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Otso Cycles Introduces the Hoot Ti Trail Hardtail

Jun 10, 2024 at 14:15
by OtsoCycles  
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Press Release: Otso

Our new Hoot Ti is a premium titanium hardtail that was designed for bringing the fun to any line on the trail. The frame tubing is the 3Al/2.5V grade 9 titanium that has been an industry favorite for decades. This titanium tubing was selected because it is lightweight, lively, and emphasizes the playful Hoot Ti geometry. The bike features a custom Fox 36 Performance Elite Fork with 140mm of travel to optimize the Hoot Ti ride experience. 3D titanium printing in the rear UDH dropouts and chainstay yoke pair with short stays for a playful ride. However you choose to ride this titanium hardtail, it’s guaranteed to be a Hoot.

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First and foremost, the geometry of Hoot Ti is playful with one goal: fun. The 425mm chainstays are core to Hoot Ti because they add nimble, playful handling. The head tube angle, seat tube angle, and chainstay length are consistent across all sizes. The 65º head tube and 76º seat tube angles pair for a balanced riding position. A slack head tube angle, a long reach (482mm on the size large) and a low bottom bracket drop of 60mm allow for confident downhill riding on aggressive trails. The 76º seat tube angle positions the rider to conquer steep, technical climbs. A shorter standover and lower top tube allow for longer travel dropper posts and more creative, playful riding without the bike getting in the way. Every detail of Hoot Ti contributes to a bike that will bring the party to any trail ride.

Otso Hoot Ti

Otso Hoot Ti
*All geo numbers are based on a 140mm suspension fork at 20% sag

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The key to bringing Hoot Ti to life is 3D titanium printing. This is present in the rear dropouts and the chainstay yoke. Otso engineers leveraged this technology to give Hoot Ti short 425mm chainstays while maintaining the 29” x 2.6” tire clearance. This also presented the opportunity for unique dropper post routing port placement where the chainstay yoke meets the BB shell – compared to most bikes that have this port higher on the front of the seat tube. Two cable clamps for a shifter cable and brake routing are molded directly into the chainstay yoke with a clean, unobstructed look. The other area of the frame with 3D titanium printing is the rear UDH-compatible dropouts. This creates a clean, lightweight dropout with tidy integration of the post mount brake caliper inside the rear triangle, as well as UDH for compatibility with all drivetrains.

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Hoot Ti is built with a custom Fox 36 Performance Elite 140mm travel fork. While any 140mm fork will work with Hoot Ti, Otso engineers worked directly with Fox for this custom option. The Fox 34 has a stock 140mm travel, but Otso engineers wanted the sturdiness of the Fox 36, which does not have a 140mm option. The Hoot Ti is designed to be a playful bike and the 36mm stanchion is better suited for aggressive, chunky trail riding. Fox was able to develop a 36mm fork with a custom damper to bring the travel down to the 140mm requirement for Hoot Ti. It features the new Grip X Damper, a 44mm offset, bleeders on the fork lower, and black stanchions with black lowers for a stealth look. This is a MY25 fork that is not available off the shelf from Fox.

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Our bikes can be purchased as a frame only, frame and fork, or complete bike via the Otso Custom Bike Builder. This is where customers can use a full custom option to build a bike to their liking and riding style. Virtually every build spec has customizable options for size, component manufacturer, and/or color. Customers can choose everything from wheels, to drivetrain, to dropper post travel, to brakes, and more. One of the benefits of sharing a facility with Wolf Tooth is that headsets, seatpost clamps, chainrings, grips, dropper posts, pedals, and dropper levers are machined less than 50’ from where Otso bikes are assembled to order. This is how Otso is able to provide such extensive build spec options and anodized color accents with premium components.

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Though this is the first Otso mountain bike that is designed for trail riding, Otso engineers are no strangers to mountain bikes. The Otso Fenrir was first shared in 2021 as a bike that was created for bikepacking and can come to life as a drop bar mountain bike or a hardtail with a 120mm travel fork. All Otso bikes have suspension-corrected geometry that allows for installation of a suspension fork without drastically altering the geometry of the bike with a rigid fork, including Otso gravel and fat bikes. The Voytek 2 is a fat bike that rides 4” tires on the snow, then doubles as a 29er hardtail or rigid bike for spring, summer, and fall months when the snow melts and the trails turn to dirt. Otso engineers are also the same team that is behind all Wolf Tooth products, including dropper posts, pedals, chainrings, headsets, and more. The Hoot Ti hardtail is a natural evolution of the Otso lineup.

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The Hoot Ti is available in four sizes: S, M, L and XL. Only a small batch was made for this initial offering. The price for the frame only is $3,300 USD and the base build spec starts at $6,100 with options for upgrades. All Otso bikes are available for purchase on OtsoCycles.com and with any bike shop that stocks Otso.

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Author Info:
OtsoCycles avatar

Member since Aug 19, 2016
2 articles

71 Comments
  • 26 0
 If they do a press release for their second mountain bike called ' the blowfish' I'm quitting bikes and taking up croquet.
  • 16 0
 If the make an electric version it could be the HootiE
  • 49 29
 No steel or Ti hardtail should ever come without sliding dropouts.
  • 30 0
 To me that's not really a criteria and i actually prefer "Aggro"-HT's wich are ment for gears with vertical dropouts. I once had a HT with sliding dropouts (Last Fast Forward). It was a nice feature but it also adds complexity and weight and is more finnicky to align wheel and Rotor and so on. Sometimes it has to be readjustet. I changed CS length maybe once or twice but in the end i settled on one adjustment and did stay there. Never missed horizontal dropouts on my other HT's (OnOne 456, BC podsol).I need sliding dropouts only on my Dirtjumper.
  • 10 0
 how come? I get it for single speeds, but would you run this one as a ss?
  • 24 1
 I actively stayed away from adjustable dropouts when I was making my hardtail frame selection. To me, it’s a weak point that adds flex and play. That was my experience with the “sliding” adjustable dropouts such as the ones on a RSD I had.
  • 5 1
 @flipdascrip: I don't mean horizontal dropouts (e.g., dirt jumper), I mean sliding dropouts (e.g., Kona Honzo). These typically do not shift, maintain your desired CS length, and cannot misalign relative to the rotor.
  • 7 2
 @plyawn: I would run this single speed in a heartbeat. Every hardtail should have the option because with the right version of a sliding dropout it doesn't really take anything away, but does provide the choice.
  • 4 0
 @mtber111: That is good to know about the RSD version. I've owned several Konas with sliding drops and a Santa Cruz Chameleon with its adjustable version. With all three bikes I hit some decently sizable drops and jumps and never had an issue with them.
  • 2 0
 I don't entirely agree but it's also surprising to see given their gravel bikes were some of the first with flip chips at the rear axle which were brilliant at adjusting BB height with chainstay length. Adjustable dropouts are another failure point and add complexity to manufacturing. Also check the Esker release from today, all of their hardtails can have adjustable dropouts swapped in. Their other models pretty well benchmarked against this Otso and you won't go wrong with supporting either brand.
  • 13 19
flag justanotherusername (Jun 11, 2024 at 11:01) (Below Threshold)
 Nah, unnecessary pain in the arse unless you are weird enough to ride single speed, which the majority don’t as it’s a shite thing to do.
  • 5 0
 @dungeonbeast: I've owned the Middlechild and the RS-291 from RSD, neither of them have ever had an issue with the sliding dropouts. I'm going to go ahead and mark that persons issue down as, "user error", and that's astonishing as it's a dead simple system.
  • 8 0
 @justanotherusername: or maybe you have weak legs and lungs and like to spend extra money on fancy electronic shifting to make up for your lack of skill.

(Totally joking, you probably rip but SS is super fun too)
  • 2 0
 @dungeonbeast: to be honest I have been leaving the ebike at home this year and blasting about on a gravel bike.

Single speed though? Nah, your right I am too weak for that, it’s for sadists.
  • 9 1
 As a 100% single speeder, I find most sliding dropouts and the 18 bolts that go along with them, more annoying than just running some sort of tensioner. Plus, my chainstay length stays where it is supposed to be.
  • 2 0
 @FrankS29: it’s within the design. The “chip” that takes up the space within the slot for sliding portion of the dropout that holds the bolts has play. While braking in one direction (forward) probably not an issue. But it annoyed me the amount of play it had when holding the brake and rocking the bike back and forth. Like I said, probably not an issue, I just think when everything is tight there shouldn’t be any of that. That’s why I go for no adjustability in dropouts in any bike.
  • 2 1
 I came here to say this. Every opportunity I have to mention this, I will do it!
  • 1 1
 @justanotherusername: All balances out when you land your first 180 fakie, I'm still pretending SS is worth it.
  • 3 0
 @5poundplumbbob: Adjustable dropouts = set once and forget, chain is tight and cannot drop, no chain noise.

Tensioner = can be knocked out of alignment easily, chain is 'loose' and can bounce off chainring, noisy like a normal derailleur. None of the benefits of SS and all the problems of a derailleur, except you don't get gears.
  • 2 0
 @flipdascrip: 100% agree, sliding drops are not a must have feature. I have run both my current Ti hard core hard tail, and my prior steel one, as both single speeds or with gears too and neither have slides (Chromags). It is super easy to single speed using a tensioner (short cage Zee or reverse components). Geo is what is key as a criteria to me - buy the correct geo and then you never have to use sliding CS adjustment.
  • 1 0
 @dungeonbeast: No sliding dropouts needed for my purposes so I'm happy to not have them. Even though my hardtail is made from steel and not aluminum or carbon (which apparently get a pass according to your statement).
  • 2 0
 Not everyone wants the weight/complexity of sliding dropouts. For geared applications I’ll take a lighter, stiffer, simpler fixed dropout.
  • 1 1
 @wyorider: if you’re worried about weight and having gears you should be on an Al or carbon hardtail.
  • 1 0
 @dungeonbeast: What is the point you're trying to make? There are more than a few titanium and steel hardtails out there with sliding dropouts. Get one of those if that's what you're after. There are also other hardtails. How do these bother you?
  • 2 0
 @dungeonbeast: Sliding dropouts= having your gear ratio dictate your chainstay length.
  • 3 0
 I think Sram kind of ruined this option for a lot of folks. For everyone who wants sliding dropouts there are just as many, if not more, who want UDH/Transmission compatibility.
  • 1 0
 @hitchhikerbikes: That would imply that before UDH people getting a steel or titanium (why this specific subset is beyond me) hardtail would be equally happy with sliding dropouts. I don't think this is true. Heck, I doubt there has been a shift at all with the advent of UDH. I'd say that unless someone is interested in sliding the dropouts, people rather just have it fixed. Seems much more reliable, less to go wrong. An intermediate step would be replaceable/rotatable inserts in the dropouts which you sometimes see on full suspension bikes. Still gives you options but at least not that much more hassle.
  • 3 0
 @5poundplumbbob: Tensioners don't look cool. I gotta a rep to protect.
  • 1 0
 @hitchhikerbikes: but there are brands that are making UDH and SS work just fine. Esker is doing it with Portage mounts, Rodeo Labs (gravel bikes) with their UGH mount on otherwise SS compatible frames, pretty sure Paragon has a slider that takes a UDH for custom frames.
  • 1 0
 @GTscoob: Otso price is in line with the Rootdown Ti tough, I guess the Esker is a great deal?
  • 1 0
 @SidewaysSingleSpeed: 10000% maybe

@fentoncrackshell: off-the-rack 3D printing? Where's the hyperlink to the catalogue frame
  • 1 0
 @hydraulica: How did we ever manage?
  • 17 5
 $3300 for an off-the-rack frame built in Taiwan, with no sliding drop outputs or size specific chainstays? You could get a bespoke custom hardtail made locally for that kind of money, or something like an Esker that ticks all the boxes at a fraction of the price.
  • 6 0
 Great bike. Now, is that some Redhead Mountain Bike Park in Chisholm, MN, with a bit of Grand Marais, MN, Lake Superior backdrop added just to woo me? Because it's working.
  • 3 0
 As a 100% single speeder, I find most sliding dropouts and the 18 bolts that go along with them, more annoying than just running some sort of tensioner. Plus, my chainstay length stays where it is supposed to be.
  • 4 2
 Having ridden my share of ‘aggressive geo’ hardtails over the years, I’ve found that a longer wheelbase makes a longer travel fork feel right. And as with any mtb, size-specific CS length should be a must on any premium priced bike. So yeah if this hoot XL had 15 mm longer CS, 25 mm longer WB I’d be interested. The geo just looks too 2018 to me.
  • 1 0
 So, a few things I notice.
A) Where is the ISCG mount? I had the same problem on my RMB Growler, which is excusable on a budget hardtail, but not a bike at this price. Using your chain(ring) as a bashplate is stupid. I had to get a iscg spacer, new BB and crank just to mount a bashplate.
B) In order to avoid cross chaining, Knolly went with a 157mm rear axle, thereby pushing the cassette outboard 4.5mm, and alleviating a lot of friction. I see the merits of a 157mm rear axle, and think it'll eventually becoming the new standard.
Seat tube could be more upright.
Honestly, I think the Knolly Tyaughton is the bike to beat.
  • 1 0
 Cable routing below the tubes? I'll be blunt - so short-sighted. I've had cable cut from sharp rocks because the cable routed below the frame. Koff koff .... Tracer T275c..... Koff. Not too mention if you're transporting the bikes and resting it over sides of trucks.
  • 3 1
 That would hoot my wallet at $3.300
Never mind the hooting I’d get off my wife...
  • 3 0
 I recognize Redhead mountain bike park. One of the better networks in MN
  • 1 0
 I’d steer towards a WW bike, custom geo, Easy to fit 29x3.0’s w 84mm bb and dishless rear wheel and paragons. Best birthday bike ever.
  • 1 0
 Correction 83 mm. Whoops
  • 1 0
 I wonder if they pronounce it like Hootie Looks like a ripper, I'd love a nice Ti hardtail
  • 1 0
 500mm reach has a 500mm seat tube in 2024 when 240mm droppers are available lolz
  • 3 3
 don't say it... don't say it... Wow this bike looks like a lot of fun! One could even say a hoot!
  • 1 0
 The "Hoot" logo is doope!
  • 1 0
 Where the hell is he gonna land in that last pic?
  • 1 0
 Was the Hoot built by Moot?
  • 1 0
 I would rather have a Moot than a Hoot!
  • 1 0
 Oh great another hardtail, progressing mountain bike technology
  • 1 0
 The hardtail drip release got me in my feels
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Stanton
  • 1 0
 The seatstay/toptube section maybe
  • 4 0
 Looks like a hard tail, how many ways can you design one?
  • 2 0
 Looks like a bike
  • 5 7
 I am sure that this is an awesome bike but no water bottle cage mounts on the seat tube is a compromise I would not settle for on a hardtail.
  • 2 0
 ???
I count 3 pairs of mounts in the downtube of this bike!
  • 17 3
 Water bottle mounts on the seat tube, so you can enjoy your 100mm dropper post without compromise..
  • 3 0
 @Fix-the-Spade: no problem running a 210 1up on my Salsa V2 Timberjack , size L (430 seattube with bottlemount..) And as Ive said before : every hardtail maker should take a long hard look at a V2 Timberjack for cablerouting
  • 3 0
 @Fix-the-Spade: Check out how Neuhaus Metalworks handles it.
  • 2 0
 Not being able to run all dropper posts is a way bigger compromise. There are dozens of clamp/band type bottle cages on the market if this was a deal breaker... plus, since it's a Ti frame it's a piece of cake to install mounts if you were that way inclined.
  • 2 0
 @JimmyC1212: A braze on bar never occured to me, that's pretty nice.
  • 1 0
 Das Otso.
  • 3 4
 Short reach. Slack SA. Pass.
  • 2 1
 Yea and long seat tube. 2012 geo…
  • 1 0
 It's a hardtail XC/light trail bike, not a full suspension bike for gravity shredding. The numbers are exactly where they need to be for fitness for purpose.
  • 1 1
 @rich-2000: 2012 geo? yeah I guess the HT is only half a degree slacker than what a Giant Glory DH bike was in 2012, and the Otso is only an inch or so longer in the reach than the Giant Glory too. So you're totally right the geo does resemble something from 2012.







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