Fox Racing Releases New Dropframe Pro Helmet

Dec 18, 2023 at 11:13
by Fox Head  
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PRESS RELEASE: Fox Racing

Fox Racing introduces significant updates to the “first to market” Dropframe Pro. This new iteration features similar upgrades as the Proframe RS with an all-new aesthetic and list of features that further enhance the performance of the classic ¾-shell silhouette.

It’s not just the all-new aesthetic that catches your eye. As the ¾-shell helmet of choice for riders looking to drop in, the Dropframe Pro has taken its feature set to new levels of protection and fit that’ll transform your ride experience. With extended ear coverage, BOA adjustability to dial in your fit with finite accuracy, and built-in Mips technology to protect your brain in the event of a crash, the Dropframe Pro elevates safety to another level, even meeting the NTA-8776 E-Bike helmet certification standard. That’s a little more coverage in a helmet for a whole lot more confidence to express your vision on dirt.

The Dropframe Pro also includes several more details that riders will appreciate, like a new 3-position adjustable visor and Big Bore front vents with an area designed for eyewear storage. The vent profile and decreased surface contact area work together to improve cooling. The helmet also includes an Ionic+ antimicrobial liner and cheek pads to optimize fit, a Fidlock magnetic closure, and a removable under-visor GoPro mount.

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The new Dropframe Pro is currently available online and at finer retailers across the globe.

MSRP: $279.95
SIZES: S, M, L
COLORS: Matte Black, Purple, Black/White, Midnight Blue, Black Camouflage, Orange Flame, Olive Green, Oat Brown

For more information, go to www.foxracing.com.

Author Info:
Fox-Head-Inc avatar

Member since Jan 17, 2012
57 articles

130 Comments
  • 112 9
 Once you add cheek pads why not just have a chin bar? Seems like you get the extra heat of a full face without the protection.
  • 5 3
 The only thing I could imagine is visibility, but that's about it.
  • 12 9
 @danielfloyd: I think more people should be buying removable chin/face guard helmets. They are not ideal for cross country riding where you're constantly having to pedal, but for rides with long ups to downs, slapping on a faceguard seems like a nobrainer to me - especially if you ride rougher terrain. I can't rationalize why my face need more protection when I ride a chair life vs having to bike up. If anything my local trails are more techincal than the DH trails I ride and going over the bars easy enough to accomplish.
  • 14 3
 Eating and drinking without having to take the helmet off. Maybe a marginal benefit but enough to matter to some?
  • 63 4
 All the disadvantages of a full face but you can still easily knock your teeth out
  • 3 1
 Agreed… don’t get the concept. No significant facial protection added, loads of heat added.
I’ve opted for a Leatt convertible helmet. Chin bar stashed on my pack when climbing or on normal parts. Mounted for downhill trails.
Yes it is a bit of a schlep to put on or disassemble. No real hindrance to use a Camelbak drink tube.
Face protected when needed.
  • 14 3
 So I use the previous gen Dropframe for my work as bike patroller. Full face is overkill for my park, especially since I have to stop and fix things all the time and this helmet with googles gives me a little bit more protection than a standard half shell. It also scores well with VT bike helmet study that is funded by IIHS. I also use it for standard trail riding and I can breath way easier than my previous Proframes. This allows me to use a more substantial full face helmet for my park riding, instead of the Proframes in the past.
  • 16 6
 @jesse-effing-edwards: removable chin guards are super dumb. Adds weight to the helmet which makes it less safe, also more complicated and expensive. Just get a full face with good ventilation
  • 2 1
 @Comatosegi: thanks for some first hand reporting. I think this helmet looks to offer a smart compromise.
  • 1 1
 @bbachmei: this is exactly how i feel about it too!
  • 4 1
 Don’t really want to wear my full face outside of shuttling my dh bike or riding park. I use a drop frame when I do E dh loops, and my old trail helmet for regular rides.

Drop frame definitely a niche product, but gives extra protection without FF.
  • 1 0
 @wburnes: I keep my chin guard in my backpack and it doesn't feel heavy compared to my other helmet.
  • 5 0
 I have a Giro Switchblade that I run in 3/4 mode for the winter months, it's way too hot for the summer but I love the warmer ears when the temps drop here in Colorado.
  • 2 0
 Ya I like my old dropframe with the ear protector bits. Still get some side of face protection but the ears open helps cooling a lot on long rides. There is no advantage to this over a proframe now.
  • 1 1
 @jesse-effing-edwards: its heavier than it would be without the hardware to make it removable (the safest helmet is the lightest helmet, all else being equal). If you keep it in your backpack, I would just not bring it in the first place
  • 3 0
 @wburnes: TLD Stage
  • 3 0
 I slipped (OTB...) and fell down a cliff face in Leavenworth and slammed the side of my head into the granite with my old helmet. Cracked it and cut my ear/cheek a bit... The 3/4 would have saved me a bit of face rash.

Been riding the Dropframe for about 2 years now and I would submit that, unless you are ultra XC oriented, everyone would benefit from wearing at least a 3/4 helmet like this for normal riding.
  • 2 0
 Some people enjoy looking like dorks? Jk, anything is better than those hideous Bell full face helmets
  • 3 0
 It definitely adds extra protection, I can show you dents on my Switchblade in places where your half shell does not have any coverage.
But currently I mostly ride in FF, just carrying on a hip-pack belt and ditched Switchblade completely. However this approach works only in the long ascent/long descent scenario and does not work on races.
Sometimes you are not comfortable in and FF but want as much protection as you can get and this is what it's for. People need to feel 100% comfortable on a bike to preform well. Simple as that.
You all pay lot's of money to have something 1% lighter, better, so why not pay for something with 1% more protection.
  • 3 0
 These style helmets really are not noticeably or meaningfully hotter than a standard half shell. I've been running the previous generation of this helmet since it came out, and love the damn thing. The extra coverage stabilizes the helmet and really makes it disappear on your head, especially with the pad fit of the older gen. Hopeful that pad-fit comfort is still there with the new gen, as the boa dial and mechanism is integrated into the shell.
If you are racing XC or that closely matches your riding style then this will not suit your needs, but if you are trail riding and leaning more towards the aggressive end of the spectrum and dont want to wear a fullface I would pick the extra coverage, stability and comfort any day. Even on the hottest days, I was almost always using my Dropframe over my normal half shell cause it is more comfortable and the extra protection is only a net positive. They also work better than a half shell for night riding since the helmet is more stabilized on your head and extra the weight of the light doesn't shake it around nearly as much.
In my mind, these are not a replacement for a fullface (that much should be obvious), they are simply a better half shell.
  • 2 0
 @lkubica: Agree, Have been wearing ffirst the Giro Switchblade (never with chinbar), then Tyrant & now on the Leatt 3.0 Enduro (which l like most, but biased, because work for them). It is a mindgame, i just feel safer with an open face helmet, plus knowing the upper shell is ASTM (DH) certified. Fit is also better, stays super put even in roughest terrain. No heat issues, apart from very, very hot days, especially with the switchblade back then.
  • 2 0
 Think you're understating how much a chin bar blocks in regards to airflow. This style of helmet actually makes a ton of sense to me. I'd be curious about the data but I'd have to imagine that most impacts come on the cheek/temple area due to our natural desire to look away from the impact. With secondary impacts being the back/back side of the head.
  • 1 0
 @onemanarmy: I've been punch in the jaw by the ground.

pedalling with the faceguard, even though there's tonnes of space to breathe, is still not as good as with the guard removed. I love the option for bigger downs to slap on the guard after a long climb. I also feel like you're less likely to fall when over-protected, it's psychological. Most falls for me after the hard stuff when I let my guard down. Full face has your guard up, literally!
  • 3 0
 @dchill: This. A 3/4 helmet…well, I spent 3/4 of a year getting a bone graft, implants and dental work after I lost my front teeth in a crash. The mild decrease of heat ventilation in a Stage is much less inconvenient than the pain and money loss that I went through. It’s actually a very livable helmet in warm temps.
  • 2 0
 @vw4ever: sorry you went through that. I have Dropframe for very mellow local trails without rocks but anything else is the Stage
  • 1 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: Direcly to the front of it? I mean I've done that and who knows, may do it again one day. But I think the last time I did that I was like 14.

Personally, I ride a normal trail helmet. I have been kicking around a full face because I'm getting old and fat but I still like my face. But I'd likely go with a lightweight full face, not a 3/4. Not really my cup of tea. But I can see why they decided to do this.

I'm very curious to see where Fox's helmets in 2026 and beyond go now that they have access to Bell/Giro's test lab in house.
  • 1 0
 @onemanarmy: Honestly I don't really fall all that much, period. Just not super aggressive. But had a couple good ones a few years back that woke me up. Totally came out of now where once the hard part was over (lose turn, caught a pedal on a stump.. ). Once I was in the market for a new helmet I got the Leatt Enduro 3.0. It comes with cheek guards if you just wanna enduro, but I figure if I'm going downhills why play around, so I slap on the chin/faceguard after the climb is done. I really see now draw back for long ups to full downs.
  • 2 0
 @onemanarmy: Hard to go wrong with the TLD Stage
  • 1 0
 ya i have the old one this one is just stupid
  • 1 0
 @pb4imtb: I disagree I like they got rid of the big ear holes. Although the new one looks aimed more towards dirt jumpers were a chin bar blocks your vision when looking towards a landing
  • 1 0
 "Introducing the new Dropframe helmet from Fox - Never go full send, always 3/4 send."

See, it just rolls of the tongue.
  • 1 0
 @wburnes: I beg to differ. In terms of overall weight in half shell & with the chin bar mounted it is not noticeably different to a standard half shell or comparably rated full face helmet respectively…
  • 1 0
 @SchalkMarais: how much does it weigh in grams?
  • 1 0
 @wburnes: 375grams without the chin bar. 750grams with.
My Specialized Tactic half shell is 380grams +
A Specialized Gambit (probably one of the lightest full face helmets) is 680grams.
  • 1 0
 @SchalkMarais: the lightest DH rated full face that I know of is 570g

www.dainese.com/im/en/bike/helmets/linea-01-mips-203869820.html?dwvar_203869820_color=WHITE%2FBLACK

IXS trigger mips is 595g
  • 1 0
 @wburnes: That is super light, but in terms of ventilation, convenience and getting 2 for 1 with convertible helmets, I can live with a bit more weight.
In half shell setup it is on par with what I would normally run.
  • 1 0
 maybe but options are good... cant hate it
  • 30 8
 This is dumb as far as I’m concerned, it’s like 85% full face whilst loosing the bit that might make the difference between smashing your teeth out or not
  • 6 2
 Generally, I agree with you. Personally, I would always opt for full face over this.

But if someone doesn't want to wear a full face (too hot, think theyll look dumb on XC trail, whatever) and would opt for this which does provide more coverage, then it seems they are still better off then going for the half shell.
  • 52 1
 Brits concerned about their teeth?
Well that's something new!!!!!!!!!
(Just joking!)
  • 4 0
 @Bitelio: you Scots are on a roll today. Keep em coming!
  • 5 1
 3/4 = 85%
  • 2 0
 @mariomtblt: they are calling it 3/4, doesn’t mean it’s mathematically correct
  • 2 0
 Right….thats exactly what it is.

You’re aware there’s more to protection than your face - right? Hello?
  • 7 1
 @mtmc99: If they're wearing one of these to not look dumb...I've got some bad news.
  • 1 0
 Increased temple protection with same visibility and similar lightness as a small helmet is why I love them. Fullface just takes away half of fun when jumping but I've had enough concussions to opt for additional protection.
  • 2 0
 @Bitelio: No you're not.
  • 22 0
 What's the deal with e bike ratings for helmets? Why are they different to normal helmets?
  • 7 22
flag misteraustin FL (Dec 19, 2023 at 7:15) (Below Threshold)
 Probably tested with slightly higher speeds in mind.. makes sense to me
  • 115 0
 More cheek clearance.
  • 7 0
 @misteraustin: I'd like to think my helmet is rated to above 15mph : /
  • 5 1
 the test drops helmet from higher onto the anvil, therefore it needs to be stronger to pass the test similar to the DH standard. Its for epeds that are upto 28mph pedal assist not your normal 15mph emtb
  • 22 0
 extra protection from the incoming traffic when you ride up downhill trails
  • 2 0
 They have a spare battery built-in to charge the bike if and when it runs empty halfway up the climb?
  • 3 0
 @iiman: right after ignoring the no e-bike signs.
  • 7 0
 E-bike rating just means it’s too hot to wear if you don’t have a motor doing all the work for you.
  • 3 0
 They're tested to higher energies. The caveat being, it's challenging to make a helmet safe at higher speed impacts while keeping it safe at the lower ones. So, unlike some people think, making a helmet pass a standard with higher speeds might not necessarily imply it will be safer for your specific use case
  • 3 0
 @Arierep: how much faster is the highest speed (which will be downhill) of someone riding an ex-bike compared to a regular Enduro bike? I see pros going 80km/h+ on those. Can't imagine the bike being the speed-limiting factor there. And you're not in the bike, but on (or, in the case of a crash, most likely off of it) it, so the few extra kilograms that the e-bike weighs has no impact on the impact energy (pun not intended).
  • 6 0
 @BurtMcBurburt: Speaking of cheek clearance, where can I find an e-rated saddle?
  • 2 0
 Dang, I got flamed!
  • 4 0
 @eh-steve: Ergon has one. I shit you not.
  • 2 0
 @slovenian6474: "Better traction plus maximum comfort uphill" Plus extra taint protection. They even used MRI to guarantee it! I'm disapointed it's not gel though.
  • 2 2
 E bikers are generally older less informed and usually more willing to part with their cash which they generally have more off. It’s excellent marketing and whoever came up with this scam definitely earned their Christmas bonus.
  • 2 0
 @Mac1987: I'm not commenting on the actual speed difference of the e-bike VS bike uses, rather than test requirements of this NTA helmet standard. Wether or not having a standard with higher test energies reflects the use of e-bikes, that's up for debate. The NTA standard come to being in the S-pedelec context, if I'm not mistaken, and those go to 45km/h with assistance
  • 1 0
 @Arierep: yeah I understand. Still find it a bit silly for the manufacturers to market them as e-bike specific, if the difference is the speed rating. 45km/h is a very regular speed for gravity racing, regardless of using a human or electric engine. The only real difference for a helmet I can think of is heat related, with regular bikes creating more heat that needs to be transferred away from the head. But I still wouldn't mind good air flow on an e-bike...
  • 22 3
 The only time I go faster on my ebike is uphill. I don’t see the need for a special ebike rated helmet.
  • 65 3
 Full faces are automatically ebike-rated because they help hide your face from mountain bikers...
  • 1 0
 What the....
  • 2 6
flag nvranka (Dec 19, 2023 at 9:48) (Below Threshold)
 Sucks to suck
  • 4 0
 @MTBrent: I want to be offended by your comment, but it is too hilarious. Well played.
  • 13 0
 I have the first version and I love it. I see myself reaching for it more often than my A2. It feels safer and more secure than a regular half shell, gives a little more confidence. I also where it at the dirt jumps, I like the moto look of it and it definitely provides more protection than a bucket helmet. Lastly, I wear it on cold weather rides, it covers the ears enough I don't need to wear a headband or anything over my ears. A lot of hate here for it but I love the thing. Keep em coming Fox!
  • 10 0
 Remember, comments are full of weekend warrior gapers. Don’t pay much attention to them.
  • 1 1
 @nvranka: what’s a gapper? Haha
  • 3 5
 @nvranka: so you're one of those guys who uploads their e-bike ride as a regular MTB ride. So brave!
  • 2 1
 @ultimatist: huh? Are you suggesting I care about climb times? I haven’t seen someone go faster on any of our local dh on an E…so why would that even matter? You don’t ride E to go faster than everyone else you muppet…you do it to self shuttle dh that in many cases isn’t accessible otherwise. The E may be heavy, but they handle proper DH well enough to have a blast and train at the same time. I used to have my dad or girlfriend shuttle me and I prefer riding my DH bike over the E, but use your brain…



Kind of proving my point about the commenters around here…
  • 2 2
 @nvranka: smart of you to delete your previous comment. Now be even smarter and categorize your rides correctly so your motor bike doesn't pollute the top 10 lists.
  • 1 1
 @ultimatist: delete a comment? I’ve done no such thing you. So now you’re a liar and a gaper? Yikes.

Now you’re just trolling me or mentally unstable. Either way, I’m out.

I always get baited into conversations with absolute apes on PB. Wish they’d just ban me again for saying trans in athletics is unfair.
  • 1 1
 @ultimatist: lmao, a bay area bum, shocker
  • 1 2
 @nvranka: I'm definitely trolling you, and I'm mentally unstable. It definitely isn't you who needs to grow up. Also, Silicon Valley is full of lazy and dumb people, even though somehow it's a world hub of innovation. You've never been here, but your Slovakian Fox News told you so.
  • 1 0
 Doing research on this helmet and came across this thread. I completely agree with your take on the previous version. I have that, an A3, and a pair of TLD Stages. They all get used, but the Dropframe is my go to unless I am hitting the jumpline or bike park. The extra protection matters on overgrown trails and on the cooler rides.Only reason I am looking for new is the old one has a fixed peak and is getting old...time for something new, and the 2024 Pro is the likely choice.
  • 13 1
 Now we can detect e-bikers long before we recognize their bike! Thanks for that!
  • 23 5
 Their obesity was a clue before this helmet came along. Obviously just a wee joke! There must be slim pedal assisted motorcycle users out there. Just joking though!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • 1 11
flag nvranka (Dec 19, 2023 at 9:51) (Below Threshold)
 @Bitelio:

180lbs 6’3 here…I use an E to mix up dh training days.

Plenty of old men and gapers on my local trails who like to smirk at me on an E when I take that bike out.

Doesn’t bother me much as I manual by them and proceed to shit on their strava times.

Anyone still hating on E’s universally is simply bad at riding. I wouldn’t want just an E bike, if I had to only have that I’d just go back to my moto. But as a tool in a quiver they are super fun.
  • 3 0
 Does anyone know of a study made, where these type of helmets prevent a TBI vs standard lid, without ear protection? Or are these just made for the people that think the ground is Mike Tyson, and you are Evander Holyfield? Mmmm... cartilage.
  • 3 0
 So it doesn't address whether the extended mandible protection reduces TBI, but because it uses the more substantial EPS design of the Proframe it scores really well on the Virginia Tech protocol.

www.helmet.beam.vt.edu/bicycle-helmet-ratings.html
  • 2 0
 @Comatosegi: Thanks. But, VT's rating system is about as useful as Dave Portnoy's OneBite pizza ratings. I don't think these helmets provide any more protection from a TBI. If anything, it's just there for anti abrasion, which to be honest, I've not seen much, on the side of people's head, after a crash. To each their own.
  • 3 0
 @AppleJack76: So from a TBI prospective, they are the most comprehensive testing methodology publicly available. They actually test for rotational impact, b/c they built the protocol for the NFL to approve helmets for their use. IIHS commissioned them to do the bike helmets.
  • 4 0
 @AppleJack76: Forgot to mention I actually just trashed a helmet on the side. My left temple took a rock strike when my front tire slipped out on some wet leaves at speed. At the same time probably 80% of the hard crashes occur with an OTB, striking to top of the head where most half shells cover.
  • 6 1
 Go put on your standard half shell helmet, then place your hand on the side of the helmet (or anywhere around the rim) and apply a bit of pressure. Now imagine it with the force of a crash. See how the helmet just easily rotates out of the way and exposes the part of your head it was supposed to be covering? These drop-frame style helmets dont do that. I think that's a very realistic and common sense test that is never performed in lab experiments. IMO These make WAY more sense than a normal half shell for mountain biking, and should probably have been the norm from way early on because of the dynamic and random ways we crash. Instead, half shell helmets seem to be a byproduct of helmets designed first for road cycling and then that shape became the accepted norm.
Normal half shells have honestly never made that much sense to me, in that they are really only effective in protecting you if you land on top of your head. Push anywhere around the rim of a half shell and you can get the thing to slip off your head quite a bit unless the chinstrap is absolutely choking the shit out of you.
How many people (kids especially) have you seen in the woods and at the trail head with their half shell sat totally crooked, straps all a mess, tilted back, tilted forward, or just loose AF and hanging half off their heads? You can't really put these on wrong because of how deep your head sits into them and how stable they are, and most importantly your head Stays there.
  • 1 0
 Thanks for everyone sharing their opinion on a type of helmet they've never tried.
The difference in comfort between a half shell and a 3/4 shell is a lot smaller than between 3/4 and fullface. So when the question is whether I'm taking my light fullface (eventually bikepark only), the 3/4 (gnarlier pedal-accessed riding and winter) or a half shell (backyard loops and easier rides), mostly it's between the half shell and the 3/4, and the 3/4 mostly wins.
Stop pretending coverage of temples doesn't make a difference - when I fall, I put my hands in front of my face, not my ears.
  • 4 0
 I cant wait to "express my vision on dirt"... Ebike punter style

Give me f*cking break
  • 5 0
 Bring back the Troy Lee D2 Open Face
  • 3 2
 IMHO, I love DH helmets for the protection, but I miss being able to see what is directly in front of me when I glance down, especially on steep features.
I'd really like to see a helmet that takes after a football NFL/CFL kickers helmet where there is a chinbar that stops large objects (like a tree) from smashing my jaw, but does not obstruct vision.
I'm thinking something like a 10mm dia. removable chin bar made from aluminum
Same goes for dirt bike helmets.
Trying to think of some drawbacks to this, but can't. Am I missing something?
  • 2 0
 Not really that good at taking an impact. Sure the tree won’t smash your face but all that energy has to go somewhere.
  • 3 0
 you might be wearing your helmet tilted too high. Chin bar should be low.
  • 3 0
 Uh... I don't even think my chinbar is in my field of view on my DH helmet.
  • 1 0
 @ultimatist: To be fair, it's not as much a problem with the mtb helmet as the moto helmet, because I don't wear goggles with the mtb helmet, so it can be tilted further forword, but it's still a problem. But this is the reason trials motorcyclist helmets don't have a chin bar; it obstructs vision.
  • 1 0
 @woofer2609: try a lower stack goggle, or a helmet with shorter length? No, wearing a "safe helmet" that doesn't let you see what you're riding is not reasonable.
  • 2 0
 I've thought about that as well, and it would essentially be the same type of thing as a ski helmet with the chin guard bar for slalom racing so the gates dont smash out your teeth. This bar style chin guard won't work for MTB though, and I think it just comes down to the mechanics and speed of the impact applied to the chin bar. When a chin bar is struck, the whole of the helmet will push back and your face will contact the inside of the chin bar. This is dealt with on fullface mtb/moto helmets by placing the chin bar relatively close, and padding it. The strap will also catch some of that energy if it's tightened properly. In slalom racing, the chin bar is just there to protect your face from a gate pole and not the ground. In football/hockey, the helmet is held in place by a four button chin strap, so the face guard does not contact your face and your head stays at the back of the helmet. How the helmet is secured is the primary mechanical difference. If you could imagine the amount of leverage and instant acceleration a single bar could generate over your neck if the helmet was secured to your head via a chin strap... Just picture that force if the chin bar hit the ground, or a tree, or snagged something while crashing. Maybe its my imagination but I can picture a lot of snapped necks.
  • 2 1
 Liked the older one better. Covered ears generate more heat. And the opening for the Boa in the neck might reduce neck protection. They should have used the old design with a vent at the top side to avoid trapping heat as with the old one and should have added a removable chin bar.
  • 1 0
 I Would Love the Drop Frame with a removable chin bar!
  • 2 0
 People who wear these types of helmets, genuinely curious as to if you have any issues overheating in this? I'm a sweaty mess even in a half face even on cold trail rides
  • 3 0
 Hi. I have a Giro Tyrant (I know, it's not exactly like this one but a wee bit similar) and I have zero issues with overheating. Mind you, I'm a Spaniard living in the Highlands so it's never really hot up here for me!!!!
  • 2 0
 I also have the Giro Tyrant. No more overheating than normal. I'm in the Southeast USA, so sweating buckets is the norm even if I decided to ride naked. I have no issues riding with it in the middle of the summer, and it's actually really nice in the winter to prevent my ears from getting too cold.
  • 1 0
 To answer your question, yes it is a warmer helmet then a normal open face. As a fellow sweaty mess when cycling, this new version does look worse in the ventilation department than the original drop frame pro I have. As well just from looking at it's appearance it looks like a full face with the chin bar removed. Where as the previous version I would say is like a normal helmet with ear and side of head protection. I am a big fan of the original helmet as a note. Its super comfy, fits snug in the way a full face fits without any pressure points from the ratcheting enclosure. Definitely had to try all the sizes on to find the right fit and given it has only thick or thin padding for adjustment, it may not fit as wide of range of heads as this new version. Think of moto trials riders they wear open face style helmets. Also you can still have a conversation with your mates while climbing. My 2 cents!
  • 1 0
 I wear one all summer. It's hotter but not terrible. I don't sweat a ton though.
  • 1 0
 I own the previous generation and am happy with it. Added coverage in neck and around ears is not significantly increasing heat. But it traps heat at the top cause there is a big surface without vents. Regardless I think it was still a great helmet.
  • 1 1
 All joking aside, what is this helmet for? I mean, I know it ticks somebody's fashion box, but approximately zero people in the history of mountain biking have ever suffered an injury to the additional areas that this helmet covers vs. a road helmet. Source: I just know.
  • 1 0
 If you want to actually see what this helmet looks like from the front, here's a link that will save you hunting around in Fox's photo album like I did:

www.pinkbike.com/photo/26009630
  • 4 0
 Chin bar delete
  • 1 0
 “…Dropframe Pro has taken its feature set to new levels of protection and fit that’ll transform your ride experience.“

Well, I’m sold.
  • 1 0
 Dropframes are the best winter helmets, hands down (unless you ride Siberian DH). Fox Head really needs to play that card more.
  • 3 0
 Looks like a trials helmet. Goofy
  • 7 4
 So awful looking.
  • 2 0
 i´m waiting for the dropchin model: chin bar & no cheek pads
  • 2 0
 I'm a professional chin model, so removed the rest of the helmet and only ride with a chin bar now.
  • 1 0
 There is a significant amount of anecdotal evidence that people turn their heads before their faces hit, or something
  • 6 7
 Thank god it has an e-bike helmet certification. I was running out of topics after exhausting being a lawyer, doing CrossFit, being a vegan, and owning an e-bike.
  • 1 1
 This will sell well in the UK and other markets where dental health isn't a priority.
  • 1 0
 Is the creaking option still available??
  • 2 0
 Ronnie Mac.
  • 1 0
 Feel like I'm missing something with this helmet.
  • 1 0
 Perfect for with my half-caf latte, light beer, 3/4 jersey and shants.
  • 1 0
 No ear holes, No bueno.
  • 1 0
 Good catch. Better be removable.
  • 1 1
 ugly colours, ugly and useless design.
  • 1 1
 *kretin* helmet







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