Life of an Almost - Josh Harder's Story

Dec 7, 2016 at 15:48
by Josh Harder  
When it comes to life, I’m no expert. In fact, I’m 27; married (which is awesome), no job, no house, and I live with my in-laws. I’m an educated person. I have a diploma in civil engineering, 3 years of experience in a fast paced engineering environment and I still can’t land a job. I lack the ability to sell myself to a company. The places I want to work don’t want me and the places I don’t want to work don’t want me. Talk about a good way to slip slowly into madness.

Life of an Almost

It all started about a decade ago in a town called Red Lake. I was a 17-year-old kid with no life experience. I worked for my dad doing construction and renovations and that was going really well. I had responsibility at work, I got to be outside all day, and on the right job we’d have our lunch by the lake. Life was good, but I had big goals in a big world. I wanted to be a biker. No, I didn’t want to wear spandex and pedal my butt off. I didn’t want to wear leather and grow a huge beard. I wanted to throw on a helmet, maybe some knee pads and some gloves, jump on my bike and throw myself off jumps and cliffs. I wanted to ride epic trails that seemed to go on forever and just when you think you’re close to the bottom you stop and find out you’re only half way there. Now this was 2006-07. The bike industry had stepped away from events like Red Bull Rampage and focused on slopestyle events. This posed a problem for me. I wanted to be a big mountain rider, but in a time when the entire industry was focused on a defined course and what tricks you could do, a big mountain rider was not going to get his name out there. So in 2006 I entered to get a spot in the Crankworx lottery for slopestyle. I got a call, but because I had one day to travel from the metropolis that is Red Lake, I wasn’t able to make it to Whistler in time.

Small step down back home in Ontario

That summer I saw some of the most progress in my riding. I was building bigger and bigger stuff. Going bigger than ever and looking for more all the time. That year I grew so much and was becoming the rider I wanted to be. I even started getting respect from people in high school who didn’t really know much about me. You should have seen the looks on their faces when I’d call them out on things too. Every rider has at least once in their life had someone say “I’d hit that”, but they shut up pretty quick when you hand them your bike and helmet. Late 2006, bike season was over and the snow had begun to come down, the lake was freezing and I didn’t have very much going on other than school so it was time to get the snowboard out. That winter ended up being my best season of riding my board. I was so confident in my abilities and was doing bigger things all the time. It was like 06 was my year. I was doing bomb drops from buildings, hitting jumps that one year earlier I would have never thought of doing and doing it in style, and sliding actual hand rails. There was a small group of us that just shred all winter long. We’d have the snowboards in the back of my Volvo, ready for a short after school sunset shred (the sun went down at 4:30pm). That winter was the first time I didn’t want to bring out the gt snow racer, which in previous years was the main source of entertainment.

Life of an Almost

Now being a typical Canadian, there was a third form of fun I had, hockey. That was another thing that was always in the back of the car. I’d have all my friends’ skates, sticks, and about a dozen pucks ready to go at any time. Usually after a day of riding snowboards and the sun was gone, the lights at the outdoor rink would turn on and we’d go and play a few pick-up games and go home. Our group was super tight. There was Greg, Danny, Tyler, Lyndsey and Me. We were pretty much inseparable. Early 07, the snow was starting to melt and it was time to start planning my bike season. This meant I would be hanging out with Greg, Danny, Cody, Jon, Jamie, and Caleb a lot more. This also meant getting the bikes ready for the season. Bring on the start of the craziest year of my life.

Life of an Almost

In March 07 I was working on a rim and I had some trouble with it. The tool I was using got stuck, I torqued it a little more and a small piece of aluminum broke off and hit me in the eye. It must have been travelling really quick because it went into my eyeball and was lodged there for a week. The doctors didn’t take me seriously when I said it went inside my eye and just tried flushing it twice. I had an x-ray and sure enough, there was a shiny spot inside the right eye, just to the left of the iris and pupil. This would be my first big medical event of the year. The day we found out how bad it was we were heading down the highway to Winnipeg to get surgery. I was already losing sight in my eye so it was an emergency.

Life of an Almost

This surgery restored my vision to almost perfect. In fact, colours are more vibrant in my right eye now. The next five weeks of my life were pretty boring. After eye surgery, you aren’t allowed to lift, run, or do anything fun because you could rupture your eye and lose it. So I went to school, watched my gym class have fun, did all the learning I could do with an eye patch and go home. I wasn’t even allowed to drive the quad to go pick up my friend after their co-op. Life was boring. In early May I was able to start doing stuff and I just went for it. I had five weeks of pent up energy. I managed to go from an average gym student to a performer and was able to get right back into the swing of things on bikes. On one occasion I miscalculated, though. I ended up puncturing my arm on a rock and had to go in for stitches and pretty much felt that injury for the rest of the year.

Larger Step down back home

It was time to enter for a place in Crankworx again. I submitted my form for the lottery and I was selected as one of the 100 to be in qualifying. It was a celebration in the Harder house that day. I was going to be riding the biggest event in the world and this was my shot. Now finding out I got in was both good and bad. I had a goal, but I didn’t want to get hurt before so I took the rest of the summer a little easier than I normally would have. I wasn’t as confident in the air, I was riding different equipment on my bike so the geometry was a little weird, and I wasn’t pushing my limits. It came time to go to Whistler. My parents and I drove to Sicamous, BC and spent a few days at my sister's place. This was my first real chance to ride some BC trails. There was one north of town that was really fun and gave me a chance to push myself. It came time to go to Whistler. Thinking only positive things about this trip, I was beyond excited. When we got to town, we checked into the hotel and I immediately went to check out the course and get my lift passes. Because I was an athlete, I got a week of lift passes for $35! The next day I got up and got first chair. I spent the whole day riding the bike park. It was my first time there and it was amazing.

The next day was practice. I met some of the biggest stars during practice. I hung out with Lance McDermot, Andreu Lacondeguy, Tyler McCaul and Cam McCaul. I practiced all morning and eventually it was contest time. Before my qualifying heat I went to my dad, I told him that I wasn’t feeling right. My gut was telling me to hold off on riding and we eventually agreed that I should just go have fun and not worry about my result. So up the mountain I went. It finally came time for my heat shortly after 1pm. I was nervous to say the least. I was about to ride in front of thousands of people and the entire bike industry. On July 26, 2007, at approximately 2:30pm I dropped in for my run. I went off the starting drop like usual. Pretty tech little drop and was rolling towards the road gap. I went off the road gap and did what would have been the best table of my life. Like, that thing was flat. Next up was the big double… after the table, I was lined up for a jump that I had never hit and didn’t have the time to stop so I was committed to it. I remember right before I left the lip that I wasn’t going the right speed so I bailed and was aiming to slide down the landing, only instead of a long and low bail, I got LAUNCHED.

Life of an Almost
Photo: John Ker
Life of an Almost
Photo: John Ker

All of a sudden I was 30+ feet in the air and not the 5-10 I was expecting. Instead of sliding down the landing I was thinking about what part of me to land on. It felt like I was up there for minutes with the volume of thoughts running through my head. You know how they say time slows down. It actually does. It’s like the gravity of the situation acts like a black hole. After all, time is relevant. As I was flying I was thinking, ‘If I land on my feet, I’d break both my legs’, and ‘my best bet is to try and slide out like my original plan’. I must have gone back and forth on this two or three times before I made my decision.


When my butt hit the ground I uttered on word on impact, “shit,” and rolled down the landing. Something felt off about this tumble though. It felt like my upper half and my lower half weren’t connected. When I stopped I tried to get up because I felt ok, but I wasn’t. I folded at my belly button. The emergency crew was there in seconds and were doing assessments. “Move your hands, move your arms, wiggle your toes….” My toes didn’t wiggle. I was paralyzed from the waist down. Thankfully there were people everywhere so I had a hand to hold. My dad was volunteering that day on the hill and had a radio so I was able to have him right there in under two minutes. When he got there we prayed and prayed that this would work out. Thankfully I was aware of everything and not totally freaking out because my bag was at the top of the hill with my ID and camera and everything. I was able to tell somebody to get my bag. This was the start of a long road. I spent a few hours in the Whistler clinic and was airlifted to Vancouver General Hospital where I spent the next three weeks of my life. The first few days were just a blur. I was put in a coma so I wouldn't move around and only briefly woke up for things like MRI and x-rays. I woke up because the pain was so intense that I could tell you if they rolled me over a dime. Then it came time for surgery. I had a quick prayer with my Dad and Adrian (Brother-in-law). Then it was lights out. When I was under they cut open my left side, removed a rib and moved my lung so they could get to my spine. They removed all the pieces of my L1 Vertebrae. I am now the proud owner of a titanium vertebrae, one plate, and four screws.

After my operation I spent three weeks in Vancouver General Hospital. It was one of the most trying times of my entire life. The next few days were a blur. I had tubes out of every part of my body. There was a chest tube to help get air out of my chest cavity, a catheter which is as unpleasant as they say, an I.V. in my hand, and one in my neck. The one in my neck was my favorite one because it was hooked up to a machine that gave me a shot of morphine every 8 minutes if I wanted. Pain relief was just the press of a button away, I named it the "Happy Button" while I was there.

After a few days something amazing happened. i was laying in my bed and I noticed something was different. My thighs were feeling normal. That's right FEELING! I was stoked. Within the week I was able to bring my knees up. It was incredible and a bit of a miracle. Unfortunately my feet weren't working and they still don't to this day.

My days consisted of getting up, going to a short physio session. That's where I learned to sit up and even transfer from my bed to my wheelchair. I remember sitting in the physio room, looking out at Vancouver thinking that this isn't how I wanted my first visit to the Van City to go. After my morning therapy session it was back to bed and my TV. I has speen network so I spent my free time trying to catch some motocross races. It was right at the start of Ryan Villapoto's pro career and he just kept winning.

After a few weeks in Vancouver they needed to give my bed to someone else so it was time to leave. I was sent to Winnipeg's Health Science Center to finish my rehabilitation and I was sent in style. I wasn't able to sit for more than 2 hours so a regular airline. The kind people at BC health wanted my bed so bad that they chartered a medical transport for me to get to Winnipeg. They got me a private plane. It was the most rockstar feeling moment of my life.

In a way it was fitting that I went to HSC because it's where I was born. I met my new physiotherapist and told her I was walking out of that place. She always seemed unsure of that and tried to keep me grounded. I kept to a routine, get up at 9, physio at 10, lunch at noon, physio at 2 and then cruise the halls of the hospital until I got tired or bored. I spent time talking to lots of old people too. My ward was spinal injuries, amputees, and stroke patients. So there was a real mix of us.

On November 16, 2007 I walked out of the hospital.


This road has lead me through some of the deepest valleys of my life. From being told that I would never walk again and constantly telling my physiotherapist I was walking out of the hospital to actually doing it was amazing. It helped that I had a walker and still didn't have the money I needed for a wheelchair. Believe me, those are more expensive that you can ever imagine.


After leaving the hospital I went to a very dark place. Going from active to stuck inside is worse than it sounds. I was questioning my own value and debating if it was worth it to keep going. Then I found a group of friends to hang out with all the time and slowly worked myself off the painkillers, because those things are almost as addictive as riding. I spent that winter riding my quad around town and going ice fishing with my friends. The next summer we went out and built a trail for them to ride. I was the creative mind behind the whole project and loved just being out, talking about biking and lines again. Almost a year after I got hurt I rode my bike and bombed down an old logging cut, I even did a little manual at the end. It was a huge victory, but unfortunately I lost the video of it.

The next summer I went with my parents to visit some family in Quesnel, BC, and had my dad chase me with the truck down a massive hill near my uncle's place, I think I hit close to 50km/h which is pretty good for somebody whose legs don't work all that well. And last year, just before I got married I went riding for a morning with one of my roommates. I was living in Lethbridge, AB, at the time. I hiked and rode down twice. It doesn't sound like much, but it's nine years later and I haven't fully recovered. I've made it a crazy ride, and I've made it my goal to do everything that somebody in my condition wouldn't normally do. I aim to keep doing that for as long as my body will let me. Lack of newer equipment has slowed me down a little bit and lately a lack of finances.


Life of an Almost - Josh Harder s Story

Life of an Almost

In spring 2015, I met my wife. We've been married for seven months, and plan on a long time together. I was one of the thousands laid off in the fall of 2015 and haven't been able to land another job yet. I have a diploma in Civil Engineering Technology and have worked in the mining industry too. As of right now, my wife Sarah and I are living at her parents in Fanny Bay, BC, on Vancouver Island and are job hunting all over the province. Our goals in the next few years are the basics: get a place to call our own and start a family, and I'm going to do my best make mountain bikes a family tradition.

Cheers and ride safe everyone!
Merry Christmas!

Josh Harder


MENTIONS: @Albertabound



82 Comments

  • + 91
 Hey, Josh!
This article really brought me to tear up. Because my story and yours are very similar. Only that my accident happened while skiing (got avalanched) and I fully recovered (well, maybe I am not as clever as before, but still reasonable intelligent). It was a great set back in my life and well cost me several years that other people spend with building a career. I think about starting a small ski company (have a degree in engineering like you) for boutique style touring skis. But to make this a reality I still need to work my shitty job to build up the funds required. You seem to be about my age ( i am 34 now)...a lot of similarities... maybe we should team up :-) Most touching article that I read in a long time.
  • + 5
 Me too man, I understand the what he went through very well, I am currently bed ridden while my C1 vertebrae heals up. I shattered it on October 14th in Revelstoke BC, after one of the best most progressive seasons of my life. Luckily I still have feeling throughout my body. the doctors say I will make a full recovery.
  • + 32
 Everyday you open your eyes is a gift ! Life is short, oh so short so remember to suck all the marrow out ! leave no stone unturned.. Go for it ! Life here, is truly heaven on earth... treat it as such. Thank you for sharing your story, You are an inspiration to us all.. cheers
  • + 2
 Really great story and perspective from him. One thing I noticed throughout the story, no $400k medical/rehabilitation bill! Ahh how I long for single-payer.... Its incredible to hear the amount of support he received during his injury and the recovery following oh and that picture of the eject is straight up terrifying.
  • + 13
 Fukkkk. Amazing read, you've obviously been through it dude but I hope things continue to improve for you and your Mrs. I recently had a pretty large over shoot which was nothing like as big as yours but enough to give my brain a beating. Makes you think. All the best in the future and everybody stay safe :-)
  • + 11
 All the best for you, man.

Normally, I don't take my time to fully read an article. But yours got me. Life can change in a blink of an eye, glad you made it almost completely back. Incredible you've stayed awake during and after the crash. when I destroyed my knee years ago, i fell into coma and they brought me back in hospital just to tell me they'll do a surgery. Such things will keep nagging on you for the rest of your life. Every time the weather changes, I feel pain in all the broken bones.
Sometimes, it's payday. But f*** it, most of the time, being out there on the bike is totally worth it!
  • + 4
 Weather changes are the worst! Sometimes those days are a total write-off for me. You're right though, any time I've managed to throw my leg over the bike, all lifes problems just don't matter! Cheers Chris!
  • + 11
 Great story josh and happy for you with the outcome. You are an awesome writer. Forget engineering and write!
  • + 8
 I thought this too. Writing was on point dude.
  • + 27
 Thanks! I'm glad they published this. I know I'm not the only one in my position. For every pro out there, there's about 100 people who have tried. Thanks for the read and comment!
  • + 7
 That was you in that photo? I remember that being in an issue of MBAction back in the day. There was no mention of how bad the rider was hurt though.

Glad that you have been able to recover as well as you have.
  • + 4
 Oops...guess I should clarify that the photo I meant was the bail off the bike photo.
  • + 11
 Yeah that was me. Couldn't believe I actually got a shot in the mag, just wish it was for something a little different hah
  • + 3
 Merci pour ton histoire.
Ne lâche pas.
Je reste au Québec et j'espère te voir dans nos petite trails un jours à VBN.
Best wishes to u and your wife.
  • + 10
 Sombody give this man an e-bike
  • - 3
 a mototrized e bike!...not the boring pedal assist ones....
  • + 1
 Hey, I remembered your comment and my wife just started this GoFundMe to get me an E-Bike. Feel free to share it. Honestly, your comment has stuck with me since this story went public. I took one for a ride last summer and it changed my outlook on riding.

www.gofundme.com/help-josh-get-an-ebike
  • + 4
 Josh, what an incredible story of determination and spirit. You should write for a living Josh. You have a gift. A couple of things sprang to my mind as I read your article aside from the obvious emotional impact that it has. 1) the sentence that stating that opioid based pain killers are "almost" as addicting as biking. I agree I don't think there's a drug in the world that can do what MTB does for your body and soul. I could go on but everyone in this audience gets it. I have a nephew that has a recurring drug problem and I'd love to take him riding and let him feel that rush instead. Sadly he lives several states away so I've never had the chance. 2) The wisdom of your country's govt. to make health care available for all. It not only assures that you actually can have a life instead of being bankrupted after an accident, it allows the innate kindness and generosity of the healthcare professionals to shine through and really do their job well because they aren't worried about where the next dollar is coming from. Your story is both a testament to the human spirit and to the society/country in which you were born. You didn't write it to be political in any way. It simply states the honesty of what occurred. That very honesty is what sends the message home on all levels. Keep writing Josh. You'll have no problem feeding your family once you figure out the "ropes" so to speak.
  • + 3
 Such an inspiring story man. Although ive never had an injury quite like that, ive been in those deep dark places living wih my parents with no job and questioning my life choices up to that point. Hell even now im almost 31, married, a 2 yr old son, a daughter coming soon, and a house just working my ass off so every chance i get i have a nice bike to ride. Even though my life is on the right track (thanks to my loving wife), my mind is left wondering what could have been.

Just keep pushing forward. Wish you the best
  • + 4
 Thanks and all the best to you! Behind every man is a better woman right?! Thanks for the comment and all the best with your family!
  • + 3
 This guy amazes me. I find time to feel sorry for myself over much less. Somehow he keeps getting out there when he can. More power to you, man. You're an inspiration. Those were some gnarly features he was sending in those pics, too Big Grin
  • + 3
 Man that one hit home. I spent 3 weeks in intensive care in the same hospital after a skiing accident. New pelvis, pins in elbow, and five surgeries to deal with an infection in my ass. Sounds funny til you have part of your butt muscle removed and have an open wound repacked daily for two weeks. After a while i didnt care about riding and just wanted to see home. I dont ride as fast as i did but i want to. Then i remember my moms face in the hospital and i slow the f*ck down. Life is awesome even if its not quite as rad.
  • + 3
 I've had a couple of big setbacks over my life as well. It's easy to feel helpless and as you mention fall into "that dark place", ironically maybe even easier at times of the year like Christmas when you should be the happiest. You have to have faith in the belief that you can make it better even in the tiniest of ways and keep going, just keep going.

Thanks for sharing and reminding us that bad things may happen to us but we make our own change.
  • + 2
 I feel ya man. Did the exact same thing on that jump in the boneyard. Did the step down and my rebound was cranked up. As soon as I hit the lip EJECT. Landed almost flat thought I shattered my ankels. After a few mins I walked it off. Got damn lucky at age 16. Got no rubber bones no more !
  • + 3
 Yeah, it wasn't the best year. So glad that they have those courses dialed now. You lucked out hard man! Glad to hear you walked off dude! Sucks getting older eh? I was 18 at the time, any older and I would have broken more I'm sure.

Stay safe out there!
  • + 2
 @Albertabound: You just wait... until you're actually old! So glad to learn there's a happy ending. As you well know, all stories don't necessarily end well. Life is precious. So glad you're still kicking. Cheers bro!
  • + 2
 The bail out picture was ripped out of my MBA and glued to my garage wall with the likes of Peaty and Minnar. It always made me realize that you have to be ready to risk everything anytime your leg is thrown over the top tube. This was an amazing read for sure and a crazy life that I don't envy at all but I do idolize.
  • + 3
 Happy holidays to you too Josh~ Amazing story to tell to thousands of people. It takes courage to do so and I applaud you. Your tough mindset and positivity will only help you in all that you do in life.
  • + 2
 Well written and this time your talent will launch you into a much better place than a hospital ward. Reading the comments clearly many of us, if not most of us have the shared experience of dealing with pain and recovery, but not at the level you have. My friends tell me I am "living the dream" retired from work and traveling with my best friend riding new trails every day. Last week I asked a local rider at White Tanks in Arizona what his favorite trail was, and being much wiser than me he answered "the one I am riding today." Enjoy the ride every day, you have earned it.
  • + 2
 Thanks for sharing your story! Life is hard and wonderful at the same time. Sounds like you have amazingly supportive parents, wife and in-laws, and you live in Fanny Bay! So the bike career didn't work out, oh well, still got a lot going for you! Stay positive and Best Wishes.
  • + 2
 Cool story, bro.

And I mean that in the most sincere, respectful way possible. I haven't read such a personal story on pinkbike since... Ever? Getting some insight into your life and challenges was a painful read but I deeply appreciate it.
  • + 2
 Very strong man, full of courage, and still very young with a great future ahead. Dont hesitate to move to where the jobs may be now. Many of us have had to take jobs(move) different from our interests/education during
These past 9 years of tuff economic woes.
  • + 3
 Yeah this economy is so flaky. I had a few good jobs, but last year when the oil price dropped the construction industry died in Alberta and I was out of a job. Thanks for the encouragement!
  • + 6
 I hope your able to find a job
  • + 5
 Glad to hear the accident didn't control your life, and you did get back on the bike. Best of luck in the future!
  • + 2
 Thanks for sharing, what a life you've led to this point. I spent 25 days in a burn unit years ago and the bad parts seem to have faded from memory and the experience has made me a better man. You're a survivor, not a victim. Hang in there and good things will come your way.
  • + 5
 Man this is really really great.
  • + 4
 Nice read. Hopefully you'll be a dad someday, those dark places will seem light years away.
  • + 5
 Thanks for sharing and good luck for the future.
  • + 2
 You should write for pinkbike. This was good man! I usually blow long articles off to the TL;DR but this had me glued from start to finish! Best of luck with everything and I am sure life will work out for you!
  • + 3
 Somebody in the Fanny Bay area really needs to step up and give this man a job!! He deserves an easy road from here on out.
  • + 2
 Thanks for sharing your story Josh! From what I see, with your attitude and depth of bravery you have "made it" and glad to hear that you were fortunate to get so much function back from your injury! All the best!
  • + 2
 Life is a struggle sometimes for small gains that outweigh huge losses.Your strength is inspirational. Thank you for sharing your story puts important things into perspective.
  • + 3
 The right opportunity is going to come along for you soon, you are obviously someone who has the motivation to chase your dreams, good luck and best wishes!
  • + 3
 And don't be scared to chase yours! Thank you for the read and comment!
  • + 1
 You article made me think about this sport as fundamentally dangerous. I fell on a free stump a couple of weeks ago, which is nothing compared to your story, and 4 weeks later it still hurts. I had fallen in all kinds of ways, except that I don't jump and I wonder how many falls is too much and too dangerous. I don't know, but the other part of me wants the flowing feeling by commanding the bike. I don;t know how to reconcile these two parts: fun and danger, risk and feeling happy. What do you think, guys?
  • + 4
 If you're worried about getting hurt, just make sure you stay within your comfort zone man. If you truly love to ride, continue to ride and be smart. I don't want my story to scare people away from riding. Just remember the ride doesn't stop if something happens, it just means you might have to ride a different trail.
  • + 1
 Josh, thank you for sharing your story with us. For me, your experience is very humbling. I had an accident this year and it's stories like yours that make me feel lucky. I've felt all but normal since my crash but thinking about the struggle you have endured makes me realize just how minor my accident was. I commend you on your ability to keep moving forward. I've learned that despite my injuries and condition, a good attitude will take you a long way. You are evidence of that and given that, continue to keep up your good attitude and things will fall in place. Hoping you find a great job soon brother! Thanks for the inspiration. I go to sleep tonight with a better attitude...
  • + 2
 Damn. That was heavy. Seriously wasn't expecting PB to make me cry today. You sound like a really good dude, Josh. The article was well-written and extremely touching.
  • + 1
 The main theme I kept thinking was damn I got to learn to crash better. Cause that shit is inevitable. Brilliantly written story. Hey man getting married and starting a family is going pro that's the real show man.
  • + 5
 brave lad.
  • + 2
 If only more people had Josh's attitude and passion for living... way to stay tough man. Very nice article, thanks for sharing that with everyone!
  • + 2
 Hey Josh.....that was a fantastic article and I feel privileged to have read it. You keep up the fine work and best to you and your family.
  • + 1
 Josh, if you can speak to an audience as good as you write, you have a wonderful and inspiring story to tell and Im sure there are lots of folks you can inspire. If life punches you, you punch it back Harder.
  • + 3
 @Albertabound you're incredible.
  • + 3
 Hang in there buddy. Thanks for sharing.
  • + 3
 You the man! All the best, your positivity is heartwarming.
  • + 2
 Ah, and you should work for Race Face or Rocky Mountain. Comon guys, hire Josh
  • + 2
 I wouldn't complain!
  • + 2
 Wish you the very best.Live your life no matter what. Μπράβο Ήρωα!
  • + 1
 ama ginotan afto sthn ellada den 3erw an 8a pepatage....
  • + 3
 Thank you for sharing your inspiring story.
  • + 3
 Amazing story...way to keep on fighting.
  • + 3
 Way to keep your chin up and push through the pain!
  • + 4
 Josh Harder than you.
  • + 1
 LOL. Right on!
  • + 3
 Hope you find a dream job. Thank you for sharing your story..
  • + 2
 Good on you for being so tough.....merry Christmas!
  • + 2
 Great story, thanks for sharing! All the best in the future.
  • + 2
 Awesome story man, thanks for sharing.
  • + 3
 You've got a testimony
  • + 1
 First reaction: on dang, they gotta move that chairlift so it doesn't hurt anyone else.
  • + 1
 Most bikers have imagined what it would be like to experience a spinal injury. Thanks for sharing your story.
  • + 1
 Merry Christmas Josh and I hope your goals come to fruitation as your story is truly inspiring.
  • + 2
 ya, a reality check for me
  • + 2
 Thank you for sharing!
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