First Look: Devlin Cycles' Long Reach Trail Bike Prototype

May 13, 2021 at 5:43
by Dave Rome  
Devlin Cycles Prototype trail bike. Australian made steel.

The 2021 Handmade Bicycle Show Australia was held over the past weekend and it proved to be the usual showcase of Australia’s thriving builder scene. The Melbourne-based show certainly attracts more road and gravel bikes, a symptom of where the custom bike scene is strongest, however many of the builders come with deep roots in the mountain bike world too.

The Trinity MTB was one of the attention-grabbing steeds on display, and then trail bikes from Devlin Cycles and TOR Bikes were well worth a closer look, too. That TOR will be covered next, but for now, let’s look at Devlin’s prototype.
Devlin Cycles Prototype Details

Frame material: Steel
Travel: 140mm
Wheel Size: 29"
Intended Use: Trail
Head Tube Angle: 66°
Reach: 490mm (for 5'10" rider)
Price: AU$8,500 (approx US$6,500), painted frame with shock.
More info: devlincc.com

An intro Devlin Cycles
Devlin Cycles is the creation of Brisbane-based steel frame builder Sean Doyle. Doyle is an engineering draftsman by profession, and the merger of his profession and passion for bikes dates back to the 90s when he first drew up a first full-suspension mountain bike frame.

Devlin Cycles Prototype trail bike. Australian made steel.

Fast forward to today and Doyle has a number of custom-built frames to his name, all sharing steel tubing, brazed construction and a few stylistic flourishes inspired by classic lugged construction that serve as his build signature. Those flourishes are effectively carved out sleeves that sit over the steel tubes, something that is known as bi-lam construction, and in addition to looking great, they help distribute forces through the tube and greatly increase the surface area of the brazed joints.

Devlin Cycles started as a classic custom steel road racing bike maker, however, Doyle has quickly expanded his builds into other realms. His most recent creation is this yet-to-be-named trail bike that he built for himself as a prototype to help refine the concept.

Long reach geo
The goal with this bike will to offer entirely custom geometry, however, the concept of that geometry centres around a long reach that ideally overcomes the need for a super slack head angle or long trail figure. Standing at 5’ 10” (178 cm), Doyle is rather average in height, and yet this 140 mm travel 29er trail bike is built with a lengthy 490 mm reach and a 1230 mm wheelbase. That’s combined with 440 mm chainstays, a 77-degree effective seat angle and a not-so-slack 66-degree head angle. Doyle had originally designed a custom 20mm bar and stem combo but is happy with the existing 35mm stem.

Devlin Cycles Prototype trail bike. Australian made steel.

“I’ve gone for a moderate head angle,” said Doyle. “I’ve done a lot of reading and absorbed some of what Peter Verdone has written about and what Sam Whittingham from Naked Cycles discussed on the Cobra frame building podcast regarding long reach frames and moderate head angles. I did some thinking, and thought, well let’s just do a platform that makes sense in my head. Fortunately, it’s kinda got really close first go.”

The bike also looks tall and that was by design. “The bottom bracket is relatively high, firstly, my local area has a lot more rock and steps than a lot of South-East Queensland trails. [And then] one of the ideas in my head is that with the longer wheelbase, I wanted it to be a little bit more tippy, which may be a weird way to describe it, but as opposed to being really sat down and into the wheelbase and making it hard to turn, I wanted the weight higher up to get it to flop over a bit.”

“At the moment, for me, I wouldn’t change anything in the geometry.”

Suspension design and the build
Creating a new full suspension bike from scratch doesn’t come together quickly, Doyle suggests he had over 400 hours in CAD work (Doyle’s profession) before spending a further 200+ hours creating the bike.

Devlin Cycles Prototype trail bike. Australian made steel.
Devlin Cycles Prototype trail bike. Australian made steel.

This prototype makes use of a traditional Horst Link suspension layout, however other designs were certainly considered. “I had spoken with Canfield at one point. I had also considered the DW linkage. But I went this route as I’ve got a lot of experience with it and I think it’s a good mix of pedalling platform, bump compliance and ease of design.”

“I had initially designed the main pivot to have some adjustment for anti-squat so I could tune that but it seems the centre position was right first go, so when I rebuilt the swingarm I took that out of it.” The result is a ride that Doyle claims to be quite balanced in the amount of anti-squat it provides and is well suited to his riding area where the terrain is rolling.

As shown, the front triangle is built with a Columbus 38 mm 29 downtube that’s been flipped upside down and extended in its length. The top tube is a Columbus 35 mm Zona tube, while the seat tube is a 35 mm Reynolds that Prova Cycles helped to bend. “I then chopped up the seat tube, the top half is a thick 1.8mm walled tube to cope with not having the brace to the top tube.”

“[The] front triangle is using my bi-lam sleeves which carry over from my road frames,” said Doyle of the design element that’s both aesthetic and function. “It creates a really thick end tube section so that when you mitre the tube to the head tube you’ve got a really big surface area that creates a lot of strength in the joint... It comes back to aesthetics in that I don’t have to have such a big fillet in there and it creates a tidier finish.”

Devlin Cycles Prototype trail bike. Australian made steel.

The frame is all silver fillet brazed, however, Doyle suggests that doing so makes for an extremely expensive frame. “I may go back to doing bronze because it’s cheaper, and there is a lot of filler. Bronze is harder to pull through the sleeves, silver is a lot easier, so it might be that the head tube stays silver because of the bi-lam sleeves and the rest moves back to bronze.”

Looking to the back of the bike, this prototype uses a swingarm that’s made with 4130 Chromoly round tubing and seat stays that are actually Columbus Zona chainstays, dropouts are the Syntace model from Paragon Machine Works. “There’s a lot of manipulation with the 4130 tubes and I have a lot of scrap from getting that right. This is the second swingarm I’ve created, this one is a lot stiffer and it’s to the point that I’m thinking maybe I need to back it off a little. I didn’t expect it end up here, it’s quite direct.”

Devlin Cycles Prototype trail bike. Australian made steel.

Currently, a 29 x 2.5in tyre fits in the back, but Doyle has plans to replace a portion of the manipulated 4130 tubing with a 3D printed stainless steel yoke that should more breathing room around the tyre and ease the build process, too. Doyle is considering using 3D printed stainless steel for the dropouts, too.

“I’d like to do another prototype to nail out some things. For example, the bearing configuration details, I’d like them easier to make and using less parts. That main pivot would likely annoy people to pull apart and put back together again, I’m already upset with it. So that will be redesigned so it’s simpler.”

Devlin Cycles Prototype trail bike. Australian made steel.

And Doyle is still thinking through a few other elements, for example, the suspension linkage is currently CNC’d aluminium from a Brisbane-based supplier. The original plan was to use a printed metal part here, but Doyle quite likes the organic look of the machined alloy.

Want one?
Devlin Cycles Prototype trail bike. Australian made steel.

The fetching two-tone candy paint on this prototype is the work of Wallis Paints in Brisbane and would add further cost to the bike. Speaking of the paint, Doyle joked that it’s not the most practical thing. “Don’t make it look like a show bike, any touch up requires a full respray.”

Doyle is clearly still sorting out the finer details but didn’t dismiss the idea of taking on orders already. Of course, a custom geometry bike with this number of fabrication hours isn’t cheap, and you can expect to pay about AU$8,500 (approx US$6,500) for a painted frame with shock.


156 Comments

  • 114 2
 Why did I read that title as "Devinci" 5 times?

Nice bike, clean lines. The reach is massive yet the head tube is relatively steep for a bike that seems to be designed to get rowdy?
  • 33 0
 Oh man i was so excited to see devinci making steel bikes
  • 9 0
 Dude holy shit I was so confused
  • 5 0
 You too? Lol
  • 27 0
 The internet is full of dyslexic people today.
  • 5 0
 Haha! I wonder how many people will go to their website and spend ages trying to find the bike!
  • 1 0
 i didnt even realise it wasnt until i read this comment
  • 12 0
 Same thing happened to me buying a bike I thought was made by Ferrari.
  • 9 0
 @Planetx888: lysdexia is a bitch
  • 6 1
 66 is not steep. lol
  • 8 0
 @Bkinzel99: no but that price is lol
  • 4 0
 @Bkinzel99: 66 is pretty steep compared to most bikes with similar intentions these days or at least not on the most progressive end of the scale.
  • 4 0
 490 isn't so very long
  • 1 0
 Seems perfect to me!! I like mine to have a snappier feel to the steering. Preferred the older 2015 Kona Process 134 over the 153 for example and was sad the 134 kept getting slacker. This thing is so clean!
  • 2 0
 @Bkinzel99: no its not steep, its oldschool.
  • 1 0
 Stability comes from a multitude of things, but where the front wheel is in relation to your weight is a large part. Shorter stem and longer reach moves your weight back. My Mondraker XR is 503mm reach and 66 HA and it has more stability than many slacker bikes I've ridden. I like the steeper HA for helping keep the weight forward
  • 52 1
 This is the nicest full suspension frame I’ve ever seen or dreamt of. The lines are great and the details are really well thought out. All pivots look sturdy and clean clean clean. Love it
  • 6 0
 Totally agree. Amazing attention to detail, just a beautiful bike all around.
  • 8 0
 that internal routing entrance lordy. makes me feel funny in my pants
  • 2 0
 Check these out for a more affordable version

www.swarfcycles.co.uk/contour-29er-fs.html
  • 4 0
 @sewer-rat:

Also drool-worthy and a frame I’ve ogled before as well! It has a totally different industrial, sturdy, no-nonsense kind of cool. The performance is probably similar, and the performance-to-dollar ratio waaaaay better. But this frame is just off the hook in terms of detail
  • 1 0
 Check out the stanton switch9er FS. Super clean dual link super progressive suspension. This looks awesome tho.
  • 1 0
 I seriously love it.
  • 1 0
 yep one of the bestlooking bikes I've seen!
  • 1 0
 I thought it was a hard tail LOL
  • 1 0
 @sewer-rat: Gorgeous! I wih I could get one. I suppose I will have to take another trip over there sometime.
  • 31 2
 They lost me at "Peter Verdone"...
  • 1 1
 why?
  • 16 0
 @freestyIAM: he's the blowhardiest blowhard to ever blow hard. I do like some of his bikes, even if they drop him on his ass from time to time.
  • 6 3
 @Glenngineer: interesting, what makes him such a Blowhard? His blog posts (can't say i have read one in years)?

I just know him as the guy that put together the sus fluid viscosity chart which i ref when I want to tune my fork/shocks by changing the fluid properties or buy a cheaper non mtb branded equivalent fluid because you can't trust the listed weights as they aren't standardized across mfgs. For that public service, i give him a pass on what ever personality quirks he has.
  • 12 5
 @freestyIAM: He's a blowhard, but he's got the work to back his points up. PB commenters taking shots at him are generally comparable to someone who can't make scrambled eggs calling out Gordon Ramsey for something.
  • 7 4
 Peter is not always right, and he's not always nice, but he's always smart. Does his homework, and learns from his failures,, which makes him worth listening to.IMHO
  • 7 0
 @freestyIAM:
Like other people have said, there's no doubt he puts work into what he does and can back up his claims with numbers. It's those claims that make me eye roll every time he spouts them out. He seems to think his geometry and ideas are the end all be all for cycling as a whole, yet his frames are designed with just himself and his very specific riding area in mind. His frames are never ridden by capable and talanted riders against "traditional" bikes in areas outside of Marin County. Leaving most of his claims down to just that, math and numbers. Not speed, stability, or comfort. Long story short, he lays big words and claims on bikes that are very, very far from proven. Call me a shill, a sheep, or whatever but I'll stick to the more "common" geometry of bikes that are out there getting podiums and winning medals.
  • 4 0
 @Tayrob: b-b-b he doesn’t build bikes, he builds weapons systems. Also know as building odd bikes then naming them after ww2 aircraft. Guy is a mega blowhard with a massively inflated sense of self importance.
  • 1 0
 @freestyIAM: whuuuuut

That sounds amazing. At the risk of exposing my utter slackness here, do you have a link? Big Grin
  • 20 2
 Beautiful bike but I'm not sure about the 490mm reach. Im 5'9 and I've been reducing the size of my reach for my last few bike from 480mm working back to 470mm and my new bike is 454mm on my latest bike (S3 Enduro with 40mm stem) Unless you are riding incredibly high speeds all the time I don't see the benefit of a having a huge reach. I'm really enjoying having a bike that has more agility and with 170mm suspension and 29 inch wheels I don't feel like I'm missing out on stability.
  • 7 1
 Its wheelbase that has the greatest impact at speed and even high speeds I don't see the tradeoff benefit, its a crutch once you're comfortable. You lose an incredible amount in low speed tech and cornering, not a trade I've enjoyed.

My Murmur is very similar to this frame more than materially, at 490mm reach, but 64 ha and way longer wb. At 181cm, its too much, I don't need that kind of reach to be comfortable and I don't need that kind of wb to feel stable (and we have some fast trails here)
  • 22 2
 reach is less a function of your standing height, and more about torso length and ape index number.
  • 4 0
 @conoat: "ape index number"

Is WallstreetBets leaking?
  • 5 1
 @conoat: this guy gets it. I'm 5'10 but ride an XL because of my proportions (tiny torso and gangly limbs). STA is also a key metric because it changes the effect of a long reach, so a 500 reach with 78 sta (for example) really isn't an extreme riding position.
  • 7 0
 Wasn’t this geo style pioneered by Gary fisher in the early 2000s?
  • 4 1
 I agree that reach would be wayy too long for me at 5’9”. I ride an S3 enduro too and with a 30mm stem still wish it was a little shorter. I think a shorter reach and a slacker ht angle is a much better way to get to a long wheelbase. Seems to affect low speed and tech a lot less.
  • 1 0
 @blackthorne: I think so. With a first gen 29er right?
  • 2 4
 whether or not longer reach suits you, 490mm reach, especially with a modern STA, isn't long at all. I'd say slightly longer than average for a size L. Kinda misleading article clickbait title.
  • 7 2
 @hamncheez: reach and STA don't have any meaningful correlation, ETT and STA yes
  • 7 0
 If you keep talking about reach without mentioning the seat tube angle change that accompanied each change I think we've found your issue.
  • 5 0
 @alexsin: That's a good point. Moreover, reach without stack is like an x value without a y in a coordinate system--incomplete info.

It really bugs me when reviews, etc. list reach without stack.

Edit: this is a gorgeous bike. Well done, Mr. Doyle.
  • 2 1
 It does seem a bit extreme for someone 5'10"; I'm 6'2" and suspect It would fit me nicely
  • 5 0
 @PTyliszczak: TO THE MOON!

no but really. ape index=difference in wingspan(hold arms parallel to the ground and straight to your sides. think crucifiction. now measure the distance between tip of your longest fingers.) from your height. normal is about -1" to +1". I am a +5. lol
  • 2 1
 @hamncheez: guy is 5'10, he is literally medium (in the only available metric.) So given that his custom bike is a medium, 490 reach is long.
  • 2 1
 @L0rdTom: I'm 5'9". I ride a 480mm size L. Everyone I know (not exactly a scientific poll) my height would be on a size large.

Poles sizing for a person 5'9" is like a 510mm reach.

Looking at Kona, their suggested for a 5'9" is M or L, and their process has a 480mm reach in L.

Specialized, for their St Evo, for 5'8" - 5'11", recommends their s4 size, which is 475mm reach.
  • 3 1
 @2socks: that and seat tube angle.

If I took my ~800mm seat height, +/-1deg from this 77deg effective STA changes the saddle-to-bars length by ~+/-13.5mm. How can anyone compare reach numbers alone without considering seat tube angle?

Maybe it's just time to switch everything to RAD/RAAD: www.pinkbike.com/u/leelikesbikes/blog/dialing-in-your-bike-for-your-riding-style.html

Beautiful bike, did have the pleasure of seeing this in the flesh and talking to Sean. Such an amazing amount of work has gone into this and it shows!

Edit: also, it's custom made, so really the reach number basically can be whatever the customer wants/needs!
  • 2 1
 @L0rdTom: Yes, this.
  • 3 1
 @hamncheez: I don't believe anyone is disputing what industry size recommendations these days are, but instead that industry size recommendations these days are in fact long

There's a reason people are downsizing now when only a couple years ago everyone was upsizing.
  • 4 1
 @Snockers: We can talk about reach and sta independently because they are independent. Reach will never be changed by sta because its the horizontal measurement of the bb to the ht, versus ett on the other hand, which is the measurement of the ht to the seat tube intersection. Stack, reach, and ett are arguably the most important fit measurements, but they are different and can be talked about separately (stack+reach, stack+ett)

The better question is how can anyone compare reach alone without considering ett, the answer to which is you can't!
  • 3 1
 @Snockers: Yeah, STA is important too. I find ETT more useful, at least for assessing seated fit. Mostly I just wanted to complain about the industry throwing out reach values only, as if they're useful without stack. For example, I recently rode a bike with a reach that was significantly larger than my own bike, but felt way smaller out of the saddle, in part because the stack was comparatively low.

RAD/RAAD is just marketing what's already implicit in stack & reach (which annoys me) but I'll concede that RAD at least is easy for folks to measure on their own bike after throwing in variables like stem length, bar rise/roll, stem spacers, etc.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: you've literally just said 490 isn't long for a medium because all these other bikes are that long in a Large! If your 480mm reach bike is a large, then the medium is presumably shorter, and definitely a lot shorter than 490?

Pole are in their own stratosphere and hats off to them, geometry wise.
  • 1 3
 @L0rdTom: I'm saying a 5'9" tall person should be on about 480mm of reach, with some variation. The L or M doesn't matter.
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: Except that reach doesn't account for effects from STA, HTA, Stack, handlebar sweep, body proportions, terrain or riding style. So armchair engineers deciding what reach should be right for other riders is completely useless.
  • 1 2
 @ratedgg13: Originally I said "especially with a modern STA" and the most people my height that I know are choosing bikes in the 480mm reach.
  • 18 2
 Super nice...but not $6500 nice.
  • 2 1
 I agree, but aussie wages...
  • 3 2
 it says frame and shock for that ridiculous price... Not even Ti
  • 4 0
 for a hand built bike like this, you would have to consider it an investment in art
  • 1 2
 @SATN-XC: I would consider that price for a full custom titanium frame with a "unicorn" shock.
  • 1 2
 @madmon: pretty sure the $9,000 Australian ($6,948 USD) is for the full build ...(I could be wrong, website is not 100% clear)
  • 1 0
 @SATN-XC: i went on the site and the only option is to donate 500 clams deposit with zero information about anything else except how wonderful they are. This is ridiculous
  • 3 0
 @nozes: don't get me wrong, I would never drop that type of money on steel bike...hell, I'm not really in a position to drop that on ANY type of bike. That said, to a very lucky few anything under $10k is throw around money...if I was in that position, I wouldn't think twice about buying this beautiful bike. Pretty sure that is the crowd he's going for.
  • 2 0
 I'm on Australian wages and I still think that price is ridiculous.
  • 4 0
 @MorettyBtt: ozzy wages aren't great, especially not when you factor in the cost of basic living, I've lived in England and Nz and never felt poorer since I've been in Oz, some specific trades do get paid insane money though
  • 1 0
 @ctd07: You are right. But even being a experienced craftsman in china, wages are lower, so manufacturing bikes expensive.
  • 7 0
 I would like a side profile shot of how a rider would be positioned on a bike like this, or maybe a computer generated model with the theoretical position. Genuinely curious, because even with a 77* SA & short stem, this has got to have you pretty stretched out.
  • 1 1
 just look at the norco sight, which this is pretty much a facsimile of
  • 4 1
 @tonkatruck: Pretty much. Except that HTA... 66 on a bike with this geo is odd these days.
  • 1 0
 @tonkatruck: Almost- Sight is 5mm shorter with a steeper SA, so the Sights seated position will be shorter than this bike.
  • 3 0
 @PTyliszczak: is it? Mondraker Foxy 29 has the exact same reach and HTA numbers .5º slacker STA and a 6mm longer wheelbase, in a size large.
  • 3 0
 At the builders height it’s quite common for 40-50mm in variation of arm and leg lengths. There is no one correct bike size for a given height.

(At my height of 6’3.5” you would think any XL would work for me, until you found out I’ve got short legs, a long torso and even longer arms)
  • 2 5
 Since when is 490mm reach "long"? I'd say 480mm is average for a size L nowadays.
  • 2 1
 @PTyliszczak: it's not all about HTA, it's a lot about front center: distance from the bb to the front wheel. The longer the front center, the more room you have to counter OTB forces. And with a longish reach you can still get forward to weight the front wheel when needed, without as much feeling of falling out the front door. Someone with old skool "off the back" riding technique might not like it at first because they'll feel stretched out when trying to get behind the seat, except they don't really need to because the front wheel is already pretty far out front.

But it's all personal. I'm 5'10" also, but I know it would take me a minute to get my arms and shoulders used to a 490 reach (from 455) and really be able to drive the front really hard into tight or slippery corners. But since the front center of this bike is pretty much the same as my current bike it'd feel pretty nice legs- and hips-wise (no extended wall-sit position hanging off the back to stay in the front door) for fast sweepy corners that don't need as much front-end traction management.
  • 1 0
 It gives me a nice straight back on the climbs, not hunched over at all just comfy- Large Cotic Flaremax
  • 12 1
 SLX Shimano Brakes....100 positive comments and 100 negative comments
  • 27 1
 “Their bite point wanders!”

“Your mom’s bite point wanders!”
  • 1 0
 150 by Levy
  • 3 0
 Nice looking bike!

The red paint job reminds me of my Saracen Ariel 30 Pro - www.saracen.co.uk/products/ariel-30-pro

The Saracen isn't steel, obviously, but the HA is slacker and it has even more reach (despite only being a 130mm trail bike).

Oh, and it only retails for £3000... ;-) Honestly, if the Ariel 30 was included in the latest Affordable Trail Bike Field Trip, it would have wiped the floor with the other bikes!
  • 2 0
 Nice bike, but the desperate mention of "downcountry" on that webpage loses them some points.
  • 2 0
 @chakaping: how is a 15kg 130mm travel bike even remotely downcountry? Levy will be livid.
  • 2 0
 I am very intrigued by the design concepts for this bike. I have often thought that the ideal trail bike would have a longish reach and moderate head angle. This should keep the steering light and responsive while the added wheelbase could provide some stability and keep you from feeling like you were constantly in danger of going over the bars on the steep sections. Also, I find that many current bikes have the bottom bracket so low that pedal strikes are a constant issue.
  • 2 0
 Why everyone focusing on long reach, and not on stack? bike is looking dope, however riding in plank position is not the best option for my body type;

So far only liteville were smart enough to offer reach/stack adjustment for sizes
  • 3 0
 Well done Sean, it's great to see your attention to detail come through on your bikes too.

I had the pleasure of working with Sean on a big coal washplant design and construct job(where he was working as a drafter).
  • 3 0
 After seeing this bike in person at HBSA and talking to Sean I can say this is one of the prettiest full sus frames i have ever seen, and Sean knows his shit.
  • 2 0
 Apart from the relatively high BB (I can't see the height in the artical) this bike seems spot on, with the added bonus of looking the dogs b0££0#.
  • 5 1
 Stunning, but $6500 for a frame??
  • 4 0
 It is a huge amount of labour to build something like this. Silver brazing is expensive and time consuming and then custom paint costs a fortune. This is a one man operation rather than a real factory which would have much more efficient production, but this kind of attention to detail is impossible in on a normal production line. I'm sure Devlin isn't aiming to sell thousands, or even hundreds, probably a few dozen at most.
  • 3 0
 Will she fit on my ThuleRack?
Should I use side flags, Oversized Load Sign and lights, just in case I carry in the rear?
  • 1 0
 I feel you! My Norco Torrent BARELY fits in the trays of my roof rack. Tires hang half out on both ends.
  • 1 0
 I thought it was Swarf 155 first, but then noticed it was a Horst link. Absolute stunner, but I couldn't stretch to that price (granted I'm sure it takes a lot of time and effort to create something like that).
  • 1 0
 Amazing looking bike Sean! You have put some photos of the build process so those morons complaining about the price understand how much time, sweat and tears it goes on one of those builds...
  • 2 0
 Super classy looking! That is a tiny rear pivot bearing though, I'd be nervous on how long it'd last
  • 3 0
 Looks like a Swarf Contour
  • 1 0
 This is a banger bike. In Canadian dollars $8000 for a steel frame, granted beautiful but at the end of the day who is the marketed to? I know its not me.
  • 5 0
 I don't think it's marketed at anyone
  • 1 0
 Well the same way the new S-works Levo cost AU$23700, people come in to the shop and say wow! That's. Lot of money, then we said yeah we sold 2 on the first day they came out... I'm sure there will be people with money and appreciation for the work it was put on this bike, build entirely from scratch by a single man in his shed. Attention to detail is beyond any shot Giant bike out there... so I'm sure there are people that would pay this money on this bike without thinking...
  • 1 0
 @boozed: Exactly. All this focus on price/market-viability etc. This was made because someone wanted to make it, no other reason needed.
  • 2 0
 A fine-looking bike and a very nicely written and researched article Dave Rome.
Will you be doing more on PB?
  • 2 0
 You'll see me dabble here on occasion. My full-time gig is still at CyclingTips.
  • 1 0
 aesthetically-love that the tubes have minimal bending. i wish i could turn my cromag stylus into an FS bike with 150mm rear travel. who cares about the weight
  • 2 0
 Visited PB today to check out the new Kenevo SL, but find this far more appealing.
  • 1 0
 Too bad Remrem just definitively and scientifically proved that shorter reach bikes are both faster and more fun on anything but the fastest and most wide open trails.
  • 1 0
 Looks too good! Now just imagine throwing away the cockpit and putting a nice set of 50mm risers and bringing that overexaggerated reach a tad back! Dreams!
  • 1 0
 All I think about when I see Devlin.

youtu.be/5KsjPjE-sTw

Thanks Adam Sandler.
  • 1 0
 My first "real bike" was a candy red Torker. It was this exact color...now I want this bike.
  • 1 0
 I need to surround myself with 6 millionaires so
I can become One & purchase this frame.
  • 1 0
 Lovely looking build on that frame!! Great to see some steel gracing the pages as of late..
  • 1 0
 Looks like a cracking frame..im on the edge of my seatube to see a video of it.
  • 1 0
 I really love steel bikes and particularly this one................................ but my wallet disagrees Frown
  • 1 0
 That’s a beautiful frame but that reach number is retarded. So is the price for a steel frame.
  • 1 0
 Wow, beautiful clean lines. High price, but for an homemade production probably it is corrected.
  • 1 0
 If you ever saw the movie "Just go with it" with Adam Sandler, you sure know what Devlin means Big Grin
  • 2 0
 That's such a pretty bike, it would almost be a shame to get it filthy...
  • 1 0
 I’m gonna half to sell 3 cars a littler of puppy s and all my Halloween candy for this
  • 1 0
 I need a red bike in my life and this would be a nice add.
  • 1 0
 Clean!
I’d ride that bike.
  • 1 0
 Wasn't there a lawsuit recently regarding this stag head tube badge......?
  • 2 0
 Not with Devlin, you are probably thinking of this one:

www.pinkbike.com/news/whyte-bikes-vs-rich-energy-what-happened-next.html
  • 1 0
 The welding on this gave me a "crisis"... 3
  • 2 0
 Looks like a Spur.
  • 1 0
 fully internal hydro-reverb routing. Shudders. Beauty of a bike though.
  • 1 0
 A custom chopper frame would run you about $1000
  • 2 0
 Looks like a Swarf!!
  • 1 0
 That was my first thought. Not that it's necessarily a criticism, of course.
  • 1 0
 mmm skinny tubes and meaty tires and suspension. timeless
  • 1 0
 YES PLEASE, that is one sexy frame!
  • 3 4
 OK go ahead and downvote me.........
,,....... is this a go fund me or go scam me for 7500 canadian for a frame? a steel frame not a titanium or carbon....WTAF
  • 1 0
 thats one big good lookn devlin
  • 1 0
 Gorgeous bike, love all details. Price is the hurdle....
  • 1 0
 my oh my. this bike is nice to look at.
  • 1 0
 Beautiful bike for sure but $6500 NO THANKS!
  • 2 0
 I'm sure he's gutted to know that he's lost the sale.
  • 1 0
 Shut up and take my money
  • 1 0
 It must be a PITA to build & de$ign
  • 1 0
 Oh wow: conversion rate from AU to US is INSANE!
  • 2 5
 8 grand for a steel frame lmao gtfoh!!! Is today the day for stupidly overpriced bikes? I wouldn't even pay 8 grand for a complete bike let alone a mediocre looking steel frame.
  • 1 0
 What's your time worth? I mean a $2,000,000.00 car isn't that much better than a $200,000.00 car, but there are people who are willing to pay the bespoke difference. At least in this case, the money is going to the designer builder who is investing in his community, and paying WAY more in taxes than any corporation.
  • 1 1
 @woofer2609: big difference I can walk into my shop right now and start welding steel tubes together to make a frame I can't however build myself a Ferrari Enzo. There is nothing special about this bike and his time isn't worth anymore than big companies fabricators that sell their frames for a third of that price or even less.
  • 1 0
 Nice
  • 1 0
 Cool whip.
  • 1 0
 Gorgeous
  • 1 0
 looks flexy
  • 1 2
 LOL what a joke on geo and price. Quite misguided, but have fun on your steep, long and high contraption.
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