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DirtCrab mikekazimer's article
Mar 20, 2019 at 10:00
Mar 20, 2019
First Ride: Santa Cruz Megatower
@oneimaginaryboy: LOVE the B3, easily one of the funnest bikes I've ridden in the last year. MT climbs better-- roomier front end, steeper STA, more traction.
DirtCrab mikekazimer's article
Mar 20, 2019 at 8:39
Mar 20, 2019
First Ride: Santa Cruz Megatower
@JesseBuller: MT will be replacing my Ripmo. That said, Ripmo is likely the better "one" bike for most riders. To date, my Ripmo has been my favorite bike I've ever owned. It's been perfectly reliable and it just seems to do everything well. It certainly hits well above its weight riding park and racing DH. That said, it's still basically a 5" bike, so I'm asking a lot of it for my personal use case. MT fits my current needs better as a race bike, but it will probably be getting a smaller stablemate for mellower rides. @jeremy3220: MT will climb better than your HTLT by a country mile. Doesn't solve the issue of it being more than you need for your local rides, but I could see it being a total ripper at Windrock.
DirtCrab mikekazimer's article
Mar 19, 2019 at 8:29
Mar 19, 2019
First Ride: Santa Cruz Megatower
Quick comparison from someone that's owned an OGHT and HTLT, currently rides a Ripmo and has tested and ordered a MT. Although I liked my HTLT as a trail bike, I always felt like it took a lot of core engagement to climb (SA too slack) and the front end would tend to knife when ridden at race speed (too short and too steep). Ripmo has been a big improvement in terms of climbing and the longer front end is way more comfortable for me. MT basically takes everything I love about my Ripmo and makes it slacker and more forgiving. No getting around the fact that the MT is a lot of bike. If you find that you want more than the HTLT can give, the MT is a no brainer. The MT climbs better and it's more aggressive everywhere else. If the HTLT feels like more bike than you need, the MT will likely be a bridge too far. And yeah, a MT as your "one" bike will be overkill for plenty of places. Then again, if all your riding is fast and gnarly, it'll be a perfect choice. My $.02.
DirtCrab mikekazimer's article
Mar 19, 2019 at 8:09
Mar 19, 2019
First Ride: Santa Cruz Megatower
@mikekazimer: How much do you weigh? Genuinely curious. At 170lbs, I found the MT on Reserves to be stiffer than some others (SB150 in particular) but actually very comfortable.
DirtCrab mikekazimer's article
Mar 19, 2019 at 8:01
Mar 19, 2019
First Ride: Santa Cruz Megatower
Bad decision? Definitely not. Ripmo has legitimately been my favorite bike I've owned to date. I also tested a MT a few weeks back and currently have one on order. The choice really comes down to your particular use case. For me, racing CAT1 DH and EX enduro on the same bike gives the MT the edge. It's more stable and has more travel, which pretty much seals the deal. Climbing is pretty similar between the two. If I wasn't racing, I would probably be riding my Ripmo again this year and loving it. That said, MT is a RIPPER, and I can't wait to put it through its paces on my home trails.
DirtCrab deityusa's article
Feb 8, 2019 at 9:42
Feb 8, 2019
Video: Mad Style & Speed with Shelly Flood in 'Koala'
Rippah! And proper nosed in landings. Jabronis take note, that's how you do it.
DirtCrab jamessmurthwaite's article
Feb 1, 2019 at 19:15
Feb 1, 2019
5 Bikes from the Burgtec House Show
@seraph: You mean a 5010? But really though.
DirtCrab jamessmurthwaite's article
Jan 30, 2019 at 9:31
Jan 30, 2019
The Syndicate's Prototype DH Bars (& Something New from Josh Bryceland) - Burgtec House Show 2019
@BiNARYBiKE: -- This dude gets it. As it turns out, different people actually need different things from their setup for a variety of different reasons. Crazy, right?
DirtCrab jamessmurthwaite's article
Jan 22, 2019 at 21:19
Jan 22, 2019
Bike Check: Joe Nation's Pole Stamina
@rpl3000: Hard to say, since "new" geometry covers a really broad spectrum. That said, I really only think there's one group of people who would truly struggle with the new bikes as a whole. There are some real crusty old rippers out there who are set in their ways and honestly might not want to adapt their riding style to "get with the times". Jokes aside, I genuinely respect that. But I don't think that old habits should be taken as evidence that new riding styles and design philosophies are misguided. That's like writing off smartphones for everyone because your grandma prefers her rotary dial. As a rule, "new school" geometry reduces the amount of body English you need to put into the bike. It also tends to demand that the rider shift their weight a bit farther forward. That can take some getting used to, but it's well worth the effort ATMO. It's also worth noting that, as ever, wheel size makes a difference. Big wheels and lots of BB drop makes for a bike that's more stable. Smaller wheels and less drop makes for a bike that's more responsive. New geometry hasn't changed that at all. There are certainly compromises at the more extreme end of the geometry scale in either direction, but they might not be what you'd expect. The Poles, for example, actually corner VERY well even at lower speeds, but the timing is different than a more traditional bike. You also need to have the skill to carry momentum and lean, not steer. Where Pole loses me personally is that the combination of the massive reach and long rear end requires pretty dramatic weight shifts front to back if you're trying to link up technical manual lines, or if you're nosing into a steep landing. That said, if you're into riding flat out in open terrain, those things are very nearly in a league of their own. Not something I need to own, but a VERY cool option for the right rider. My Ripmo, on the other hand, is definitely new school, and it's one of the EASIEST bikes to blast whips, slap corners, and generally get buck with that I've ever ridden, and I test and review a HUGE chunk of the new bikes from a ton of brands every year as part of my job. Obviously, I'm biased in favor of the new stuff. I just want to ride the best bikes that I possibly can, and we're at a point in mountain bike development where BIG improvements are being made every product cycle (Boost notwithstanding). Some people might think that makes me a shill. Hopefully it's apparent that in reality, I just have a lot more experience in with the latest gear than the average forum poster, and I'm trying to share that experience to help others make informed choices. Take that for what you will. It looks like you're in CT? As you know, the riding there is pretty unique. With the trails being relatively slow and technical, you'll want to go on the steeper, and probably shorter end of the new bike spectrum. With all the rocks, some cush will definitely help. If you can, start by demoing a new Bronson on the Plus wheel package (I HATE Plus tires, but ~35mm rims and Maxxis WT tires make for a genuinely amazing setup) That bike is pretty conservative numbers wise, and it's REALLY good. If you don't like it or prefer your old bike, that's totally fine too. Happy hunting!
DirtCrab jamessmurthwaite's article
Jan 22, 2019 at 16:25
Jan 22, 2019
Bike Check: Joe Nation's Pole Stamina
You really should try riding one of these "new" geometry bikes if you haven't already. And don't ruin it for yourself by trying to outsmart the designers-- ride the recommended size, period. Different brands will recommend what appear to be very different sizing, but appearances can be VERY misleading. What you'll find if you give it a fair shake is that wheelbase has little if anything to do with overall maneuverability. Positioning between the wheels, relationship of stem length to fork offset (this is HUGE, and widely misunderstood), and fork length (A2C) are all way more important. Although this opinion will be unpopular with some of the forum dwellers, there's a reason that literally every mountain bike brand is moving in this direction. It's because it works better, and if you're going to shell out to upgrade, your new bike should damn well be better than your old one.
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