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LokiTheCat mikelevy's article
Jul 15, 2019 at 19:53
Jul 15, 2019
Bike Check: Felix Burke's BCBR-Winning Rocky Mountain Element
@clink83: He's riding a Fox 34SC, its main selling point is it is NOT an XC fork, it is a trail fork tuned for weight reduction at the expense of adjustability. Even if it were an XC or "Enduro" fork, air spring is air spring, and midstroke support drops off with dropping air pressure. Hate to say it, you're talking out your sphincter on all fronts. Resistance testing on MTB tires benchmarks the inherent rolling resistance of the *casing* and the outer tread surface. Anyone with a brain knows the dynamics will vary as soon as the full tread engages a loose substrate, but go try rolldown testing on hardpack, gravel, and asphalt, and you will notice a direct correlation between lab numbers and real world rolling resistance: a tire that tests at 20W in the lab will rolldown faster than one that tests at 25W in the lab. Lower pressures reduce tire deflection, but they *increase* inherent resistance of the tire system at all times that it is not absorbing impacts.
LokiTheCat mikelevy's article
Jul 15, 2019 at 0:40
Jul 15, 2019
Bike Check: Felix Burke's BCBR-Winning Rocky Mountain Element
@clink83: Also, no. Adding tokens makes the spring rate more progressive: this means that when you set up a fork for maximum plushness off the top, the softness continues well into the mid-stroke, unless additional measures are taken (e.g. increasing low-speed compression).
LokiTheCat mikelevy's article
Jul 15, 2019 at 0:35
Jul 15, 2019
Bike Check: Felix Burke's BCBR-Winning Rocky Mountain Element
@clink83: No, increasing pressure lowers rolling resistance. Consult the tables on this testing site: https://www.bicyclerollingresistance.com/mtb-reviews For a given surface, there is a tipping point at which increasing pressure results in enough loss in traction that it is no longer worth it, but there is a reason why road time trialists still run pressures over 110psi for nontechnical TTs.
LokiTheCat mikelevy's article
Jul 15, 2019 at 0:24
Jul 15, 2019
Bike Check: Felix Burke's BCBR-Winning Rocky Mountain Element
@thekaiser: German Bike Magazin has tested Dual EXO 2.3 version of Aggressor at 32W (Google it for a pretty solid archive of tire tests from last ~5yrs. German language skills help, but numbers speak for themselves). The Aggressor is actually not a top-tier trail tire if rolling resistance is the priority, I just named it because Burke is a Maxxis rider, and it is Maxxis best all-around trail tire w/ a hardpack-friendly round profile that also has enough bite in the moderate amounts of dust & loose rock you'll find on the D.ville course. I've had great luck with a Purgatory Grid (24.5w) up front, and a Nobby Nic Addix Snakeskin (20.4w) out back at Downieville. Not only are the wattage numbers of this pairing vastly superior, but the handling characteristics are far less schizo than a DHF w/ a near-tractionless Aspen out back. Having a semi-slick let go on you in the dust-on-crust of 3rd Divide at 30-40mph will put you on the ground so fast, it won't matter what you're running up front.
LokiTheCat mikelevy's article
Jul 14, 2019 at 0:25
Jul 14, 2019
Bike Check: Felix Burke's BCBR-Winning Rocky Mountain Element
For someone obsessed enough w/ rolling resistance to ride BC tech on Aspens, it's puzzling that he's willing to drag a DHF for an hour up the Trail of Tears at Downieville: it requires double the wattage (~40 vs ~20w). Neither the XC nor the DH day features terrain that is gnarly or loose enough to demand a DHF. An Aggressor would be plenty, and the rounder profile would actually grip better on the sunbaked hardpack that is now the entire Sierra Nevada below 7k.
LokiTheCat edspratt's article
May 16, 2019 at 21:05
May 16, 2019
Innsbruck Bans Downhill Bikes from Public Transport
@loopie: Bros don't let Bros go full apostrophes when they mean plural. Never go full apostrophes.
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