Video: Exploring Fear & Getting Older in 'Unrealistic'

Nov 3, 2022 at 11:28
by Emil Carlson  

bigquotesThis business is filled to the brim with unrealistic motherf**kers. Motherf**kers who thought their ass would age like wine. If you mean it turns to vinegar it does. If you mean it gets better with age it doesn’t.”
For those who might not know – that’s a quote from Quentin Tarantino’s “Pulp Fiction”. A scene where the gangster Marcellus Wallace lectures the aging boxer Butch on “the hard motherf**king fact of life” that ability doesn’t last.


Back in October 1994 when "Pulp Fiction” was released in Norway I was 18 years old. I had raced mountain bikes for two years and was coming off a rather successful final year in juniors, placing second in DH at the national champs, and picking up my first victory at a national points series round. Fast forward a couple of years I had a stint from 1997 to 2001 where I raced a lot, including World Cups, and ultimately had to make peace with the fact that I was “one of the many”: One of the many who are quite good but not quite good enough. As opposed to one of the few who have the full package of skill, fitness, and mental ability to succeed at an international level.

By the end of those five years, I was quite burned out on racing. For about three weeks… After that, I regrouped and spent the next 8 years having heaps of fun racing the Norwegian nationals alongside studying to become a psychologist and, from 2007 on finding work as one. 2009 was my final year of racing the DH nationals, and at 33 years old I was already somewhat of an old-timer on the scene. From then on, time seems to have simply flown by with two kids, increasing job responsibilities, etc., but still ride whenever I can, and race the occasional enduro when time allows. So yeah, 46 years old now, riding and racing mountain bikes (as a privateer) for 30 years. How is my ass aging...?


Riding with your friends never gets old.

That Pulp Fiction quote, and my musings around it was the inspiration for wanting to make an edit showcasing how for my buddy Svenn and I riding as middle-aged persons is a lot about finding the balance between accepting that ability will wane while still celebrating the childish joy and pride we feel whenever we stick a tricky line, send a scary jump, or just corner that little bit faster than on our last run.

For viewers of my own age group – I hope you find elements you can recognize and identify with. For younger viewers I have the ambition to inspire and instil a “hope for the future”: Over the years I have myself encountered older riders who still ripped and through that showed me that life as an “extreme sports athlete” does not have to end at 35 or 40 or whatever age my 18-year-old self may have considered “ancient”. If through this edit I can be that older rider to someone, that’d be very cool!

Kvasshovda in the sunset.
Two days of riding and filming in Hallingdal Norway.

Oh – and there’s one thing that’s very different when you’re 46 and want to make an edit versus when you are – say 21: As an adult, I didn’t have a friend with a camera and lots of spare time on his hands ready to come along to film and edit just because that’s a fun thing to do. So to make it happen, I recruited the talents of Magnus Grönberg (filming/director) and Lars Storheim (filming/editing). Hallingdal Rides, Vertical Playground, Sweet Protection and Plan A Sykler all chipped in so that the guys got paid for the job. Thanks to Tveit Eiendomsutvikling for lending us a beautiful cabin for the weekend. Big shoutout to everyone involved!


135 Comments

  • 126 0
 As a 30+ year rider who's turning 50 this year, I appreciated this video.
  • 22 0
 Yep....I'll be 52 coming up next year. Awesome vid!
  • 30 0
 same, 64 soon and hoping to at least to clear bigger drops
  • 4 0
 F yes
  • 7 0
 Ive been riding since 87. Also turning 50
  • 7 0
 @owlie: for a second i read that as you started riding age 87 and wondered how old you are now! Then read the second bit and it all made sense.
  • 3 0
 @cxfahrer: two days ago, there was a 76 years old happy guy on the local quite challenging "Wassertal" trail. Still long way to go for you and even longer for the rest of us Big Grin
  • 8 0
 I turned 62 in August.
In the last year or so I rode:
Moore Fun, Horsethief Dropin, Gunny Loop, PreNup, Holy Cross, and Zippidy Do Da In Fruita/GJ.
Hyper Extended Ridge, Extended Ridge, Snake Charmer, and Medicine in Durango.
Unkle Nazty in Salida,
Hiline and the Hogs in Sedona.
Jagged Ax and Chili Dog in Santa Fe.
All combined with recovering from Rotator Cuff surgery.
You don't stop playing when you get old. You get old when you stop playing.
  • 84 0
 Wow - on behalf of our little crew here, I wanna say we are humbled and grateful for all the positive feedback!

When I came up with the idea I was pretty certain the subject matter would be universally recognizable, but wasn’t really sure what angle to put on the project. I mean - on the one hand I’m proud to be an unrealistic motherf**ker - still charging hard(ish), but I knew we’d fall flat on our faces (literally) if we set out to emulate Brage Vestavik… We’re not that hot:-D

So while this really was a team effort, I especially want to thank Magnus, our director. He’s a very accomplished rider himself (and a young buck in his mid-thirties), and someone I’d met on the Norwegian enduro scene a few years back. His creative mind and understanding for the sport was decisive in making this edit what it is! A Hallingdal local, he also scouted locations, and dragging us up to that scary drop was pure genius! Thank you, Magnus!

Oh - and on the subject of that drop: I’m a bit embarassed it doesn’t show in the movie that Svenn was the first to send it! (Cheeky bastard was supposedly «just going for a speed check»). Props to you for opening the door on that one, Svenn!!
  • 4 0
 Typically Svenn!
  • 11 0
 Norway looks to have some amazing riding. Cheers for a 41 year old who is definitely seeking that balance between progressing, but not being stupid.
  • 2 0
 Great video and commentary! Two very competent and fast riders - and both been inspiring to me and younger members of my family. Mountain biking is just awesome! At 57 I don't use age as an excuse except that the process of sensing - processing - doing may be marginally slower plus learning complex physical moves is generally a lot easier with a young brain
  • 7 0
 Hahaha .- "Speed check" is just my way to approach things like that. If it feels right during the speed check ill go for it.
  • 4 0
 @LTV: wow! thanks for the compliment! To inspire someone is one of the nicest compliment u can get! :-)
  • 2 0
 You guys are ripping! I am 44 yrs old and I feel like I have dialed back my riding quite a bit. Maybe it's having 4 kids and having to provide for them or maybe it's just me allowing fear to control more than I used to? But it's still every bit as much fun as when I started biking with my dad back in 1990!
  • 75 0
 I'm in my 60's now - yesterday I rode like I was in my 50's hauling ass. Age? Who cares. Stay in shape, stay positive live laugh and love. That's what it's all about.
  • 75 0
 “Today is the oldest you’ve ever been, and the youngest you’ll ever be again, so send it. " ― Eleanor Roosevelt
  • 16 0
 Eleanor Would Go
  • 29 1
 Turned 53 this year and had to decide do I want to mellow out and ride injury free for many years to come, quit riding altogether, or send it,risking injury and divorce. After two broken legs in the last 3 years, I decided to mellow out and keep riding, setting different goals. I’m still having a blast, just not trying “to get rad” anymore. It’s all personal choices and I love being outdoors on a bike in the woods more than sending it now more than ever. Enjoy the ride everyone.
  • 2 0
 @suspended-flesh: Beautiful and so eloquent, i luv it!
  • 6 0
 @suspended-flesh: “America is all about speed. Hot, nasty, bad-ass speed.”-Eleanor Roosevelt
  • 6 0
 @suspended-flesh: "Bro, age doesn't mean shit. Just send it and feel the endorphins!" -- Albert Einstein
  • 3 0
 @neimbc:
This man!!
  • 4 0
 Riding since 1986 and 57 now. Raced XC and DH for many years. Slowed a little now and definitely not jumping but bought the latest Carbon Slash with all the toys and staying rapid. I think riding is all about enjoying it
  • 42 0
 Getting Old(er):

Pros:
* More resources to dedicate towards biking
* More confidence with who I am, less concerned about looking good or what others think
* Less pressure to be the best; just participating makes you an outlier
* More appreciation for all the indirect aspects of biking (health, exploration, travel, nature)

Cons:
* Heal WAYYYYY slower
* Progression is slower
* Understanding from experience that you are not indestructable, fear from past injuries
* Harder to maintain a social peer group
* More responsibilities to others

I played basketball competitively until my body couldn't keep up with my brain, so I quit cold-turkey in my thirties. The same brain/body decline happens with biking but the indidivual aspects and self regulating parts seem to make the decline curve less steep. I'm almost 50 now and still ticking off some fairly ambitous "firsts", so while I wish I'd started focusing when I was younger, you can definitely keep improving well into middle age and beyond.

If you can stomach some of the more "new age" aspects I recommend watching Alex Bogusky's "The Joy of Bike" YT channel. I consciously applied some of the ideas in this video and found it really worked:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=uK5rwIdq8uI
  • 17 0
 61 and still riding and enjoying every moment on my bike. My bike gets me back to my younger years-childhood when nothing was complicated and only riding was important. Good friends just happened to be your riding buddies. I know that getting older is inevitable but how you get older is up to you.
  • 18 0
 Great video and riding! I relate to this. Turning 52 next year and still hitting new features. Keep it up my old bros!
  • 13 0
 I recently visited my grandfather who is 97. He's still pretty much with it mentally, physically he's in his 60s according to the doctor. Was always very strict with health. We were talking and he asks me 'if you had no idea how old you were, how old would you think you are?' That question really changed how I feel about getting older. I'm 42 but can honestly say I'm in my early 30s
  • 16 0
 You don’t quit when you get old, you get old when you quit.

Ride on!
  • 11 0
 At 42 I’m substantially stronger than I was at 22. I need way more rest and recovering. I have to think about what I eat and drink. Training is different. I was thinner and could drink all night and work all day at 22 though. This life thing is an endurance event.
  • 10 0
 Note from your 70 YO self: "Get out and ride all you can. You're never going to get younger, and if you think you're fragile in your late 40's, just wait to see what's in store"
  • 9 0
 What a refreshing and inspiring video! Truth be told, I'll be 50 next season, and I currently have my Stumpy Evo for sale because I sometimes feel too old for owning such a bike. Guess it's just a matter of facing those fears.

Logically, doing rooty/rocky singletrack in the wet @40 km/h on my 120mm bike is not much less lethal than some airtime on the Stumpy Big Grin

Think I'll pull the ad!

Thanks guys & kudos for a lovely piece!
  • 9 0
 As long as your still riding and having fun that's all that matters. I will be turning 54 next year. If we had the bikes back then that we do now I would have probably killed.myself. keep riding and just have fun with it.
  • 8 0
 This is good content, as PB seems to be catering to the older generation more and more lately anyway. Me? I turned 50 this year and ride not much more than a clunker, but still have a lot of fun discovering new trails, clearing difficult lines, sending some jumps, and even breaking some old Strava times - when the stars align.
  • 8 2
 Well, there aren't too many teenagers that can afford $12k bikes.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: They don't have to - mommy & daddy can & there are literally 100's of teens in my area on bikes more expensive than both of mine. Just a fact...
  • 8 0
 I Great video! The bicycle really is mankind's greatest invention isn't it? We commute, we travel, we push ourselves to the highest of heights jthen bomb back down. We strengthen bonds of friendship and regularly make new ones. We get to see and experience things that most people never will all while reaping the physical health benefits our bikes provide without it ever feeling like exercise. I'm 53 years old and probably in the best shape of my life. Ride on!
  • 8 0
 Great video on an aspect we'll all face. I'd pontificate that over the past 20 years, bike technology and experience has allowed most of us to progress as riders and ride what we couldn't when we were 20 somethings. As technology plateaus somewhat, and slow healing age sets in, that may no longer be the case. I'm sure we've all had a lot of time to think about this as we recover from injuries and re-evaluate what's important. In my case, foregoing the ecstatic feeling of hang time is OK as long as I get some good rock rolls in, and a good joggers high from cleaning a good climb. It sure is hard to draw the risk/benefit line, though.
I also would rather ride 80% of what I used to for another 20 years, than 100% and risk an injury that ends riding.
  • 2 0
 Amen!
  • 8 0
 In my 49th trip around the sun. I've been riding for 34 years here in New England. I'm a stronger, more calculated rider these days, pushing myself hard and hitting bigger obstacles than I ever have. I refuse to acknowledge the wear and tear on my body but I'm aware of its presence. My connection to my bike, my buddies and the woods is infectious, I wouldn't trade it for anything. I relate to this film and it's sentiment to a T..... thank you for making it! Cheers to many more years of this.............
  • 8 0
 I'm 54 and just had a heart attack 3 months ago right after a ride. Mountain biking hard, racing and keeping up with those 30 years younger has kept the fire allve, but the heart attack scared me more than going fast. Staying fit does help with healing faster, but aging changes things you aren't even aware of inside. My body is just not the same as it was 20 years ago even though the stoke is. You can have all the desire in the world, but the reality is that just getting outside and riding your bike, no matter how fast you ride is way better than not riding at all. I hope to hell I can keep riding into my 60's and 70's. Hats off to those in this forum still getting out there well into their 60's, you guys are such bad asses!!!!!!
  • 5 0
 thanks for your coment an sorry to read aboot your heart. An old friend of mine, aboot 6months older. I'm 48. He's Super fast XC wippet, raced for a top national team. Last year, december. He passed out an passed away from heart attack while out on the trail. I was out that day but on another part of the loop...
Real Shock, he was super.. ultra fit an healthy. Opened my eyes to the symptom of getting older that isn't being mentioned here.

Look after your self in the late 40's kids

P.S His family had a ride out for him an thankfully we raised over £9K for East Anglia Air Ambulance
  • 8 0
 I’m 61
Still riding most of the North Shore, and building trails.
Trail building is a great way to feel younger.

I made this comment once before:
“ I only feel old when I pass a mirror “
  • 6 0
 Really felt this video. I'm 44, ride very similar terrain to what's in the video, and in the last three years have had 3 major injuries that have set me back a lot in my riding. Single and no kids, so not as much responsibility, but...the fear is real at this age. Def riding a lot slower and second guessing myself on features now, which I hate. Prob gonna take this season to explore more backcountry long rides and less DH bike park. Thought about giving up riding after the last crash, but I dont think I can. I'm here for a good time, not a long time, or something.
  • 6 0
 I guess it's a balance between not getting the high from cleaning a sick drop or jump with a possibility of injury vs. not ending the day in emerge with a 3-9 month hiatus from riding with a recovery. I'm currently doing the latter, and taking the chicken line seems more appealing with each crutch walk up the stairs.
  • 1 0
 @woofer2609: Exactly - we're either up for the 'tight rope balance ' or not. Injury always possible so we do our best to mitigate. 65yo just recovered from broken ribs and pneumothorax. Will enjoy that trail first ride next year!
  • 5 0
 @brentkratz: woof. I feel that man. two years ago, I crashed riding park and broke 6 ribs and had a hemothorax, plus broken collarbone and scapula and a brain bleed. heal up quick, good luck with the recovery.

@woofer2609 yep. I lost most of my summer to Post Concussion Syndrome. I may get to ski if I'm lucky. Hence me saying I think next season I'll focus on exploring and adventure rather than getting air.
  • 5 0
 49 and still (slowly) improving and (carefully) pushing my boundaries here. Skills compensators (new bikes) help a lot, as does having more opportunities to ride more technical routes.
  • 2 0
 "Skills compensators" haha
I would add good pads to that list also.
  • 5 0
 Discovered proper MTB’ng in my late 40s. 7 years later am in the best physical and mental shape of my life thanks to it. The desert has been discovered so many amazing parts of the world and the Dumpsters
  • 7 0
 If you ride a bike at whatever age, then you are not old.
  • 2 0
 I believe that there’s a fair bit of evidence that people who ride a bike regularly tend to have a lower physiological age than their non-riding peers.
  • 3 0
 Thank you for making this video, your stoke, dialogue and age mirrors the experience I am grateful to enjoy with similar buddies when riding in the Bay Area. When I was young, I heard ‘you won’t be doing that in your thirties and forties’ all the time in relation to bikes, skateboards etc… but our generation is slowly proving that sentiment wrong. Though we may not hit it as hard anymore, I think I am having as much…. maybe more fun now than when I was young. Getting older does bring many challenges, but accepting and working with them is incredibly rewarding still!
  • 3 0
 Genetics and injuries. They control my choices in riding. Introduced to clunker in '81, finally getting my first in '83, second in '84. Numerous crashes and gashes; they take two months to heal now. Three shoulder surgeries, strep infection of the heart, and piloting an office chair have also taken a toll.

But I continue to ride.
  • 7 0
 The trick is to die young, as late as possible. These guys are on track.
  • 1 0
 And leave a beautiful corpse.
  • 4 0
 I'm about to turn 46 and have been wondering how long I can keep hitting the big jumps at my local bike park. The heart is willing but the head knows that an injury will mean no riding for a longer time. It's a tightrope.
  • 2 0
 I’m 50 and ride a combo of DH and trail, as for hitting big jumps it’s all about comfort for myself, last year I had a local trail on lock for all the jumps, this season I rode a ton but didn’t get back to that trail till the late fall and there were 5 or 6 jumps I didn’t feel like I could just rock up and clear, If I invest the time and effort into the trail I know I can do it but I just don’t have it in my head now I have to do it. It’s my comfort level I need to have to pull the trigger.
  • 3 0
 That was great. Having just turned 50 I completely relate to that appreciation of being able to ride at the level I am and enjoying that appreciation of still trying to challenge myself. I got to spend a few days riding with Emil back in 99 in the South of France, and he doesn't look to have slowed down!
  • 3 0
 Thank you for this video. Totally relate. Been at this since 1985, still racing XC and now Enduro and chasing my son on DH tracks. At age 60, all of the pros and cons. In the end it brings me to life. For me there is no better place and riding. The bikes are so excellent now, new style of trail building incorporated with old natural trails. Wow! The stoke is very real!
  • 3 0
 My advice it get a son or daughter and ride with them. My son pushes me all the time. I ride skatepark, dirt jumps and DH park because of him. They all complement each other and progression is the best feeling. I'm 51 and was lapping Crabapple Hits with my 17 year old son this past summer, so fun. I just build a freecoaster rear wheel today for my dirt jumper for more possibilities at the skatepark. I did break a few ribs on Banana Peel 2 summers ago but never thought of stopping. Modern body armor is pretty dope. I always wear maximum pads, one thing that sets me apart from the younger riders. I'm not sure what the upper age limit on sending big jumps is but I intend to find out.
  • 4 0
 Everything about that was cool. Those are the types of people who make a fun environment. The commentary makes this more than just an MTB video.
  • 4 0
 Thanks for sharing. At 57 I still do Crabapple every year at whistler but I'm not sure I would have done that drop. Keep charging, no need to slow down!!
  • 2 0
 Thank you gentlemen for a great video. I'm 52 and my primary riding partner is 53, neither of us were world cup champs but it's great to tick off some firsts and keep progressing. This is one of the few "lifelong" sports that exist in my opinion and you two have highlighted how great it is to keep riding.
  • 2 0
 So true about one day realizing you're "one of the many". There are always physical and mental challenges to riding. What those challenges are changes over time. Most challenging thing for me nowadays is cutting myself some slack. You get to an age where can't ride-it-like-you-stole-it everyday. It is difficult for some of us former racers to not treat every ride like a race.

Any day riding is a win!
  • 2 0
 I find I'm far more fearful as an older rider. My brain says no to jumps and features far before my skill is exceeded.

I still like the idea of going 75% on the bike, and still able to show up for work and keep biking sans injuries. It's not always possible, but that's the rough plan.
  • 2 0
 Finally, something on here I can totally relate to. I'm 53 this year and whilst still in shape, psychologically I've definitely dialled back on what I'm prepared to do. The subconscious daily risk assessments around work life balance, family commitments and the knowledge that, that might well hurt (a lot) if my technique doesn't join me in my ambition means that my riding has evolved to finding new locations, avoiding big sends, riding as fast as I dare on whatever surface and environment, motivated to doing that for as long as I can.
  • 3 1
 Despite being 52 and a keen offroad rider since childhood I’m way better at riding off road than I’ve ever been, the trick is ride fully rigid til you feel its time to build up the ‘mid life crisis’ full susser. Form some opinions about how it could be improved and just keep upgrading via ebay etc. I’m sure my cognitive and physical decline will surpass any bike improvements soon enough but for now I’m still winning at mountain biking.

Its similar to these folks attaining super ultimate fitness in the prime of life, it must seem like a really downhill decline all the way from your mid twenties!
Far better to just be ‘reasonably fit’ at that age then you can feel as fit as you’ve ever been at 52 (creaking joints aside!)
  • 2 0
 You are the man, Emil! Thanks for some Fun and Playful rides together! I ve got some new trails lined up for you in Trysil, when spring comes around; just get your ol' sorry ass over here!
(Ooops; just forgot I am 3 years older than you..)
  • 2 0
 Great video...turned 50 this year, so this resonates.
The segment about the drop and the discussion of fear really was great. When I "raced" (I was mediocre) DH, those scary sections were so stressful, but cleaning them was what really made me feel alive. I'm still doing some of that, but just riding, with an occasional Enduro race thrown in.
As an old guy now, the perspective changes, and I see my teenage daughter being scared, taking chances and clearing a drop or section, and the joy from that for her, really feels great to see for me. The same for my wife who only picked up biking a few years ago in her mid 40's.
We are lucky to be here to get to do this...
  • 2 0
 42 seeing my boy clean an new feature gives me far greater pleasure than checking something off my own list
  • 4 0
 Thank you Emil and Svenn for this great video. Keep up the amazing riding!
  • 3 0
 As I get older I accept that my physical abilities decline however I take solace in the ability to still learn new skills albeit slowly.
  • 4 0
 This is awesome! Thanks for sharing Smile . Come to Canada and ride with us #oldandbold haha.
  • 1 0
 I'm 54 and just one week out of ACL reconstruction. I decided to have it done (people have normal lives without one) because I knew I had a shrinking window of good aggressive mountain biking and I didn't want to ride thinking my knee couldn't hold up. I get this video (in other ways).
  • 2 1
 Great video. Nearly 48 and in the beat shape of my life (apart from a sly broken wrist and ribs this year as a wee set back), prioritising diet, exercise and quality time on the bike rather than all day rides with 80% chatting and most of that watching someone else ride a bike too.
Can't wait to dig during the week and get a quick shred in at the weekend, keeps us young at heart.
  • 2 0
 Almost sixty, been riding trails since I was a little kid, the number of trail and road miles is beyond count, the appreciation I have for riding is beyond measure, biking is what I do and who I am, long live biking!
  • 1 0
 49 here. So stoked to watch this and read all the comments. I have been on some form of 2 wheels most of my life and have a really hard time imagining life without bikes. Because of this, I am definitely focusing more on riding another day than increasing my speed and airtime. That doesn’t mean I’m having any less fun.
  • 4 0
 I turned 50 this year and I still think I'm 17 on the bike. Results vary...
  • 1 0
 I fear a lot from getting injured, since during the years I have realized recovery is hard and miles away and takes time and costs money, most probabyl some % of injury stays with you till the end. My phizioterapist says, your body (when older) starts putting out bills from injuries, which happened when younger. Probably if the injuries were not taken care properly...
  • 1 0
 Great video, I definitely could relate being 43 years young here.

These past five years have been by far my best years riding. Not only on the enduro rig unlocking new features in the trails or the bike park, but also pushing a lot in the pump track and the dirt jumps, getting to a level i never expected to ride, confidently hitting the big lines and flowing like a champ.

Now i'm sitting on a broken collarbone due to a stupid crash and even though I can't wait to get back at it, I definitely felt for the first time what getting older means. I guess it's just a matter of time that I recover my previous level, but responsibilities (job, wifey, kids) are really pushing me back. However I am not stopping, it is just a matter of being smarter and 100% conscious of your possibilities at all times to stay safe.

This sport is no joke but it's worth all the pain and suffering. The mental wellness it brings is just unmatched (well, only matched by skiing in my case).
  • 3 0
 I'm turning 48 next month and riding harder than ever... oh yeah i had a hearts attack at 43 (damn genetics) and also have MS but who's counting?!!
  • 1 0
 Still improving at 54 (took it up at 49) and it was great to see quite a few around a similar age at Revs last Thursday. Mindful of the drive home and work the next day, I left out a drop I've looked at for a while. Annoyingly, I was happy to go over similar sized drops on different runs, but knowing this one is on a Pro Line seems to make it harder than it is. The Psychology as you get older is both equally fascinating and frustrating.
  • 1 0
 47 and still fortunate to be riding as well/ faster than ever but fitness is easier to lose and recovery from injury is way harder.
Hitting the deck on even a small fall now leaves the body sore.

While I'm still sending it I have a different appreciation and equally love taking my boy on rides on a MacRide and spending hours upon hours in the woods with him while trail building.

I just don't really feel the need to be the fastest or sendiest rider in my hood anymore ( not that I ever was but I had my moments of glory).
It is admittedly fun to still drop a your buck once in a while though LOL.
  • 1 0
 42. Talked about slowed progression with my main riding partner during what may have been the last ride before winter sets in. Kinda have come to terms the leaps and bounds that my early 30s riding partner is still making wont happen for me. (Still have days that im faster than he is though lol). Just getting out is the joy for me.
Got a family that depends on me and it's hard to perform my job with any physical Injuries. Happy that my body has remained pretty durable and flexible up to this point.
Walked away from more than one crash that should've resulted in more than a few scratches and bruises.
Despite all that.........Attempted my biggest, steepest step up. Bailed mid air, and now have a nasty ankle sprain to show for it. Ended the year on a bang! Cleaned two hits on the double black jump line before that I had never ridden before so all in all it was a good day (missing work today......)
  • 1 0
 Hi it is good to see "old "riders" having same questions as me.
Riding since 2007 in dirt jumping/skatepark, freeriding and now enduro and all mountain, that article make sense to me.
I turned 50 this year and I am still spiltted between safe ride and risky riding every time I take my bike.
I ride less jump feature than before of course. Or I clear "big" jump only when I feel confortable.
I ride more natural feature and I feel still and more confortable on rock garden or steep singletrack.
Anyway pleasure is still the post important to me (more than performance or risk).
So I "go big" only when I feel fit and mentally strong. Otherwise I ride safe to return home in one piece ;o)
Keep riding everybody for a long time!
  • 2 0
 I’m about to turn 58. My son is 14 and has a great group of riding buddies. I’m the bike maintainer, trail scout, organizer and now, the noob at the pump track and jump lines progressing with the 14 yr olds.
  • 1 0
 So much life experience reflected in the comments here! Beautiful stories of continued progression, riding with your kids, having fun «at 80%», battling old injuries, that mix of fear and sorrow when new injuries occur - «how long will I be out for now»?

And also a few very sobering accounts of heart attacks and other more serious conditions, underlining how fortunate most of us are to be able to meet middle age with relatively healthy bodies.

Thank you everyone for sharing your feelings, thoughts and experiences! And thanks again for all the love you’ve showed for this edit!
  • 1 0
 57 here, been riding mtb for 32 years, mx and bmx before that, still ride hard with my sons, new ebike helps a lot with my pathetic back, crap jumping skills and recovery, recon I have at least another 5 years in me of hard charging then a further 6 or 7 at a mellower pace. The big worry for me is I will never want to give up but eventually I will have to and that is hard to contemplate because I love riding. My advice to anyone younger is get as much time in on the bike as you can because the desire to ride never goes away even when you get older.
  • 1 0
 I asked my 95 year old grandfather (who was an avid golfer) if he still went to the driving range or putting green. He said he doesnt have the body of an 80 year old anymore. lol. I guess he did stop but he was still a funny guy.
  • 1 0
 It sucks how you have more experience and more money for cool gear when you're older, but less time fitness and recovery than you were younger. Wish I could teleport knowledge and money to younger me.
  • 6 0
 Youth is wasted on the young
  • 1 0
 Been feeling a bit aged compared to all the youth, I’ve been riding Freeride/Downhill since 2001, it’s been 22 years I feel like a veteran but know I have tons of time left.
  • 2 0
 55yo here. feel like I'm riding better than I have in quite awhile. a new bike (2020 patrol) helps fill the gaps in skill! haha
  • 2 0
 I agree. 55 with a new Spur.
  • 1 0
 I just turned 50 this year. I to have to balance work and family, and gave introduced my daughter to the sport, and she digs it. Fun to watch her skills grow and in turn let's me still young at heart. This was a great video.
  • 2 0
 Nice video so far! But so what? 46 years old and still sending and going fast and most important: Enjoying MTB... What was the question at the beginning?
  • 1 0
 The footage is appreciated, thanks for putting the work in to create this. As I get older, I still feel young, but the fear seems bigger. Technique i think becomes more important when tackling tricky features.
  • 1 0
 After 40+ years of riding and racing, i've taken up fly fishing... I'm getting fat, my body hurts, but I'm enjoying standing in a cool river vs. slogging it up hill in the heat, lap after lap.
  • 1 1
 Did I miss something. No subtitles and not in English? Not that it has to be, I just see everyone making comments and unless you all speak the language it doesn’t make sense.
  • 1 0
 Subtitles work if you Dont open full screen…
Took me a minute myself…
  • 1 0
 @Ferd: I did full screen and had subtitles
  • 1 0
 @road-n-dirt: thanks for sharing?
  • 2 0
 What a great video. So totally on point for many of us. Thanks for sharing that!!
  • 2 0
 57 here. and my skills remain the same like 35yrs ago... I was always riding crap!! :-)
  • 2 0
 Fin video gutter, kult å se at du fortsatt sykler litt innemellom @EmilC76
  • 1 0
 This sport fosters such a great approach to life! It's reassuring to hear these guys sharing a progression that matches my own.
  • 3 0
 Well done video.
  • 1 0
 44 here, in the last months I get the feeling that I am actually aging like milk.
  • 2 0
 Everything with that video was great. Bra gjort grabbar! //50 åringen
  • 2 0
 Thanks man! :-)
  • 2 0
 51 here! Love it, trails are beautiful and "Acoustic" bikes FTW
  • 2 0
 “ I am not ageing gracefully… I am raging gracefully!”
  • 2 0
 On point, great vid!!!
  • 1 0
 I blame autoplay, aged me 20 years in a week.
  • 1 0
 Pot calling the Kettle black LMAO Smile
  • 1 0
 Thanks for this
  • 1 0
 Simply wonderful!
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