Kali Unveils New Lightweight Invader Full Face Trail Helmet

Jan 15, 2020 at 8:49
by Kali Protectives  
Kali is proud to announce the release of the all-new Invader. An ultra light fully ventilated full-face helmet designed as an all day in the saddle go up go down go anywhere trail helmet.

Press Release: Kali

Kali is proud to announce the release of the all-new Invader. An ultralight, fully ventilated full-face helmet designed as an all-day in the saddle, go up, go down, go anywhere trail helmet.

The Invader is built with Kali Protectives high standard for safety and reliability utilizing our LDL, Low Density Layer, technology which offers impact protection against rotational AND linear forces by crushing, shearing and rotating during certain types of impacts.

The Invader is ready for aggressive descending with a unibody chinbar which passes the motorcycle chinbar test. It has massive vents to help you stay cool while climbing, and a magnetic Fidlock buckle to make taking it off a breeze. Of course, the pads are antibacterial and the visor is adjustable, plus we added an integrated accessory mounting system for your camera or light.

If you are the type of rider who chooses tougher lines, attacks the rock gardens or is looking for some added protection for your long days shredding trail, but you don’t want to spend your time fooling around with a detachable chinbar or overheating in a full-face DH helmet, then the Kali Invader has landed and it’s designed specifically for you and your adventures. Don’t forget that as with all Kali helmets, the Invader comes with a lifetime crash replacement policy. You crash it, we replace it.

The Invader is available immediately online at kaliprotectives.com and through Kali’s global network of retail partners.

Weight 640 grams (size S)
Price $225 USD

Kali Protectives Founder Brad Waldron rides the all new Kali Invader on his home trails.



180 Comments

  • 90 20
 I wear my full face Bell Super DH trail riding. I see more people using full face for trail riding. Saved my jaw and cheekbones. Glad its becoming more main stream. Some people look at me like a Joey but I can laugh when they knock their teeth out! Multiple times I have been ridiculed because of elbow pads only to watch poor suckers lacerate their arms. Gear is cool. In motorcycling gear is cool, in mtn biking its still nerdy.
  • 46 0
 But what about all the dudes I see on crotch rockets wearing Nikes and basketball shorts?
  • 20 2
 depends on what you're riding... sometimes 90-95% of the ride is just climbs or mellow singletracks, where a full face helmet or pads would be totally useless and would just make the ride less enjoyable
  • 38 1
 @slumgullion: That's just natural selection at work...
  • 98 0
 I wear mine to bed. You can never be too careful.
  • 16 3
 @f00bar: You can enable a dentist to buy a new Yeti with an OTB on a very mellow trail. Look at Fridays Fails.
  • 9 0
 @slumgullion: squids are gonna do what squids do. Can’t fix stupid.
  • 34 0
 @slumgullion: I'll one up you, I saw someone on a crotch rocket in Colorado Springs wearing basketball shorts with a handgun in the waist belt without any holster.
  • 21 0
 @dthomp325: As someone who lived in COS for 12 years, this story checks out.
  • 20 2
 @dthomp325: CO seems like Oregon, in that it has a weird mix of really liberal cats and some super scary hillbillies.... LOL. Wink
  • 2 7
flag f00bar (Jan 15, 2020 at 10:57) (Below Threshold)
 @endlessblockades: The probability is close to zero and I'm willing to take the "risk" (the is none, really). Friday Fails happen on jump lines and gnarlier trails.
  • 12 0
 Kelly McGarry once said elbow pads are for the smart ones and the pussies. He's neither one.
  • 4 0
 @dthomp325: That is so Colorado Springs (I would know - I grew up there).
  • 19 0
 I started MTBs when the hairnet or hockey helmets were the only options. I've seen the evolution through cooler w/lycra, soft shell, hard shell, full face, Mips, etc. The quality of the safety gear is what really opens up MTBs to a larger market - it gives you the sense of security to go faster or harder than your skills allow.

In the 80s I helped put on a large, regional race. We had some bad crashes, but the only fatality was a rider on his way to a spaghetti dinner falling in the gravel parking lot and hitting his head on a rock. I don't care if it's level, uphill, or downhill, always wear your helmet. Without a brain you're just a jellyfish with a spine.
  • 1 0
 @skycripp: that’s just CO in general
  • 2 0
 @slumgullion: Nikes now? Back in my day they wore Adidas. Not all, just the straight line heroes.
  • 4 0
 Bones heal, but teeth don't grow out again. I like my Bell 2r but it's due for replacement because of age. Nice to see that list of brand options has grown considerably since last purchase.
  • 27 5
 It’s like this... there are no medals for picking the right amount of protection. You can ride road bike in motorcycle armor or ride Whistler for a week with no knee guards and in pisspot - nobody really cares. Only people who want credit for whatever the hell they chose to wear. You better put your head in the right place before you put a helmet on it. If you crash often, then you fail to understand what you are doing. Sadly many people on Friday fails videos are geared up and have no bloody idea what they are dealing with, quite a few obviously not eating crap this way for the first time. Quite a few folks in Bell Super helmets with back packs...
  • 17 1
 @f00bar: How is 90%+ of your riding climbs? Do you shuttle down, then climb back up? Haha, I got nuthin...
  • 20 1
 @chyu: That's a young man's attitude, now that I'm older (40+) it just takes so long to heal. I wear knee and elbow pads on every ride (G-Form) and they have saved me from tons of scrapes and breaks over the years. Lets say you don't want to look dorky, and not wear pads, now you go down and have some scrapes and road rash and maybe a decent cut, not problem. lets say it get infected a little, still no biggie, my hang nails get infected all the time, harden up. Lets say you get tetanus, because you haven't had a shot in over ten years. I mean who keeps track of that? You know what the death rate is for Tetanus? 40%. that's right, two out of five people with tetanus are going to die...... I'll wear the pads. Funerals are expensive and shitty.
  • 12 8
 @brownstone:, you want to avoid injury, give speech on protection and wear G-Forms... Dude! I mean - DUDE!!!
  • 2 1
 @WAKIdesigns:
If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough!! Or wear a super 3r..
  • 12 0
 @brownstone:
Almost lost a leg to infection, that shit is no joke.
  • 8 0
 @WAKIdesigns: For me trail riding, I like them, DH I go all out with a full kit, but for trails, even easy trails I always have the g-forms on, something is better than nothing.
  • 5 3
 @brownstone: this is a good example of differences in priorities... I love my knees. Hence the thiniest knee protector I would ever take for a XC ride is Poc Air. Which is made of 3DO and like at least twice as thick than G-form which is nothing more but abrasion protection that won’t take any blunt force.
  • 4 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I'll have to give those Poc Air's a try. I'm always trying to balance the protection/comfort out for myself.
  • 2 2
 @brownstone: I can’t fully recommend them. TLD Raids though... will surely buy another pair but in Western Sweden it’s never too hot.
  • 2 2
 @Monsterman156 cool that you laugh at people that get their teeth knocked out...
  • 9 1
 @WAKIdesigns: "Quite a few folks in Bell Super helmets with back packs..."

Hey now...what'd I ever do to you?
  • 2 1
 @DJammer: easy, you climb 1 hour only to enjoy the last 6 minutes of riding downhill
  • 4 0
 @iammarkstewart: Well, in my ride club there are at least 5 or 6 Bell SuperR helmets and we all ride with some kind of back pack
  • 4 0
 @pakleni: Yeah, so do I...I was asking Waki why he was taking potshots at me. And us.
  • 6 0
 @WAKIdesigns:

yeah it's pretty shocking to see "Joeys" all geared up and even on a proper bike (sometimes) and then just sit there and ride off a drop without the faintest idea of what's about to happen.

let's responsibly help our friends progress and not throw them on a dh bike and take them to the park. F*ck - just bc Brandon and Fabio make it look effortless doesn't mean you can hop on a bike and hit the park. Just like how i'm not going to free solo a desert tower just because Honnold can climb a wall in yosemite.
  • 3 0
 @brownstone: totally what you said there sir! (I'm 51 years young and been riding 30 of them!)
  • 4 0
 I never make from of anyone for wearing protective gear. I get scoffed at for wearing a pressure suit at the bike park. But laughing at someone after they knocked their teeth out? Man that's harsh.
  • 2 0
 @dthomp325: how about in Arizona where people ride Harley’s in shorts and flip flops on the freeway with no helmet.
  • 1 0
 @mybaben: I thought you were gonna say really liberal cats and regular people
  • 1 0
 @jefflong: LOL! Sorry mate, I'm a city boy. Wink
  • 1 0
 @dthomp325: totally agree with all you guys some ppl here are wierd and crazy some mellow. I was born here and have here 30 years take the good with the bad. Because the biking in town is killer if anybody local wants to ride message me. Always looking for some riding buddies.
  • 3 0
 @brownstone: 100% agreed. On a very hot day I chose not to wear elbow pads and went down. Decent cut on my elbow but no real biggie just a few stitches...fast forward to a day later when I did in fact have necrotizing fasciitis ( flesh eating bacteria) and I found myself in surgery and ICU step-down for a week.
  • 6 0
 @WAKIdesigns: G-Forms work surprisingly well. Especially as elbow pads. I find that the slip the least compared to other offerings and you don't get arm pump. I've crash tested the shit out of them.
  • 1 1
 @WasatchEnduro: waki himself is an average level rider with a superiority complex.
  • 2 4
 @WasatchEnduro: huh? Maybe There would be less injuries and less bad cred for MtB as a sport for idiots who try to Kill themselves... if some people first rode “safer” trails with less protection crashed a bit there, instead of going to a bike park and think: hey I’ll put all that body armor on me and it will be fine.

Pinkbike father figures moralizing on using fullface helmets and elbow guards for trail riding. There are profound consequences to your mental game if you think like thatZ If you are that scared you are doing it wrong. There are tools to learn skills and gain more confidence.
  • 1 0
 @dthomp325 @slumgullion Also, the guys barefoot or wearing flip flops and shorts doing tricks on scooters. Youtube videos.
  • 6 8
 @WasatchEnduro: and since you really stepped on my toe now: back in 2003-2008, when freeride was at its peak, we used to pad up completely for everything even remotely reminding of stuff we used to see in Cranked and NWD. The division between daredevils hucking stuff or “riding DH” and fireroad warriors was clear. “We” laughed at lycra, they laughed at us saying sending stupid mounds of dirt and ladder drops is not MTB. Then around 2011 when Enduro and trail bikes evolved, when it was suddenly cool to ride bike parks on trail bikes, we found ourselves using knee guards and half shells on stuff we would normally wear full body armor to. Now since then, bikes got much better and fireroad warriors (or at least people with their general lack of confidence and drive to ride risky stuff) , they jumped on big bikes and decided “gnar is cool”. The problem is, their skills and motivation to stick their head out and learn to jump didn’t change. These days bike parks are full of people who are still completely unwilling to spend time doing homework, hit drops and jumps for fun and practice, they come to A-line and send it on their face all day long. And replacing skill with ton of protection is to blame as well, nobody will tell me that riding in base kit at the beginning of your career does not muster respect to certain terrain features. That also involves the bikes off course. A 2008 160 bike was way more wobbly and twitchy than a 2018 one. Now many local trails around the world got spiced up since sport evolves. And people crash there too.

How often do you see articles on riding technique? That Gives fantastic room for shitty coaches to do shitty work and a particular person will come and aay: I can go to Whistler, I did skills clinics. Do you know how many times I hear Joeys who I know to be Joeys for years say year after year: oh I need to get better at jumping?

So to answer your first paragraph: these people coming to a bike park with empty bag of skills, that is their first mistake. We all did it. But some of us were doing at least basic homework.

If you are a 40+yr old with more responsibilites than Actual risk of injury then please realize That if you don’t learn to ride and manage risk, manage fear, then MTB is too dangerous for you. Armor is not a safety to buy. It doesn’t make you much more confident, the very fact of wearing armor to a fricking trail ride is a sign of lack of confidence. This is a dangerous mind set. There are many online sources of information how to practice. Many people here should go practice instead of teaching people In half lids how to behave responsibly. Guess what maybe the “extreme sports” aura is a bit too much for you to risk and you should stick to fireroads? Either this or get your ass to Deliberate practice. It’s a very rewarding practice. Treat it like vertS on Strava
  • 14 0
 @WAKIdesigns: pick how much/little armour you will wear and be a dick about it?
  • 2 0
 This 100%. Whenever I've wrecked my shin, my first response is, "why wasn't I wearing shin pads!? stupid". Why look back in regret?
  • 5 9
flag WAKIdesigns (Jan 16, 2020 at 2:37) (Below Threshold)
 @koldunuk: who was dick about wearing armor in the first place? The father figures on this site are taking over, just because they cannot manage their fear when they better should. You know what many good riders say: I am scared to be scared. You know what average Joe says? Being careful means I am caring about my family and coworkers. Except being careful means you are greatly increaseing your likelyhood to crash. Mountain BIking is dangerous to the point where you can have a life changing injury despite wearing all protection available. Bike Parks are not honest about it. Somebody has to. Get your head straight. If you are going to a bikepark and can't leave the thoughts of your family and work at home? - Don't go. If trail ridign stresses you to the point you think you are highly likely to hit your face? Don't go. Your head is filled with safety software interfering with your motorics and you are more likely to fall, and you are not fullfulling the potentional of fun to be had either.

I just observed a bunch of folks telling a person who practices jumping, tell her to pad up. She was fighting for gaining skill and confidence, and they all just virtually told her she is reckless and better be more careful. It's such a hard process to get someone to understand that anything is achievable when trained an practiced methodically in safe environment and they virtually just told her she is not in safe environment. f*ck yes, Congratulations. I just wonder... how much of it is being bitter that some people are not as scared as you? Care? Really? you can dress up any complex with "care". Oh I shouted at you to not hang out with this dude, grounded you, because I care about you Billy! Oh Honey... you are going skiing, please be careful, please remmber that you are a father of the family. I just care about you. - No you are caring about your god daamn self.
  • 1 0
 @slumgullion: you mean temporary citizens?
  • 3 0
 @WAKIdesigns: knee pads work differently for different body types (I'm a bodybuilder). If you ask me TLD knee pads suck, they shifted and basically end up with no protection. On other hand G-Form has a thicker version padding which I have crashed with it (2x times), without a problem.
As far as learning the correct technique, I agree. However, 1 of these 2 crashes mentioned happened when my front tire got slashed and came out of the rim, so technique was not the issue.
  • 5 2
 @WAKIdesigns:

holy sh*t, TLBig Grin R

where the hell is @WAKIresigns

also, i'll pay you to put your thoughts on a blog, youtube channel, insta, literally anywhere other than here so that every comment section doesn't clog up like my arteries after too many double cheeseburgers.

I'll start the GoFundMe and throw in the first Hamilton ($10).
  • 3 0
 @mybaben: As a CO -> OR transplant, can confirm.
  • 1 0
 @slumgullion: lol, ever been to Jamaica? Add moms holding babies and her man to that.
  • 26 3
 If POC or Troy Lee made this it would cost 400$.
Thanks Kali for keeping it real.
  • 9 4
 And not using mips bs.
  • 2 1
 I think the TL Stage is the closest comparison to this (ventilation, weight, fixed chin bar) and is $295. Super Air R is $275. But the Super 3R is on sale for $160 at several places right now and I really like that helmet. Anyway it is nice to see an option priced closer to $200. Looks great!
  • 8 11
 @Sshredder Our Stage, full face trail helmet, is 690 grams for the medium, Mips, fidlock, and the only bike helmet to combine EPP and EPS (Low speed and high speed energy management) in the impact foam. Xstatic liner as well, so some significant differences and only $70 difference from this lid, and $105 off of your $400 comment. But thanks for playing! Wink
  • 5 1
 @Archimonde: Source on this BS?
  • 6 4
 @stikmanglaspell:
This helmet like other Kali helmets started the conversation on low-g linear and rotational impact.
The stage is a enduro race helmet. This is a trail helmet you can ride in all day.
.... cause teeth never go out of style.
  • 2 0
 @WasatchEnduro: add IXS Trigger FF to that list.
  • 25 2
 The Invader is actually $225 and the 640 grams is for the small size.
  • 1 0
 @artistformlyknowasdan: they are not testing full face bicycle helmets-yet.
  • 1 0
 @stikmanglaspell: hopefully soon!! would be awesome to see if lightweight makes a huge difference or not in protection
  • 16 0
 I learned my lesson on protective gear. Had a tiny OTB not going very fast but my front tire got caught in a rut with a rock in it and went flying. Wouldn't have been bad but my rib landed on a rock and gashed my arm pretty bad. Was wearing my full face Super 3R so could have been worse there. Now I might look crazy out on the trail with elbow and knee pads and full face but I don't care. Way cheaper than a trip to the ER. Also now wear a lightweight Leatt 3DF vest too to protect the ribs and back. I would rather look silly all day long than having to have surgery.
  • 11 0
 I completely detached the tip of my elbow on a rock after going OTB. Not surprisingly I started wearing elbow pads afterward. Hated them at first but now I'm used to them and it actually feels weird to ride without them. They go in my pack on the way up, and get put on for the ride down. Pretty sure they saved me once this year as well
  • 2 0
 Broke my elbow badly a couple of years ago. Elbow pads for sure. Full face for sure. Knee pads for sure.
  • 13 0
 Following a TBI, fractured orbital plate, sinus bone, and too many stitches to count in my face, I will never ride with a half lid again (if i get over the trauma and continue to ride). My point of impact was just above the outside edge of my eye where the Bell Super did not protect, a full face would have changed my life. I had a moderate disability in language, memory, and emotions. I still don't process emotions well, and have memory troubles. It happened 6/16/19. Wear a full face helmet!
  • 2 1
 Ouch! Do you think a full face helmet would have prevented your cognitive issues or mainly the structural ones?
  • 2 0
 @alexsin: It sounds like his face hit rock (causing lot of fractures), which would have been protected with a full face. Not saying that full face make you 100% safe from TBI, they certainly do not, but this situation would likely have been avoided if the direct rock to face impact was instead rock to helmet impact.

Get better soon!
  • 2 0
 @alexsin: Honestly, probably both. The Super DH I've gone out with a few times stays in place much better than a half lid. I forgot, I also de-gloved my chin, I could stick my tongue all the way under my chin, so they had to sew my chin back to my gums below my teeth. Ya can never be sure but I know the chin bar would have helped keep my face from being impacted significantly. The helmet had damage where the visor screws into it as well, so just above the point of impact on my face, so I'm not sure what took the brunt of it. But yes as Bill said below, there were rocks around where I was found face down un-responsive but what happened will never be known. It happened going around a high speed berm section and I remember about 50 feet before it and don't regain memory till getting back to the truck 15-20 minutes later. Luckily we were near our vehicles and I didn't have to get life flighted out. The facial surgeon I saw also said I was the 5th patient that year that he'd seen from MTB crashes so it's not just me who's getting their face smashed.
  • 4 0
 @HARv379: Dude, I hope you make as good a recovery as possible.
  • 1 0
 @robinfisk: Thank you
  • 14 1
 This helmet is exactly what I’m looking for, I don’t want to cook alive in my D3 and I really don’t want something without a chin bar
  • 15 0
 Fox Proframe, TLD Stage, MET Parachute, Endura MT500 all fit this category
  • 1 0
 @5afety3rd: I’ve tried the proframe, it didn’t fit very good. I’m looking at the stage, my D3 fits good so maybe it’ll fit the same and I haven’t tried the other two
  • 3 0
 Stage is an awesome helmet!
  • 1 1
 @BCtrailrider then get a Stage
  • 2 0
 @stikmanglaspell: I reckon I’ll have to give one a try this riding season
  • 2 1
 @BCtrailrider: dang im opposite, my proframe fits like a 2nd set of head hair while the stage fits like wet sock on a foot (not very comfortable)
  • 11 2
 Have been using the Bell Super 3R for the last year... have really liked the protection (it has saved my face from a couple scrapes including a full crash replacement). Don't like the looks so much... thinking of switching to the new Air or DH version. But, I'm also switching my set-up from using any kind of pack or hip bag to everything on my bike which leaves no-where for me to store a chin-bar (not a fan of tucking an end into my waist band).

Also... although taking the chinbar on-and-off is easy and quick, it's getting tiresome and I've even forgotten to do it a couple times. But the biggest eye-opener for me has been that once I put the bar on, the helmet is actually so well vented, that I typically just leave it on for the rest of the ride... this has me thinking that my next helmet should just be a nice lightweight highly vented full face for my normal aggressive rides and enduro races (have a full DH rated full face for park). I see more and more people rocking light full faces for everyday trail riding and hope it's a trend that sticks... makes a lot of sense really.

Not sure... thoughts?
  • 4 0
 I have a 3R but often can't be fussed with taking the chin bar on & off, so I sometimes leave it on for a whole ride. And it's not bad at all; it's pretty light, doesn't interfere with breathing or glasses/goggles, and is certainly better ventilated than my trusty A1 that has no chin bar.
  • 8 0
 I don't know- it's a line you have to draw for yourself. In my case there are a couple trails that I never thought of as being all that aggressive but they have an extended dh section and the conditions vary through the year. There's no big rocks but it's fast and usually pretty empty of people. But I had a fall, then I looked at my strava (i'm not a kom chaser- just tracking my mileage) and I realized just how fast you can get going and I bought a trail'ish full face helmet.

I probably look like an asshat with my helmet on, but it just seems so logical. There are some trails where it's too much, but when the snow clears I'll be wearing the FF more frequently - but I've got to be sure to be extra polite to the other trail use groups, I think they see the helmet and make assumptions.
  • 3 0
 I'm on a Super 3R as well, and generally like it a lot. I do leave the bar pretty often and the only pain in the ass, is using my water hose. Def not as nice as an open face for drinking. But I live with it bc it's so much safer!
  • 3 0
 @ICKYBOD: Who cares what we look like, safety is number 1. You never know what might happen anywhere on the trail. I was on a smooth, fast blue run when my front wheel went over the back of a berm. I face planted so fast i didn't even have time to say, "Shit!" I went out straight away and bought a full face! Wear it almost all the time.
  • 4 0
 I got a chance to try this helmet on as a prototype a month ago. It is very light and as you can see very well ventilated. I've been looking for a full face like the TLD Stages or Fox Proframe for more of my rides, including the pedaling ones since we pedal up to hustle down, until I saw this one coming out. Although it is more trail oriented than enduro it is the one for me.
  • 2 1
 @mybaben: care may be the wrong term- its more that when you come down off the fun stuff and bike through the 'lowlands' with the hikers and such- they can take a look at you being geared up and assume you're there to terrorize them. Can start off your trail interactions poorly even when you're being responsible.
  • 1 0
 Curious about people's thoughts on where they store chinbars during climbs?

Obviously can strap them to a backpack, but has anyone found a good solution when riding with a hip pack? I can wear the chinbar like a necklace, but then any crash, if my neck extends back at all, leaves a perfect lever to crank/crack my neck spine bones against the chinbar. Thanks for the advice, and pumped that more people (myself included) are seeking reasonable amounts of protection.
  • 1 0
 @Billjohn6: I have been riding a fox proframe for two years and I don’t think its an issue at all. They breathe so well you don’t even notice the chin bar. The rest of the helmet is only a little hotter than my POC Tectal.
  • 13 2
 Exactly what I’m looking for. Nice work Kali.
  • 6 0
 I'm glad to see all these lightweight full face helmets. I had a face plant and I'm sold on them now. Even when there aren't big stunts, trails are still fast enough with loose surfaces that a washout would not be a good end to a day.
  • 5 0
 I have been riding with my Fox Proframe primarily for the past 6 months, along with both knee and elbow pads. I don't feel like I have given anything up in comfort - though water bottle drinking is a bit more difficult. I have found that when I don't wear my pads, protection - that's when I get injured doing JRA. My friend had an incident when riding super mellow, wide double track where somehow, he hit the only rock protruding on this section with his chainring. All momentum changed to angular and his face took the brunt of the impact. Full face would have been helpful there.

When I was riding with my Bell Super 2R, 90% of the time, it was as a half shell. The Proframe doesn't give me that option.
  • 5 0
 You never know what might happen anywhere on the trail. I was on a smooth, fast blue run when my front wheel went over the back of a berm. I face planted so fast i didn't even have time to say, "Shit!" I went out straight away and bought a full face! Wear it almost all the time.
  • 5 0
 @mybaben: True! My only real injury this year came on almost the same scenario. Went hard into a berm that I had hit 20+ times that day, washed my front out, and landed hard on my "oops forgot the pads" elbow. Radial fracture put me out for 4+ weeks. Bought the full face after that and now wear my elbow pads almost all the time.
  • 5 1
 The biggest problem with all these new lightweight full face helmets is that it gives a person the confidence of a DH helmet when they are certainly not DH helmets. This goes for all manufactures of these new light helmets. I have seen so many people riding gnarly double black bike park trails in proframes and lets be honest you need a better helmet for that kind of riding but the chin bar makes people think it can handle like a true DH helmet. (I have seen to many proframes literally shatter) Carbon or fiberglass shell is what you need for TRUE DH.
  • 5 0
 While a proper DH helmet will be stronger these light weight full face helmets offer loads of protection. Main thing is they will be destroyed in big crash. Unless you only ride bike parks these new light weight ones make perfect sense, let you ride gnarly enduro trails without deciding if to put up with heat of full face on climb or lack of protection of half shell on the downhill. They are pretty much all DH certified.
  • 2 1
 @BenSandle: I don't think I would trust this on a gnarly enduro trail because- for all intents and purposes- they're just mini-downhill runs. I ride Keystone fairly frequently and the trails that would be considered "enduro style" would easily punch a hole through the side of this thing. I ride with a Giro Switchblade which is DH rated with and without the chinbar, but is also great for climbs since the chinbar is removable.
  • 4 0
 I crashed really hard once with a Proframe and it cracked the chinbar but it kept me alive and I don't have long-term issues. I'd trust a Proframe on pretty much anything. The impact was actually hard enough that I lost an hour or two (at least) of memory. Apparently I was still conscious and talking but I only remember bits and pieces of what happened before and after the crash. I also managed to lacerate my liver and a kidney somehow and spent the next week in the ER.
  • 4 0
 I don't see the reasoning behind full face helmets without dh certification. A proframe or stage are both so light, and so breathable yet they both have dh rated safety. Why buy this over an arguably safer, super light Enduro helmet?
  • 3 0
 Because it's not a DH helmet. It's a step up from trail helmet.
  • 2 0
 @alexsin: I get that, but why not just buy a Stage or similar? It's comfortable, lightweight, breathable. I don't see what this lid offers that the fullface enduro lids don't
  • 2 0
 The only reason these helmets don't pass DH certification is for penetration because they have too many vents. Their chinbars and impact protection pass. They specifically talk about this for the Super 3R and Kali themselves mention this in a below comment. The Stage and others don't have the same venting as this or some other full face non-DH certified helmets like the Super 3R. Climbing transitions between stages on long 4 to 5 hour enduro race days in 95 degree weather makes a helmet like this perfect. A few extra vents in the right spots makes all the difference.
  • 2 0
 My local trail is mostly rock, like kilometres of rock and roots. There’s no need for a DH helmet, but there are many ways to smash your face and pedalling is hard work. A helmet like this is perfect.
  • 4 0
 Lets hope they makes something to fit people who don't have infant head sizing. Seriously, idk why so many helmets top our at 60 cm but it makes it impossible to find a good helmet.
  • 6 0
 now my stanky breath won't get trapped in my helmet
  • 10 8
 Safety related rant: Frankly I'm tired of watching virtually 90+% of MTB reviewers, lifestyle athletes, factory pros, etc., etc., wearing NO eye protection, no gloves, no elbow pads, open face lid, and doing really advanced riding... I don't really care what you do personally, but you're contributing to the danger factor in our sport, because people want to "be cool like you". Frown
  • 5 3
 i admit i'm pretty perplexed at the number of EWS racers sporting bare arms. ludicrous speed on ludicrous terrain. roughAF? yes. dumbAF? yes.
  • 4 1
 that's their business, you choose the protection you wanna wear and why.
Pros shouldn't wear whatever if they don't want to just in case someone wants to look like them.

Pain's a good teacher; let people learn.
  • 2 1
 @ismasan: LOL. I guess the Darwin Awards are open to everyone. Wink
  • 3 0
 The lineup of bros in the Whistler clinic with hamburger elbows wearing nothing but shorts, singlet and knee pads to go with gloves and a $600 carbon TLD helmet is astounding.
  • 2 0
 It’s a dangerous sport. If you want something safer maybe try bowling? Or maybe road riding. Descend mountain pass on tarmac at 50mph on a 1” tight wearing nothing but spandex and barely a helmet. Oh and cars. What color is your safety sash?
  • 2 0
 @5afety3rd: my safety sash is 1300 lumens baby!
  • 1 0
 @flyguyty: hahahaha
  • 2 0
 I'm perplexed by this thread littered with anti-protection people trying to find deeper meaning in wearing gear about skill level etc... or it looks nerdy. I thought we were past all of this in the mtb community.

It is quite literally the norm to see arm/knee pads in BC. More full faces each year, and even the odd chest protector. Seeing someone without gear is abnormal. Crazy how this differs based on location. I'm sure trail difficulty has something to do with it.
  • 6 2
 Is it certified as a full on full face? EG is it race-legal or is it just a trail helmet?
  • 16 0
 It is not a DH helmet. Too many vents to pass testing. It is indeed intended to be used as a trail helmet.
  • 8 9
 @KaliProtectives: well that sucks, can't use it for Enduro racing then. Guess I'll keep my proframe.
  • 30 16
 @jason114: Sorry this won't work for your needs, but there is no need to use that kind of language.
  • 1 3
 Like the integrated chinbar - but not sure why that would necessitate 2X the weight of my TLD A2, also a trail helmet (M/L)?
  • 2 1
 @KaliProtectives: C'mon - he's Canadian and at least he didn't go full Jay da Wizard.
  • 7 2
 @brentkratz: You're comparing apples to oranges. Would be a better comparison to check it against other full-face trail helmets.
  • 13 1
 The DH certification standard significantly limits how much ventilation you can incorporate into the design. Most riders would not want a DH-certified helmet for everyday trail riding for that reason. Helmets like this one are for someone looking for a modern trail helmet with a chinbar without adding too much weight or giving up too much venting.
  • 6 1
 @KaliProtectives: not really, my met parachute is dh certed so can be used in enduro races..
  • 4 0
 @bat-fastard: Sure. But substantially less vented. (And also exactly zero features designed to reduce concussion risk, which in 2020 is *bananas*.)
  • 17 0
 @bat-fastard: The Met Parachute is indeed DH certified, but it is no-where near as well ventilated as the Invader. This helmet was never intended as a DH helmet, it was concieved and designed as a lightweight trail helmet, packed with protective technology. If you're riding all day and looking for a little more piece of mind then the Invader just might be what you're looking for.
  • 4 2
 @KaliProtectives: language? I'm patiently waiting for you to release an Enduro full face so I can sell my proframe.
  • 25 0
 @jason114: I was totally kidding. And we know exaclty what you want. And we want to get it to you. We have made the mistake in the past of announcing things before they are ready, so currently we are on the hush-hush. But we have heard you and want to make you happy. #workingonit
  • 3 1
 @KaliProtectives: awesome!!!! Available before may 9? First Enduro race of the season.
  • 7 4
 @bat-fastard: Your MET Parachute also looks like it was designed by a blind seven year old with no concept for aesthetics or style who also used his non-dominant hand to design it.
  • 3 0
 @skycripp: don’t hold back! Tell us what you really think!
  • 1 0
 @Phillyenduro: theres a new model out now but mines good enough. I bring out the D3 carbon for proper days out..
  • 2 0
 @KaliProtectives : before April 1? Smile
  • 2 0
 @skycripp: @KaliProtectives says "phrasing".
  • 1 0
 @jason114: what organizing body do you race with? Is requiring ASTM F1952 a thing now? I thought the EWS regs just required "full face"?
  • 1 0
 @KennyWatson: Canadian Enduro series, just went back through the rules and they only mention it must be a full face, Guess I got it wrong. Although I wouldn't want to race without a DH certed helmet anyway.
  • 5 0
 @KaliProtectives: How do you pass the motorcycle chinbar test but it’s not DH certified?…
  • 2 0
 @KaliProtectives: Yep fair point - extra protection must come at some weight cost. Damn unicorns!
  • 1 0
 @Vandermouten: dh certification is size of openings. Like it literally limits how big the vents can be.
  • 5 0
 Lifetime crash replacement? Add to cart, checkout, pay now, done.
  • 1 0
 I definitely want to look at this as my next trail helmet. I was a little more excited before I looked at the sizes. XS-M and L-XXL. I sit right in the middle of that. When I fall in the middle of sizes on helmets I usually can't find one that fits right. How adjustable is this? Does it come with different pads to adjust fit?
  • 8 0
 It comes with a gob of pads to help you dial in your fit.
  • 1 0
 @KaliProtectives: Thats good to hear!! Your helmets have a better fit than any others i have tried.
  • 2 0
 @KaliProtectives: Very good to hear. So does someone with a head measuing 58.5 cm go for the XS-M or the L-XXL? Probably hard to say I'm sure. I tend to fit best into most other brands M helmet the majority of the time.
  • 1 0
 @rkillianjr46: This is my problem too. I'm a 59cm and the medium Kali Maya 2.0 fits perfectly. I would have no idea what to order if I got this helmet.
  • 1 0
 In anything remotely gnarly I like to wear some sort of full face. At the moment it's the Giro Switchblade outside of shuttles and the bike park. I looked at the Fox Program but just can't get my head around climbing etc with a chin bar. You just look like such a tool. Sorry.
  • 1 0
 Sweet helmet, but it needs some sweet graphics. Plain black is too blah, and the colored variations are equally blah. I'll be interested when it's available with a compelling graphics scheme.
  • 3 0
 Looks ace. You can't put a cost on your noggin
  • 3 0
 Darth Vader would be proud of this....be ace if they'd called it the Vader
  • 5 0
 They did. (in)Vader.
  • 2 0
 Hey @KaliProtectives, have you guys commented on the Virginia Tech tests? (Or care to here?)
  • 1 0
 There are obvious questions about their test methodology. But it's still striking to see the Interceptor scoring below comparable designs like 6D's and Leatt's. And it's flat-out shocking to see it sitting right now between a $25 Schwinn and a $10 Bell.
  • 21 0
 Our resident helmet geek and boss, Brad Waldron, is on the road today or he would reply. This is what he said when the same question came up during our Pace helmet launch and I think he does a pretty good job of explaing where we stand here:

I'll take this discussion head on, We do a lot of testing, in-house and out. We strongly believe in our science and philosophies (test standards require our helmets to be too hard). We test at many labs all around the world, unfortunately we get very different results in each lab. Which one should I trust the most? the one that gives the best results?
If we had all the labs in the world test and list all helmets according to each labs results according to their rating of performance (based on that labs and lab engineers principles and methodologies), I doubt we would get two labs with the same listing of helmet performances.
Currently lab tests are subjective. One lab might pass a helmet another will not. Some labs test 8 helmets randomly (which is my favorite because you can’t design to specific points), other labs test 2 or 3 in exact same spots…. Which I feel is statistically weak.
Also if you test 10 different helmet brands the exact same spots (lets say 2 inches left of the crown) certain helmets will win out because of their shape design… where as if you take those exact same ten brand of helmets and pick another spot (lets say 2 inches above right brow) suddenly the performance list of the helmets is reversed.
To evaluate helmet performance I truly feel you need to evaluate much more than one lab… not to mention I believe all our testing is antiquated… these tests were all design back in the 70ties and does not to low G hits (below 70 G) into accounts. And the fact is almost 80% of impacts happen at low Gs… so when we design only for high G impacts, we increase concussion chances at 80 % of impacts.
However I will never criticize any lab trying to create empirical comparative data… I believe V tech as many other labs are trying to do an excellent consumer informative job. I wish many more labs would do this and between all the labs maybe truer picture of helmet performances would develop.
Meanwhile I stand by what KALI does. I have gotten different results from many different labs, and we will continue to push the latest technologies in the hopes of reducing rider’s chances of concussion… that is our ultimate mission. And not only ours. There are many other like minded brands (and their engineers) I’m honored of working along side with… and though our production methods and material choices differ, and hence test results may differ from lab to lab, I see us all pursuing the same over reaching goal of improving rider safety!
Meanwhile I do hope you will consider researching how labs test, why they get different results, and differnt brand core values – and above all keep riding!
  • 4 0
 I'd missed that, thanks for posting.
  • 2 0
 @KaliProtectives: That's an informative response. To me as a consumer, the simple fact that Kali is willing to discuss these issues is important. It reflect's Kali's longstanding commitment to advancing safety, not just making sales.

That said, I think that response leaves unanswered some valid questions about Kali's design concept.

Your main point is that testing is arbitrary because test-impact-location is arbitrary, and that seems indisputable. But that only spotlights what is, to me, the #1 concern with Kali's design, which is whether the LDL covers enough of the inside surface of the helmet to be confident that they'll function as intended in a crash. With 6D's ATB-1T, the entire inner surface of the helmet engages the ODS. Other techs like MIPS Spherical or Wavecel cover the great majority of the inner surface. Even the tech that's most similar to Kali's, Leatt's, appears to cover more of the inner surface. So, while test-impact location is arbitrary, the fact that the Interceptor is the advanced-design helmet that suffered most from that arbitrariness doesn't seem like a fluke.

The other question I still have is how in the heck the Interceptor is scoring worse than so many helmets with no safety tech, simple EPS shells. Even if the test impacts missed the LDL every time, I'd still expect the Interceptor to outperform any old-design helmet due to the dual-density EPS alone. But in VT's tests it scored behind the $50 LG Le Tour, the $23 Bell Adrenaline, the $40 Garneau Eagle, the $99 TLD A1, and the $25 Schwinn Excursion. That makes no sense at all to me. What gives?
  • 1 1
 I don't really get it I'm flying down the mountain 30mph..hit dirt..sorry it's only a trail helmet as opposed to what..oh I guess I should've been going that fast on my trail bike..
  • 1 0
 Will definitely be looking at this as my next helmet once my Bell Super DH is damaged.
  • 2 0
 Strong contender for my next helmet.
  • 1 0
 My Google-Fu is lacking. Anyone know of authorized/reputable dealers in Alberta/Calgary? I want to lay hands on this.
  • 1 0
 Finally a proper trail full face! Now let’s get to work on summer trail pants!
  • 4 4
 Ok, Kali Helmet is like a life time? You crash it you give me a new one is this what it ment right?
  • 31 0
 You crash it, we replace it. LCR- Lifetime Crash Replacement Policy.
  • 11 0
 @KaliProtectives: That is enough to make me try a Kali.
  • 16 0
 This is an important, underappreciated safety feature. Too many folks keep using crashed helmets because they can't bear to buy a new one.
  • 4 0
 @KaliProtectives: this is awesome! more companies need this!
  • 8 0
 @endlessblockades: there was a DownTime podcast awhile back with the Kali founder that was super informative. He seemed extremely spirited in the pursuit of better head protection and after listening to that their crash replacement policy is no surprise. My next helmet purchase is likely to be a Kali based largely on that discussion.
  • 5 0
 Can vouch for Kali standing behind the replacement as well after a crash I had. Keep up the good work guys.
  • 3 0
 @mtmc99: Cool - they based are in my neck of the woods too.
  • 5 1
 @endlessblockades: the Kali Maya 2.0 is sooooooooooooo comfortable it's like your head is being cuddled by a cuddle monster. Highly recommended lid.
  • 2 0
 @KaliProtectives: I don't get it, that means anyone who buys your helmet is pretty much entitled to 2 for 1 helmets. Kinda crazy, but makes me want one! Looks like a nice option too.
  • 3 0
 @KaliProtectives: How do you define “lifetime”?
  • 3 0
 @lewiscraik: We like to think people who ride Kali are smart, sexy and thoughtful individuals. So if they wear there helmet out and it is time for them to replace it, they buy themselves another amazing Kali lid. If you are unfortunate enough to crash your helmet during it's regular lifespan, we are happy for you to reach out to us and use our generous LCR, lifetime crash replacement. We, of course, prefer everyone to leave the testing of the helmets to us and never have to use this plan.
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