Andreani Group Announces PAC-1 Dual Compound SuperMousse Tire Insert

May 27, 2020 at 21:37
by AndreaniGroup  
SuperMousse PAC-1 detail


PRESS RELEASE: SuperMousse

The SuperMousse PAC-1 is a product different from the ones you are used to seeing; it is the first dual-compound mousse composed of an external red hyperelastic part to ensure stronger grip and ride comfort, and an internal black harder one that will help you to absorb and dampen impacts and help eliminate pinch flats. Developed by Andreani Group to optimize the tubeless tires' functioning, it offers exceptional durability and reliability, especially for riders with a more aggressive riding style.

Being the first point of contact with the ground that works in synchronism with the tire, the mousse plays an important role in terms of harmony and efficiency of the bike damping system. It prevents the bead from loosening and saves the rim, and it can be used when the tire is completely flat without creating any kind of damage to the rim. The Andreani SuperMousse works with any tubeless valve.

SuperMousse PAC-1

Installation

First of all, unroll the Pac-1 from the packaging taking care to do not damage the red compound with sharp objects. Place it on the rim - putting the black side facing the hub – and, after measuring, cut the Pac-1 to size the SuperMousse to the rim. Join the Pac-1 with the zip and adhesive provided in the package and wet it to facilitate the tire installation. Insert the first tire bead sidewall on the rim, install the Pac-1 and complete the tire beading using standard plastic levers. Deflate the tyre and insert 80 - 120ml of sealant (our bike technicians recommend a sealant like Stans NoTubes or other ammonia-free sealants) through the valve by using a syringe. Inflate at low pressure (0.8 - 1 bar) and shake the wheel to distribute the sealant inside the tire, and then reach the desired pressure. And now? You have just to enjoy your ride!




The PAC-1, is available with diameters of 26”, 27.5” and 29”, and in the size S for XC and Marathon (rim width from 21mm to 26mm), M for Trail Bike, Enduro and eBike (rim width from 25mm to 30mm), and the L one for DH and eBike (rim width from 28mm to 35mm); of course the choice depends on the tire used.

For more information about the Andreani SuperMousse PAC-1, click here.


108 Comments

  • 29 1
 I could really go for a chocolate supermousse and some fries right about now.
  • 1 0
 "it is the first dual-compound mousse" - wonder where they got that idea......www.rimpactmtb.com
  • 23 0
 Due to Manufacturer Suggested Retail Weight (MSRW) we can not list a weight at these times
  • 2 0
 MSRW are unicorns these days. That was the first thing I looked for and no where to be found.
  • 8 0
 These are light. Weights are published in Europe. I guess to weight it in the states you need to pay somebody for their stamp.

Weights before cutting:

- S: 1.9-2.25: 95 grams
- M 2.3-2.5: 145 grams
- L 2.6-2.75: 180 grams
  • 2 0
 @RedRedRe: light compared to cushcore or other heavy ass insert.
  • 1 0
 Interesting, seems lighter than Vittoria Airliners even though more material?
  • 7 1
 Has anyone used helium to inflate tires yet?????
  • 16 0
 @Supergirl56: all the early adopters flew away
  • 7 0
 @Supergirl56: Helium would leak from tires too quickly, because it’s a small molecule.
  • 2 3
 38€ each fos S size...I guess that the DH size would cost nearly a new rim...I've tried several tire inserts and noone worth the price.
With bombproof rims, dh casing tires and good tire sealant using a piece of foam that doesn't last a day (if you are not destroying them in a rock garden means that you are probably running enough pressure to save your rims as well) is a nonsense.
  • 5 0
 Hi @RedRedRe, here are all weights:
S size: 29" - 79 grams, 27,5" - 72 grams, 26" - 65 grams;
M size: 29" - 145 grams, 27,5" - 130 grams, 26" - 115 grams;
L size: 29" - 180 grams, 27,5" - 158 grams, 26" - 145 grams.
  • 3 0
 @Honda750: Would hydrogen work better? It is a smaller atom but the actual molecule would be larger. It has made zeppelins go up in the air too and it has an edgier image than helium, which may go down well with the audience is you market it appropriately.
  • 5 0
 @Honda750: you mean a smallecule
  • 1 0
 @Supergirl56: Helium molecules are smaller than air and therefore escape quicker.
  • 2 0
 @vandall: It also, uhhh isn't as light when you compress it to 30 psi
  • 5 0
 @Supergirl56: I think I'm going to try inflate my tires with foam insulation, silly string, whipped cream, and perhaps laughing gas. What about Flex-Seal for tire sealant?
  • 5 0
 @Supergirl56:

I inflate my tires with the evaporated tears from newly born puppies. I chose Dobermans, coz I like to ride aggressive
  • 12 0
 Cant wait for 6 compound sealant and 100x compound rims to go along with my dual compound mousse bibs and four compound tires.
  • 9 0
 "it can be used when the tire is completely flat without creating any kind of damage to the rim."

I feel like this is where we're headed. Who's running airless tires?
  • 2 0
 This is what I think is actually the best option. I really want to try something like Mr Wolff's ebike insert (a tiny tube wrapped in foam) with a thin casing tire. Weight would be about equivalent to a DH casing, and lighter than a DH with an insert. It would be virtually impossible to flat, and would have very good sidewall support and damping. The only problem currently is the lack of thin casing tires with aggressive tread compounds. As well as the fact this would likely be more expensive than a standard tire. Though once again not really any more expensive than a DH casing with an insert.
  • 12 1
 Ive finished racing an Enduro stage on Cushcore with a flat. No damage to rim, dyna plug'd it, air'd it up and finished the day on the podium. NAEC 2018
  • 4 0
 @hmstuna: Well you could still tear the tire which could lead to ruining your pool floatie.
  • 1 0
 @camcoz69: a slash would have to be pretty bad to cause any serious issue since it doesn't need to hold air. I would suspect that anything under an inch and a half wouldn't be an issue. larger might cause an entire section of the tread to seperate and flap around which wouldn't be ideal.
  • 2 0
 I remember installing these things circa 1991 with huge tire levers. They were right all along! www.greentyre.com/bicycle-tyres.php
  • 1 1
 @jgainey: What class, Sport had some mellow courses. lol, just messing you you.
  • 1 0
 @hmstuna: dhf maxxgripp exo is a real tire.
  • 1 0
 @Grosey: True, I don't like DHF's though. Magic Marys or Assegais all day.
  • 1 0
 Tannus does a couple of airless tires though not for actual mountainbiking. Their Tannus Armour stays on the outside though (with the thinner tube safely close to the rim) so that would kind of make it appear airless if you inflate the tube rock hard. Unless it is being penetrated by something really long, that is of course. I ordered one of these halfway October last year, by the end of October I was informed that it was underway and should arrive in three weeks. So it could be here any day. Super stoked! I'll report back once I've put it through it's paces.
  • 1 0
 @hmstuna: I think the snakeskin mary is lighter than exo dhf. It's close anyways.
  • 2 0
 @skerby: they don't make that in the ultrasoft though.
  • 1 0
 @racerRANDY: Ha, Touche'.... 40-49 Expert men, Mid-pack in Pro times.
  • 10 0
 Here I thought people were joking about using pool noodles as tire inserts, Andreani says hold my beer.
  • 3 0
 I can't wait for someone to joke about filling their tires with urethane spray...
  • 3 0
 @jfcarrier: Back in the early Nineties, cigarettes smugglers in the south of Italy drove jeeps with silicone-filled tyres. These were bulletproof, so they could smash through police checkpoints. Now, urethane foam? Hmmm....
  • 4 0
 "The PAC-1, is available with diameters of 26”, 27.5” and 29”, and in the size S for XC and Marathon (rim width from 21mm to 26mm), M for Trail Bike, Enduro and eBike (rim width from 25mm to 30mm), and the L one for DH and eBike (rim width from 28mm to 35mm); of course the choice depends on the tire used."

So they sell individual sizes for all three major wheel sizes, and different sizes for various tire sizes, yet we'd still have to cut them to length? Why not make them the correct length for the size you choose?
  • 2 0
 could be mfg costs. happy to pay less for minutes worth of my time
  • 8 0
 I think there is something lost in the translations, I believe there are three widths(S, M, L) but they are all the same length which can be cut to fit 26", 27.5" or 29" rims
  • 2 0
 @5-9-A2: so probably they'll move inside the tire, just like so many other tire noodles, tire troopers etc. do. That's why cushcore is the only real option I know, as it's so tight, it keeps a flat tire inside the rim bed...
  • 2 0
 @5-9-A2: not 24?
  • 6 0
 Pinkbike, where's the darn insert shootout comparison whatever thing you promised last summer?
  • 23 1
 They’re still fighting with the tires.
  • 3 0
 I've been using and selling (in the shop) the Vittoria tire inserts for the last year and they are absolutely amazing. Yes they are a little on the expensive side but when you factor in never having to replace a damaged rim, as well as your tires lasting almost twice as long because the carcass has the support it needs so its not twisting and folding under hard cornering load and G-outs, they are a smart financial move to make. Not to mention performance benefits of being able to run 3-5 psi less with more sidewall support, get actual dampening from the first point of contact to the ground that is essentially an air spring. Hands down one of the best performance upgrades someone who actually rides can do to they're bike.Rant over
  • 4 0
 Curious how these ride. I've run mousses for years in my dirt bike tires and love them. No flats, less deflection, and better traction.
  • 3 0
 I run Nitromousses in my KTM. They are great. However mounting them is a bit of an art and definitely requires some force with correct tools to mount them. You are basically mounting a tire that is already inflated. How will this work on a CF rim ? Rimlocks also make this work on a Moto. No rimlock?
  • 6 0
 When these glorified pool noodles drop to 20$ I may give them a shot.
  • 2 0
 Yup, 38 euros for a length of foam. Im in the wrong business.
  • 8 0
 I've tried pool noodles just for kicks and giggles. The first few rides you can notice improvement in rocky terrain (tire inserts work), however the foam gets destroyed after a few rides and turns to mush. The tire inserts on the market are light years ahead of pool noodles.
  • 8 0
 @tacklingdummy: cool that you actually tried pool noodles. It's closed cell foam so it's a tad more complex than a dollar store toy. Still it's fun calling inserts pool noodles. Still , max I'm shelling out is 20$ .
  • 3 0
 I paid nearly 300$ for cushcore for two of my bikes. Ridiculous to think about but they do improve the ride noticeably more than most similarly priced upgrades elsewhere.
  • 13 12
 When will this end? Aren't we asking for the wrong thing? Either change the rims or the tires so we don't need inserts. Pneumatic tires have been round for over 100 years. If you need sidewall support, then you need heavier casings, if you damage rims, increase your PSI. If you need more grip, use a softer compund. I'm not shoving something inside my tire that shouldn't need to be there.
Is the answer to all this using Super Tacky/3C tires with DH casings at 30 psi? Would anyone ever flat again?
NB XC racers exluded.
  • 7 0
 Running DH cassing Assegai front and rear is not the best solution. It's heavy (I don't care, but many other people do), the lower pressure helps absorb bumps your suspension can't soak up and soft rubber wears quickly. I would definitely like to try out cushcore, as the rim protection and added damping sounds nice (already on DH casing tires)
  • 4 0
 @Pavel-Repak: Oh I understand this. But once you've gone to a harder compound, lower pressure and insert, how far off a DH tire are you?
The tires have nothing to do with suspension for me, they are there to do a job, there's no rebound or compression damping knobs on my tire.
I'd love to see a timed comparison of a soft compound at 30psi vs a hard compound at 20psi. Are the lower pressures to compensate for a hard tire?
A good debate nonetheless.
  • 5 1
 a product in existence for 100 years says nothing
  • 2 2
 @ace9: How many other pneumatic tires run inserts? MotoX? WRC? I have no idea? Seems like a solution looking for a problem.
  • 10 0
 @ChazzMichaelMichaels: I'm pretty sure the mousse insert thing is pretty big in moto even at a high level.
  • 3 0
 @ChazzMichaelMichaels: Tires have a huge effect on suspension. They are essentially a spring with no damper. They just bounce back full force like a pogo stick. Higher pressures would make this worse. Inserts like this or Cushcore act as a volume spacer for your tire. If you were bottoming your fork all the time, you wouldn't want to run the pressure super high or it would feel like shit on the small bumps. You would add spacers. The same thing is happening inside your tire with an insert. I can see how you wouldn't understand if you've never tried them, I know I didn't. But I'm never going back. Don't knock it til ya try it.
  • 4 6
 @ewoodard024: I've used inserts. I don't see the point. Yes tires affect suspension, but you can't control it. If you need to run 30 psi because of rocks, ride fast or are heavy, then how do you adjust the rebound and compression of your tire? Do you change the density of the foam? Do you add more, less?
You can't. The tire has one job, your suspension another. I have 170mm of suspension with LSC, HSC and rebound. Why would I rely on a piece of foam?
  • 3 0
 @ChazzMichaelMichaels: you say tires affect suspension, but you can't control it. That is what an insert is trying to help you do. Yes obviously it's not as good as the knobs on your fork, but it is better than nothing. Maybe you don't prefer the feel of the insert, or maybe only on certain tracks, but it at least gives you options.
  • 4 0
 @ChazzMichaelMichaels:
You can control the way your tire acts as suspension - that's what the insert does, and to me it makes a huge difference to control, comfort, grip, puncture protection etc.

You want to run DH tires at 30psi? Be my guest, I certainly won't be joining you, it sounds horrible (and I know, because I used to do this before i discovered cush core)
  • 2 1
 When I was a kid in Italy my first ever bike (when I was 4) had tires directly made of foam, without rubber. And I never punctured because there was never air. It's kept rolling with sharp objects inside and could be popped off by hand... why has no one gone that way??
  • 9 0
 shitty traction
  • 3 0
 Tires build out of foam would probably tear very easily. Airless tires aren't anything new, car companies come up with new ideas every few years so far nothing beats air.
  • 7 0
 My guess is you gained a couple pounds since you were 4.
  • 1 0
 Im just waiting until they start doing mousse bibs like they do for dirtbikes (which cost a fortune), where there is zero requirement for air, just rim locks. They work well, lots of traction and you cant cop a flat but are a bit heavier (although not that much heavier than UHD tubes), hard to install and expensive.
  • 1 0
 Arrow Racing tires used to have a nice rim protector built into the tire, like you see on low profile car tires. It worked really well. I wish that was available on Assegai or DHF. Also not convinced that wide rims are a good idea. They just get annihilated no matter what pressure you run, i think because the rim is close to tangent to the sidewall.
  • 4 0
 It's a red and black Vittoria Airliner, I don't get it.
  • 1 0
 Almost. Vittoria have the channel on both sides. I love mine. Curious about these though.
  • 1 0
 My limited experience with the cheap as chips Barbieri Anaconda inserts would suggest you need to downsize the insert to actually be able to install the tire and not just be rolling on foam.
  • 3 0
 I thought Stan's isn't Ammonia free?
  • 2 0
 Not the first dual compound insert. Rimpact Pro has a similar idea with theirs
  • 1 0
 Didn't Rimpact pro came out like 6months ago !! ?
  • 1 0
 @bike-hero: think so. so theirs was probably the first
  • 1 0
 If it’s not better then cushcore I don’t care. Thoose guys really have somthing better tire suspension is where it’s at!
  • 2 0
 Im gonna need some grammage
  • 3 0
 Lol....
  • 3 1
 Not interested without weights.
  • 3 0
 Hi, here are all the details:
S size: 29" - 79 grams, 27,5" - 72 grams, 26" - 65 grams;
M size: 29" - 145 grams, 27,5" - 130 grams, 26" - 115 grams;
L size: 29" - 180 grams, 27,5" - 158 grams, 26" - 145 grams.
  • 1 0
 @AndreaniGroup: That's very helpful, thank you!
  • 1 0
 Finally an insert people can't complain about price on. Oh well, I'm sure they will find something else.
  • 1 0
 First cush core, then mousse, now supermousse!! All these progressions sound similar
  • 1 0
 and you can use it with sealant Sweet
  • 1 0
 Ice cream, "How the hell is that going to keep the bead on the rim?"
  • 1 0
 Who distributes these for AG?
  • 1 0
 Electric full suspension fatbike.
  • 2 1
 Rimpact Pro is also Dual compound. #nothingnew
  • 1 0
 After mumbling enough profanities installing and removing CushCore I’m eagerly awaiting my Rimpact Pro order. Wink
  • 1 0
 Also was released 6months ago , so moose are clearly not mentioning that ????????????
  • 1 0
 All time best name for a product in the bike industry.
  • 1 1
 You know what else has hard exterior and soft interior? Properly inflated tire!
  • 1 2
 I had cushcore in the rear....was heavy and dampened the liveliness out of the bike....waste of money for me. I've just added more air and bought a tough michelin dh22...
  • 2 1
 April fools in May?
  • 1 0
 Question for all Those running an insert... I've got a Panzer (the almost V-shaped one, lovely to fit.. Rides like a dream) HOWEVER.... I've noticed that despite NOT using tyre levers to fit it.. And injecting the correct amount of fluid at the end of installation... I've started to struggle to keep air in the system. I've re-taped the f-king rim 3 times now. And even after putting a tube in there to apply even pressure to tape to get good adhesion, after installing the insert and after a few days coming back to a flat tyre.. Pumping and leaking.. It seems that the internal pressure of the insert is pushing down on the rim-tape and pushing it into the well of the rim SO much, its actually de-sticking from the rim and causing leakage through the nipple holes EVERY C**TING TIME!! thoughts are appreciated. - Rim, Hope Tech Enduro, Tyre WTB Judge 2.4 Soft Comp, DH Casing, Panzer Insert - 27.5x2.3

TL;DR - Is my insert f**King up my tubeless rim-tape and leaking through nipple holes?!
  • 1 0
 @steviestokes: with dirt bikes we used to put a blob of silicone on every spoke nipple to fill in the void the day before putting on the tape.
  • 2 0
 @DHhack: cheers man, a good tip. Not a weight weenie.. So I'd prefer reliability over weight. Cheers man
  • 1 0
 Mynesweepers
  • 2 5
 I will tell you a lizzle djerman zecret, 4 bucks worth of water pipe PU isolation from the hardware store works equally well
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