Park Tool EK-1 Tool Kit - Review

Feb 25, 2014 at 6:45
by Jordan Carr  
If you're on your bike regularly, it's pretty much inevitable that you'll need to perform a few repairs on your trusty rig. Whether those repairs are simple or a bit more involved, having the correct tools for the job not only keeps your bike running smoothly, but will also keep those expensive components from failing. And when it comes to tools, the blue Park Tool logo has to be the easiest to recognize, having been around since 1963. That makes them older than nearly all of the bike manufacturers out there that their tools could be used on! All that time in business has also made them the world's largest bicycle-specific tool manufacturer, all from their headquarters in St. Paul, Minnesota. It's Park Tools' EK-1 travel-based tool kit that we review here, with the 35 piece kit being intended for those on the road who might need to perform some serious repairs. The kit is packed into a durable, well organized blue suitcase that can be closed up and stored away until needed. Yes, $689 USD MSRP isn't a small amount of money, but Park also offers a number of less expensive tool kits that will suit many riders' needs if the EK-1 isn't what you're looking for.



Park EK-1 Tool Kit Details

• 35 separate tools
• Dent-proof, composite, lockable box
• Additional space for adding extra tools
• Proprietary front hanging tool board
• Removable tool boards made with durable 600D ballistic nylon sewn to an ABS inner panel
• 35 tool pockets and straps, plus four adjustable modules to accommodate a wide variety of tools
• Lifetime warranty
• MSRP: $689 USD


Construction
Anyone who uses tools on a regular basis, be it bike tools or those to fix a car or build a house, knows that quality is a key. Park is known for their shop-level quality, and the EK-1 is another example of this. All tools are constructed utilizing a variety of materials like high-torque and chro-moly steel. We found the Bondhus high-torque Industrial steel utilized in the hex keys to be the most durable material for extensive use as it offered an amazing level of resistance to rounding out tool heads over time, even on the smallest of hex keys.


Included Tools
The EK-1 tool kit includes all of the following (take a deep breath): 4, 5, 6mm hex wrench Set, 2, 2.5, 3mm hex wrench set, folding hex set, 1.5 to 6mm, bottom bracket / cassette lockring tool for campagnolo, bottom bracket tool, bottom bracket tool, bottle opener, chain wear indicator, crank wrench, chainring nut wrench, synthetic blend chain lube, cable and housing cutter, master chain tool with peening anvil, crank puller, cassette lockring tool, gear clean brush, 32 and 36mm headset wrench, double sided
hammer, 8mm hex wrench, 10mm hex wrench, master link pliers, 8mm combination wrench, 9mm combination wrench, 10mm combination wrench, adjustable wrench, PolyLube 1000 grease, pedal wrench, tape measure, 13 - 19mm cone wrench set, SD-SET screw driver Set: #0 and #2 phillips screwdrivers, 3mm and 6mm flat blade screwdrivers, sprocket removal tool, professional spoke wrench x 3, tire levers, fold-up star driver, 12 point, T7 to T40, utility knife, and the tool box (19.25” L x 8.25” W x 16.75” H).


Key Tools
While the EK-1 includes quite a few tools, there are obviously key items that will find their way into your hands more often than others. It's imperative that these tools are durable, well designed, and improve your experience using them. Some tools we found ourselves using most from the EK-1 kit were the AWS-1 three-way hex wrenches, separate 8mm hex key, the HT-10 10mm, the masterlink pliers, CN-10 cable / housing cutters, and the UK-1 knife. All these tools were picked up on a nearly daily basis during peak riding times as we are always rotating test bikes and components. A three-way allen wrench is something we use so often it is almost an extension of our hands, and the AWS-1 is a nice offering from Park. Featuring 4mm, 5mm, and 6mm hex keys, it fits the majority of cockpit components, seat post clamps, many brake levers and shifters, and a slew of other highly adjusted components.

Key tools included (Clockwise): the MLP 1.2 masterlink pliers, which make for quick easy masterlink removal, chain tool, and the AWS-1 Three-way hex wrench.



Using EK-1 Tool Kit
Once organized, the EK-1 kit makes finding the tool you need an easy task, and its self-contained design makes it super easy to travel with. Knowing that you can sort out pretty much any non-proprietary repair job while on the road really does add peace of mind, and once you're done you can close up the blue box and toss it into the back of your truck. When it comes time to make specific repairs, we liked the organization that the EK-1 offered, and found a few tools we used quite regularly. Key items like the three-way hex keys, two-sided hammer, side cutters, chain tool and Masterlink pliers were things that proved their value.

We really loved the organizational aspects of the EK-1 and its professional grade tool box. Keeping tools organized and accessible meant we were able to quickly and efficiently make required repairs so we could get out and ride.



Assembling an extensive, well equipped tool kit is not an easy task. With so many varying styles of components and standards, certain tools are bound to be left out, and there were a few key tools we felt the EK-1 lacked: a simple L-shaped hex key and torx set is something we use very often, and would have been an inexpensive addition, although there is a good chance that anyone purchasing a $689 USD tool kit likely already has a few of those kick around. A simple torque wrench is another item that we feel every home and shop mechanic should have given the influx of torque-specific carbon bits. Also, the cassette and bottom bracket tools included need to be paired with a basic adjustable crescent wrench, and although this obviously works fine, a more uniformed setup would be nice.

Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesPark Tool is very aware that dropping this much money on a set of tools isn't going to be for everyone, but the EK-1 most certainly isn't intended for every rider out there, is it? Look elsewhere if you don't find yourself getting too far beyond fixing flat tires or the odd broken chain, but don't rule the EK-1 out if you don't mind diving a bit deeper into repairs, and this is especially true if you find yourself on the road with your bike often. It is true that a lot of seasoned riders will already have many of the necessary tools on hand, but the cost of assembling something similar to the EK-1 does add up to a higher total that its $689 USD asking price, making it a good option if you're looking to start from scratch and want a took kit that you can travel with. Just make sure to pick up a set of L-shaped hex and torx keys. - Jordan Carr


www.parktool.com


177 Comments

  • 283 39
 So essentially this kit is for wealthy middle age suburban dwelling roadies who have never actually wrenched on a bike and therefor don't own any of the tools yet, but are willing to drop $700 on an all in one kit thay they dont know how to use to show off to their roadie friends at the next meet... Nicely played Park Tools. You are about to make a bunch of money.
  • 35 9
 Couldn't have said it any better.
  • 66 3
 Good tools last forever. Why waste money on anything substandard?
  • 90 2
 So what? Plenty of much more stupid things to buy than a $700 set of tools that will last you for years.

Oldest bike tools in my garage are over 20 years old, and still work. Plenty of money saved, plenty of bikes built. If I could afford just to buy such a set back then, I would.

The roadies you talk about will not buy it. They go to a bike shop to change tires.
  • 5 2
 www.bikeradar.com/road/gallery/article/tour-down-under-2014-bike-tech-gallery-ii-39702/37 I'm pretty sure anything except for these are substandard. I just use my good old mastercraft $14 hex key set with no issues but if you want to spend money you got options in the bike world.
  • 6 1
 I like Bondhus for hex wrenches - t-handle, and ballpoint Ls. Knipex for pliers and cutters. Bosch for power tools - not that they are the best, but kinda settled down on it. Proxxon for rotary tool. And Park for bike specific tools. Need a good set of sockets and wrenches...My current are Sear's crap. But they work, so there.. Not like I run a machine shop..
  • 8 1
 So I'll think I'll stay with my 80$ X-Tools 37 piece kit they work great
  • 32 0
 you only need the hammer if you ride street
  • 6 0
 Buy an entry level tool box, this brings everything you will need as a beginner home mechanic, and acquire new tools as you need them....
  • 11 0
 Bike specific tools are the only thing I buy from Park, rest of the stuff can be picked up from a decent tool/ hardware store for prob less than $500 (I dont see more than Maaaaaaaybe $200 in park specialty tools) That is pretty steep IMO
  • 6 2
 I have battery drills for my work that cost more than this whole kit. If you starting from scratch have the money and like park tools then why not?
  • 7 0
 so this is better than the duct tape, sawzall and claw hammer that is my tool kit?
  • 49 19
 "So essentially this kit is for wealthy middle age suburban dwelling roadies who have never actually wrenched on a bike and therefor don't own any of the tools yet, but are willing to drop $700 on an all in one kit thay they dont know how to use to show off to their roadie friends at the next meet... "

Ummmm, you do realize most shops use Park Tool for a reason, right? $700 is a lot for tools? Says someone who I wouldn't trust with a spanner to save my life.

As a T&D maker, I spent well over $6000 on my own personal tools. That's upwards of $200 on a simple indicator, $400 on a precision V-Block, and that's not counting the tools I made myself, easily worth in the thousands themselves..... My bike tools are all a high quality mix that I've had since the early 2000s. My automotive tools are well into the thousands. I can bet my entire collection I can run circles around you with regards to anything to do with making or fixing *anything*. It's my profession. So does that make me just someone wanting to show off because I know the difference between a bahco wrench and a Chinese made knockoff?
An automotive mechanic spends about the same on his tools. Their chests are worth thousands alone. A good master mechanic will have about $7-10,0000 in tools in his collection. Why? Because unlike you they don't skimp on garbage that will need to be replaced in a years time.

And you are bitching about $700 on a portable kit full of top notch tools to bring to the races? I can empirically say this opinion is not one a professional would ever have.

There's a saying that goes, "You can tell of a machinists work by his tools" and that is ALWAYS the case. A good bike mechanic will happily spend this much (which isn't even that much) on quality tools they will never need to buy again. Your comment is incorrect.

I'm not even going to touch the 'roadie' comment. I haven't touched these comments in a while, but when someone bashes good tools, the gloves are off..... hahahahah
  • 12 16
flag ninjatarian (Mar 26, 2014 at 6:15) (Below Threshold)
 @Axxe- I never said they wouldn't still go to a bike shop to change a tire, I just said they were going to buy this kit. Don't confuse the two. Good news is that these kits will pop up "used" on Craiglist just as soon as the roadie needs more room in his garage for the new zero turn lawn mower he bought for his half acre yard along with the Snap on impact wrench and tool kit he bought for working on said mower (and presumed boat).
  • 16 4
 When you get older, and wiser, and hopefully more experienced with breaking off cheap ratchet drives or rounding bolds with cheap tools, you'll change your opinion. I can bet on it.
  • 14 0
 when it comes to standard tools (ie tools that are not specifically for bikes) I go craftsman or snap on because they have life time warenties that kick ass....I have straight up busted tools and craftsman replaces them no questions asked, same with snap on. As for bike specific its all about park tool....but never would I buy screwdrivers, hammers, pliers, adjustable wrenchs or any wrench for that matter, from park tool.
  • 6 2
 ^ that's a good way to go about it. Bahco for wrenches. etc etc. There are better tools from companies like that, whereas you would be hard pressed to find better bike tools than Park. so a the end you're still in around $700 but you've got a good collection. Not the biggest fan of craftsman for automotive though. I broke 2 1/2" drive 24" ratchets, so went to snap on for those. People need to remember good tools should last decades, so while they seem *expensive* to 13 year olds, they are cheaper in the long run.
  • 6 0
 I Looove good tools, but I really do not like the Park Tool Kits. Its not that these arent good tools, its that these Kits are not a good value at $700 freaking dollars give or take, and also some of the tools are crap.
They always include those filler tools and rape the value out of these kits. Why do I want to pay a premium for a crappy crescent wrench, flat head, #1 and #2 philips head, tape measure, box cutter utility knife, non marring hammer, open ended wrenches.
You can find most of these tools at home already, or buy way better quality for less $ at a good tool store.

I had managed to put together a more comprehensive kit than this by the time I was 16 or 17, and have been using those tools for the past 15 years and dont think I even came Close to spending $700 including a case, and thats Park Tools for the tools that are bike specific. Park is also the way to go for the allen wrenches. The three ways are indispensible.
  • 2 1
 Yea, mix and match, but $6-700 is pretty normal for a full home tool kit, minus the stand/press/vice/etc. Bear in mind we're in Canada where things cost more.
  • 2 0
 Pedro's BB and cassette tools: socket fitting for torque wrench. Park tools: at least one BB standard, and the cassette tool, only option is hex head for a crescent wrench. End of argument. Also, they give you lots of tools in this that are of limited use if you don't ride specific parts, so why pay for them if you don need them?
  • 1 0
 I take this kit as something intended for a team mechanic or privateer who may need to fix something he/she doesn't normally use. The case is worth something too. But yea, for your own use, build something up. Those cutters are amazing though. One decade with mine thus far and I've used it for everything from automotive to cutting weld filler.
  • 1 4
 Why buy, if you can borrow? $700 on more bike parts! Haha
  • 2 1
 Jealous of those who have a good paying job?
  • 6 0
 atrokz, I think you missed ninjatarians point. I don't think anybody was questioning the need for quality tools but most people who are going to seriously wrench on thier bikes will put together thier own tool kit that fits thier needs. I don't think this one does it that well for most of us. When was the last time you used a 32 or 36 mm headset wrench? I havent used mine since the 1990s yet they put one in this kit but don't have a 24mm flat spanner, which most of us are more likely to use for fork service, and why no L shaped hex wrenches. There are a bunch of other comments on here that illustrate why buying a kit like this doesn't make financial or practical sense for a serious home mechanic, which leaves the rich roadie as the target demographic for this.
  • 2 0
 I just buy the tools as I need them. It saves on money for repairs, I dont spend money on tools I dont need, and I can shop around for the good prices (and still great quality) for each individual tool. Win. I wont lie though, If I had more money I wouldnt hesitate to buy the whole thing at once. Its a nice package!
  • 2 0
 We bought one of these for our uni cycle club best bit of kit yet not had any problems that we haven't been able to fix with this tool box yet!
  • 5 1
 why buy all those silly tools when you can buy a sledge hammer, if you hit stuff hard enough with it, the broken part tends to kinda fix its self, either that or you break it more.(no refunds)
  • 2 0
 for a seasoned rider the kit offers a nice box and a few missing tools.......meh
  • 3 0
 700 $
  • 4 1
 meh, needs a bigger hammer
  • 2 0
 I avoid Park for non-bike specific tools, their screwdrivers, wrenches, cutters, etc. are nothing special and you can get much better quality from mainstream tool suppliers with solid warranty backup!

Buying specific tools for specific jobs is a wise move, these "toolbox kits" often contain redundant items as well as paying top dollar for a blue case...

ep1.pinkbike.org/p4pb10754660/p4pb10754660.jpg

Here are some tools I have at home, but must admit they are rarely used when I have this setup at work...

ep1.pinkbike.org/p4pb10599299/p4pb10599299.jpg
  • 2 0
 Would be nice if they threw a torque wrench in there.
  • 2 0
 I don't think anyone really has a problem with Park tools. I love mine. I'm thinking anyone who is willing to wrench on their bike probably already has many of the important tools, so spending $700 on a complete set seems steep since much of that won't be used, or will be a duplicate of something you already have.
  • 2 0
 I don't have a problem with them, per se, but: every time I've compared a tool to the Pedro's version, the Pedro's has had better fit and finish, and has better design (knurling on the outside of tools for finger tightening, socket wrench receptacles on most tools) and cheaper. With a few exceptions, Park charges more for less tool (I haven't found a truing stand that compares to a TS-2.2 for the money.) Their tool kits are especially BS, though, as they usually have lots of filler tools that you'll barely use, and don't include tools that you need: if you buy this kit, for example, and need to replace a pressfit BB, you're screwed. and you just spent $700 on a toolkit. You could buy their shop quality press, their cup and BB removers, plus the rest of the tools that you would actually use, for probably less than $500.
  • 3 0
 Why the hate for roadies though? Yeah, many of them are not mechanically inclined, but so what? They participate in a good sport too.
  • 2 0
 Two things:
1. Most riders don't need tools that last years of daily abuse. Most riders need most tools two to three times. It would be the cheapest for them to go to the LBS, but some enjoy wrenching. They don't need a 700$ Toolkit with some basic tools. I am in a similar position, I went and bought a reasonably priced universal toolcase (not bike specific), and now add tools to it as I need them.
2. Too many useless items. This toolbox for example includes a tape measure, bottle opener, grease, lube, and a few more basic tools that aren't bike specific at all, but they add to this 37 Piece total. Instead, they should've included a few more hex keys, especially individual ones. These Star-shaped hexes can be difficult to fit in some spots, and the folding hex minitool is just silly in a workshop.

Just buy the tools you need when you need them. You'll better understand why you need said tool, and you'll have fewer useless tools (For example, I don't have a bike with loose bearing hubs - so the cone wrenches are useless to me). That being said, a Toolbox is something great, you always have your favorite tools at hand...
  • 1 0
 Kainerm - bollocks. Two, three times? Even if you do not build your own bike (like you should), many tools are needed every time you do even a minor service.

But yes, this particular toolkit has stuff that you are better off buying elsewhere - anything non-bike specific. But picking up something better is even harder. You pay for convenience. And it certainly missing tools you need quite often - like a derailleur gauge.
  • 2 0
 @Axxe

you raise a good point about this tool:

www.parktool.com/product/derailleur-hanger-alignment-gauge-dag-2

one of the most useful tools, especially "on the road" when crashes are common and derailleur hangers are easily bent

probably 90% of the bikes coming into our workshop with gear issues have a bent hanger from a crash or just the rear derailleur receiving a slight "knock" in transit or even when lent against something
  • 3 0
 How much for just the box??
  • 1 0
 @Axxe:
There's your problem. Most riders don't do major service - they do the easy stuff plus changing come easy parts. I don't often need a crank remover, casette tool, chain whip, cone wrenches, BB tool, hydraulic hose cutter, chain breaker, etc. How often do you change a BB? How often do you replace crank arms? Do you ever fit your own brake hose?
That's my point - about 50% of the tools in this toolbox I will not need in years, and for a tool that I whip out once a year, I don't need workshop quality. Chance is by the time I need my BB tool again, I will need a different one than the one I currently own. The most used tools are probably the 15mm pedal wrench (if you like to travel and bag you bike for it), 4-6mm hex wrench and a T25 Torx wrench. Those few tools probably cover 90% of all tool uses I have on a bike. I don't buy a headset press, because it's much cheaper to have the LBS do that the three times I'll need it done...
  • 1 0
 @Kainerm
Ever been on a bike trip to somewhere remote? If not, you should try it! Stuff breaks, and if you don't fix it, you don't ride.

And I'm cracking up at the roadie hate. Sure, some are just on the coffee shop, team jersey circuit, but many are just people loving riding bikes. Most great dirt riders also spend time on the road either training or riding to work and will crush you going both down and up. Power up your legs, don't be a weakling.
  • 1 0
 @Kainerm: There's your problem. You do not know what you are talking about. Yes, I do shorten my brake hoses when I set it up, shorten chain when replacing it, remove cassette - in particular when swapping wheelsets, remove cranks for cleaning - and to lube main pivot when overhauling a frame. Etc. etc.
That, and when out for a trip - stuff brakes. I carry a big box of tools and have used it. Better than wasting a weekend of riding due to some stupid mechanical problem.
  • 33 2
 Where's the rotor truing tool? Headset remover? Bearing/ headset Press? Brake pad spreader? And torque wrench maybe. They are expensive especially for a quality one.. me thinks overall its missing a few key things to keep a mtn bike goin in tip top shape. But that price!
  • 4 0
 rotor truing tool was my first thought too.
  • 5 1
 If you added the torque wrench and the headset press you'd have a $1000 tool set. Plus Park's torque wrenches aren't that nice.
  • 2 0
 Wrenching in a bike shop, the tools I couldn't go with out are a nice set of 4mm, 5mm, 6mm L shaped alley keys with ball point. Plus one on the rotor truing tool, wayyyyy better than a spanner with a cloth. And what about a pair of long nosed pliers?
  • 1 0
 Knipex smooth jaw ratcheting plier wrench is awesome for rotor truing, besides being the best adjustable wrench ever. One of my all time favorite tools. Park's tool is not a perfect fit for thinner rotors.
  • 2 0
 Cyclo make a great rotor truing tool with 3 different slots for different thickness in rotors….
  • 1 0
 the problem with adding a torque wrench is now you also have to add all the necessary bits to go with it. so now you've got 2 of every allen key and what not. not so much of a travel kit anymore at that point
  • 3 0
 They have more expensive kits, but unless you're buying the 6k one you'll be missing some stuff haha. I found that looking at some of the park and unior kits they are missing some things that should be in there which is annoying
  • 2 1
 I think that stuff is in there 1000 dollar tool kit. This tool kit and other lower priced tool kit is overpriced.
  • 1 0
 You know, you can successfully true rotors with just an adjustable wrench, a cloth and a lot of patience...
  • 3 0
 i can take my whole bike apart with a 6mm and 8mm allen key and a hammer! boom!
  • 6 0
 anyone can take an entire bike apart with a hammer. putting it back together afterwards might be a little tricky though
  • 2 2
 What an incredible waste of space a bearing press would be.
  • 1 0
 Thats a necessity for any mechanic. With all the press fit bottom brackets now, not too mention angled headset cups to adjust the feel of your ride, why would you not need one? Is a block of wood and the included hammer good for $600 + dollars?
  • 2 1
 its a travel kit. not meant to be everything you need to open a bike shop. I would never want to have a bb press with me when I go riding because I would never carry a spare BB.
  • 1 0
 There are a lot more tools necessary than a bearing/ cup press to warrant the title of a full shop. Im sure you work in a shop/ have your own mini shop at home too.
And nobody. Nobody would carry a press while riding. Wtf? Haha.
Im saying if park is marketing this as a travel kit at this price, it needs a few more tools for the discerning mechanic.
Park makes very good tools so for something of this price to not include even a slimmed down version of the press is odd. Not to mention a cup remover..a tube of steel with 4 cuts.
Id think buying this amount of parts can get you more of them at a slightly lower cost than what seems like individual purchase price. Maybe im wrong in that regard.
  • 1 1
 You definitely misinterpreted that.
Of course nobody would carry a press while riding. That's what I meant. There's no point having one in a portable kit because you're never going to have those spare parts with you. So rather than add useless tools to the kit (Useless in a travel kit, not a completely useless tool) to make it worth the money, couldn't your argument be that it should just be more affordable, and left the way it is?
  • 2 0
 No...your putting words in my mouth haha. If same tools less money is your opinion then I agree with you there. For me for this price, I'd personally like to see a few more things. You already know. And maybe I misinterpreted that but that was what you wrote verbatim.
  • 1 1
 Haha wow that second to last sentence makes sense like drunk David hasselhoff eating hamburgers. But whatever I'm just being picky
  • 3 0
 Agreed on the missing essential tools. One that I would use a lot is a DAG. Derailleur alignment gauge. The majority of bikes that have shifting issues are caused by a very slightly bent hanger that is not noticeable to the naked eye.
  • 2 0
 If your worried about missing essential tools then just get one of these: www.parktool.com/product/master-tool-kit-mk-234
You won't be missing the enormous price tag either, $7,000
  • 1 0
 Lol MTB rotors are so thin you can true them by hand, simply find where the buckle is in the caliper and then rotate the wheel and push it the opposite way with your thumb, no need for a tool!
  • 1 0
 Lol and compromise your braking power because you're getting oils/whatever is on your hands onto your rotor then. Thats why there is a tool for it.
  • 1 0
 DAG-2 is one of my favorite Park tools. All my friends had some shifting problems I have solved for them in a few minutes with it. Local shops charge silly fees for such work. Truing rotors by hand does not work well. If grabbing it with flat jaw pliers you can make a much more precise and local correction.
  • 1 0
 @madmax650 indeed that's why I included a cloth in the list, but I'd use a cloth even with the specific tool.
  • 1 0
 Ever heard of brake cleaner Madmax? Who's to say your tool doesnt have oil on it? Straightening by hand does just fine imo, but each to their own!
  • 1 0
 Brake cleaner? No, never heard of the stuff.
  • 9 1
 For that money I'd have thought a torque wrench and something better than a tape measure (digital caliper vernier) would be included, but I love the case and am guilty of having tools spread all over the workshop Smile
  • 8 0
 I'll stick to my Mac/snap on splashed with needed park tools for now I think
  • 5 1
 I bought this case (empty) for my existing tools and love it. The price may seem crazy to some, but is on par or cheaper than other high-end, similar style tool cases, and this one is bike specific. I also have a need to travel with my tools and keep them compact instead of splayed all over a garage. Highly recommended.
  • 1 0
 A proper tool case is key. Cases similar to this are great for organization and travel. I used cases like this for work with Fluke tools and specialty equipment. I love how rugged they are despite the improper care at the airports. And as you noted, it helps to keep the garage clean.
  • 11 4
 ParkTool is the Snap-On of bike tools.

Is it better? Yeah.
Is it worth the borderline rape-pricing they charge? That's up to you...
  • 5 3
 Thinking I'll stick with my X-Tools 37 piece kit that costed 87$
  • 2 1
 I don't think I would ever spend close to $700 on this particular kit, but I did shell out ~$200 for the case and am very happy I did.
  • 5 1
 ahhah snap on is still better quality
  • 1 1
 I wouldn't go that far. Yes, Park makes pretty nice stuff but for non bike specific tools you can get nicer stuff for the same or less money (Gedore, Facom et cetera), which can't be said about Snap on.

Also because of the larger customer base it's more likely to find them second hand or for a nice deal on Amazon.
  • 3 2
 Did you REALLY just compare Gedore and Facom to Snap-on? Lol
  • 1 2
 Read my comment again and you can answer your own question.
  • 4 1
 @Anonymous I was hoping someone would mention the similarity to Snap-On. It's especially apt because how many people really NEED that difference in quality? There are quite a few broke-ass mechanics financing tools from Snap-On when they'd be perfectly fine and debt-free with Craftsman. If you're not working in a shop every day, I doubt you'll ever wear out a tool used properly. This kit could be pieced together for less than half the price out of hardware store tools and off-brand bike tools for the bike-specifc stuff (SunLite, ToPeak, etc)... I know cuz that's what I did. Hell, I even made a headset press out of threaded rod and washers and a remover out of PVC pipe. My whole kit was probably $250 tops.

Gotta admit that case is way nicer and more organized than my $8 plastic toolbox though.
  • 2 0
 In my mechanics tool set, I run a mix of tools. All my ratchets, universal joints, extensions swivel sockets, obstruction wrenches etc. are snap-on.

But my wrenches, sockets and other "solid" tools are just craftsman. I've never had a socket or wrench break from craftsman, but their ratchets and whatnot are pretty shitty compared to my snap-on stuff. Lifetime warranty doesn't do me any good when my one 3/4" drive ratchet breaks in the middle of a job. Lol
  • 2 0
 @Anonymous028 yeah I can definitely see the merit in going snap-on for tools with moving parts that are gonna see high loads (I guess you could keeps spare craftsman ratchets on hand though, possibly cheaper?). But people who buy snap-on files, putty scrapers, breaker bars, shop stools, etc kinda crack me up. I mean people can do whatever they want with their money but I've never seen a solid hand tool break without heinous abuse. Can't see a snap-on/park hammer or bottle opener doing its job any better than a Kobalt/HDX one, for example.
  • 2 0
 You're spot on mate.
  • 3 0
 there certainly are cheaper tools out there. but as a tradesman ive learned the value of owning good tools when you have to use them everyday. park tools are the benchmark of cycling specific tools. certainly worth the investment if you do a lot of your own work on your bikes
  • 1 0
 You should check out Campy tools. Not sure if they offer MTB specific stuff (probably not) but these are hands down the nicest tools I've ever seen.
  • 3 0
 Most of those tools you can buy far cheaper in the same quality. I do have a fair amount of parktools but i bought an advanced mechanics tool kit from bike tools and the gear in thst has lasted 3 years so far with nothing broken. Having worked self employed in construction for years then mechanics i have way too many tools. Thousands of pounds worth in snap on and blue point. Your buying into a franchise there and when something breaks your dealer takes care of it. Expensive quality tools with great service. I do think this park kit is poor value for money. More cost spent on the design of the nice box. Park = good tools but thats not to say this is worth the money.
  • 12 6
 No way those tools cost $689!
  • 4 11
flag themountain (Mar 25, 2014 at 21:22) (Below Threshold)
 Yes way...and they are worth every penny!
  • 4 6
 maybe "park" branded ones. but that kit minus the case could be put together for under $200 easy.
  • 1 0
 you're right parks ak-38 advanced mechanic set offers pretty much the same tools as this and a few this set doesnt like a chain cleaner for $292
  • 5 1
 It's funny; the whining trolls at the top of this thread are usually the first ones to turn up at your garage door asking to borrow your bike tools...
  • 5 1
 The problem is the kit obly has about 4 or 5 worth while hand tools everything else is easily bought elsewhere for less money and equal od better quality
  • 5 1
 Good little low end beginners tool kit i suppose. The price is extortionate though. It makes me wonder... is this merely an accessory for the rich?
  • 2 0
 Pedro's tools are all good quality. As far as tool go in genetal.park.is medium quality. I would never use.any.of tjere shit.thats multi use. Have uou seen there junk screw drivets?. Ill by park if its the.only option. I have a few of thier tools. But for quality pedros and lezene both make better tools.
  • 1 0
 You said it. Park is not the "end all be all" of bicycle tools. Better than Sunlite or something.
  • 3 1
 Realistically this tool kit would cost you a lot more if you were to purchase the same tools individually. And you get a nice protective case to carry them in too. So really I'd say it's worth the price and if your a person like me you wouldn't mind dropping a few hundred on a tool kit that will last. Bottom line is that this is Quality..
  • 3 0
 bought a kit that has everything on chainreactioncycles, for about 70 euros. Has 9/10 tools which this one has for a very smaller price and it's much smaller
  • 2 0
 quite a few obvious tools missing there and at that price i would buy summat else,add the special tools to good quality steel and you get a set far cheaper with the tools you need.
  • 4 0
 700 USD for some common tools ????

The most expensive part seems to be the case.
  • 3 1
 Those hex wrenches aren't worth the plastic they are held together with no way would I pay 700 bucks for a cheap ass measuring tape and crappy hex wrenches at least they give ya lube to lube you up after they bend you over
  • 2 0
 Funny that you say that it does come with lube lol
  • 1 0
 found the sixty five piece kit for $600, and you can get a 35 for $280. also you could say way pay for the park tool name and get something for tenth of the price. love my park tools but rather keep cash in my wallet for parts
  • 2 0
 I can see 19 tools that could be ditched from that kit. What makes a park tool crescent wrench any better than a harbour freight wrench. Plus the price is ridiculous. Ill use park for specialty tools and that's it.
  • 1 0
 This seems like a great kit for a team mechanic on the go. As a home mechanic however I'd rather build my own toolkit with the tools I prefer to use. It's not about saving money as I like high quality tools and my toolbox is a mix of Park Tool, Pastorino and Facom tools but more about customization. Selecting your tools one at a time and building your dream toolkit is a joy on its own. Btw I love how they included Park Tool's beer botle opener in the kit. It's the best botle opener I've ever owned!
  • 1 0
 I'll stick with the tools I got... But if PARK actually wants to do something constructive with their time.... Bring back the Park ts3 and ts2 truing stands and ditch their sub standard ts2.2 that doesn't even compare to the Good tools they used to make. just my opinion.......
  • 2 0
 For $700 you could get a pretty sizable Craftsman tool kit PLUS a ball bearing rolling chest for it and still have money leftover to buy any bike specific tools. Other than that seems like a great deal...
  • 1 0
 700$ !! this is expensive! Who wants to buy this? If you are like me you already have half of those tools and you invest a few bucks each time you realise you need another tool. Also I dont really like this kind of compartimented tool box.
  • 1 0
 for 700 there better be a scale and stand involved. ridiculous to pay that much for a tape measure, utility knife and lube. I know tool cost money... (10 year pro mechanic) but this is too much for what you get. used to get twice as much for less years ago. what a shame... at least the actual tools will last!
  • 6 3
 Tools are cool. Have collected most of these over the years, but a kit like this would be a sweet addition.
  • 3 3
 Overpriced, like everything from park tool. Way to rape and pillage the impressionable young riders, who want to do bike repairs. Forget about it... go get the tools individually, and without the brand name.. you will save money! Makes me angry, simple tools costing an exorbitant amount of money!!!
  • 3 0
 Right on! a basic tool, with a blue plastic cover that adds 200% to the price tag, erm, no thankyou Park. the box looks like it should have a mobile esspresso maker in it!
  • 3 0
 I just buy tools as I need them and eventually you will have all the tools you need.
  • 1 1
 Here's the bottom line. I'm not saying you have to buy this set, and as many posters have said it is missing some important tools for major repair, but if you are choking looking at a $700 outlay for nice tools, you are not serious about wrenching on your bike. You can easily save that amount with even simple repairs and tune ups over the course of a couple of season's and the tools last a lifetime.
  • 2 0
 I might get down voted for this but this is the attitude that turns me off of some mountain bikers. Saying someone is not serious about wrenching if they don't pay $700 for overpriced tools is elitist and not needed. This kit is nice but not nice enough to justify the price tag. The community seems to think anything that touches their bike must be the most expensive tool money can buy. I know dirt bikers that fix their kits with harbor freight adjustable wrenches and zip ties and no one thinks twice about it or bothers them. I wish more of that mentality existed around here
  • 1 0
 Except for the chain whip, cassette and bb tools, crank puller.... I don't see a whole lot in that kit that couldn't be got at canadian tire for a hundred bucks on a good flyer week
  • 3 0
 So, with a little math, and all parts being equal, that's about a $20 bottle opener.
  • 3 0
 I think they're over priced, the adjustable spanner is £25-35, for that you could buy a quality Bahco one and have 2 pints
  • 2 0
 At least it has the bottle opener...seriously though, it's one hell of a bottle opener and definitely the most used tool in my house.
  • 4 3
 A good DH tune up costs what? $100-200?

Sure, up front it's a lot but it seems like it will pay for itself in savings after a while.
  • 3 3
 What, 200 bucks!? where at and what are they doing for the "tune up"


This kit is over priced and is packed with useless tools.
  • 2 1
 No tools are useless. If you think there are any useless tools in this kit, you don't know how to use them.
  • 2 1
 Do you even hyperbole?

Cheap ass tape measure a friggen box cutter and a bottle opener. The scew drivers park tools make are garbage.


Sorry but you kind of asked for this one Smile






You're a useless tool.
  • 2 0
 I use those tools every day at work and they are not bad at all. I also use the bottle opener at home and it's great.
  • 5 2
 seems like a lot of that money goes towards the case :/
  • 13 11
 seems like a lot tools to carry on each ride but i guess if you are buying those new sram brakes you'll probably need it ....
  • 7 1
 good one...
  • 3 0
 a torque wrench would be sick
  • 2 0
 You can also buy the case without the tools. That's what I did and built my own toolbox to suit my needs.
  • 4 1
 I can most of those tools from Harbor Freight for 1/3 the price
  • 2 2
 I bought a 10 pack of allen wrences there for 7 bucks. Thats 3 sided park tool is 20 bucks and is lless usefull then a standard wrench. The 2 sides your not using impeade the rotation,
  • 2 2
 Youre comparing Park tool to harbor freight??
  • 2 1
 Yeah, considering most of the tools in the kit can be found at harbor freight with warranty and lower cost.
  • 2 0
 I have few park tool they work great, but i Doubt i need more than 5 of them.
  • 2 1
 "higher total THAN its $689 USD asking price"

And always wanted to get a park tools kit. Sooo expensive, but so worth it if you have the coin they will last forever.
  • 2 0
 You need to re-think your priorities when your tool kit is more expensive than your bike...
  • 1 0
 Those 3 way allen keys are junk. I used mine and broke the plastic from twisting. I still use an old all metal one thats older then me
  • 3 0
 Thats a lovely hammer in that tool kit
  • 2 0
 I would never buy this kit. As a street and BMX rider, all my bikes must always be in sufficient disrepair.
  • 3 1
 But are these tools enduro enough?
  • 1 0
 This is the point that everyone has missed. Great question.
  • 1 0
 Chainreaction.....for a100 0r less euro you can pretty much get all the tools you need....in black or in blue.
  • 3 2
 You could put together this same kit for ~100 bucks if you did it yourself. That must be one expensive case.
  • 1 0
 soo no UNIOR FTW yet? FIRST! Big Grin i have used unior sice forever and all tools are still like new...
  • 1 0
 For me it wouldn't be worth buying this since I have more than half the tools already
  • 2 0
 do they have to cost that much??!!
  • 1 0
 All I know is. The Park tool knife made in China is an utter peice of crap.
  • 1 0
 There is only about 4 things in there you wouldnt have in a normal tool box.
  • 1 0
 I put in a backpack and go in the mountains, if anything breaks I do not need to worry, Big Grin Big Grin other then break my body Smile
  • 2 2
 Hmm, buy tools to fix my bike.... or buy a new part I just broke?! Decisions, decisions.
  • 2 1
 You have my curiosity... add a torque wrench and you have my attention.
  • 1 0
 The best tool box ever_____0^0_____
  • 1 1
 $700 and most people dont know a shit how to use most of the tools, by the way nice briftcase
  • 1 0
 For that price, I want a torque wrench in that kit.
  • 1 0
 No Spork or Rotor Tuning tool? WTF?!
  • 1 0
 the case is probably 1/2 the price of the kit...
  • 3 2
 beans....
  • 3 2
 rad?
  • 9 1
 lukewarm
  • 3 2
 nooice
  • 4 3
 kowabunga
  • 1 0
 chilly
  • 1 1
 PARK ROCK! PARK ROCK! PARK ROCK!
  • 1 0
 $$$$ well spent IMO
  • 1 2
 i want one Razz
  • 1 0
 www.bitul.pl
  • 1 2
 I neeed one
  • 1 2
 LOUD NOISES!!!!!
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.033322
Mobile Version of Website