Video: How Do the Enduro Pros Set Up Their Pedals?

May 10, 2019 at 2:10
by Enduro World Series  

The Enduro World Series is all about achieving maximum efficiency in the pursuit of raw speed. Maximum power needs to from legs to ground, via bike.

One of a MTB riders key contact points with the bike is the pedals and how they are set up, alongside what shoes are connected to them, is one of the most unique personal preferences the pro’s need to have confidence in.

With nearly 70km of racing ahead across two days at round three in Madeira, we headed to the opening morning of practice to find out who was standing on what. Only one of the riders wasn’t clipping in… we’ll let you guess who.


142 Comments

  • + 145
 Thank you for that media squids!

An open Waki letter to all the shoe makers out there: as you can see in this video and what you would be able to observe on trails, most people run their cleats far back and almost nobody runs them far forward. Some even make deeper cuts into the shoe to move pins further back. Hereby PLEASE: Make clipless shoes with the whole cleat mount bit moved 10mm backward so that cleats can placed in a more mid foot position. Even if there are folks who prefer far front position, they are fewer than those who would like to have them further back
  • + 18
 Giro Chamber II's have this feature and they're awesome for it.
  • - 8
flag landscapeben (May 10, 2019 at 4:46) (Below Threshold)
 Ball of the foot for me otherwise I'm scraping my front tire with my toes on tight turns...
  • + 77
 @landscapeben: get a frame with modern-day geometry
  • + 60
 @landscapeben: Get smaller feet
  • + 24
 @landscapeben: get smaller wheels
  • + 35
 @lmartin: 20" aint dead
  • - 7
flag paja-tousek (May 10, 2019 at 6:51) (Below Threshold)
 And here I am, running all my shoes with cleats in the far forward position, even wishing one pair of those could have the mount further forward.
  • + 140
 I've heard there's a pedal that allows movement like this. I think they're called 'flats' - but only for experts who can also tie shoelaces instead of using velcro.
  • + 5
 More companies are starting to do this. The old dremel trick works pretty nicely though!
  • + 2
 @trialsracer: the point is to achieve similar position on clipless as one would on flats.
@paja-tousek: you will then be one of the fallen heroes.
  • - 3
 @lmartin: I'm running 26" @dcaf I'm only a size 10! @oldtech true dat, although i've tried a slacker head angle when I test road a Mondraker and I don't get on with the wheel flip-flopping around like a dead fish during normal trail riding or climbing, personal preference I guess. I actually have a bit more toe clearance now i've put a pair of 27.5" Pikes on the front of my 26er and the head angle is slightly more agressive without being too slack for me.
  • + 3
 i had to dremel the clear box back 10mm on my Giro Chamber 2
  • + 2
 Cleat box. Stupid autocorrect
  • + 7
 There’s so much more to this than just preference. Anybody running their cleats far forward on a shoe (somewhat excluding roadies, who still shouldn’t) are risking long term injury. Riding a Mtb requires a lot of support in your legs. Hinging off your ankle by balancing off your toes or ball of foot is highly stressful to your ankle, calves, achilles tendon, and all the way into your hips. Flats or clips it doesn’t matter, spindle should be in or near the center of your foot. For those who don’t believe, this is what led to the creation of the massive pedaling innovations catalyst pedal, and there is a ton of bio mechanics science in this throughout other sports and sports medicine.
  • + 6
 @landscapeben: ride flats!
  • + 11
 This is wear my recent transition to clips after riding flat for years kinda pisses me off. When I'm on flats, I could climb on the balls of my feet = great. Then I would descend on my mid-foot = great.

Now using clips I have to settle for something in-between and it doesn't feel as good as flat for either.

Are you all really climbing with your cleats as far back as possible?? When I tried this, it just destroys the climbing efficiency.
  • + 9
 @islandforlife: We need dual cleats shoes!
  • + 1
 There was a video on Dirt years ago where Fabian Barel explained how he did this. Basically he cut the slots on his Shimano shoes further back to mimic the flat pedal position while still getting the benefits of clipless. Did this to the wife's shoes and it made the world of difference. Probably moved her cleats 10-20mm back. Before that she felt that she was standing on tiptoes on the pedals.
  • + 0
 @islandforlife: flats are my favorite tool to climb. On tech climbs I get better balance and I try harder to the end. When clipped in, I always have to bail early to be able to clip out (Crank Bros). Then on long climbs I do enjoy the ability to move my feet around. Midfoot when seated and on toes when standing. But I seriously doubt that foot position kills efficiency since if you look how roadies pedal, most of them don’t use their calves much. Extensive use of calves for pedaling has been argued by a few folks comparing motorics of cycling to running but there’s as much water in it as in “pulling” on the up stroke. Some argue that extensive utilizing of calves with forward cleat position is counter productive, since pedalling involves many muscles, one cannot just say that employing calves more just adds power. They call it toe-dipping technique - the issue is that it decreases stability of the ankle joint and thus creates power losses higher up the muscle chain. Leading to a conclusion that while certain pedalling style may suite certain people more, the end sum comes up quite even.

@mountainyj: While I appreciate James, there’s lots to learn from him, he is a bit dogmatic and I am not buying his idea of pedalling being a one huge set of single leg deadlifts. Overuse injury risk goes up, that is for sure though. When it comes to descending or bunnyhopping then absolutely, midfoot allows for better balance and a bit more power. I think he goes too far with general pedalling though. The fact is that majority of pro gravity riders have their feet placed quite centrally on flat pedals and have their cleats far back when clipped jn
  • + 3
 @islandforlife: if you’ve spent some time in a gym, think of proper form on a squat. You’re driving through your heels to get the most strength and reduce risk of injury. Similar concept when climbing, drive through your heels more. Will take a second to get used to and you’ll notice some different muscles being sore.
When seated climbing, and when I referred to roadies in the last comment, most of your weight is supported by sitting on your bike and your legs are just pushing the bike forward by mechanical advantage. When you’re standing and descending most of your weight is supported by your feet. Higher risk of injury on long rough descents for this reason. There’s a lot of bouncing and pushing which is a huge risk of injury if hinging off your ankle, as you’re trying to control repetitive compressions and g forces. Personally I consider it better to change and learn climbing technique vs loss of strength and fatigue on descents.
  • + 1
 @islandforlife: In an industry that seems to make solutions looking for problems, you're onto something legit. We've got bc ski bindings that switch from efficient tech on the way up to bomber alpine for the way down. We need similar pedal tech. Wish I was a mechanical engineer.
  • - 1
 I run mine forward ( xc style ) not, am, dh fashion style . There are a lot more of us than you know , take off the blinkers before making sweeping assumptions .
  • + 0
 @dubod22: seems weird that 'experts' would risk slicing their shins, slipping off and loss of efficiency. Cosmic.
  • + 3
 @Loche: I think what we’re seeing here is market demand for a shoe that has adjustable cleat position while riding, with the flip of a switch
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: don’t disagree about James being a bit A-type in the flats vs clips debate. I see this as more of a biomechanics issue though. As for the squat reference, that was more from being yelled at by pt’s and coaches anytime I was too far forward on a squat, and discussing it with someone who has dedicated most of their life to human movement and bodily balance, just happens to apply to bikes also.

Let’s see a drawing of a new dual cleat shoe, I know you can come up with something Big Grin
  • + 1
 @mountainyj: I honestly know nothing about this subject, but are you telling me that Nino Schurter is riding incorrectly due to his pedal placement?

Don't know how to link to an image here but here's a cut/paste link to an image: i2.wp.com/inthebunch.co.za/itb/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Nino-Schurter-1.jpg?fit=740%2C551&ssl=1
  • + 3
 @trev4short: I will just need a remote lever to change my cleat position while riding.
  • + 7
 @mountainyj: this seems crazy. It's like telling a runner to run flat footed.
  • + 4
 @islandforlife: This: "Are you all really climbing with your cleats as far back as possible?? When I tried this, it just destroys the climbing efficiency."

We are watching a video of enduro riders who pedal very little. You can't climb efficiently while flat footed. You need to activate all of your leg muscles. Look at every XC rider. They're not running their clips in the back. Not even close.
  • + 7
 @WAKIdesigns: Mr Waki BB PB whilst I agree on a lot of your opinions I must fervently defend the use of clips on uphills both technical and smooth. There is literally no comparison when it comes to proper climbing , might I suggest you clip in more often to get accustomed to said benefits. Yours sincerely ex xc racer boaty mc boat face
  • + 0
 @mountainyj: too far forward on squat when? Going down, at the bottom, going up, beginning of going up, ending? Which squat? Front squat? Low bar, high bar? Smile James teaches in his programs to drive through heels (I bought 3 of them) but this goes against pretty much every Olympic lifting school out there. You can check Juggernaut TS, Starting Strength, Barbell Medicine, and more ( just don't check JT Fletcher haha) Being on heels is lesser of two evils but it is still an evil. You should drive through the weight evenly distributed on the whole foot. It is fine to do a bit of so called "good morning" when starting to go up from back squat but that has to do with having legs much stronger than the back.

The flaw of James thinking (although the result seems fantastic) is that pedalling is supposed to be a form of weight lifting like squatting or deadlifting, it seems as off as pedalling is like running although I'd rather lean towards the latter. Theoretically BMX gate start is a set of 2-3 alternating single left deadlifts, but they have their bars much lower than mountain bikers so the pull is evidently harder. It is very hard to be done efficiently already on a DJ bike. There can be no doubt that lifting stuff compliments bike riding (as long as you know what you are doing, pumping out singles or sets of 20 won't help you much...) but Pedalling is... pedalling...

The thing is, we don't just pedal. If anything a crucial component of riding mountain bike is hip drive. Pumping, jumping, landing, bunnyhopping etc. But again, it has more to do with rowing than deadlifting. Although deadlifting is closer to it than squatting.

I used to ride my flats with axle between midfoot and the ball of the foot. Then One Up pedals forced me to ride more midfoot as the bearing was in the way. Sudddenly I realized that it is easier for me to clear doubles on pumptrack and that jumping steep 45-60deg take offs on DJ site got less taxing on legs and ankles. So if I was to give James credit it would be mainly for midfoot position. As to his pedal, mainly for balance. I find it slightly too big, unnecessarily long, but the latest CBros in large platform are super cool. And I think James helped to bring them to the market with his theories.
  • + 2
 @mountainyj: You dont weight your heels on a squat- the bar should be centered over the middle of your foot the entire path.
The weight should be in the center of your foot otherwise strenght and torque gets lost.
  • + 1
 @landscapeben: I still do midfoot, and scrape my toes, because that's still preferred. Mind you, I run clipless only 2 or 3 rides a year.
  • + 1
 @nick1957: It isn't about XC style vs DH style. Half the pro road peloton has moved the cleat back to midfoot. It engages different muscles and allows for a different pedal stroke. Maybe you are the one who should avoid sweeping assumptions
  • + 1
 @goldencycle: Can you please show some kind of evidence for this? Following all of these comments, I've been scouring the web. There's like one female rider who does this, from what I can find. This is an honest question. I'm content on being wrong, but I can't find a thing.
  • + 2
 @spaztwelve: I don't have an article for you, but they discussed it for like an hour during a stage of the tour de france last year. I'll do some checking. It was mainly about the calf not having the stamina that the quad does. Moving the cleat back engages the quad a lot more, and relies less on the calf. Similar to how you normally stand up from a chair. It is being pretty widely embraced from what they said. And I tried it as well on road and mtb and definitely see the benefits.
  • + 1
 @NotNamed: and balance! Proprioception is important work to do in gym. Charging your heels you'll be a dick at it!
  • + 0
 @goldencycle: I think we are talking like 10-15mm behind the metatarsal. That's hardy midfoot.
  • + 0
 @spaztwelve: Ok...? Are you qualifying midfoot as in the middle of your foot? No one else is.......
  • + 1
 @goldencycle: yes. That’s the literal meaning of mid foot. There are people who do this including triathletes, which seems crazy but their course aren’t usually hilly and apparently helps with getting off and running. 10-15mm back from your metatarsal is still on the ball of your foot. It’s not anywhere close to mid-foot. I ride mid-foot descending on flat pedals. I assume that every enduro athlete talking about pushing their cleats all the way back are trying to get as close to mid-foot as possible. There are people talking about dremelling out their shoes on this thread. Going 10-15mm back from your metatarsal certainly doesn’t require that effort on any clip shoe I’ve ever seen.
  • + 2
 @islandforlife: I agree with what your saying, I think there's definitely a sweet spot for clipless cleat placement. I use Shimano interface (it's got good float about 5degrees)with my shoes and pedals, I find while clipped in, a few mm behind the ball of the foot allows for efficient climbing and it doesn't feel that far forward for descending, however my Riding style is more so, cross country esqué, uphills and I don't do that much jumps, so perhaps there's way different feeling for people Riding more flow trails and require more movement
  • + 0
 @spaztwelve: looks like his cleats are possibly back as far back as those shoes will allow by looking at his left foot. Impossible to tell for sure without seeing the bottom of his shoes. So considering where this discussion all started, he seems to be following the same logic of slamming the cleats back....can’t say I’ve seen many high end xc shoes with the cleats mounted further back like the giro chamber 2’s.
  • + 1
 YES!!!!!
  • + 1
 Absolutely agree, number one reason why I never persisted with clips felt like I was standing on my toes riding downhill even with the cleats as far back as they would go!
  • + 1
 @spaztwelve: Nino could out pedal us with the balls of his hands.
  • + 4
 Flat pedals. Put your foot where you like.
  • + 1
 True, AT/BC ski and splitboard bindings nowadays are complex, light, trustable (and expensive) mechanisms that can change between two very different attachment modes for ascending and descending....

“Fun fact”: most light modern AT bindings do NOT release in ascent mode, that maybe not transferable to MB?
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns Shimano ME7 (my favorites), Scott prowl/mtb team (newest), many PI models, Giro terradura/chamber, and many more....but I agree that most mtb shoes have the typical 11cm toe to most rearward position but more are making it 13cm toe to most rearward position.
  • + 1
 man up get on flat pedal
  • + 27
 5 10 shoes, flat pedals, so cool, so old school.
  • + 14
 Same - DMR Vaults and 5/10s for the win...
  • - 13
flag headshot (May 10, 2019 at 3:49) (Below Threshold)
 Used to be even cooler - 27.5 and flat pedals. So old school cool. Now only 50%.
  • + 3
 DMR v12 + 5-10 impacts. If anything they're too grippy.
  • - 15
flag oldtech (May 10, 2019 at 5:12) (Below Threshold)
 If you can't ride your Clips like Flats you haven't spent enough time on them. I clip in and out as easily with my Shimano spd's as most squids do on Flats.
  • + 3
 @Richt2000: I ride the same setup
  • + 19
 @oldtech: thats sick what else can you do as well as squids?
  • + 10
 Once global warming puts us all underwater, the kraken will be our God
  • + 1
 @medievalbiking: you can get impacts to fit v12’s half of my impacts hang of the side of the pedal with v12’s
  • + 16
 @oldtech: If you can't ride your Flats like Clips you haven't spent enough time on them. I stay planted as easily with my OneUp flats as most squids do on Shimano spd's.
  • + 6
 Yay- aside from market forces and shifting product availability no one is forcing to ride anything you don't want to. Great news right! I ride mostly clipped in- but also have flats for here and there (lately been putting them on as I'm trying to snap out of fakie and found it just safer on flats). I ride clips cause I like it. If you think a certain pedal choice makes you more or less bad ass then enjoy that feeling and I won't try to dissuade you from it- but at the end of the day they are just pedals and run what you enjoy.
  • + 0
 @Jimmy0: french fry them and turn them into calamari bro
  • + 0
 @iduckett: I prefer my squids french fried flat with salt and pepper
  • + 4
 @oldtech: you don’t have to clip in and out of flats...
  • + 3
 @oldtech: oh I just got it - you’re equating the word squid with the literal meaning of the word squid when the colloquial squid was used to describe a person. That’s next level
  • + 20
 shoe manufacturers need to learn and allow the cleats to still slide further back than what they currently do!
  • + 18
 Only watched hoping to hear Sam Hill talk about flats and he didn’t disappoint ????
  • + 8
 Man, for such a popular MTB site, it boggles my mind how poorly written most of the articles can be. There is almost always at least one major typo or other grammatical error. I KNOW. I GET IT, and I love it. BIKES! But Jesus guys, give it a once over before clicking on SUBMIT. (I'm a translator, so I'm sure I care more than most)
  • + 7
 I think its harder to run flats on rough trails than "clips". I have to be quick at readjusting my feet all the time and sometimes they are in the wrong spot but I just deal with it. flats are not as efficient for that reason alone.

I run flats and my riding buddy is clipped in and we both ride a fuel ex.
The only time I see the advantage is getting up and over a ledge on a steep climb. he can pull the rear up in some places I can't.

My buddy would like to try flats but won't because he never used them and at 55 its too late to switch.
  • + 7
 Can't see why it's too late. Do it! It's always time to learn something new.
  • + 5
 @nozes: you're absolutely right, us old dogs can indeed learn new tricks, we're just a little smarter about which tricks are worth the effort Wink
  • + 3
 I ride flats with worn out pins, on running shoes, on a hardtail 5 sizes and a half smaller than what should be good for me. My speed is in pair with m8's running nice flats or clips on full suspension. They are always amazed how I can keep up with them on any terrain going down. Going up is ridiculously awful. Currently I'm looking for a frame my size and full suspension. Along with it will come new flats with new shin eaters. Keep in mind, brazil has horrendous prices on bikes. its like 3 grand just a good frame from 6 years ago. The nacional minimun wage is almost 1 grand.
  • + 10
 I used flats for years... I've been on clips for about 10 rides now. I hate that I can't move my foot to my ball for climbing and then move it to mid foot for descending. I getting used to it but it's driving me nuts.

But I enduro race, and I am just faster on clips, there's no mistaking it. It doesn't have to do with fast rough sections... I've found with good pedals and five tens, I feel just as stuck to the pedals on flats as I do on clips. Where I'm faster on clips is in two situations - 1. the pedally sections of a stage where I can just hammer hard while almost dying of exhaustion and not have to worry about my foot being in the right spot or readjusting while I'm tired and lose momentum, speed and seconds. And 2. when I do take a foot off in a racing situation, I'm trying to get it back on in the exact right spot so that I can have full confidence in my ability to go 100% into the next section - clips make this easy. Sometimes on flats I don't get it right and trying to re-adjust slows me down or I don't get it right going into a rough section and I end up slower because I'm not set.
  • + 1
 Thats what got me off of flats. Literally, my buddy just said "you'll never think about your feet" and the rest was history.
  • + 9
 How to set up flat pedals... Put shoes on and ride
  • + 3
 Pin height and configuration is an underrated adjustment on flats
  • + 1
 @goldencycle: Absolutely true. I bought a pair of Chromags for my last build and wasn’t thrilled with the grip... until I realized the bag of “spare” pins was actually a bag I’d longer replacements. Swapped ‘em in, tweaked a few heights and now they’re like Velcro.
  • + 4
 I dont really get the whole cleats at the back thing, in moto all the trainers say stay on the balls of your feet which makes sense for better balance. Anyone care to explain ?
  • + 1
 I've been riding clips for longer than some on this forum have been alive, but on my limited time using flats (bike park) I find I really prefer putting the pedals mid foot for jumps etc. Feel more control. Sometimes I can irritate my ankle jumping clipped in if my foot is too far forward as there's that much more leverage, which = weakness.
  • + 1
 @JesseE: True yeah I was thinking for big hits the cleat placement further back would be beneficial
  • + 4
 Because MTB is not moto is my guess. I imagine differences in suspension and the amount of force that one "absorbs" over the other versus the amount of force your body (feet, ankles, knees, hips, etc) absorbs plays a factor. All I know is, for MTB, mid-foot position on flats provides more stability and less stress on my ankles for big hits/landings.
  • + 1
 For years it was the ball of the foot for everything...basketball, cycling, tennis etc. I think people misunderstood exactly where the ball of the foot is. The best area for stability is the tarsometatarsal position...basically where the toes attach to the foot. This is more to the centre of the foot or just behind what we think of as the ball of the foot. Think of it like this...walk around on the balls of your feet for awhile. I would guess that you would tire easily. Most of the muscles in your leg are working toward stability so if your foot is in a more stable position then you will be more efficient. Take a look at where roadies on any major tour are positioning their feet. Seems like they are more centered on the pedal. With new riders/kids, I get them centered on their pedals for strength and stability.
  • + 1
 @spaztwelve: Does Nino do anything wrong on a bike? The guy is a beast and obviously does what works for him as do many other professionals. My above comment was based on spending some time looking at research on foot placement and there is great evidence on how being centered on your pedal is more efficient. Is this going to work for everyone? Probably not. But I like science/research to help me make decision rather than on what the pros are doing.
  • + 1
 @criscokid25: Okay...fine. Can you actually cite this research? Why is it that not a single image can be found of elite road/xc mtb riders riding in the style you are describing? I ride both flats and clips. I ride midfoot at bike parks and on jump lines. No way am I going to crank long climbs flatfooted.
  • + 2
 @spaztwelve: Not a single image? I guess we use different search engines. In my first post I mentioned being more to the center of your foot...just behind what we call the ball of the foot. Many riders who put in hours of saddle time are riding in this position. As for research, have a read here: www.researchgate.net/publication/227286445_Influence_of_Pedal_Foot_Position_on_Muscular_Activity_during_Ergometer_Cycling_P39
for some information on what I am talking about. There's way more research on the tarsometatarsal position for cycling if you want to dig further.
  • + 2
 @criscokid25: Sure, there's wonky images. I can't find one pro athlete sporting this. By all means, please show these pros.

I'm reading this single study from 2009 and it doesn't list any kind of conclusive evidence. I have access to a lot of academic research and I'm not finding this huge body of research you are referring to.

If there is even an minute advantage, don't you think every pro out there would be doing this? All I can find through web searches is that the pros recommend being 10-15mm behind the metatarsal. That's far from mid-foot. I'd argue that this is the position most clipless riders use.
  • + 2
 In motocross they have big, stiff boots which take stress off your ankle. In mtb if you take a big impact with the pedal at the front of your foot in torques your ankle out
  • + 1
 Im profesionally doing bike fittings for decade now wtih really exact body check of muscles, theri limitations, bones, and so on, and I could really see on daily basis how much problems for body are doing cleast that are to much back... I know, that it makes sense for downhill, but enduro has quite a lot of pedalling or?!
  • + 2
 What about Q-Factor? A few shoe companies are moving the cleat mount position inward to increase the Q-Factor. I just moved my cleats to the most inward position to increase my Q-Factor and it is much more comfortable with the wider stance.
  • + 1
 Which one??? After riding 5-6 months on my fatbike (ultra wide Q-Factor) I always find it so uncomfortable to ride my mtn bike!! Fat is maybe too large but mtn bike too narrow for my liking..
  • + 1
 @Timo82: The Giro Chamber II (Aaron Gwin's shoes) has the cleat mount position further inward so you can get a wider stance if your Q-Factor on the pedals is narrower. I'm sure there are more but I haven't searched.
  • + 1
 @tacklingdummy: Cool, thank you! Smile
  • + 1
 Northwave enduro shoes have really good slots for cleats to go right back. I just snapped the base of my mavics which may or may not have had something to do with me drilling the slots longer....
  • + 2
 Why is everyone running their cleats in the back? Don't you lose out on your foot providing that little extra bit of bump absorption?
  • + 3
 Awesome, would love to see how they set up their grips , cable ends and valve caps too.
  • + 2
 Quite interesting to see how Sam Hill has set up his pedals. One left and one right... Damn this will be the next big thing. Go for it you hero on flats!
  • + 1
 Are those CB Mallet E from Martin Maes the Long Spindle version?
What are the advantages for using Long Spindle instead the "normal" version? Read somewhere that was just only an uprade for higher guys.
  • + 2
 Probably something to do with heel clearance. I know people who have done it with their fatbikes so that large winter boots don't rub the stays. Maybe another reason is just he prefers the wider stance for his feet for whatever Martin reason that is
  • + 2
 I like them to get clipped out a little easier with modern wide sole clip shoes (like the chambers) without getting my toe hung up on the crankarm while rotating out
  • + 3
 TRIED 'EM, DIDN'T LIKE 'EM...
  • + 1
 So, how does Barnes ride his pedals? No idea from the video.

I liked this video, showed some diversity, everyone is lit on a track and they ride different setups.
  • + 3
 An 8 minute video on how to set up pedals?
  • + 18
 Seriously...and heck, what I'm really wanting is a 10 minute video on how they set up their grips.
  • + 1
 There's quite a bit more to it than just pedal set-up if you watch it. Quite an interesting video actually... especially for someone who is going through a transition from flats to clips for racing.
  • + 1
 Made just for all those PB readers who love to argue about pedals
  • + 2
 interesting helmet on martin maes. are those new retention systems for goggles?
  • + 1
 If I recall correctly, it was a system to lift the goggles a bit from your face to allow for more ventilation on the climbs (to avoid fogging up). There was an article on them here on Pinkbike but I forgot the name so that makes it hard to search Wink . They do sponsor him though so you could browse through his list of sponsors.
  • + 2
 @vinay: I wanna say they were called air flaps or something
  • + 1
 Funny that the photo on the video cover is of Sam Hill running flats... so no setup needed lol
  • + 7
 Pins size pedal width and shoes sole preference though
  • + 2
 Remember when "clips" were called "clipless"?
  • + 1
 nice one, don't see any problem with 8min video, I could watch longer and wanted to see non famous riders pedals set up.
  • + 1
 Was this post written by a drunk person?
  • + 2
 Where the dremels at??
  • + 1
 Whatever. If video have my heroes in it I’m in. Can be about pedals
  • + 1
 The Horizon got humbled by a big Vault as it looks...
  • + 1
 I like the old school bear claw looking pedals.
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