through it but isn't that what you might want from a 26-lb 5-inch trail bike? I did. For my trails that's what I preferred instead of another awesome bike like the Troy, which was a little beefier - the Yeti is just incredibly light and playful but the suspension still takes 10-foot hard landings like a boss, and it just completely kills any climb. Yes the bars have to be slammed down but I didn't see that as a consideration either way - you just don't use spacers. For a 5-10 guy on a medium the seat tube is perfect height for a 150mm dropper (too bad they spec a 125). I'm not much of a Strava guy but I've now owned four carbon trail bikes between 4-6 inches of travel and whenever I turn it on, I destroy whatever old time I had laid down - I'm the fastest on the SB5, period, and I have the most fun on it too. I was lucky enough to have options but I'm super happy with the SB5.
  • + 1
 @IllestT: The chart is just a geometry comarison chart, but how many of these bikes were realyl tested by this guy ?
  • + 4
 @mikealive: You loved it but think they are bikes for people who don't ride bikes Rolleyes

I'm not a fanboy, I have had many high-end bikes and they are all pretty similar to be honest. The SB6 is a great bike, the nomad was great etc. Not a fanboy just not a 'fan' of dumbass bashing of a design for no real reason
  • + 2
 Yup. Props to @ajbarlas for unvarnished opinion on his review
  • + 1
 @yeti115: Not disagreeing but with the SB5.5 out and being praised as highly as it is, I find it hard to consider this unless it was a pricing issue.
  • + 1
 @paulwatt: YEAH BRO total inspiration. I hope life doesn't win and I'm out shredding in my 50's.
  • - 1
 @poozank: clearly I wasn't speaking about every bike Yeti has ever made, I thought that much would be obvious.. *sigh*. Ok, carry on with your witch hunt.
  • + 0
 yeah, so now go pay 3500 for a frame because it says yeti in it
  • + 83
 I can't help but I read turd review and can't unsee it ... sorry.
  • + 21
 Savage...
  • + 34
 About time we see a real review on PB. Lots of shit bikes out there. Good on AJ for telling it how it is. The sizing on these bikes is bizarre. I couldn't ride one unless I was prepared to run a dropper with no more than 125mm drop as the seat tubes are stupid long relative to the reach. Then there's the suspension design...
  • + 10
 @jclnv: you are very negative about most bikes. What do you reckon is worth looking at? I won't downplay it, I promise, just wonder what such demanding person likes... sorry considers valuable
  • + 2
 As someone who is 6', I can't help but think that this bike is not for the taller folks. I hopped on a Large and found it awkward as well. Compared to the SB6 and SB55, it's the weird stepchild.
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: IMO at 130mm you would have to be nuts to not go 29". At 150mm+ I can see arguments for 650b but at 130mm, 29" are faster and more efficient.

Whyte T-130?
  • + 9
 @jclnv: faster, more efficient and less fun
  • + 3
 @jclnv: For me both wheel sizes have their taste to it so I can see why someone would chose this one. 29ers need speed to feel good airborne. They may also feel a bit too "raily" for some since they have so much grip. However I would not pay so much money for a boutique bike and ride around with that dumb shock. it's fine on 100 bike, or on cheap ass bike if you don't have much money. But Yeti? Put some freaking serious valving on it. All the sprinting /climbing potential gets wasted by compromising for either going big or mashing it. Perhaps I could even consider carbon wheels for such thing. Just tried Bonty XR2 tyres, and it just shows the power of square knobs in a rational pattern. AWESOME, would put them on this thing.

For my personal likes and terrain I ride, i would not make that much use of this Trail specific genre, as a main bike. Then you take it to real mountains and you suffer the descents. It would have to be my 4th bike after 160, XC and DJ. And having such 4th bike seems a bit obscene to me considering my budget. I can imagine though that if people have less rough trails yet like to go sideways, it must be a blast. You'd have to make sure though that your friends suffer enough on pedalling bits, otherwise 29ers or 140+ bikes with quality suspension would outride you on longer descends. I don't mind being outridden, just not every time Big Grin Also, those 120 bikes keep you on your toes all the way down, if you let go off the brakes, you better nail those lines and be above sht when needed. A surprise jump, a bit bad loading of the lip - BOOM! And as the day goes on and one gets tired, sht starts to go south.

I like cushion... I need a bike that can carry me home sometimes Big Grin But if money were no object I'd goof around on this thing once every second week.
  • + 3
 @jclnv: A T-130 breaks your rules. It's a 27.5" with 130mm travel.
  • + 9
 @azureblue: Yeah that was the best 650b I could think of. I'd still have many a 29" instead.

I don't get the 'fun' argument either. Fast is fun.
  • + 1
 i was looking at this and a transition.
  • + 1
 @jclnv: I've got one. The T-129 fitted your criteria, but always looked relatively tall to me and didn't get quite the same glowing reviews as the T-130 (and isn't a thing anymore anyway).
  • + 1
 @jclnv: not when you below 165 cm height
  • + 3
 @azureblue: The Jeffsy looks good on paper. Haven't ridden one but they seem to get the suspension kinematics bang on.

When you look at all bikes at all travel ranges the only bike from a larger company that nails it is the new Orbea Rallon. Unfortunately there is only three sizes but if you fit one the numbers are great IMO.
  • + 1
 @eugen-fried: Possibly. I'd still run a 650b bike with a 29" fork and front wheel though ????
  • + 2
 @jclnv: motorbikes come in one size... nobody complains.
  • + 10
 @WAKIdesigns: BS. Many tall guys can't ride a number of bikes and reducing suspension length so short riders can touch the ground is fairly common.
  • + 1
 @jclnv: you know what I meant...
  • + 2
 @jclnv: Yes good on @AJBarlas
Especially when there are so many biased reviews out there. I hate steering people away from Pinkbike but this is the gold standard in bias reviews.mtbr.com/yeti-sb4-5-trail-bike-review, check it out for a laugh
  • + 2
 @fullbug: I'm a yeti owner 5x over. Im a dealer so i figured it was the best choice. Dont get me wrong they are phenomenal. Still have a 5.5 and am about a week away from getting an alloy Scout. (Also a dealer). Just awesome bikes.
  • + 1
 @jclnv: honestly, if 2-5cm in reach or wheelbase make a huge difference for you, then I don't know what you are doing when you are riding the fricking bike... i could buy this argument on a roadie but on MTB, this is just silly. Like those dumb comments about wheelies and chainstay length. Seriously if 3 bike sizes can't cover people at 160-200 then we are dealing with a clinical case of first world problems. A kind that only Orange County Choppers or Pimp my car can "solve"
  • + 2
 @fullbug: sentinel keeps starring at me
  • + 2
 @jclnv: Have you had a chance to try a Rallon? Would love to try one, but outside of BC and Quebec, there are no serious dealers.
  • + 4
 @jclnv: I read this review with interest. I just recently bought a Yeti SB 4.5 and I would have a totally different description of the rear suspension then this review. Certainly this review also is quite different from Mike Kazimer's review of the SB4.5. I don't get the back end skipping at all. In fact if I had a complaint about it it's that it tends to track the ground and remains planted to the point where it takes a bit of work to get it to pop off stuff. To me it's a very nice feeling rear suspension design, especially in square edged hits where I really feel the bike rolls over rather than gets hung up on stuff. I guess I'd have to temper that with I have not had it that long yet and thus need to put it through more riding scenarios. However again Mike Kazimer's description of the suspension performance is very different from this review, and I wonder why. Is it all the 29er wheels just being better at smoothing things out? Is it personal preference? Is it my bike bring the plain carbon rather than the Turq (I have read elsewhere that carbon frames that use more expensive carbon and thus less material tend to have a more lively feel)?
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: It's just comfort and weight behind the front axle isn't it? You're looking at it like the bikes we've been riding for years have been the right length and the new school bikes are long. What about if the bikes we've been using have all been optimally far too short?
  • + 1
 @jaydubmah: No, I would love to ride one.
  • + 2
 @mhaager2: I'm 100% with you on this. My SB6 tracks to the point that jumping can become a chore. I've scratched the idea of going coil off the list because of it. Now, I think there's some brake jack, for sure, but square-edge hits and traction is off the charts. Very predictable compared to my Trek's ABP when things get really rough.
  • - 1
 @mhaager2: I think the high anti-rise is the issue which is a common trait of the Switch Infinity system. There will be a loss in suspension sensitivity when the rear brake is applied.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Its because they are having so much fun riding, they forget to complain on PB, but a 1.5' seat , 12"plus inches of squish and a motor help a lot, oh and plus sized tires.
Fuxk I can't believe I said plus size.
I will be slain on PB
  • + 1
 @jclnv: no it isn't. Really short people and people without skills lower their motos.
  • + 1
 @fracasnoxteam: you thought the same thing about that woman at the bar last night. Wasn't true, either time
  • + 1
 @fullbug: Just sold my sb5 ver 1. Liked it very much. If you're thing is climbing and mostly trail oriented descents, you will love. Just ordered the sb5.5 because it feels more plush and climbs even better.
  • + 1
 Me too!
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: completely wrong. Tall people just don't ride them because they look stupid on them. Tall people don't drive convertibles either.
  • - 1
 @bogey: there you have an agenda for some SJW snowflakes on Campus next to you. Industry! KKK! - it's the price! Tall People pay!
  • + 1
 @jclnv: 30" inseam here and the medium is perfect for a 150mm dropper. Can't say what the seat tubes on bigger sizes are like but that's spot on for a 5-inch trail bike.
  • + 1
 @Klainmeister: Sorry man AJ just did not like this bike. He found out today he was riding with the lock out on. But his trails are so rowdy. Or maybe be the fact he could not put his bottle with the pacifier on where he likes it. Sorry but this bike tracks really well on roots and square edge bumbs just flip the switch AJ.
  • + 2
 lol. classic.
  • + 1
 @jclnv: you just said you'd be nuts to not ride a 29'er and the recommended a 27.5 t130?!
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: First world problems or not but I'm not f*cking with tall seat tubes.
  • + 1
 @thenotoriousmic: Yes I'd rather ride a number of 29" at that travel. Waki was asking what bikes are better than the above 650b bike and the only comparable 650b bike I could think of was the T-130.

There's also the Jeffsy.
  • + 1
 @shortcuttomoncton: You can't have a lot of post exposed? Regardless that reach number is too short for a modern medium.
  • + 3
 @jclnv: I've got just over an inch exposed on the 125. It's perfect for a 150mm in other words.

I'm simply not hung up on evaluating how a bike will ride based on the specs, before I actually ride it. Take a bike like the Devinci Troy (which I love) - the Troy's numbers are super modern but I was faster in every way on the SB5, even on DH sections but especially on the climbs. If my local trails were a bit more DH oriented with chunkier terrain I may have chosen the Troy - or tried an SB5.5 - but frankly, both are incredible bikes and I felt best on the Yeti, even if the numbers aren't extremely long. Remember - they are long from only 3 or 4 years ago - and they're not short by any means, simply conservative. That doesn't mean it won't be an amazing ride - you've got to try it first....
  • + 48
 What do you call a Yeti with a 6pack?

An abdominal snowman.


Thanks guys, thanks x
  • + 5
 The most expensive beer cooler you ever bought?
  • - 1
 A head Turner?
  • + 44
 The review doesn't sound that enthusiastic for a Yeti bike (and for this price too). A bike like that shouldn't be just "okay".
  • + 9
 Price is not an indication of bike performance.
  • + 33
 Refreshing for a change to see a review that calls it like it is - need more of this.
  • + 1
 @jclnv: But it can be a reference point. The old saying holds true "you get what you pay for", of course there are exceptions but generally speaking its an accurate way to narrow in on the better quality products.
  • + 2
 @indydave124: Sizing and kinematics are the main factors in how a bike rides. Price has no bearing on those.
  • + 1
 @jclnv: Quality comes at a price and the higher the price of the bike typically the better components, materials and design are used. Sizing comes down to personal preference and body shape of the rider.
  • + 3
 @indydave124: Yes the sizing is critical as I stated. What aspect of design is going to increase a bikes performance?

I think you're confusing aesthetics with function.
  • + 3
 @trillot:
@Whipperman:
Also liked how Mike Levy (I think?) preferred the 29" 4000$ process to the 27" 6000$ one!
  • + 1
 @jclnv: Suspension design play a huge part in bike performance. (VPP, Switch infinity, Delta, FSR, DW....etc)
Most companies release their best designs at the higher price point as it has cost them the most R&D dollars.
  • + 2
 @indydave124: Funny thing is that the most acclaimed bike are simpler : Kona Process 111, Transition Patrol. This Switch infinity thingy is interesting from an engineering point of view, just like Magic Link or Hatchet Drive (bet you forgot those), but unecessary.
  • + 1
 @indydave124: You can read in the above review how effective those marketing based suspension designs are...

Leverage rate, Anti-squat, anti-rise (IC location) can be engineered on to be the same on the majority of designs. Add an adequate volume shock and the cheap bikes suspension will perform exactly the same as a higher priced variant. The bike industry doesn't want you to understand this but it's pure fact. Take a cheap model bike with good suspension knematics like a YT Jeffsy for example and nothing you can do to the bike above will make it perform to the same level.

Don't get caught up in the marketing.
  • + 0
 @Whipperman: And then there's Yeti's other failed experiment, the Yeti Linear Rail Technology.
  • + 1
 @Whipperman: I had a Cannondale Carbon Moto , I know all about the Hatchet link. I do agree that a complicated suspension design doesn't lead to a superior product but it also does't make it inferior.

All I was saying is that at the higher price point you typically get the best performance. From there pick the design that you think will best meet your needs.
  • + 1
 @jclnv: I don't get caught up in the marketing but I also don't discredit designs based on price point or any other factors either. If something works then it works simple as that and if it costs a lot more then it better perform to the price point being asked. If I cant afford the fancy new design you wont see me complaining about it, I just wont buy it.
  • + 2
 @jclnv: It's 2017 bro, fluid dynamics outpaces kinematics in ride characteristics every day. Proof of that can be found in the fact that Orange can still sell bikes.
  • + 2
 Also pretty refreshing to not see the tester throw out the stock rubber and slap on a set of minions/magic marys etc for the review process. Let the spec stand on its own I say.
  • + 2
 @nohit45: I honestly prefer a single pivot suspension, much stiffer rear end with fewer bearings taking up the hits.
More reliable, and I just like the feel better.
  • + 1
 @Losvar: That was my point. The fact that we live in an era of great shocks allows companies to cash it in on kinematics. Almost all of the current suspension designs are based on 20+ year-old patents.
Single pivot designs, like Orange, flourish because of great shocks.
  • + 1
 @jclnv: Don't get caught up in Jared Graves crushing on this bike or Gwin crushing on that bike. It all works good enough if its set up right.
  • + 3
 @jclnv: Ya right man, that 4 bar bike isn't gonna pedal like a VPP, switch infinity, or DW link bike. Most people that hate on Yeti, haven't ridden one.
  • + 1
 @re-ride66: Eh?

@duelsuspensiondave: Like the above guy? A 4-bar linkage like the FSR could easily be designed with as much anti-squat as the designs you mention. They rarely are designed that way as it sacrifices braking sensitivity. Something the riders of the designs you mention have gotten used to.
  • + 41
 Sounds like the rider has an odd shaped body and preference. Ive ridden the new 5 all year in rough terrain, rocks, roots, holes, steep terrain and also our butter smooth Boise trails and haven't had single complaint. Bike rips. I also swapped the tires for DD Maxxis HR2 and Aggressor and threw beefy wheels on it but thats a personal preference. Not every bike spec is going to match every riding style or trail system. Too bad PinkBike let the odd shaped guy test the bike.
  • - 1
 Meant to upvote this comment and pressed downvote by mistake.... Doh.
  • - 1
 Yeah that's bummer. Just sounds a bit out dated is all.
  • + 2
 Agreed. Barlas was either on the wrong size (too big) or his proportions are pretty far from any sort of norm. I'm 5'9" on a medium and the fit is awesome. Running a 150mm Fox Transfer dropper with room to run a 170mm if they made one - or a 170mm Reverb, etc.. Head tube is on the longer side, but not so long that you can't get the bars where you need them. Swapping the tall top cover on the headset of the bike on test would have given him another 7mm of height reduction to play with. Just really disappointed with this review based on my experience with the bike and the otherwise positive reviews from other experienced reviewers (Vital, Blister Gear).
  • + 24
 Seems like a mediocre bike performance wise. When they first tested the SB5 a few years ago it was described as "not the best climber and not the best descender, but it has a lot of personality". I remember this because the leading comment was "so you're saying this is the fat chick of mountain bikes".

That being recalled, I cant believe they are pulling 7k for a bike with a review like this.

Also, the switch infinity link looks clunky. Id like to actually ride one to confirm, but just by looking at it, i can't imagine it's that efficient.
  • - 6
flag MX298 (Sep 18, 2017 at 7:56) (Below Threshold)
 I can't believe Yeti specs a fox float (ctd) shock on their bikes. That shock would make any bike ride like crap. Throw an Ohlins in and it's a totally different bike! ! !
  • + 3
 if it was clunky do you think they would continue selling it on 6 different bikes for three years?
  • - 1
 The SI seems like it would be a nightmare to tune because you'd be trying to hit a constantly moving target. From the review it seems like the bike is mediocre at best and if that's the case then Yeti needs a rethink. If anyone has experience with setting up the suspension on a Yeti please share
  • + 5
 @indydave124: throw in a larger volume spacer for additional bottom out resistance and drop the shock pressure for some small bump compliance. They come from the factory with a stupid linear tune that you have to run too firm to keep from bottoming all the time.
Our just buy a new shock, a db inline totally changed my yeti for the better.
  • + 2
 @chize: What do you have the sag adjusted to? Any weak points still remaining after in the ride?
  • + 0
 @MX298: Nothing to do with the shock. Any bike with AS and PKB amounts such as yeti's will have hard time dealing with square edges bumps and finding traction.
He exemplify it very well saying that rider have to be very active on the bike, meaning that you have to compensate/damp with your legs for the lack of sensitivity.
On the other hand it will "pedal like Hell" and be a breeze on smooth terrain.
Bikes with low AS/PKB and progressive LR will work with any modern air shock, even on the simplest version.
  • + 2
 @dudee47: Yea, I do. It avoids admitting its not that good, and gives them a chance to recoup the money spent on R&D and Tooling.
  • + 4
 @dudee47: unfortunately real suspension performance is not the aim of most of makers. Suspension design is just another marketing argument to distinguish and build brand identity. The most techy it looks, the better it is.
Riders need to realize that the "climb like a goat, descend like a GOAT" gimmick is pure bullshit since what make a design good at transmitting energy without loss make it bad at tracking ground.
And like MTB is still full of road bike inheritage, nobody want a bike that is not "good" at pedaling.
No brand will never say "look, this bike is not the more efficient at pedaling but it goes down like hell, soaks bumps and got a lot of traction" for a trail bike.
Moreover it's easy to compare how bike behave at pedaling (just add AS), but very difficult to assess suspension performance.
  • + 4
 I had an SB6C for a while and that needed a Fox Float X2 to get the rear end working how I needed. I think the HSC damping as stock is a little heavy and opening that up so the rear end didn't get hooked up on square edged hits allowed the bike the freedom to motor through the chunder more easily. Sounds like the SB5C is afflicted with the same issue.
  • + 2
 @indydave124: Setup is very simple actually. 30% sag and done.
  • + 2
 @indydave124: I think about 30% sag. No real downsides, obviously more small bump compliance means it's a bit more active when pedaling but not significantly more.
The db inline took a bit of time to get dialed but it's better than the Fox ever was
  • + 25
 You noticed a 1mm difference in sag? And in other words this bike is overrated and overpriced and only excels in smooth terrain which almost all bikes do.
  • + 4
 Right? Sounds like a hardtail would be a comparable option. It would excel in the same terrain, be lighter, cheaper, and take a water bottle in the front triangle!
  • + 2
 Sometimes it takes a big PSI change to affect a little difference in sag.
  • + 1
 ..and a volume spacer. Any good rider that understands what their suspension is doing would notice a spacer and 1mm sag.
  • + 16
 Clifnotes: Guy rides bike that's too big for him and then complains that it's too big. Seriously, if you're having to slam the seatpost, drop all the stem spacers and slide the seat all the way forward maybe those were clues that you were on the wrong size bike... Geometry is obviously for taller riders and the shock valve damping for the corresponding weight that comes along with that.
  • + 10
 You my friend hit the nail on the head. While I agree with some aspects of his review I must say the seat being slammed all the forward is a clear indication that he was on the wrong size bike thus making his review somewhat pointless and out of tune with reality.
  • + 8
 I interpreted dropping the stem spacers as a handling choice. I also ride exclusively XL frame bikes and prefer to drop my stem by a few spacers from stock height as a handling choice on nearly every bike I've owned the past few years. H

Sliding the seat forward isn't a symptom of the reach being too long. Technically speaking, sliding the seat forward does not reduce reach. The ESTA on the XL Yeti is actually a fair bit slacker than published, as Yeti is NOT one of the manufacturers who compensate for ESTA in their frames as sizes go up, or at least publishes accurate ESTA numbers as sizes increase (Norco). I've had to slide the seat forward on all of my bikes running traditional ESTA numbers.
  • + 2
 Hey you... GET OUT OF HERE WITH YOUR LOGIC
  • + 3
 @DeLunes reviewer is 6'4, what size do you think he should be on?
  • + 1
 How tall is AJ? I am 1.88m and this bike in XL would not work for me in the reach department but the stack height would be usable.
  • + 1
 @j-t-g: spot on! Some people here don't actually understand what reach is and how a longer reach makes bikes better...
  • + 19
 Hard to believe its worth two of these... www.pinkbike.com/news/staran-fsm-140--review.html
  • + 5
 Weighs 2 pounds less for $4000 more, that is about double normal even by insanely expensive bike standards! The Yeti is beautiful, but I would be very reluctant to drop that much on their more complex suspension system with seemingly little to no benefit in the end result. And the final blow is the water bottle under the frame, never again...
  • + 1
 @Rasterman: less than 2 pounds
  • + 4
 With $800 worth of upgrades to spare
  • + 15
 Probably one of the worst reviews that I've ever read. You take a 127mm bike to coastal B.C. and say it's overwhelmed in that situation. Really?! Then the pedal feedback... from a switch infinity bike. Everyone else I know that rode it in rough terrain said that it's much more bike than it feels, has no pedal feedback and pedals great.
  • + 12
 I have one, in coastal BC. Feels like a way bigger bike in every way. This review is pretty far off from my experience.
  • + 6
 Took mine out last night on chunky east coast hiking trails. Lots of square edge hits, high speed rough stuff, and low speed tech. I wouldn't have wanted any other bike. Just wanted to check to make sure this off base review didn't change my mind. Nope. This 127mm bike is the bee's knees.
  • + 0
 I bet if it was an ebike it would get stellar reviews on pinkbike.
  • + 10
 AJ, when you're critiquing geometry, bear in mind that we're not all shaped like you. Long reach doesn't work for everyone. With comparatively long legs, I look specifically for a high ratio of stack to reach, so your 'awkward' is my 'ideal.'
  • + 2
 You really have an issue with getting a saddle high enough with 170mm droppers?

I bet you vastly more people have the opposite issue.
  • + 7
 @jclnv: With a 485mm seat tube and a 150mm dropper, I have something like 9cm of outer post exposed. Such is the result of a 35.5" inseam.

It's easy to find bikes with long reach and low stack. The few companies willing to make bikes for people with different proportions shouldn't be panned for it.
  • + 9
 @AJBarlas: Thank you for the honest review. I own a 2017 Yeti SB5 Turq and while I feel quite comfy on the medium and have no issues with stack or reach I do have to agree with you when you say "the bike preferrs to skip rather than track" and "to feel a little “tingy”, translating more of the feedback from the trail through to the rider over the rough stuff" which I think comes from the firm Tune and the fact that the Fox Float DPS is simply not up to the task which is why the team has been seen running the FOX X2's on their 5C team bikes, But then again I think Yeti already knows what you have mentioned above which is why we are now seeing the the release of the SB5 Lunch Edition!.........I built mine up from day 1 with a Push Tuned FOX Float RC2 36, DHF Minion/Aggresor Combo, XM 481/240 Wheels/Hub combo and just ordered a FOX DPX2 for it as the Fox Float DPS with the custom tune is just not up to par with the current SB5
  • + 13
 I could watch those suspension-action videos all day long....
  • + 3
 You'll go blind
  • + 1
 Can't help thinking we don't see everything the Switch thing does, e.g. at bottom out. The sliders seem to be moving down, but shouldn't they go back up at some point?
  • + 8
 Beautiful bike, expensive but definitely beautiful. I wonder if the owners of Yeti or Pivot have any thoughts about the carbon industry like the owner of Pole... perhaps Genio doesn't dump carbon waste into the ocean and they all feel much better.
  • + 10
 The owners of Yeti and Pivot are too busy making quality carbon bikes than coming up with an excuse for why it can't be done that makes them look like a cross between Mother Theresa and Al Gore in the eyes of easily swayed pinkbike commenters.
  • + 17
 @wibblywobbly: "quality carbon bikes" yeah quality chaintays
  • + 1
 Yeah...but Yeti bleeds carbon at this point. Seeing an aluminum one makes you do a double take since it looks more industrial compared to the current smooth finish Yeti line.
  • + 6
 @wibblywobbly: Yeti's chainstays are known to crack, not sure if I'd consider them quality. Also, if Pole was telling the truth, isn't that a good reason not to make their bikes carbon at this point?
  • + 5
 @FindDigRideRepeat: Yeti's early foray's in to carbon had some issue, but the stuff the last few years has been much better.

There is some element of truth to what Pole is saying, but the puff piece that Pinkbike published was a complete joke. Pole simply doesn't think they can make money doing carbon "right" (or doesn't have the capital to start "proper" carbon production) so they came up with this heroic story about saving the planet. They are a for-profit company, not a charity, despite what their PR Rep Paul Aston wants you to think.
  • + 4
 @wibblywobbly: So you think that carbon factories in China don't pollute into the ocean? That's a marketing ploy?
  • + 2
 @wibblywobbly: yeh call that envirunmunt BS man. We don't need no stinkin' fish, lobsters, surfing, swimming, Life. I don't know anybody who likes being able to actually breath.
  • + 11
 minor error in your frame weights: 2.66 kg is 5.86 lb, not 5.5 lb
  • + 0
 came here to say that.
  • + 10
 0.00586 kilopounds
  • + 3
 Thanks For the catch Tim. Updated to correct weights now.
  • + 11
 @AJBarlas: 2.84 kg minus 2.5 kg is not 180 grams
  • + 3
 @Jimmy0: Yup - looks like 340grams different... almost twice the calculated weight savings.
  • + 5
 God, you lot must be fun at parties...
  • + 6
 @trillot: looks like they tried to fix the mistake, but left off the final zero and ended up putting down 34 grams now.
  • + 8
 Nice job, AJ! One of the best and most-thorough reviews I've seen on PB (or anywhere else). Great to see "weak points" effectively and fairly called out by a reviewer.
  • + 0
 Agreed. Well thought-out with all the details highlighted that someone needs to pay attention to when test riding this particular bike. I think that is more important than whether the bike fits the tester well or not.
  • + 8
 The summary on the front page says "The smaller wheel..." Are we all just trying to pretend 26in bikes never happened?
  • + 4
 I read that headline and literally thought "Is Yeti making a 26" bike again"? Haha. I only clicked the link to find out....
  • + 4
 I have been riding this bike for a couple months now, XTR build, Deity bits, stock suspension. The best way I can describe it is that it rides like a 5" travel hardtail when the going gets rough. If you are the kind of rider that actually likes to pick the good line, jump the nasty stuff, pump the rollers, sprint the flats, then climb up and do it again, it is an amazing bike.

It is not my Glory Advanced 0. Yeah, you actually have to work a little to ride it if you are blasting rock gardens, but it is fun as hell. I have never been knocked off line, but I have definitely driven it late in to line changes that it was more than happy to slice through like a scalpel.

It doesn't erase rocks, and I'm going to put a DPX2 on it for the start of next season, but it is a nasty bike that wants to be ridden fast at all times.

This review actually reminded me of why I like this bike so much. It is not a DH rig with a single crown. It is a bike that shines more and more as you pump, pedal, and pick the most fun way down the trail.
  • + 5
 Sb5c Fanboi here. I'll openly admit the bike sucks in stock form. Needs better tires, 160/36 fork and better rear shock, then it's sublime. There's a reason the 'Lunch Ride' edition happened.
  • + 8
 Really loving my Scout, thanks Transition! Sorry I couldn't help it
  • + 1
 Me too!
  • + 4
 I just built a large SB5c up from a frame and while my build is slightly different I must say that I have never once felt like this bike was overwhelmed in any situation, to say it's possibly well suited to aggressive xc isn't even close to accurate. I came off a Santa Cruz 5010 v1 and the SB5 crushes that bike in everyway. The headtube is looong though.There's no aggressive xc option for this bike, its ridiculously capable and feels like I'm riding a bike that's bigger in travel and slacker... but its not. FYI I built mine with a 160mm Fox 36 Talas and it has Hans Dampf rubber so that does contribute to it's unstopableness, no bike should have a 34.
  • + 4
 When do we get a long-term SC 5010 v2 review? Would like to weigh a couple years of riding against an informed opinion. Only thing I don't like so far is the slacker STA on slow and seated tech stuff.
  • + 3
 I have a 5 yr old 1st gen of this bike called the SB66c (sz med) and it was one of the pioneers in light weight 152 mm travel frames that can do it all. Now this version has a 2 degree steeper STA ,shorter seat tube and 25mm less rear travel but I still see it as the same bike. Mine rolls on 31mm x 26er wheels and if you keep the rubber reasonably light at 700-900gr you have a all day trail eater. (28.5 lbs w pedals)It does not have the same issue getting up and over chatter on climbs and after a 4 season test period I have to say it's absolutely rocks everywhere it should from local XC to Top of the World. AJ did spend a lot of ink pointing out the importance of fit type for his long lanky upper body which likely does not fairly belong in this test article but those same body types as him will benefit from his fitment points. There are many frames that by the numbers I will not fit well......but I don't blame the bike for my none standard body type. I also had a SB6 for the record that I bought in a sz L. Sold it after 6 rides as it was too big for my 5ft10in. I fall half way between a M and L.
  • + 6
 Everyone asks for honest reviews. And now you have one. Cheers for that PB.
  • + 7
 To summarize: Its a Yeti, but not a great bike.
  • + 2
 "Yeti oozes quality in everything from their website, to their videos and photography, and their frames are the perfect exclamation point."

Man ain't that the truth. Many years ago I fell in love with Yeti. Their website had awesome videos of beautiful terrain with sick background music - that's where I first heard Glitch Mob (I don't get out much). This was back when they made the 575 and the ASR7. The promo material for the 7 was on point. Something like "As rider's skills are progressing they're looking for a bike that can do more."

Then they ditched ALU single pivots and went with the SB line. *sigh*.
  • + 2
 The last time I truly lusted for a Yeti was when they were still making aluminum bikes. Bummer.
  • + 2
 It's a fair point, but I think you have to look at what was going on with the industry at the time they moved away from single-pivot alloy bikes:
Direct-sales were really starting to take off, and the market was being being flooded with cheap brands punting out alloy frames for not very much. They were cleverly marketed, painted in pretty colours and touted as the next big thing - how could the 575 compare against that? Don't get me wrong, I loved the 575 and ASR5 - they were awesome bikes. But if you're judging things purely at face value (which most consumers do, especially in this price-segment) why would someone buy a dated-looking 575 over something like a Nukeproof/YT etc..? At the end of the day it was a single-pivot alloy bike.
So, Yeti would have been faced with a choice: Sell out their principles and cheapen their brand by going into competition with dirt-cheap import companies who put little to no development into their own bikes; Or, stick their heads out above the mess and look at how they could be better. That's what they did, and I don't think they regret it at all.
If you want a cheap alloy single-pivot bike there are literally hundreds of options to choose from, but if you want something pretty special that rides incredibly well, check out the SB lineup Wink
  • + 2
 @speedfreek: I don't debate that it was a logical move for a business that sells bikes. Market segment with highest growth 5 years ago: Enduro. Demand for carbon: High. Market location of enduro bikes: High end. Being a high end company, it was a no brainer to move to a carbon framed high end enduro bike.

It's just not what I happen to like, long story short.
  • + 1
 @speedfreek: The 575 was not only single pivot, it was also made of cheese.
  • + 1
 @BenPea: I have to disagree. In the early versions where they had a carbon/alu bonded swingarm, yeah, the failure rate was pretty high. As soon as they switched to full alu the failure rates dropped significantly - The last version of it (650b) was solid!
  • + 2
 I own this bike and your review is really spot on! But i like To work the bike a lot. so this bike is easy and fun To play. For myself, i believe it's the Perfect bike. Change the rear tire for a maxxis agressor and front High roller 2. Tumbs up. Tell your boss
  • + 2
 Five volume spacers on a 34!!! What air pressure are
you running ... I have this bike I am no pro and I donk huck but at 240 geared up I am running 75 psi and 2-3 volume spacers and tunned it with a shockwiz.
I also run the 3rd from smaller volume spacer in the rear it's the max on this shock. Suprised your setup it so many Volume spacers in the front and just a little in the rear. ?
You have some fair criticism but I am lucky I have long legs and a short torso so it fits me like a glove. I also think this bike
handles square edges better then any vpp or dwlink that I tried.
  • + 2
 My ride/handling experience with the old SB66 - pretty much the same as this review.

A lot of people picking apart Yeti here for the ride feel expressed by AJ. You guys really need to try the bike before bitching. Yes, the bike likes to skip and dance through chunder, instead of plow. But, this results in three things:
1) It's faster.
2) It's precise.
3) It feels nervous and chattery when plowing.

Suspension design is always an issue of trade-offs. Considering Yeti's focus on racing, I'm not surprised they went this route. Yeah, when I'm in over my head on a trail that can overwhelm me, I'm not gonna want a 'nervous feeling' bike when plowing through chunder. But when I'm on a trail I know well, and I'm riding within my technical/speed limits, man is skipping and dancing through chunder soooo much fun (and fast!). With the way Yeti has set up their suspension, it's really easy to pop off a rock at the beginning of chunder, skip over the rest, and land right where you want to, on the smoother section of trail. Guess what... thats what makes you fast and win races - not plowing aimlessly through momentum-sapping roots and rocks like a beginner.

So yeah... many of you are missing the wagon here. It's not that the bike's suspension sucks. It's that it's for a certain style of riding. And maybe AJ undersold that side of things, because Yeti's suspension design definitely does things well that other bikes can suck at.

I enjoy both styles... bikes that dance and skip, and bikes that plow and stay composed. Pick your poison... or, better yet, buy both types and ride the one that suits the trail and your mood for that day.
  • + 2
 I am glad to see a review that isn't all positive, but it seems like perhaps some of the issues were caused by the frame size choice and the shock setup. 12.5% sag? I wonder if a different combination of air pressure and volume spacers would create a vastly improved ride dynamic.
  • + 1
 32% sag. 16mm of 50mm shock stroke.
  • + 1
 @brianpark: You are correct, not sure why I interpreted otherwise. Thank you.
  • + 2
 I've had both a SB5 and a SB6. I loved both bikes they seem to hold up to the trails here in Pisgah, I've never really noticed any issues with square edge hits slowing the bike down but maybe thats because I try not to hit square edge things... I will say though that both the 5 and 6 were both much better with my ElevenSix on the back.
  • + 2
 "I did find the carbon frame to feel a little “tingy”, translating more of the feedback from the trail through to the rider,"

You have to laugh at the nonsense of claiming to perceive "tingyness" (?) on a 130 travel bike ...
  • + 2
 "The reach is considerably shorter than what other extra larges I’ve ridden in the last while are, but that wasn’t the issue. The tall stack and long head tube length became more of a problem than I could have imagined. "

Reach is related to top tube length...
  • + 3
 Interesting review, I have an SB6, I'm not a dentist and I ride rough trails. I think the switch system works great and I have had multiple DW link and VPP bikes both for trail and DH.
  • + 2
 I really appreciate the sizing comparison tables. Very nice, thank you. I totally expected a glowing review, love and am surprised that you can criticize the mighty yeti. Sure is a pretty bike but I agree, I demoed one and was happy to get back on my hardtail.
  • + 1
 I don't get this "The Turq series frame comes with a claimed weight of 5.5lbs (2.5kg) whereas the regular carbon series frame weighs in at a claimed 6.27lbs (2.84kg), giving a saving of 34 grams for the Turq" isn't that a 317 gramish weight savings?

Also just caling shenanigans on Yeti in General. I have owned 4 of them over the years and I love them. But again it's an old argument. They say they have the best Carbon process so they have to charge more for their bikes. Now what they have the lesser carbon model that will still probably cost more than more frames out there. Again when Ibis 1st was launched they were and still are the best of the best. But their frame prices are reasonable. Sorry I will get off my soap box.

In truth I can purchase an Ibis, Santa cruz, Turner, etc for a reasonable price and get their top tier offering. I still love reading your reviews, but as a loyal customer you lost me when your prices became elitist. Oh by the way when I first said this argument yoru response was we still offer the 575 for those of you that want a Yeti but can't afford our premium carbon offering. I knew that was a cheap excuse than, and look at where it is now.
  • + 1
 Fwiw, have a 4.5c... similar in many ways. The stock shock tune was very firm off the top and too linear (bottomed like crazy at correct sag). Going to a big vol spacer really helped, but getting the shock retuned was a game changer and totally transformed the bike. Went from Ok to Absolutely love it, now!
  • + 6
 Wow. I expected more
  • + 1
 "one helluva good looking bike."

Seriously? It looks like it's inflated. Like I should find an air-valve at the bottom of the downtube.

Yeti's alloy frames were works of art. These new carbon balloons look silly.

Come to think of it, that would be great though...you could just keep a compressor in your vehicle and transport your bike deflated.
  • + 1
 I like the fresh tone to the review. It's refreshing to see innovation approached with a constructive critical lens. In regards to quality, you must not have put many miles on that press fit BB. I wish Yeti and other manufacturers would think about the longevity and serviceability of the bike beyond the demo circuit.
  • + 2
 It's kinda refreshing to hear that Yetis aren't always awesome exotics and Guides can be inconsistent. Might be nice to hear it sooner than two or three years after release... but honesty is cool anytime.
  • + 1
 As a SB5.5 owner I'm as big of a Yeti fanboy as they come. Turquoise 5.10's, color matchy matchy, I'll be the first to admit I really drink their coolaid. That being said, I've never understood the SB5 in their lineup. I've ridden one before I bought my 5.5 and found it really underwhelming (same with the SB5+). It's a trail bike that isn't good at being a trail bike? But is more like a bad xc bike, but clearly worse than the SB4.5? I dont get it.
  • + 3
 and then you have this review by Blistergear which is way different to the review by AJ

blistergearreview.com/gear-reviews/2017-yeti-sb5
  • + 1
 A thorough review that gives detailed and accurate ride impressions, positives and negatives, and makes ride comparisons to other similar bikes that appear really accurate. Yup.
  • + 2
 Actually it sounds pretty damn similar - it's not a couch, it's a bit harsh, but it races, pops and plays (skips/dances) well - pretty much what AJ is saying - I feel like they both nailed it. The difference is purely in how they sold the strengths and weaknesses. I feel like Blister did a better job selling the SB5's strengths and noting it's weaknesses than AJ did - which produced a more unbiased-sounding review. A good reviewer tries to take their own preferences and biases out of the equation as much as possible.
  • + 1
 Haven't ridden this one, but rode a few other bikes of this kind. I must say keeping the build "light" with light tyres with not too knobby pattern is what makes them shine. Even if it gets a bit loose sometimes, it's still cool, after all this is where the fun is at. If you just upfork it, put big tyres on, you may as well ask yourself: why am I not riding a bigger bike instead? For me the best kind of bike to get sketchy on.
  • + 3
 the problem is they put 5 volume spacers into a front fork for a guy who weighs a 120 lb no wonder he didn't like the ride may as well stuck a ridged fork on the bike
  • + 1
 Exactly what I was thinking... Adding spacer everywhere and wondering why the bike is so harsh.
  • + 1
 Owner of a Medium SB5C for 2 years I was very surprised by this review. I almost have the opposite feeling on this bike. My trails are only rocks, rocks and square edges everywhere and my SB5c is amazing for climbing and descending.
If I've read this review before choosing my bike I will probably look at another bike. Hopefully, I didn't do it and it will help me for the the future: don't care about XL size pinkbike reviewers.
Should be really interesting to read a medium size review.
  • + 2
 I read over damped rear shock. Stink bugs when you use too much rear brake. Skips and chatters instead of tracking well during hard braking. Odd frame sizing. Frame transmits plenty of noise. The bike looks nice.......
  • + 3
 Something tells me that if you're relying on custom shock tunes to get the bike to feel good, then maybe it's time to rethink your suspension dynamics.
  • + 1
 Fyi, Most bikes comes with a custom shock tune for their suspension design
  • + 1
 @eball: True, but when you change shocks for something highly adjustable you don't want to find out that the only reason the bike rides the way that it does is because of a factory tune.
  • + 1
 @matadorCE: This is true, but I don't see how one tune can work for every rider as we are all different in size, weight and riding style. In the MX world almost all dirtbikes are custom tuned for the riders weight. I am on my second Push Tuned Fox Fork which has been tuned for my weight / riding style and I can tell you that the difference is night and day. Why this does not happen in the MTB world is beyond me.
  • + 3
 @eball: I hear you and I've had PUSH shocks and i've run 4-way adjustable shocks, and from my experience you're in a much better position when the bike kinematics are already good to start with instead of trying to make it feel good by heavily relying on a shock tune.
  • + 3
 "I'd argue that the reach is not long enough for a rider of that stature". Maybe you should learn how to set a saddle (see the first pic) before to review a bike...
  • + 4
 Damn, Pinkbike didn't like my bike. Have to sell it now!
  • + 3
 Pivot Mach 5.5: same price, same lightweight, same attention to detail, but way more capable.
  • + 2
 ITT people who can't afford this bike and have never ridden a yeti talk about how horrible they are with thinly veiled jealousy
  • + 1
 "nothing like a good suspension video to make me wanna shit, " I think you jarred something lose there tiger." That video was filmed at a medium pace or was it sloooowwwwed dowwwwwn.
  • + 2
 Does this confirms that any bike with travel 127mm or less is basically a cross country bike, regardless of how much marketing koolaid is splashed on it?
  • + 0
 Great to see a solid honest review like this. Seems to say pass on this bike for this much money. I was not impressed with my guide brakes either until I switched to Galfer rotors and pads. No more fade even on long descents, much better power and great modulation.
  • + 1
 My riding buddy (his wife just had another baby, RIP for the season) has last years model in XL and he loves it. It does prefer smoother, faster terrain, but not to the extreme that this reviewer says.
  • + 1
 One little thing not often brought up, however I hope the tester should have noticed and I think worth mentioning in a review article, is that Yeti specs real yellow label Maxxis tires. Not the crap white label OEM tires.
  • + 10
 Unfortunately, they are yellow labeled Ardents.
  • + 2
 @ReformedRoadie: However, my SB6 came with yellow label DHF and Aggressor. Its the attention to detail that makes a Yeti, a Yeti
  • + 1
 @profro: I have a 575 that I am having a hard time letting go of it to get a bro deal on a new team bike...love that thing. I think they may have over estimated the Ardent which is shite for aggressive riding.
  • + 1
 Tried Iron Maidens pub ale the other day. Good beer and has to be the best looking can in the history of cans. This bike is 7k right? You say it comes with Ardents? hehe
  • + 1
 It seems really odd to discuss the bike being 'tippy', lay out all the geo tables, but leave out Bottom Bracket drop / height.
  • + 1
 Yeti has sexy lines dialed.

Holly head tube Batman, although it is an XL frame.
Awesome POV helmet cam vid.
19% rear sag, that sounds high to me.
  • + 2
 Nearly all modern bikes are designed around 25-30% sag (Usually 30%). Negative travel is very important for traction and if you need more support volume spacers and more compression is usually a better option than more air.
  • + 0
 @RoboDuck: yup, 19% still sounds a little high.
  • + 1
 32% sag.
  • - 1
 Rear shock stroke length = 127mm
30-32% sag out of 127mm = 38.1mm-40.6mm

Yeti recommends 15mm of sag, thats not normal negative travel, unless I'm missing something? Maybe their Switch Infinity stystem makes up for the rest?
  • + 4
 @Myfianceemademedoit: Oh man... You're confusing travel with stroke. Stroke on that bike is 50mm. 30%=15mm sag. Trust the manufacturer and assume the mistake is yours when the #'s don't line up.
  • + 3
 Wow 76.3 degree seat angle.... hehe
  • + 1
 The head tube is definitely TOO TALL. I rode my brother in laws SB5 and the front is very high meaning you have to really weight the front wheel.
  • + 2
 That stack is big..I have the same on my xl and I have to drop/ flip my stem and run flat bars..not Ideal
  • + 1
 @ Bike companies: Longer, slacker, yes.....but stop going lower. Some of us ride raw trails that require lots of log hopping
  • + 1
 Guys, relax... once the chainstay cracks it becomes much more compliant in the rough rocky sections; it just needs to break in...
  • + 1
 I want to see a "making of" the suspension movement video. What's going on there? A ladder? Some kind of super funky yoga positioning to keep out of the picture?
  • + 2
 It better be playful and light for 7000$ and 127mm travel !
actually 12kg almost seems heavy for that
  • + 2
 Should have tested the SB6C
  • + 1
 they already did
  • + 2
 A review on a year old bike... awesome.
  • - 1
 Wow, 7000 bucks and a review that says that it can't ride rocks even if you set it up correctly! I think I'll stick to my AM hardtail that costs a fifth of the price and can still ride the smooth stuff.
  • + 0
 Chainstay length 437mm? No thanks, get with the times yeti, your bike is even less playful than giant (435mm)

At least make up for it with a bottlecage
  • + 1
 OMG... My 575 has 450mm CS...un-rideable. Well, until a loose technical climb. Like and geometry number - irrelevant in isolation, a compromise, a preference
  • + 1
 yetis are built for speed.
  • - 2
 This review makes the Sb5 seen an odd choice - like a xc/trail bike with extra travel and weight but no benefit! I think I'd get a 120/130mm trail bike over this, or even a hardtail, depending on how smooth the local trails are...
  • + 3
 FYI....this is a 127mm frame?
  • + 1
 @benviebikes: Oops! My mistake!
  • + 1
 Is the Turq X01 worth the extra $1700 over the Carbon series GX build - super confused. Thoughts ?
  • + 1
 nice review.....i aprreciate the efforts taken to point out the good and the bad points in this one.
  • + 1
 Always loved Yeti bikes. Really looking forward to my next lottery win so I can afford one.
  • + 1
 So when did 34 grams become 3/4 lbs? I know there is definitely a typo going on, but Geez.
  • + 1
 ooooouuu....that chain stretch.
  • + 1
 Hubba Hubba Big Grin @theminsta
  • + 1
 Berry naice. But people don't look at geometry sheets so they think this bike is designed for a 150mm fork... I'd be running 140mm MAX and probably 130mm if I get one.
  • + 1
 rattle free? wish Id got one of these instead of the 5.5
  • + 1
 Trust YETI to dish out a good Turqing
  • + 1
 i can't wait for the Yeti Sb#$%^& 48-g C F32 404-90210 comes out.
  • + 1
 Yeti ... Bionicon...Cervelo. my dreams...
  • + 1
 Holy high uncut steerer-tube Batman!
  • + 0
 So... It's only good on blue and green trails? So much for those switch infinity fanboys.
  • - 1
 Yeti is my bucket list bike, but not until they do away with that weird fox link thingie as I am looking for simpler designs..... Hey Orange, I see you there............
  • + 0
 Yeah! Things that I don't understand that work well are stupid!
  • + 2
 "Fake News"
  • + 1
 The nose of that saddle looks pointed down... that shouldn't be that way.
  • + 1
 Sb5 Turd
  • + 0
 Dont care about plastic bikes anymore , seen to many break
  • + 0
 Why buy this over a transition scout?
  • + 1
 Needs 26" wheels
  • + 1
 mom, can i have one?
  • + 1
 OCEAN FILL!
  • + 0
 Turqing is a new dance!
  • + 0
 wait what
  • - 3
 if i really wanted a review of one of these, i'd just ask my dentist...
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